A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I  J  K  L  M  N  O  P  Q  R  S  T  U  V  W  X  Y  Z  

  Subjects -> ARCHAEOLOGY (Total: 300 journals)
We no longer collect new content from this publisher because the publisher has forbidden systematic access to its RSS feeds.
Similar Journals
Journal Cover
North American Archaeologist
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.204
Number of Followers: 5  
 
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
ISSN (Print) 0197-6931 - ISSN (Online) 1541-3543
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1175 journals]
  • The manufacture process of war clubs: Replicating indigenous technological
           systems of conflict from the Lower Colorado Basin

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Joseph B Curran
      Abstract: North American Archaeologist, Ahead of Print.
      This study provides a multi-disciplinary framework operationalizing the study of weaponry through experimental archaeology. In this scenario, I focus on war clubs, a type of Indigenous weapon commonly found across North America. The goal of this study is to understand how these weapons were engineered for violent conflict. My methodology utilizes archival research, museum study, and experimental archaeology analyses to elaborate on features of design, manufacture, use, and tactics of war club technologies. To operationalize this framework, I focus on a case study of conflict technology in the Lower Colorado River Basin from 1540–1857. Despite war clubs being prolific and an integral part of the technological systems of conflict in this region, this is the initial in-depth material analysis of this weapon type. From this study we can begin to infer how and why weapons systems were chosen, designed, created, and used through the experiential and embodied process of making.
      Citation: North American Archaeologist
      PubDate: 2022-11-03T07:31:27Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01976931221133409
       
  • The Eads earthwork: Implications for Hopewell ceremonialism

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Kenneth Barnett Tankersley, Stephanie A Meyers, Shahad Mohammed Albalushi, Shaima Saif Salim Alhabsi, Paris Shea Bowers, Isabella L Burton, Austin Clay Matthew Loukinas, Samantha Leigh Ward, Sean Chaney
      Abstract: North American Archaeologist, Ahead of Print.
      Eads (33Ct750) is a recently discovered Hopewell hilltop earthwork, which encloses ∼10 ha above the Bares Run-O’Bannon Creek-Little Miami River confluence area. Eads falls within the interquartile size range of other Ohio Hopewell earthworks. Like the nearby Foster's enclosure, Eads is a sub-meter earthwork with a single pronounced east-to-west berm,> 70.0 m in length and> 5.0 m in height. The peak of promontory aligns with the center of the Goodnough-Brock mound (33Ct751) at a compass direction of 300o, the summer solstice sunset azimuth for the Middle Woodland cultural period. The archeoastronomy alignment and artifacts recovered from a pedestrian survey and test excavations suggest that the Eads hilltop earthwork was designed, built, and used for ceremonial purposes.
      Citation: North American Archaeologist
      PubDate: 2022-10-14T05:59:25Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01976931221128608
       
  • Correlation of regional late woodland triangle projectile point variation
           and native American ethnic group territories in the central middle
           Atlantic

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Jay F. Custer
      First page: 291
      Abstract: North American Archaeologist, Ahead of Print.
      The shapes and sizes of 983 Late Woodland triangular projectile points from four indigenous Native American different ethnic groups of the central Middle Atlantic region (Unami Lenapi – Lower Delaware Valley, Munsee Lenape – Upper Delaware Valley, Susquehannock – Lower Susquehanna Valley, Nanticoke – Lower Delmarva Peninsula) and one archaeological complex (Shenks Ferry – Lower Susquehanna Valley) were compared using various univariate statistical analytics, including the difference-of-mean and difference-of proportion tests, to see if there were any statistically significant morphological differences among them. There were none, even though earlier studies of small samples with anecdotal observations and comparisons stated that there were observable differences among the projectile points of the various ethnic groups. This study's findings refute the axiomatic assumption of traditional normative culture approaches that there must be identifiable stylistic variation in projectile points among different ethnic groups. In the case of Late Woodland triangular projectile points in the central Middle Atlantic region, the technological prerequisites of shock hunting with bows and stone-tipped arrows limited inter-ethnic group variation in projectile point forms. However, use of poisons may have affected overall projectile point sizes.
      Citation: North American Archaeologist
      PubDate: 2022-03-29T08:00:46Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01976931221090596
       
  • Studying lithic microdebitage with a dynamic image particle analyzer

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Markus Eberl, Phyllis Johnson, Rebecca Estrada Aguila
      First page: 312
      Abstract: North American Archaeologist, Ahead of Print.
      Lithic microdebitage has great archaeological potential to elucidate ancient stone tool production. So far, archaeologists have collected soil samples, separated them into size fractions, and analyzed them manually under a microscope to identify microdebitage. This time- and labor-intensive process has limited the number of samples and introduced intra- and inter-observer errors. Here, we discuss lithic microdebitage analysis with a dynamic image particle analyzer. This machine takes videos of soil particles as they fall from a chute. Software tracks them and measures their dimensions. Since sieving is no longer necessary, microdebitage analysis proceeds more quickly and processes samples within a few minutes. The standardized output allows the objective analysis of lithic microdebitage. We compare the angularity of c. 120,000 particles in an archaeological soil sample with experimental microdebitage. While the distributions show intriguing overlaps, we conclude that the most angular archaeological particles are not microdebitage but reflect a software glitch.
      Citation: North American Archaeologist
      PubDate: 2022-07-01T06:44:33Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01976931221109301
       
  • Using tiny artifacts to answer big questions: Machine learning,
           microdebitage, and household spaces at Tamarindito

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Phyllis S. Johnson, Markus Eberl, Rebecca Estrada Aguila, Charreau Bell, Jesse Spencer-Smith
      First page: 328
      Abstract: North American Archaeologist, Ahead of Print.
      The spatial analysis of microdebitage (measuring less than 6.3 mm) can identify areas where stone tools were knapped at archaeological sites. These tiny artifacts tend to become embedded in the locations where they were first deposited and are less vulnerable to post-depositional movement, making microdebitage an important artifact class for identifying primary areas of stone tool production. Traditional microdebitage analysis, however, can take multiple hours spread over several days to complete. Because of this, microdebitage analysis is typically completed in very small areas of sites due to the intensive time and labor commitment required. Recently, however, my colleagues and I have developed a novel, interdisciplinary method that combines dynamic image analysis and machine learning to analyze microdebitage taken from soil samples at archaeological sites. Analyses of experimental microdebitage demonstrated that microdebitage could be accurately and efficiently identified within archaeological soil samples using this method. In the present study, we apply these methods to soil samples taken from the Maya Capital of Tamarindito in Guatemala to verify whether these methods remain accurate when applied to archaeological contexts.
      Citation: North American Archaeologist
      PubDate: 2022-08-22T07:26:43Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01976931221121177
       
  • Book Review: People in a Sea of Grass: Archaeology’s Changing
           Perspective on Indigenous Plains Communities by Matthew E. Hill and Lauren
           W. Ritterbush

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Robert J. Hoard
      First page: 348
      Abstract: North American Archaeologist, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: North American Archaeologist
      PubDate: 2022-08-03T04:31:46Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01976931221118597
       
  • Book Review: Prehistoric Quarries and Terranes: The Modena and Tempiute
           Obsidian Sources of the American Great Basin by Michael J. Shott

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: I. Randolph Daniel
      First page: 352
      Abstract: North American Archaeologist, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: North American Archaeologist
      PubDate: 2022-05-20T08:39:32Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01976931221102979
       
 
JournalTOCs
School of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
Heriot-Watt University
Edinburgh, EH14 4AS, UK
Email: journaltocs@hw.ac.uk
Tel: +00 44 (0)131 4513762
 


Your IP address: 44.197.108.169
 
Home (Search)
API
About JournalTOCs
News (blog, publications)
JournalTOCs on Twitter   JournalTOCs on Facebook

JournalTOCs © 2009-