Subjects -> BUSINESS AND ECONOMICS (Total: 3841 journals)
    - ACCOUNTING (145 journals)
    - BANKING AND FINANCE (329 journals)
    - BUSINESS AND ECONOMICS (1411 journals)
    - CONSUMER EDUCATION AND PROTECTION (20 journals)
    - COOPERATIVES (4 journals)
    - ECONOMIC SCIENCES: GENERAL (232 journals)
    - ECONOMIC SYSTEMS, THEORIES AND HISTORY (255 journals)
    - FASHION AND CONSUMER TRENDS (20 journals)
    - HUMAN RESOURCES (103 journals)
    - INSURANCE (26 journals)
    - INTERNATIONAL COMMERCE (146 journals)
    - INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT AND AID (103 journals)
    - INVESTMENTS (22 journals)
    - LABOR AND INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS (66 journals)
    - MACROECONOMICS (17 journals)
    - MANAGEMENT (634 journals)
    - MARKETING AND PURCHASING (116 journals)
    - MICROECONOMICS (23 journals)
    - PRODUCTION OF GOODS AND SERVICES (125 journals)
    - PUBLIC FINANCE, TAXATION (42 journals)
    - TRADE AND INDUSTRIAL DIRECTORIES (2 journals)

INSURANCE (26 journals)

Showing 1 - 26 of 26 Journals sorted alphabetically
Annals of Actuarial Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Assurances et gestion des risques     Full-text available via subscription  
Astin Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Banks in Insurance Report     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Blätter der DGVFM     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
British Actuarial Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Geneva Papers on Risk and Insurance - Issues and Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Geneva Risk and Insurance Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Health Affairs     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 83)
Insurance Markets and Companies     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Insurance: Mathematics and Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
International Journal of Business Continuity and Risk Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
International Journal of Forensic Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Forensic Engineering and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Health Economics and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
International Social Security Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal for Labour Market Research     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Derivatives & Hedge Funds     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Risk and Insurance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Journal of Risk Finance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Risk Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Risk Management & Insurance Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Scandinavian Actuarial Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
SourceOECD Finance & Investment/Insurance & Pensions     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
The Geneva Reports     Free   (Followers: 2)
Zeitschrift für die gesamte Versicherungswissenschaft     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Geneva Papers on Risk and Insurance - Issues and Practice
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.392
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 14  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1018-5895 - ISSN (Online) 1468-0440
Published by Springer-Verlag Homepage  [2658 journals]
  • Moral hazard in Australian private health insurance: the case of dental
           care services and extras cover

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: We assess ex post moral hazard in Australian private health insurance (PHI) relating to dental care services (so-called extras cover) using the longitudinal Household, Income and Labour Dynamics in Australia (HILDA) Survey. Cross-sectional probit regressions specify dental care use as a function of dental care demand and endogenous PHI policy holding, including self-assessed health condition, health risk factors and socio-economic controls including age, income, education, family structure and welfare status. We find that ex post moral hazard results in the additional use of dental care services by PHI holders. Further, dynamic analysis indicates that PHI, no matter how sporadic, is always associated with significantly more likely use of dental care services, increasing when continuously held, suggesting strong persistence in moral hazard.
      PubDate: 2021-09-15
       
  • Implications of bundled offerings for business development and competitive
           strategy in digital insurance

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: The ubiquitous availability of interconnected digital devices does not only change the kinds of risks that can be insured and the way insurance companies work, it also facilitates the formation of bundled offerings across different industrial sectors, including insurance as well as other products and services. We identify two distinct patterns in which such bundles change value creation in the insurance industry, which we describe as sales bundles and value bundles. In the former, the objects of insurance become more specific and risks can be estimated more precisely, but insurance becomes an add-on to other offerings at the point of sale. In the latter, insurance is merged with other products and services in comprehensive value bundles in which the exact distribution of responsibilities remains flexible. Although huge effort is required to establish these value bundles and maintain their systemic infrastructures, they create many new opportunities for business development in the insurance industry.
      PubDate: 2021-08-20
       
  • Family ties and commercial health insurance consumption in China

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Studying the factors that influence commercial health insurance consumption is essential in insurance economics. Family ties are important factors that affect consumer behaviour, especially in Eastern countries such as China. We construct an index to measure family ties and examine their effect on commercial health insurance consumption. We also use an instrumental variable approach to address endogeneity and apply a complementary log–log regression to deal with rare-event bias. We find that family ties have significantly positive impacts on individuals’ and families’ commercial health insurance consumption. The effect of family ties on commercial health insurance consumption is greater in individuals/families with higher income levels, those in eastern provinces, and those who are older.
      PubDate: 2021-08-04
      DOI: 10.1057/s41288-021-00242-6
       
  • Correction to: Competition reduces profitability: the case of the Indian
           life microinsurance industry

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: The original version of this paper was inadvertently published with an old e-mail address and an error in the affiliation of the author Subrato Banerjee.
      PubDate: 2021-07-01
      DOI: 10.1057/s41288-021-00206-w
       
  • Innovations in microinsurance research

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      PubDate: 2021-07-01
      DOI: 10.1057/s41288-021-00235-5
       
  • Dynamic information asymmetry in micro health insurance: implications for
           sustainability

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Micro health insurance is an important channel for financing health expenditure for low-income people, yet the supply of such programmes lags behind demand because many of them become unsustainable. Using individual-level dynamic data from a micro health insurance programme in Pakistan, this study tests for the existence of information asymmetry (adverse selection and moral hazard) using a series of non-parametric tests so that insurers and policymakers can better understand the underlying reasons that lead to dynamic claim patterns before taking appropriate actions to improve the sustainability of these programmes. The study’s contribution lies in constructing an appropriate method and novel test statistics to detect information asymmetry using dynamic claim data in a multivariate recurrent event model framework. The results show that adverse selection exists widely for a variety of disease types and that moral hazard is only significant for chronic diseases. Furthermore, pregnancy-related claims demonstrate an increasing trend of adverse selection that needs to be addressed with priority. The analysis provides insight into the sustainable provision of micro health insurance to low-income people in developing regions.
      PubDate: 2021-07-01
      DOI: 10.1057/s41288-020-00200-8
       
  • Competition reduces profitability: the case of the Indian life
           microinsurance industry

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: We aim to understand the effect of market and firm-level concentration on return on equity in the Indian life microinsurance industry (LMI). This research is one of the first attempts to empirically test structure–performance issues in India. Using data on 14 companies that remained active in the LMI market during 2009–2019, we demonstrate that firms in the Indian LMI market scored better on profitability measures whenever competitive pressures were lower. We calculate Herfindahl–Hirschman concentration indexes (HHI), market share and entropy measures and use panel data techniques to find a positive effect of concentration and a negative effect of market share. We conclude that LMI-specialised insurers in India perform better than diversified insurers.
      PubDate: 2021-07-01
      DOI: 10.1057/s41288-020-00203-5
       
  • Microinsurance and household asset welfare in South Africa

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: This paper examines the effect of microinsurance usage on household asset welfare, measured as asset accumulation index using a sample of 2006 households with access to formal non-banking and informal financial services from the 2015 FinScope Survey. Using the treatment effect and instrumental variable estimation techniques to account for endogeneity and selection biases, the empirical results support the hypothesis that microinsurance provides financial protection through asset accumulation to improve welfare. The findings are robust for different types of microinsurance products and weighted and unweighted asset accumulation indices. The policy implications of the findings are discussed.
      PubDate: 2021-07-01
      DOI: 10.1057/s41288-020-00199-y
       
  • The influence of past experience on farmers’ preferences for hog
           insurance products: a natural experiment and choice experiment in China

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Hog insurance is essential for the safety of pork production in developing countries. Although livestock insurance has been found to have positive impacts on farmers’ welfare and agricultural production, it has not lived up to its full potential. In this study, a natural experiment combined with a choice experiment is conducted among hog farms in four townships in China to explore the influence of past experience with hog insurance on farmers’ preferences and willingness to pay (WTP) for hog insurance attributes. Employing the random parameter logit model, we find robust evidence that farmers have heterogeneous preferences for insurance attributes and attach great importance to the involvement of government in insurance operation. Furthermore, farmers’ past insurance experience plays a vital role in their demand for hog insurance and significantly changes their WTP for insurance attributes.
      PubDate: 2021-07-01
      DOI: 10.1057/s41288-021-00209-7
       
  • Determinants and challenges of supplying microlife insurance in Ghana

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: The mass adoption of microlife insurance products among low-income earners in Ghana is based on the increased risks to livelihoods normally neglected by mainstream insurance. Microlife insurance is crucial for not only providing insurable coverage for the cost of targeted threats to low-income earners but also providing incentives for anyone who seeks protection against economic losses. In this study, a holistic analysis of the determinants and challenges of supplying microlife insurance in Ghana is carried out using factor analysis with principal component analysis. Primary data were sourced from 193 respondents related to the development of microlife insurance products. Out of 20 critical determinants extracted for the supply of microlife insurance products, four principal groups/components were established. They include affordable but profit-oriented products, active consideration of consumer-oriented conditions, strong internal position and controls, and favourable external factors. Further, 39 challenges associated with supplying microlife insurance products were identified and divided into five major groups: poor premium income, asymmetric information, weak internal systems, increased industry-related challenges and unfavourable external factors. The findings could serve as a checklist for microlife insurers to develop measures to sustain microlife insurance products while they mitigate obstacles to improve net profits from products. The results could also stimulate dialogue within the insurance industry as well as the research community on advancing microlife insurance to support the general populace. However, the article is limited in scope and so caution must be exercised in generalising the application of the findings.
      PubDate: 2021-07-01
      DOI: 10.1057/s41288-021-00226-6
       
  • Examining the effects of agricultural income insurance on farmers in
           Burkina Faso

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: In this paper, we examine the effectiveness of income insurance as a tool to increase the financial resilience of smallholder farmers when faced with joint yield and price risks. We applied the optimisation method to national and regional data on maize yields and prices in Burkina Faso during the period 1995 to 2015. Our results show that income insurance generates significant risk reduction at a lower cost than other programmes such as index insurance or warrantage.
      PubDate: 2021-07-01
      DOI: 10.1057/s41288-021-00212-y
       
  • Government interventions in microinsurance: evidence from China

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: The microinsurance market suffers from severe market failures; thus, government interventions are increasingly used to stimulate its functioning. Our article evaluates, from a law and economics perspective, whether these interventions are effective in increasing access to insurance without inducing moral hazard and adverse selection. We then use this framework to evaluate typical types of government interventions in the Chinese microinsurance market (subsidisation, simplification, use of group policy and established distribution channels). Using practical cases, we further identify solutions to remedy the market frictions induced by government interventions. We find that government interventions are only effective under certain conditions: (1) stable and smartly designed subsidies are provided or innovative market practices are subsidised; (2) insurance policies are easy to understand; (3) product distributors are properly trained or licensed; (4) group policies can be renewed.
      PubDate: 2021-07-01
      DOI: 10.1057/s41288-020-00202-6
       
  • The relationship between net promoter score and insurers’ profitability:
           an empirical analysis at the customer level

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: This paper examines the relationship between customer satisfaction and profitability at the level of the individual customer. In many industries, investigations detect a positive, decreasing relationship between customer satisfaction and firm profitability. The insurance industry has rarely been the object of such investigations. Pooser and Browne (2018) started this discussion by examining U.S. insurers at the firm level. We provide reasons why the positive satisfaction–profitability relationship might be reversed, particularly in the case of the insurance industry. We conduct an array of OLS regressions with customer-level data. Our results reveal a strong positive relationship between customer satisfaction and profitability. The effect is considerably large and also robust when investigating the effect of several customer characteristics on this relationship. We recommend that the increase in profitability is induced by a strong positive correlation between customer satisfaction and premium income, while satisfaction is not associated with the combined ratio.
      PubDate: 2021-06-08
      DOI: 10.1057/s41288-021-00237-3
       
  • Risk transfer beyond reinsurance: the added value of CAT bonds

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Reinsurance and CAT bonds are two alternative risk management instruments used by insurance companies. Insurers should be indifferent between the two instruments in a perfect capital market. However, the theoretical literature suggests that insured risk characteristics and market imperfections may influence the effectiveness and efficiency of reinsurance relative to CAT bonds. CAT bonds may add value to insurers’ risk management strategies and may therefore substitute for reinsurance. Our study is the first to empirically analyse if and under what circumstances CAT bonds can substitute for traditional reinsurance. Our analysis of a comprehensive data set comprising U.S. P&C insurers’ financial statements and CAT bond use shows that insurance companies’ choice of risk management instruments is not arbitrary. We find that the added value of CAT bonds mainly stems from non-indemnity bonds and reveal that (non-indemnity) CAT bonds are valuable under high reinsurer default risk, low basis risk and in high-risk layers.
      PubDate: 2021-05-31
      DOI: 10.1057/s41288-021-00234-6
       
  • Cognitive abilities and long-term care insurance: evidence from European
           data

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Long-term care (LTC) is one of the largest financial risks faced by the elderly. Yet, it remains largely uninsured. This paper explores the relationship between cognitive abilities and private voluntary or supplementary long-term care insurance (LTCI) ownership as another possible factor contributing to the small size of the market. We used data from a European panel survey, which collects detailed information on both private insurance coverage and three indicators of cognitive abilities: numeracy, verbal fluency and memory skills. We find that memory, but not numeracy or verbal fluency, has a positive and statistically significant effect on the probability of owning private LTCI above and beyond other characteristics such as general education, family, risk factors, income and wealth. Fixed effects estimates show that a one-standard deviation increase in the recall measure score is associated with a 0.5 percentage point increase in the probability of holding insurance for the baseline sample and a 1 percentage point increase among the younger cohort. The findings suggest that cognitive limitations in LTCI decision-making are likely to be linked to information processing skills and can be an important factor affecting the expansion of the market that need to be taken into consideration in policy design.
      PubDate: 2021-05-25
      DOI: 10.1057/s41288-021-00240-8
       
  • Managed care or carefully managed' Management of underwriting
           profitability by health insurers

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Managed care provides health insurers a unique opportunity for discretion over certain aspects of financial reporting. Specifically, managed care mechanisms provide health insurers with a stronger ability to engage in loss control. To test whether and how health insurers exploit their ability to manage losses, we examine whether insurers with greater opportunity to manage care report significantly better underwriting performance in the fourth quarter relative to other health insurers. Using quarterly statutory filings from 2003 to 2016, we find evidence that a health insurer’s share of enrollment in health maintenance organisation (HMO) plans, characterised by their use of ‘gatekeeper’ physicians, is significantly and negatively related to their reported fourth quarter medical loss ratio (MLR). Additionally, while we find that fourth quarter MLRs are higher for all health insurers following the implementation of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA), the ACA does not appear to have intensified the loss control efforts of those insurers with more enrollment in HMO plans.
      PubDate: 2021-05-21
      DOI: 10.1057/s41288-021-00239-1
       
  • Organisational structure, corporate governance and reinsurance decisions
           in the U.S. property-liability insurance industry

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: This paper investigates the impact of organisational structure and corporate governance on reinsurance decisions in the U.S. property-liability insurance industry. Our evidence shows that mutual insurers, mutual-owned stock insurers and stock insurers whose ultimate parent is publicly traded are likely to purchase more reinsurance from non-affiliated reinsurers than stock insurers closely held by managers. We also find that corporate governance significantly influences reinsurance purchases; specifically, CEO/chairperson duality is associated with lower reinsurance purchases while the percentage of independent directors on the board is positively (negatively) related to reinsurance purchases from non-affiliated (affiliated) reinsurers. Higher audit quality is associated with lower (higher) reinsurance purchases from non-affiliated (affiliated) reinsurers. Moreover, many interaction terms between organisational structure and corporate governance have significant effects on reinsurance decisions. Finally, we provide evidence that the Sarbanes–Oxley Act (SOX) has a substantial effect on the relation between organisational structure (corporate governance) and reinsurance decisions. The overall effect of SOX on reinsurance purchase from non-affiliated reinsurers is negative, implying that better investor protection results in higher risk taking and less risk shifting to outside reinsurers.
      PubDate: 2021-05-20
      DOI: 10.1057/s41288-021-00238-2
       
  • The magic triangle: growth, profitability and safety in the insurance
           industry

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: We empirically investigate the trade-offs between three strategic goals of the insurance business: growth, profitability and safety. Analysing 1988 European insurance companies over 11 years with simultaneous equation models, we show that moderate firm growth is associated with high profitability, but extremely high growth is associated with low profitability (i.e. an inverse non-linear relationship). Our results show that less profitable insurers are taking more risks. Insurers that prioritise profit over growth in early periods are more likely to reach the ideal state of ‘profitable growth’ in later periods. Our results emphasise the need to jointly consider growth, profitability and safety in a multi-period context when evaluating firm performance.
      PubDate: 2021-05-18
      DOI: 10.1057/s41288-021-00230-w
       
  • An analysis of post-demutualisation in the property–liability
           insurance industry

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Using a quasi-natural experiment, we examine how demutualisation affects demutualised insurers’ capital, organisational flexibility and alignment of managerial incentives post-demutualisation. First, our results show demutualised insurers have faster surplus growth than matching insurers post-demutualisation. However, the surplus growth differs between demutualised insurers with and without surplus notes. Specifically, the evidence shows that demutualised insurers with surplus notes experience long-term surplus growth, while demutualised insurers without surplus notes experience short-term surplus increases. Second, we find that increased organisational flexibility facilitates merger and acquisition activities for demutualised insurers and helps them to pursue growth and diversification. We find that 51% of demutualised stock insurers become targets in the conversion year. Finally, we find that demutualised insurers have lower underwriting expenses and underwrite more in commercial lines post-demutualisation. Overall, our evidence shows that demutualisation has a positive impact on surplus growth, organisational flexibility and the alignment between managerial incentives and owners' interests.
      PubDate: 2021-05-18
      DOI: 10.1057/s41288-021-00231-9
       
  • Insurance against natural catastrophes: balancing actuarial fairness and
           social solidarity

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Natural disasters offer a specific case study of the mix of public and private insurance. Indeed, the experience accumulated over the past decades has made it possible to transform poorly-known hazards like flood losses, long considered uninsurable, into risks that can be assessed with some precision. They exemplify, however, the affordability issue associated with risk-based premiums. The French scheme reflects such ideas and offers wide coverage for moderate premiums to all, but is questioned in its principle by climate change: we show that some wealthier areas that were not perceived as ‘at risk’ in the past have now become exposed to submersion risk. This singularly makes some well-off properties the potential main beneficiaries of a scheme that was historically thought to protect the worst-off. Acknowledging that some segmentation may become desirable, we examine several models for flood risk and the disparity in premiums they entail.
      PubDate: 2021-05-11
      DOI: 10.1057/s41288-021-00233-7
       
 
JournalTOCs
School of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
Heriot-Watt University
Edinburgh, EH14 4AS, UK
Email: journaltocs@hw.ac.uk
Tel: +00 44 (0)131 4513762
 


Your IP address: 3.236.13.53
 
Home (Search)
API
About JournalTOCs
News (blog, publications)
JournalTOCs on Twitter   JournalTOCs on Facebook

JournalTOCs © 2009-