Subjects -> MANUFACTURING AND TECHNOLOGY (Total: 363 journals)
    - CERAMICS, GLASS AND POTTERY (31 journals)
    - MACHINERY (34 journals)
    - MANUFACTURING AND TECHNOLOGY (223 journals)
    - METROLOGY AND STANDARDIZATION (6 journals)
    - PACKAGING (19 journals)
    - PAINTS AND PROTECTIVE COATINGS (4 journals)
    - PLASTICS (42 journals)
    - RUBBER (4 journals)

PLASTICS (42 journals)

Showing 1 - 39 of 39 Journals sorted by number of followers
Journal of Applied Polymer Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 134)
Polymer     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 88)
European Polymer Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 42)
Plastic and Polymer Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 40)
Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31)
Additives for Polymers     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20)
Reinforced Plastics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Polymer Engineering & Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Advances in Polymer Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
ACS Applied Polymer Materials     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Chinese Journal of Polymer Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Acta Polymerica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Inorganic and Organometallic Polymers and Materials     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Polymer Bulletin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Polymer Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
International Journal of Polymeric Materials     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Polymer Science Part C : Polymer Letters     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Polymer-Plastics Technology and Materials     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Advanced Industrial and Engineering Polymer Research     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Polymer Science Series B     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Polymer Science, Series A     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Polymer Science Series C     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Polymer Science Series D     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Iranian Journal of Polymer Science and Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Progress in Rubber, Plastics and Recycling Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Microplastics and Nanoplastics     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
High Performance Polymers     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Polymers and the Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
International Polymer Processing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Plastic Film and Sheeting     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Plastics Engineering     Partially Free   (Followers: 1)
Polymers from Renewable Resources     Hybrid Journal  
International Journal of Biobased Plastics     Open Access  
Polymers and Polymer Composites     Hybrid Journal  
SPE Polymers     Open Access  
Majalah Kulit, Karet, dan Plastik     Open Access  
Cirugia Plastica Ibero-Latinoamericana     Open Access  
Journal of Elastomers and Plastics     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Cellular Plastics     Hybrid Journal  
Similar Journals
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Progress in Rubber, Plastics and Recycling Technology
Number of Followers: 1  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1477-7606 - ISSN (Online) 1478-2413
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1174 journals]
  • Fused deposition modelling of flexible kenaf fiber/thermoplastic
           polyurethane composites

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      Authors: Nuraina Hanim, Mohamad Danial Syafiq, Zuratul Ain Abdul Hamid, Arjulizan Rusli, Muhammad Khalil Abdullah, Raa Khimi Shuib
      Abstract: Progress in Rubber, Plastics and Recycling Technology, Ahead of Print.
      This work explores the feasibility of fused deposition modelling (FDM) to produce kenaf fiber/thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU) composites. Internal mixer was used for mixing different weight percentage (0, 5 and 10 wt %) of kenaf fiber with TPU before being extruded to produce filament for FDM feed stock. Addition of kenaf fiber was found to give benefits on dimensional stability of the printed samples which is importance for its implementation in FDM. TPU filled with 10wt% of kenaf fibre showed improvements in hardness and Young modulus of 15% and 49%. However, the tensile strength, elongation at break and density of the printed samples decreased with increasing kenaf fiber loading. This could be explained due to increase of voids and porosity within the material and poor wettability between TPU matrix and kenaf fiber which is evidenced by SEM observation.
      Citation: Progress in Rubber, Plastics and Recycling Technology
      PubDate: 2022-09-20T02:56:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14777606221127371
       
  • Polymeric compounds based on thermoplastic elastomer
           styrene-butadiene-styrene block copolymers and siliconic rubber powder

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      Authors: Maria Daniela Stelescu, Maria Sonmez, Mihai Georgescu, Laurentia Alexandrescu, Mihaela Nituica, Dana Gurau
      Abstract: Progress in Rubber, Plastics and Recycling Technology, Ahead of Print.
      This paper presents the obtaining and characterization of polymeric composites based on thermoplastic elastomer type styrene-butadiene-styrene block copolymers and vulcanized rubber powder. The rubber powder used was obtained as waste in the technological processes in the rubber industry. It was analyzed by determining the acetonic extract, ash and FTIR analysis and it was observed that the base elastomer in the rubber waste is silicone rubber, and the amounts of inorganic fillers, plasticizers, antioxidants, lubricants etc. existing in the rubber powder are lower than 19%. The samples were obtained by mixing technique, on Brabender Plasti-Corder internal mixer type. The test specimens necessary to determine the characteristics were obtained on a laboratory electrical press at 170°C, applying a force of 300 kN, and moulding time 6 min. The characteristics of the obtained samples show that the addition of rubber powder improved the hardness and elasticity, and by the applying compatibility method, namely crosslinking and grafting in melt, in dynamic regime, there was a significant increase in hardness, elasticity, modulus 100%, tensile strength, and the material obtained is more compact. The new composites have physical and mechanical properties suitable for producing a wide range of rubber consumer goods.
      Citation: Progress in Rubber, Plastics and Recycling Technology
      PubDate: 2022-09-19T07:24:44Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14777606221127373
       
  • A pressure-sensitive adhesive made from macca carbon for medical use

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      Authors: Jitladda Sakdapipanich, Phawasoot Rodgerd, Sutaporn Yakkul, Supinya Nijpanich
      Abstract: Progress in Rubber, Plastics and Recycling Technology, Ahead of Print.
      Macca carbon (MC), derived from high-temperature carbonized macadamia nut-in-shell wastes from macadamia nut processing, exhibits a high surface area, high number of electrons, and high efficiency in emitting far-infrared (FIR) radiation at wavelengths between 4 and 20 μm. Numerous inventions have demonstrated promising results in health improvement applications, such as increased blood circulation, less inflammation, and enhanced life expectancy. In this study, MC and a pressure-sensitive adhesive (PSA) were coupled to form a new bandage called an MC cohesive bandage. It was manufactured by combining various quantities of MC powder with PSA and applying it to a spandex fabric tape. The peeling test, water permeability, and skin irritation were examined. The quantity of FIR radiation between 6 and 14 μm and the thermal properties of MC cohesive bandages were investigated. The FIR penetration effectiveness was determined by measuring the temperature rises from the streaky pig skin covered with MC cohesive bandages at various depths.
      Citation: Progress in Rubber, Plastics and Recycling Technology
      PubDate: 2022-09-18T05:39:50Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14777606221128044
       
  • Acidic hydrolysis of recycled polyethylene terephthalate plastic for the
           production of its monomer terephthalic acid

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      Authors: Muhammad Saiful Islam, Zahidul Islam, Rashed Hasan, AHM Shofiul Islam Molla Jamal
      Abstract: Progress in Rubber, Plastics and Recycling Technology, Ahead of Print.
      Post-consumer polyethylene terephthalate (PET) plastic bottles, after some pre-processing, were chemically depolymerized for the production of terephthalic acid (TPA), an important monomer of PET resin. The optimized condition of PET hydrolysis was 100°C with 80% v/v aqueous sulfuric acid liquor for 30 min reaction time. The terephthalic acids (TPAs) were filtered out from the reaction mixtures with a sintered glass filter. The viscosity of recycled hydrolysis liquor was measured before it was used in a successive batch of PET depolymerization. The viscosity of hydrolysis liquor increased gradually from 5 mm2/s to 87 mm2/s. TPA yields were obtained from 85.03 ± 0.03% to 99.20 ± 0.06% and the color of TPA changed from bright white to off-white in the final batches. The structure of TPA was confirmed by FTIR, mass analysis, and 1H-NMR spectroscopy. The purity of TPA was found to be 95–98% from the HPLC study via external calibration technique. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) determined the thermal degradation patterns of TPAs and residual weights. This experiment reveals that repeated use of sulfuric acid hydrolysis liquor would be a good option for PET depolymerization in terms of resource utilization, TPA quality as well as sustainability.
      Citation: Progress in Rubber, Plastics and Recycling Technology
      PubDate: 2022-09-15T02:58:44Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14777606221128038
       
  • Structure-Property relationships in natural rubber representing several
           clonal varieties of Hevea Brasiliensis

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      Authors: Sitisaiyidah Saiwari, Nabil Hayeemasae, Siriwat Soontaranon, Ekwipoo Kalkornsurapranee, Ruedee Jaratrotkamjorn, Abdulhakim Masa
      Abstract: Progress in Rubber, Plastics and Recycling Technology, Ahead of Print.
      In this study, the relationships between the structure of unvulcanized rubber and vulcanizate properties were investigated for the three natural rubber clones: RRIT251, PB235, and RRIM600. The highest tensile properties of rubber vulcanizates were achieved from the PB235 clone whereas the RRIM600 showed the lowest. The PB235 contained the largest average molecular weight (Mw) with the narrowest molecular mass distribution (MWD), whereas the least Mw was for RRIM600 with the broadest MWD. The highest protein contents were noticed in RRIM600 where the highest gel formation was found. In contrast, the PB235 showed the smallest amount of proteins and gel contents. Based on this finding, the results clearly suggested that the Mw represented as a key factor controlling the mechanical properties of vulcanizates. This was because the higher average Mw provide the greater active sites available for crosslinking reaction, while the protein content governed the gel formation in the unvulcanized rubber.
      Citation: Progress in Rubber, Plastics and Recycling Technology
      PubDate: 2022-09-14T11:00:13Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14777606221127372
       
  • Mechanical properties, dynamic mechanical analysis and molecular
           cross-linking of GTR/NR re-Vulcanized blends

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      Authors: R Zitzumbo, S Alonso, A Estrada-Monje, María B Becerra, F Avalos, L Medina-Torres
      Abstract: Progress in Rubber, Plastics and Recycling Technology, Ahead of Print.
      The effect of natural rubber (NR) on mechanical, chemical and thermal properties of ground tire rubber (GTR) was investigated. Mechanical and thermal properties of GTR/NR vulcanized blends were determined with a universal testing machine and a dynamic mechanical analyzer (DMA). The molecular cross-linking density was determined by molecular swelling in toluene. Presents results indicate that the carbon black embedded in the GTR interior phase of the GTR/NR re-vulcanized blends, did not participate in the NR phase molecular motion restriction. The blends of GTR/NR showed the phenomenon known as reversion, leading a decreasing of the mechanical properties, that could be attributed of the degradation of the interphases (GTR/NR) n+j, j=1,2,3,…. On the other hand, the Cole-Cole charts of the GTR/NR vulcanized blends changed from a semicircular to an irregular form as the NR concentration increases, imposing the heterogeneity of the blend. In addition, in the Cole-Cole charts of GTR/NR vulcanized and re-vulcanized blends, the height (E´´) and the width (E´) of the curves decreased while the re-vulcanization processes number was greater; obtained results could be attributed to the increasing of the molecular cross-linking density.
      Citation: Progress in Rubber, Plastics and Recycling Technology
      PubDate: 2022-09-14T10:00:36Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14777606221127370
       
  • Surface interactions of model microplastic particles in seawater

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      Authors: Amir Muhammad Noh Amin Abdul Rahman, Lim Zhan Yan, Zuratul Ain Abdul Hamid, Ku Marsilla Ku Ishak, Muhammad Khalil Abdullah, Arjulizan Rusli, Raa Khimi Shuib, Muaz Mohd Zaini Makthar, Mohamad Danial Shafiq
      Abstract: Progress in Rubber, Plastics and Recycling Technology, Ahead of Print.
      Microplastic is classified as fragmented polymeric particles up to 500 microns in diameter. In an aqueous system, microplastic does not always present as a single particle, and these microparticles tend to aggregate and subsequently causing severe ecological risks. The exploration of the underlying mechanisms on how microplastics aggregate in seawater and freshwater enables the prediction of their diffusivity, distribution, and bioavailability in the water environment. In this study microplastic model systems of polypropylene (PP) and poly(vinyl chloride) (PVC) were used to investigate the interactions and aggregation size between microplastics in seawater and with the response anionic sodium dioctyl sulfosuccinate (AOT) surfactant dosages via electrophoretic mobility and Dynamic Light Scattering (DLS) measurements, supported by the UV-Vis spectrum analysis. This investigation revealed that mobile ions present in water ecosystems played a vital role in the surface interactions between microplastics and their aggregation behaviour. The surface charge of both PP and PVC microplastics were switched to a positive value at 5 wt.% of AOT and continued in the negative regime with increasing AOT concentration. Upon the addition of surfactant, surface charge neutralization and aggregation of PP and PVC microplastics were detected; however, the restabilization of microplastic was observed with increasing concentration of surfactant.
      Citation: Progress in Rubber, Plastics and Recycling Technology
      PubDate: 2022-09-14T07:41:09Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14777606221128043
       
  • The influence of liquid silicone rubber on the properties of polyurethane
           elastomer/liquid silicone rubber/graphene nanoplatelets stretchable
           conductive materials

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      Authors: Chun Wei Heng, Pei Leng Teh, Nur Azura Abdul Rahim, Cheow Keat Yeoh
      Abstract: Progress in Rubber, Plastics and Recycling Technology, Ahead of Print.
      This work reports the influence of liquid silicone rubber (LSR) as a secondary matrix in the polyurethane elastomer (PUE)/LSR/graphene nanoplatelets (GnPs) stretchable conductive materials. PUE was prepared by mixing with diphenylmethane-4,4-diisocyanate (MDI) and 1,4 butanediol (BDO). The content of LSR varied from 0 to 50 vol.% at fixed 1.0 vol.% of graphene nanoplatelets (GnPs) as a conductive filler. Liquid silicone rubber was used as the secondary immiscible phase to localize GnPs into a path in the primary phase in order to obtain higher electrical conductivity value. The tensile strength of the PUE/LSR/GnPs decreased with increasing LSR content, while the tear strength shows the optimum value at 10 vol.% of LSR. The incorporation of 20 vol.% of silicone rubber has proven to enhance the thermal stability of the blends.
      Citation: Progress in Rubber, Plastics and Recycling Technology
      PubDate: 2022-08-11T04:33:04Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14777606221118659
       
  • Preparation of skim natural rubber and polypropylene blends via melt
           blending: A study on processability

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      Authors: DS Wijewardane, MASR Senevirathna, S Siriwardena, DG Edirisinghe, YCY Sudusingha
      First page: 207
      Abstract: Progress in Rubber, Plastics and Recycling Technology, Ahead of Print.
      Processability of thermoplastic natural rubber (TPNR) blends is a vital aspect in the preparation of blends for industrial applications and is assessed using different techniques. In this study, skim natural rubber/Polypropylene (SNR/PP) blends were prepared using melt mixing and their processability was examined in terms of mixing torque development, long-term processability, moving die rheometer (MDR) torque, thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA), melt flow index (MFI) and morphological studies. A series of unvulcanized (UV) and dynamically vulcanized (DV) blends having 70/30, 60/40, 50/50, 40/60, and 30/70 SNR/PP compositions were prepared. Standard Lanka Rubber (SLR) and PP blends having corresponding ratios were also studied for the purpose of comparison. The study reveals that a high percentage of non-rubbers present in the SNR has positively influenced the processability of both UV and DV SNR/PP blends compared to SLR/PP blends as assessed by the mixing torque values. As suggested by the mixing torque development and long-term processability, natural rubber dominant both DV blends cannot be processed. However, they can be processed under low shear rates as shown in the MDR studies irrespective of the rubber type. Therefore, it can be inferred that these rubber dominant blends can be processed into molded products via compression molding technique. TGA studies revealed that a similar degree of protection has been offered to the blends against thermal degradation by SNR and SLR. MFI studies showed that there is no significant difference in flowability between UV SNR/PP blends and SLR/PP blends. However, for DV blends, SNR/PP blends showed a higher flowability than SLR/PP blends. In addition, increase in PP percentage in the blend enhances the flowability while dynamic vulcanization reduces the flowability irrespective of the type of rubber used in the blends. Morphological studies suggest continuous or co-continuous phase structures for UV blends and two-phase structures for DV blends where the plastic phase acts as the continuous phase.
      Citation: Progress in Rubber, Plastics and Recycling Technology
      PubDate: 2022-05-25T10:42:12Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14777606221105293
       
  • Influence of nanoclay as a compatibilizer and a reinforcement for polymer
           blends used as insulators

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      Authors: Rana M Salih, Raghad H Mohammed
      First page: 227
      Abstract: Progress in Rubber, Plastics and Recycling Technology, Ahead of Print.
      Polymer composite materials were prepared using kaolinite nanoclay as reinforcement in different weight fractions (3, 5 and 7) %, and blends of epoxy and polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) as matrices. The current work aims to prepare a composite material with good thermal and acoustic insulation, besides improved mechanical properties, and the investigation of the effect of this nano additive on the compatibility between the two constituents of the blend, and how this compatibility might be beneficial to the performance of the prepared composite. The blend with an optimum mixing ratio (OMR) was chosen via impact test results; thus, the (80:20) percentage of epoxy and PMMA was chosen. The reinforced specimens showed an improvement in mechanical (impact and flexural) properties besides sound insulation and thermal conductivity, with the specimen reinforced with 7% nanoclay having the highest impact strength (97*10−3) KJ/m2 and the highest thermal conductivity value of (0.34) W/m.°C, with a sound intensity value 95.6 decibels at frequency 10,000 Hz. The scanning electron microscope images showed two separate phases in the unreinforced blend. In comparison, the 7% reinforced specimen showed a rough interface between the two polymer phases, suggesting a positive effect of nanoclay addition on compatibility. The differential scanning calorimeter showed two distinct glass transition temperatures for both reinforced and neat specimens, which belong to the glass transitions of both constituents (epoxy and PMMA). The main difference is the lower temperature gradient accompanied with the (nanoclay/blend) composite than the neat one. Although the blend remained immiscible, nanoclay had contributed to the compatibility and improved mechanical properties.
      Citation: Progress in Rubber, Plastics and Recycling Technology
      PubDate: 2022-05-30T07:50:50Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14777606221105298
       
  • Development of waste carpet (jute) and Multi-wall carbon nanotube
           incorporated epoxy composites for lightweight applications

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      Authors: Jogendra Kumar, Kaushlendra Kumar, Kuldeep Kumar, Balram Jaiswal, Rajesh K Verma
      First page: 247
      Abstract: Progress in Rubber, Plastics and Recycling Technology, Ahead of Print.
      This work highlights the recycling of waste carpet (Jute) to develop epoxy composites using a modified vacuum-assisted environment. Incorporating Multi-wall carbon nanotube (MWCNT) into the epoxy matrix in different weight percentages improves the physio-mechanical properties. The MWCNT was supplemented at 0.25, 0.5, 0.75, and 1 wt% to investigate the mechanical aspects of composite samples. The nanofiller (MWCNT) dispersion in the epoxy matrix was simulated using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Energy Dispersive X-Ray Analysis (EDX). The results were compared to the neat (pristine) sample to study the influence of nano-supplement. The Tensile, Flexural, and Impact tests were the selected experiments to assess the material characteristics. The findings show the feasibility of the developed samples for lightweight structural applications such as toy items, wall tiles, roof tiles, sound insulation, and roadside barriers. It could be endorsed as a feasible way to handle the waste issues generated by the carpet and textile sources.
      Citation: Progress in Rubber, Plastics and Recycling Technology
      PubDate: 2022-06-22T01:33:53Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14777606221110252
       
 
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