Subjects -> RECREATION, TRAVEL AND TOURISM (Total: 204 journals)
    - HOTELS AND RESTAURANTS (2 journals)
    - LEISURE AND RECREATION (24 journals)
    - RECREATION, TRAVEL AND TOURISM (178 journals)

LEISURE AND RECREATION (24 journals)

Showing 1 - 23 of 23 Journals sorted alphabetically
Annals of Leisure Research     Partially Free   (Followers: 2)
Australasian Leisure Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australasian Parks and Leisure     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Canadian Theatre Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Conexões     Open Access  
International Journal of Exercise Science     Open Access   (Followers: 26)
International Journal of Leisure and Tourism Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Journal of Leisure Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Outdoor and Environmental Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Outdoor Recreation, Education, and Leadership     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Policy Research in Tourism, Leisure and Events     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Sport & Tourism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Leisure / Loisir     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Leisure Sciences: An Interdisciplinary Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Managing Sport and Leisure     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Physician and Sportsmedicine     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Revista Competência     Open Access  
Revue phénEPS / PHEnex Journal     Open Access  
SCHOLE : A Journal of Leisure Studies and Recreation Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Studia Vernacula     Open Access  
Therapeutic Recreation Journal     Full-text available via subscription  
Tourism Geographies: An International Journal of Tourism Space, Place and Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
World Leisure Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Journal of Outdoor and Environmental Education
Number of Followers: 2  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 2206-3110 - ISSN (Online) 2522-879X
Published by Springer-Verlag Homepage  [2468 journals]
  • The educational impacts of a small dose nature experience on suburban
           primary school students: academic performance or happiness and caring'

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      Abstract: Abstract Nature experiences have been shown to have a number of positive impacts on adults and children (Louv, 2012; Williams, 2017). These benefits include an improvement of one’s ability to direct their attention, a reduction in the symptoms of stress, and an increase in creative play. Attention Restoration Theory (Kaplan & Kaplan, 1989), Stress Reduction Theory (Ulrich, 1981), and Loose Parts Play Theory (Nicholson, 1973) provide the theoretical framework for the study. To better understand what size dose (level of intensity, duration, or frequency) is needed in order to gain positive impacts from nature exposure (Cox et al., 2017; Shanahan et al., 2016; Weeland et al., 2019), this mixed methods study examined the educational impacts of a 20 min outdoor nature walk on suburban primary school students in northern New England, USA. Quantitative measures included an academic performance task pre and post nature experience and a 3-point Likert scale survey in which students reported how happy, calm, stressed, and focused on school work they were after the nature experience. The qualitative measures included researcher observations and participant audio recordings in response to three interview questions. The triangulated findings of this study suggest that happiness is a positive impact of a small dose nature experience for these suburban primary school students. Portions of the data also imply that potential benefits of a small dose nature experience include improved attention to school work, reduction of stress, increased feelings of calm, creative loose parts play, caring and cooperation, problem solving, and awe.
      PubDate: 2024-02-21
       
  • Learning to embrace outdoor pedagogy: early childhood education student
           experiences of a nature-focused practicum

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      Abstract: Abstract Nature-based learning is increasingly being implemented and explored within early childhood education settings. Thus, including sustainability, environmental education, place-based education, and other similar topics may help prepare future educators and teachers to provide meaningful experiences for children in the outdoor environment. The purpose of this study was to document the student experiences of a newly developed practicum course offered at Bow Valley College in Calgary, Alberta, for early childhood education and development students. The practicum is focused on nature-based learning and outdoor play. To gain a more profound understanding of the experiences of the college learners participating in this course, a qualitative study was designed using phenomenology and case study approaches. Data were analyzed by looking for significant statements that describe the meaning of the course experience for each participant, taken from their final assignment, as well as instructor reflections. Findings confirm the importance of providing a diversity of embodied, outdoor learning experiences for college students, as well as opportunities for reflection. The important role of partnerships, relationships and communication is also highlighted with this study.
      PubDate: 2024-02-16
       
  • Effects of green and urban environment exposure during classroom breaks in
           a video-based setting

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      Abstract: Abstract Natural environments are beneficial for cognitive functioning and affect. Appraisals of such benefits can lead to the development of pro-environmental attitudes and behaviors in the long run. This study aimed to investigate the effects of an indirect exposure to a natural and urban environment during a short break in a school day, using a ‘green’ video depicting a walk through a lush forest and comparing it to an urban video portraying a walk through a busy city. We involved 91 fourth and fifth graders in a within-participants design. Results show that students decreased their performance in an arithmetic calculation task after watching the urban video, while no significant differences were observed before and after the exposure to the green environment. Students also reported experiencing more negative affect in relation to the exposure to the urban than the natural environment. Moreover, the students perceived the natural environment as more restorative than the urban environment. Taken together, our findings suggest that exposure to urban environments, in contrast to natural environments, may have negative effects on cognitive and affective functioning during school breaks. Educational implications suggest that when it is not possible to stay in a natural environment around the school, or there is no access to nature due to distance, videos of natural environments can be used during short breaks. They have potential to cognitively and affectively benefit students’ who may often be exposed to environmental stressors.
      PubDate: 2024-02-15
       
  • Mapping the landscape: surf therapy program delivery

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      Abstract: Abstract Surf therapy is a structured intervention which utilizes surfing as a vehicle to achieve therapeutic benefit (International Surf Therapy Organization [ISTO], 2019). Surf therapy is presently delivered internationally within a diverse array of contexts and populations. Despite the publication of many internal evaluation studies, little research has examined themes common to the process of surf therapy across programs. The present study recruited a sample of ISTO-affiliated surf therapy programs (n = 33) to engage with an online survey, Mapping the Stoke, examining core aspects of surf therapy structure and process internationally. Findings indicated both similarities across current program delivery internationally, with examples of primary similarities including target age (adolescents and young adults) and population (mental health), recruitment (self-referral), and structure (group sessions), geographic delivery (major cities) and challenges (funding). Areas of greater diversity included support staff (roles/qualifications), therapeutic aims, measures (outcome) and therapeutic structures. The present study outlines concrete structures and processes which appear integral to the delivery of surf therapy across cultures.
      PubDate: 2024-02-05
       
  • Maintaining family engagement during the initial months of COVID-19 in an
           early childhood nature program

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      Abstract: Abstract Family-school partnerships play an integral role in supporting family engagement in children’s learning and development. The shift from on-site learning to remote programming facilitated by the means of technology during the COVID-19 lockdown required that educators and families work collaboratively in new ways in order to support young children’s growth and development in different spaces. This qualitative case study examines how educators from an early childhood nature program supported family engagement in nature-based learning activities during COVID-19 lockdown in Spring 2020. Data include program-wide communications and classroom documentation. Two major themes and six subthemes emerged from the analysis. Results show that during the period of remote programming, the educators facilitated family engagement by providing instructional support for the education process and supporting social-emotional well-being and a sense of community. A strong curriculum component was apparent with encouragement for play and inquiry, connections to place, STEAM curriculum, and environmental awareness. The findings offer an insight into innovative teaching practices and have implications for family engagement beyond remote programming.
      PubDate: 2024-01-25
       
  • Informing future directions for climate anxiety interventions: a
           mixed-method study of professional perspectives

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      Abstract: Abstract Despite reports of increasing levels of climate change related distress, there remains limited evidence regarding effective interventions for individuals and communities. The current study aims to contribute to this discussion by presenting opinions from study participants who self-identified as having a professional interest in climate anxiety. An international interdisciplinary survey was conducted, with qualitative and quantitative responses from 230 participants, from a range of professional backgrounds, including a range of mental health practitioners, along with climate activists, artists, educators, academics and scientists and others interested in the climate anxiety space. A wide range of potential components of climate anxiety interventions were suggested by participants, including supporting people to connect with others and nature, emotional validation in a group setting, and moving toward climate action. Reflexive thematic analysis of qualitative data resulted in five themes: ‘Climate anxiety is a healthy response to the current situation’, ‘Climate anxiety will continue to increase until there is climate action’, ‘Climate anxiety interventions should be individualised’, ‘Climate anxiety interventions need to include the community and societal level’ and ‘Climate-aware practitioners are required’. These themes provide a significant contribution to the discourse on climate anxiety interventions. They emphasize the need for an understanding of climate anxiety as a legitimate response to the current situation and the imperative of community and society levels being included in intervention strategies. Results from this study provide insights from diverse perspectives to provide valuable guidance for future research and practice in the development of effective interventions for climate anxiety.
      PubDate: 2024-01-25
       
  • “When the real stuff happens”: A qualitative descriptive study of the
           psychosocial outcomes of outdoor adventure education for adolescents

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      Abstract: Abstract Adolescence is a pivotal time for social and emotional wellbeing development, and the literature calls for psychosocial support approaches in this population. Outdoor adventure education (OAE), programs that contain activities perceived as risky by participants but undertaken in an environment of risk management and social support, provide a holistic approach to protecting and enhancing adolescent mental health. A qualitative descriptive methodology using purposive sampling was employed to recruit adolescents and teachers from Western Australia involved in OAE. Template thematic analysis was used to analyse the semi-structured interview data of five focus groups with adolescents and four key informant interviews with OAE teachers. Our findings suggest that developing and maintaining connections with others during OAE programming are powerful protective factors for psychosocial outcomes in adolescent participants. The tangible responsibilities and inherent challenges of OAE programming created opportunities for multifaceted successes, which also featured as an important finding in our study. We conclude that deliberate, critical OAE programming decisions with opportunities for connections, tangible responsibilities and challenges, and the nurturing of individual empowerment in participants, may positively impact psychosocial outcomes. Further research is needed to understand the psychosocial impacts of OAE on adolescent participants as it relates to individual empowerment.
      PubDate: 2024-01-17
       
  • Exploring a pedagogy of place in Iceland: Students understanding of a
           sense of place and emerging meanings

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      Abstract: Abstract This paper explores the educational opportunities of a pedagogy of place based on an action research project, investigating a course at the University of Iceland in the field of leisure studies. The aim was to identify what gave students an understanding of a sense of place and to find out what meanings emerged for them. Following the fieldwork course, qualitative data was collected from participants using photo-elicitation, a focus group, and a documentary analysis of student writing. The findings highlighted the need of acknowledging the location's cultural, social, historical, and political past. Additionally, effectively translating the language used in this educational approach was found to be essential. An experiential pedagogy was valued by students when exploring and developing their sense of place. However, educators need to be aware that it takes extended, immersive experiences in nature to create opportunities for authentic, aesthetic, embodied experiences to generate deep conversations and dialogue between tutors and students. The study suggests that greater emphasis is needed on the place-responsive process, involving more opportunities for reflection, empowering students to actively apply place-responsive activities themselves, and raising, and addressing, global issues such as the climate crisis, and environmental and social justice. This action research study provided the authors continued opportunities to develop their pedagogy of place.
      PubDate: 2024-01-13
       
  • The potentiality of nature to tug at our heartstrings: an exploratory
           inquiry into supportive affordances for emotion-focused family therapy in
           the outdoors

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      Abstract: Abstract A wealth of studies demonstrate the associations between nature contact and well-being, and gradually, nature-based solutions are becoming more widespread in mental health care and recovery. While emotion-focused therapies generally show promising results, evidence of nature-based family therapy is still scarce. In a forthcoming clinical trial at Sørlandet hospital in Southern Norway, we will compare indoor and outdoor provision of emotion-focused multi-family therapy. The foundation of emotion-focused therapeutic work with families is a deep belief in the healing powers of families, where resources within the “ecosystem” of a given family can be reactivated and nudged towards establishing a greater sense of harmony and connectedness over time. According to a Gibsonian understanding of affordances, humans respond to possibilities and limitations within an environment, where affordances in the context of this article arise from a systemic interplay between nature, participating families and facilitators. In this exploratory inquiry, we are particularly interested in the myriad ways nature may influence four core principles in emotion-focused therapy, including (a) emotion awareness, (b) emotion regulation, (c) reflection on emotion, and (d) emotion transformation. In this perspective article, we propose hypotheses and working metaphors in relation to everything from emotions’ multiple purposes to the delineation of facilitators’ accepting, empathic and curious stance. First and foremost, we attempt to generate a preliminary account of nature’s potentiality to tug at our heartstrings and offer a supportive environment for the novel provision of emotion-focused family therapy in the outdoors.
      PubDate: 2023-12-27
       
  • An infant-toddler outdoor risky play practices in an early childhood
           centre in Australia

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      Abstract: Abstract This paper examines outdoor risky play practices in an early childhood centre in Australia. Few studies have focused on how infants-toddlers engage in everyday outdoor risky practices. The study is informed by the theory of practice architectures to analyse outdoor risky play practices. Outdoor risky play practices are analysed through infant-toddlers encounters in the outdoor environment through cultural-discursive, material-economic, and social-political arrangements. The focus of this article is to explore how the outdoor environment enables and constrains infants’ risky play practices. This paper reports on a four-month research study with infant-toddlers, where video observations were undertaken with Isaac, an 18-month old toddler. The findings show that Isaac’s encounters with a big slide in the outdoor environment provide a vibrant material-economic arrangement for enabling his risk-taking. Infant-toddler’s agentic capacities for risky play involve relating by observing peers and risky doings by slowing down on the slide. The findings have implications for early childhood educators; for example, encouragement and support from educators, and the provision of a vibrant outdoor environment for risk-taking.
      PubDate: 2023-12-19
       
  • Special issue: updates from the journal of outdoor and environmental
           education publication of volume 26, issue 3

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      PubDate: 2023-12-18
       
  • Exploring the effects of a short-term, nature-based preschool experience:
           a mixed-methods investigation

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      Abstract: Abstract Gaining access to early childhood education can be challenging for some families, but summer programs may provide more opportunities for children of all backgrounds. In the USA, some of these expanded opportunities have come by way of an increased number of nature-based preschool programs. This study investigated a short-term, nature-based summer preschool program. Using an ecological systems perspective, researchers determined how the program affected children’s social-emotional skills, if children from the program demonstrated appropriate academic growth, and if children showed stronger connections to nature after participation. Multiple data streams were analyzed using a mixed methods approach, including data from observation instruments, literacy skills tests, surveys, and caregiver interviews. Findings from 69 preschoolers and 15 caregivers indicated positive increases in children’s social-emotional skills, appropriate academic development, no significant changes in connections to nature, and caregivers who felt the program positively contributed to readiness. However, it is also clear from this study that additional research is needed on these kinds of preschool programs to determine the specific factors contributing to positive outcomes.
      PubDate: 2023-12-15
       
  • Nature play with children under three: a case study of educator
           risk-taking

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      Abstract: Abstract This paper presents the action research undertaken by one urban Australian early learning service to enable and prioritise regular connection with nature opportunities for infants and toddlers. Very young children’s opportunities for nature play and community participation were expanded during the project. Research revealed the prevalence of educator risk-taking when engaging in change practice. This paper concentrates on the professional risk-taking educators engaged in when they executed these pedagogical and practice changes. It details the research undertaken, the theories that influenced collective thinking and informed changes in teaching practice. The complexities of intersecting nature play, place-based pedagogies, Education for Sustainability (EfS), and Indigenous perspectives are explored in relation to infants and toddlers. Examples of practice are described, articulating how these theoretical influences were applied in the research setting.
      PubDate: 2023-12-07
       
  • Giving Children permission for risky play: parental variables and
           parenting styles

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      Abstract: Abstract Parents act as significant agents in determining whether or not their children are able to take risks. However, there has been little literature which explores the role of parental variables that predict parents’ decisions as well as which types of risky play they are willing to tolerate relative to their parenting styles. Therefore, the aim of this study was twofold. First, to examine the association of children’s risky play with the parental variables of gender, employment status, education level, place of residence (i.e., urban/rural), and age of children. Second, to examine the types of risky play parents tolerate relative to their individual parenting styles. Through convenience sampling, 302 parents were selected to complete two questionnaires, including the Risky Play Attitude Scale and the Scale of Parenting Styles. This study found that the employment status and educational level of parents as well as ages of their children positively influenced parents’ attitudes towards risky play. Parents who worked outside the home, and those with a university degree expressed a more positive attitude towards children engaging in risky play. Additionally, overprotective parenting was a critical predictor of risky play, particularly for both low-risk and high-risk play. Furthermore, there remains a need for further understanding of what triggers parental fears along with better equipping parents with the necessary knowledge and skills regarding risky play.
      PubDate: 2023-12-01
       
  • Running the risk: The social, behavioral and environmental associations
           with positive risk in children’s play activities in outdoor playspaces

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      Abstract: Abstract The importance of positive risk opportunities in children’s play environments has been well-established. Risk in play allows children to examine their own capabilities and limits in conditions where the likelihood of serious physical or emotional harm is low. Opportunities for risky play in outdoor settings has been tied to the features available in the physical environment, as well as peer and adult interactions. The varied materials and landforms present in more naturalized play spaces may especially encourage risky play. Scholarship has emerged which examines risky play in natural outdoor environments, but few studies tie positive risk to particular social, behavioural or environmental conditions. This paper investigates factors influencing risk-taking by examining young children’s play behaviours across two studies utilizing the same behaviour mapping framework. Play behaviours were examined in both The Backyard, a natural playspace in Santa Barbara (USA) and the outdoor yards of YMCA childcare centres in Vancouver (Canada). A profile of the range and degree of risky play observed in both sites is presented, followed by a deeper examination of the characteristics and conditions of ‘positive risk’ behaviours. Findings revealed risky play was significantly associated with physical play and more active movement behaviours. Peer interaction was not strongly predictive of positive risk, but some forms of adult interaction were influential in play in The Backyard. Physical environmental features such as natural and fixed elements, along with challenging topographies, were also associated with risky play. Analyses highlight patterns in the conditions and features which appear to support positive risk within outdoor playspaces, and implications for integrating affordances for positive risk into outdoor playspace design.
      PubDate: 2023-12-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s42322-023-00145-1
       
  • Play opportunities through environmental design: a strategy for well-being

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      Abstract: Abstract In 2018 well-being was restored as a key purpose of New Zealand local government. Well-being is a multi-faceted concept, but play is undoubtedly an important component of it, and therefore intimately linked with the work of local government. Traditionally, local government strategies, policies, and services relating to play have focused on parks, playgrounds, and formal sport and recreation facilities, and overlooked risky play. A rethinking of what constitutes play, understanding the value of risky play, and where this play can and should occur (i.e., in locations outside of formal/traditional play spaces) is necessary to meet the statutory requirements of the four well-beings and support children’s holistic growth and development. Coinciding with the reinstatement of the four well-being’s, Hamilton City Council (HCC) developed the country’s first Play Strategy, and Sport NZ developed a national vision for play involving investment into local government to develop play advocacy roles. This article draws on the author’s first-hand experiences pioneering the first play advocate role tasked with activating the HCC Play Strategy. It introduces a play case study that led to the development of a novel design approach – Play Opportunities Through Environmental Design (POpTED) – aimed at achieving creative city-wide play enablement beyond traditional playgrounds. The article demonstrates how the strategies of national and local government in New Zealand are being established to help children have different kinds of play experiences than previously afforded to them; enabling the re-examination of organisational risk appetites to support play concepts that enable children to experience their own self-managed risks.
      PubDate: 2023-11-14
      DOI: 10.1007/s42322-023-00138-0
       
  • “We do it anyway”: Professional identities of teachers who enact risky
           play as a framework for Education Outdoors

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      Abstract: Abstract Accelerated by our collective pandemic experience, systems of schooling saw a groundswell of momentum to reconsider where and how learning might continue across Canada. Education Outdoors emerged as a relational pedagogical practice whereby elementary school teachers began to locate curricular learning in schoolyards and adjacent natural spaces. In jurisdictions where schools remained open for students to attend in person, many educators took advantage of public health directives to locate learning outdoors as much as possible. Within this critical participatory action research study, elementary school teachers described how they took up emergent learning by locating curricular learning outdoors. Three significant findings from this include: (1) participating teachers’ emergent curricular practice out-of-doors included time and space for unstructured play; (2) teachers highlighted the pedagogical value of risky play in relationship to student wellness, classroom management, and motivation for curricular learning; and (3) with collegial mentorship, teachers can develop the necessary skills and knowledge to enhance opportunities for risky play as a pedagogical approach to outdoor play and learning in elementary schools, even if they did not have a strong personal history of outdoor play. This study offers insight into the funds of knowledge, dispositions, and professional identities of elementary school teachers who embrace risky play as a pedagogical practice and how they navigate systemic challenges unique to education outdoors.
      PubDate: 2023-11-13
      DOI: 10.1007/s42322-023-00140-6
       
  • Children’s access to outdoors in early childhood education and care
           centres in China during the COVID pandemic

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      Abstract: Abstract China has undergone rapid development in early childhood education and outdoor pedagogy in recent times. Importantly, it was the first country to detect COVID-19 cases and introduce lockdowns and other restrictions. Chinese early childhood educators had no opportunities to learn from their peers in other countries regarding how to respond to COVID-19 restrictions. It is unknown how these restrictions may have impacted children’s access to the outdoors. The current study examined whether there had been changes in children’s outdoor time, access to the outdoor space, and restrictions imposed on children’s outdoor play. We then examined if making changes or remaining the same was influenced by educator qualifications, professional development related to outdoor pedagogy, educators’ tolerance of risk in play, and staff-child ratios. Most educators reported that the amount of time children spent outdoors and their access to the outdoor space remained the same compared to before the pandemic. A greater number of educators indicated restrictions were imposed on children’s outdoor play due to the pandemic. A series of ordinal regression analyses indicated that educators with a higher tolerance of risk in play were more likely to increase children’s time spent outdoors and access to outdoor space and impose fewer restrictions on children’s outdoor play during the pandemic. A higher staff-child ratio was associated with increasing outdoor time and outdoor space. The findings contribute to the understanding of how external factors influence opportunities for children to play outdoors and provide directions for future professional development programs and risk-reframing interventions.
      PubDate: 2023-10-18
      DOI: 10.1007/s42322-023-00139-z
       
  • Comparison of quality and risky play opportunities of playgrounds in
           Germany

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      Abstract: Abstract Outdoor playgrounds are essential for children’s development, offering opportunities for various types of play, including risky play. Based in Hamburg, Germany, this study sought to compare the qualities and affordances for risky play between two distinct types of playgrounds: green playgrounds in urban parks or natural areas and neighborhood playgrounds in denser residential zones. Sixteen playgrounds (eight from each category) were meticulously observed and evaluated using a qualitative embedded multiple-case study approach. Analysis tools included the 7Cs Scale, which measures playground design quality, and a Risky Play Opportunities Observation Form that categorizes different types of risky play. Results revealed that green playgrounds typically exhibited higher quality and provided a broader range of affordances for risky play opportunities than their neighborhood counterparts—both types of playgrounds offered experiences such as climbing, jumping, and balancing. However, green playgrounds were richer in opportunities, especially concerning playing near potentially dangerous elements. Certain risky play categories, like ‘playing with dangerous tools,‘ were notably absent in both playground types. The findings underscore the critical role of thoughtful playground design in fostering children’s growth, suggesting a need to prioritize nature-oriented and risk-enabling playgrounds that maximize affordances.
      PubDate: 2023-10-13
      DOI: 10.1007/s42322-023-00137-1
       
  • Parents’ and caregivers’ perspectives on the benefits of a
           high-risk outdoor play space

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      Abstract: Abstract Adult values, attitudes, behaviours, and beliefs are factors that shape childhood exposure to risk-taking experiences. This study examined the role of adults in supporting children’s play and learning in a high-risk park environment. Considering this context, our research incorporated a two-phased mixed-methods approach to explore parent and caregiver perceptions of a bespoke Australian outdoor “nature play park” named Boongaree. Quantitative data collected from participants (n = 302) investigated playground visitation patterns, and qualitative data were collected around parents’ and caregivers’ insights around the benefits and challenges of the park. A noteworthy finding that emerged was the parents’ and caregivers’ strong support of children’s risky play at this park and how the park supported the children’s development. Nine emergent themes from the qualitative data showed that the adults supported their children’s engagement with this high-risk park as it offered opportunities to (1) engage with an innovative nature play park, (2) be challenged and solve problems, (3) connect to the outdoors, (4) have fun, (5) direct their own play, (6) be physically active, (7) be creative and curious, (8) demonstrate confidence and independence, and (9) build social capacity. Finally, our study concluded that the risk appetite or risk tolerance level of parents’ and caregivers’ is one of the primary factors underpinning their desire to engage (and re-engage) with risky nature play opportunities for their child.
      PubDate: 2023-09-11
      DOI: 10.1007/s42322-023-00132-6
       
 
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  Subjects -> RECREATION, TRAVEL AND TOURISM (Total: 204 journals)
    - HOTELS AND RESTAURANTS (2 journals)
    - LEISURE AND RECREATION (24 journals)
    - RECREATION, TRAVEL AND TOURISM (178 journals)

LEISURE AND RECREATION (24 journals)

Showing 1 - 23 of 23 Journals sorted alphabetically
Annals of Leisure Research     Partially Free   (Followers: 2)
Australasian Leisure Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australasian Parks and Leisure     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Canadian Theatre Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Conexões     Open Access  
International Journal of Exercise Science     Open Access   (Followers: 26)
International Journal of Leisure and Tourism Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Journal of Leisure Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Outdoor and Environmental Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Outdoor Recreation, Education, and Leadership     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Policy Research in Tourism, Leisure and Events     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Sport & Tourism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Leisure / Loisir     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Leisure Sciences: An Interdisciplinary Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Managing Sport and Leisure     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Physician and Sportsmedicine     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Revista Competência     Open Access  
Revue phénEPS / PHEnex Journal     Open Access  
SCHOLE : A Journal of Leisure Studies and Recreation Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Studia Vernacula     Open Access  
Therapeutic Recreation Journal     Full-text available via subscription  
Tourism Geographies: An International Journal of Tourism Space, Place and Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
World Leisure Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
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