Subjects -> HEALTH AND SAFETY (Total: 1464 journals)
    - CIVIL DEFENSE (22 journals)
    - DRUG ABUSE AND ALCOHOLISM (87 journals)
    - HEALTH AND SAFETY (686 journals)
    - HEALTH FACILITIES AND ADMINISTRATION (358 journals)
    - OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH AND SAFETY (112 journals)
    - PHYSICAL FITNESS AND HYGIENE (117 journals)
    - WOMEN'S HEALTH (82 journals)

CIVIL DEFENSE (22 journals)

Showing 1 - 18 of 18 Journals sorted by number of followers
Studies in Conflict & Terrorism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 365)
Aggression and Violent Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 347)
Canadian Journal of Remote Sensing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 55)
Disasters     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
International Journal of Emergency Services     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
International Journal of Emergency Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Evolution, Medicine, and Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Prehospital and Disaster Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Strategic Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Risk, Hazards & Crisis in Public Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
International Journal of Intelligent Defence Support Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Critical Infrastructure Protection     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Disaster Recovery Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Applied Security Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Health Care Law and Policy     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Forensic Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Global & Regional Health Technology Assessment     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Korean Journal of Defense Analysis     Hybrid Journal  
Similar Journals
Journal Cover
International Journal of Emergency Services
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.201
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 20  
 
Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal   * Containing 2 Open Access Open Access article(s) in this issue *
ISSN (Print) 2047-0894 - ISSN (Online) 2047-0908
Published by Emerald Homepage  [362 journals]
  • Perceptions of Australian paramedics following the introduction of
           professional regulation: a qualitative exploration

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      Authors: Buck Reed, Leanne Cowin, Peter O'Meara, Christine Metusela, Ian Wilson
      Abstract: Paramedics became nationally registered in 2018 in Australia. Prior to this, there was no central regulation of the profession with reliance on organisational regulation through employers. As paramedics expanded their scope, role and range of employers, especially outside statutory agencies, there was increasing need to engage in professional regulation. Regulation is more than a legal and bureaucratic framework. The purpose of the paper states that the way paramedics interact with their new regulatory environment impacts and is influenced by the professionalisation of the discipline. Regulation also redefines their positionality within the profession. Two mixed-method surveys were undertaken. A pre-registration survey occurred in the month prior to regulation commencing (N = 419) followed by the second survey 31 months later (N = 407). This paper reports the analysis of qualitative data from the post-registration survey and provides comparison to the pre-registration survey which has been previously reported. Analysis was undertaken using interpretive phenomenological analysis (IPA). Themes from the pre-registration survey continued however became more nuanced. Participants broadly supported registration and saw it as empowering to the profession. Some supported registration but were disappointed by its outcome, others rejected registration and saw it as divisive and oppressive. Paramedics are beginning to come to terms with increasing professionalisation, of which regulation is one component. Changes can be seen in professional identity and engagement with professional practice; however, this is nascent and is deserving of additional research to track the profession as it continues to evolve.
      Citation: International Journal of Emergency Services
      PubDate: 2024-01-10
      DOI: 10.1108/IJES-03-2023-0004
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2024)
       
  • Optimization of new fire department location using an improved GIS
           algorithm for firefighters travel time estimation

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      Authors: Anas M.M. Awad, Ketut Wikantika, Haytham Ali, Sohaib K.M. Abujayyab, Javad Hashempour
      Abstract: The rapid development of urban areas in Sleman District, Indonesia, has created new challenges for firefighting response services. One of the primary challenges is to identify the optimal locations for new fire stations, to improve service quality and maximize service coverage within the specified time. This paper proposes a method for precisely calculating travel time that integrates delay time caused by traffic lights, intersections and congestion. The study highlights the importance of precise calculation of travel time in order to provide a more accurate understanding of the service area covered by the fire stations. The proposed method utilizes network analysis in ArcGIS, the analytical hierarchy process (AHP) and simple additive weighting (SAW) to accurately calculate travel time and to identify the best locations for new fire stations. The identification of new site was based on service safety, service quality, service costs and demographic factors and applied to the Sleman district in Indonesia. The results showed that the total area covered by old and new fire stations decreased from 61% to 31.8% of the study area when the adjusted default speed scenario was implemented. The results indicated that the default speed scenario could provide misleading information about the service area, while the adjusted default speed scenario improved service quality and maximized service coverage. The proposed method provides decision-makers with an effective tool to make informed decisions on optimal locations for new fire stations and thus enhance emergency response and public safety.
      Citation: International Journal of Emergency Services
      PubDate: 2024-01-08
      DOI: 10.1108/IJES-04-2023-0011
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2024)
       
  • Working principle of agile capabilities for emergency response during
           cyclones and floods

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      Authors: Joshin John, Neetha J. Eappen
      Abstract: This paper investigates how agile capabilities in humanitarian settings work in combination, and its effects on performance outcome. The study was conducted in the frame of reference of response operations during cyclones and floods, which is considered most complex and with the most widespread impact. A survey-based method was used to collect empirical data on response operations from 131 field officers who were involved in disaster response during cyclones or floods. A partial least square based structural equation model was used to study the path model of interaction of agile capabilities, and their effect on performance outcomes. The results show that integration of agile capabilities is important for enhancing effectiveness of humanitarian response. The results indicated a serial mediation effect involving visibility, responsiveness and flexibility capability on the effectiveness of emergency response. This research has implications for response units of humanitarian organisations. This includes capacity building for key agile capabilities, integration, supply chain re-configuration and differential positioning of response phase as against preparedness and recovery phases. This study is unique for the chosen humanitarian setting, which is considered most difficult. The authors demonstrate from empirical evidence the interaction effects of agile capabilities during response phase for cyclones and floods, and their impact. The research insights will help practitioners to configure and position supply chains for better effectiveness during response operations, which have markedly different objectives vis-à-vis other phases or types of humanitarian settings.
      Citation: International Journal of Emergency Services
      PubDate: 2023-12-26
      DOI: 10.1108/IJES-01-2023-0002
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2023)
       
  • The adoption of evidence-based policing: the pivotal role of first-line
           police leaders across England and Wales

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      Authors: Ian Pepper, Colin Rogers, James Turner
      Abstract: First-line leaders across the emergency services are instrumental in leading the development of a workforce fit to face current and future challenges. As such in addition to utilising their specific craft, leaders need to be equipped to understand and apply evidence-based practices. With a focus on first-line leadership in policing, this paper will have both national and international resonance for those organisations attempting to embed an evidence-based culture. The paper utilises a review of literature to develop a viewpoint identifying challenges and benefits of the adoption of evidence-based policing (EBP) by first-line leaders. First-line leaders, whether police officers, police staff or volunteers, require opportunities to develop their own knowledge, understanding and skills of applying EBP in the workplace. Acknowledging challenges exist in the widespread adoption of EBP, such learning, at the appropriate educational level, will enable leaders to effectively champion the adoption of EBP, informing both their own decision-making and professional practices as well as those across their teams. The first-line leader role is highly influential, as such, it is essential that these leaders develop their knowledge, understanding and application of EBP in the workplace in order to lead the expected cultural change. This paper provides a current framework for the understanding of the context and potential impact of educationally levelled formal leadership learning required to champion the broad adoption of EBP across policing.
      Citation: International Journal of Emergency Services
      PubDate: 2023-12-15
      DOI: 10.1108/IJES-05-2023-0020
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2023)
       
  • The impacts of leadership behaviours on the mental well-being of public
           safety communicators

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      Authors: Nadine Anik Leduc, Stephen Czarnuch, Rosemary Ricciardelli
      Abstract: Public safety (communicators; e.g. 9-1-1, police, fire and ambulance call-takers and dispatchers), like many other public safety personnel (e.g. police, paramedics), (re)suffer operational stress injuries (OSIs) that are too often hidden and at a prevalence higher than the general population. Unfortunately, there are very little data for OSI rates in Canadian communicators. To the authors’ knowledge, this is the only pan-Canadian study focusing on organizational culture, and its potential influence on OSIs, within the communicator context. The authors conducted a 179-item online survey of Canadian communicators comprising 17 validated screenings for occupational stress injuries and symptoms and four open-ended questions relating to their agency's organizational culture. The authors thematically analysed participants' open-ended responses and their screening scores. A semi-grounded thematic approach revealed that managers and supervisors were significant contributors to negative perceptions (n = 165) of organizational culture, potentially resulting in or worsening existing OSIs. Specifically, leadership was viewed as ineffective, inconsistent, unsupportive, abusive and toxic, with limited understanding of communicator roles. Communicators described feeling devalued, particularly when leaders fail to recognize communicator OSIs, which can perpetuate stigma. Conversely, positive leaders (n = 24) were described as supportive, communicative and encouraging. The findings suggest that while leadership behaviours are a key factor in employee well-being, it varies considerably across agencies, impacting treatment-seeking behaviours. The authors’ new understandings of leaders' roles in OSIs may help reduce the frequency and severity of communicator OSIs, helping ensure that emergency services are delivered to Canadians.
      Citation: International Journal of Emergency Services
      PubDate: 2023-10-31
      DOI: 10.1108/IJES-04-2023-0012
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2023)
       
  • Towards disaster prevention in community centers: development of a
           code-based fire risk assessment tool

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      Authors: Mohammad A. Hassanain, Zayed A. Albugami
      Abstract: Community centers play a socio-economic and urban role of combining different communal necessities, that serve inhabitants, at different neighborhoods in cities. Their role emerged in importance as being a hub for improving and customizing quality of life experiences of the public. This research presents a code-based risk assessment tool for evaluating fire safety measures that can be adapted in the context of community centers. It also provides an exemplary case study to demonstrate its application. The study identified the factors that render community centers as a high-risk type of facilities in fire events. Various fire codes and standards were reviewed to describe the relevant fire safety measures. A code-based fire risk assessment tool was developed and implemented, through a case study. A set of recommendations were developed to improve the fire safety conditions of the case study facility. Several violations to fire safety were identified in the case study building. The findings led to identifying a set of recommendations to improve its fire safety conditions. This research introduced a systematic approach to raise awareness about fire incidences and consequences in community centers, and provides facilities managers with a tool, to assess compliance based on international fire code requirements. In fire events, community centers are considered as high-risk facilities that may lead to significant losses of human lives and damages to assets. It is significant to study the causes of fire, for ensuring effective prevention and safe operations.
      Citation: International Journal of Emergency Services
      PubDate: 2023-10-24
      DOI: 10.1108/IJES-10-2022-0059
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2023)
       
  • Using the Fantastic Reality Ability Measurement to cope with epidemics: a
           Turkish validity and reliability study

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      Authors: Yasemin Özyer Güvener, Samet Dinçer, Enver Caner
      Abstract: This study was conducted to adapt the Fantastic Reality Ability Measurement (FRAME) into Turkish. In the sample of this methodological study, 213 participants were included. The factor loading of the tool was within the appropriate range (0.53–0.94). Its Cronbach's alpha was 0.975, and the item total score correlations ranged between 0.594 and 0.881. The evaluation of the Turkish version of the FRAME revealed that it could be used as a valid and reliable measurement tool in Turkish population.
      Citation: International Journal of Emergency Services
      PubDate: 2023-09-07
      DOI: 10.1108/IJES-11-2022-0067
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2023)
       
  • European emergency managers on social media: institutional
           arrangements and guidelines

         This is an Open Access Article Open Access Article

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      Authors: Sten Torpan, Sten Hansson, Kati Orru, Mark Rhinard, Lucia Savadori, Pirjo Jukarainen, Tor-Olav Nævestad, Sunniva Frislid Meyer, Abriel Schieffelers, Gabriella Lovasz
      Abstract: This paper offers an empirical overview of European emergency managers' institutional arrangements and guidelines for using social media in risk and crisis communication. The authors collected and analysed material including publicly accessible relevant legal acts, policy documents, official guidelines, and press reports in eight European countries – Germany, Italy, Belgium, Sweden, Hungary, Finland, Norway, and Estonia. Additionally, the authors carried out 95 interviews with emergency managers in the eight countries between September 2019 and February 2020. The authors found that emergency management institutions' social media usage is rarely centrally controlled and social media crisis communication was regulated with the same guidelines as crisis communication on traditional media. Considering this study's findings against the backdrop of existing research and practice, the authors find support for a “mixed arrangement” model by which centralised policies work in tandem with decentralised practices on an ad hoc basis. Comparative insights about institutional arrangements and procedural guidelines on social media crisis communication in the studied countries could inform the future policies concerning social media use in other emergency management systems. This study includes novel, cross-national comparative data on the institutional arrangements and guidelines for using social media in emergency management in the context of Europe.
      Citation: International Journal of Emergency Services
      PubDate: 2023-09-07
      DOI: 10.1108/IJES-08-2022-0041
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2023)
       
  • Mental distress symptoms among Muscat firefighters: the impact
           of sociodemographic factors, sleep disturbance and smoking

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      Authors: Javad Hashempour, Zubaida Shebani, Jeffrey Kimble
      Abstract: Firefighting can pose a number of psychological health risks due to the nature of the job. Previous studies have examined the relationship between distress symptoms in firefighters and factors such as age, experience in the service, workload, sleep and alcohol use. However, the relationship between risk factors and mental health problems in firefighters remains unclear. In the present study, the authors aim to assess mental distress among Muscat firefighters using the Brief Symptom Inventory-18. The authors expected that this research will allow researchers to determine the prevalence of mental distress among Muscat firefighters and assess the role of the above risk factors on the ratio. The assessment includes the prevalence of anxiety, somatization and depression symptoms among firefighters. The impact of sociodemographic factors, sleep problems and smoking on symptomatic cases was also evaluated. Data was collected from 110 firefighters then processed as per instructions in the BSI-18 manual to identify clinical cases in each of the three scales of the assessment. Results show that all factors influence the number of cases to different extents. Young, single firefighters with high school level education were found to have the highest number of extreme cases followed by those who are non-smokers and satisfied with their job. This study did not find a relationship between sleep disorder and job dissatisfaction with regard to the number of critical cases. The prevalence of anxiety, somatic and depression cases among firefighters was found to be 11.8%, 10.9% and 10%, respectively. These findings have implications for fire service work-organization policies and for the development and monitoring of treatment programs for firefighters. This work presents a comprehensive assessment on common factors that may impact prevalence of mental distress among an underrepresented firefighter community. These findings have implications for fire service work-organization policies and for updating current monitoring programs or updating new programs for firefighters.
      Citation: International Journal of Emergency Services
      PubDate: 2023-08-22
      DOI: 10.1108/IJES-12-2022-0075
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2023)
       
  • The development of an evidence-based approach to inform learning and
           practices within the UK fire and rescue service

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      Authors: Rowena Hill, Tabitha Oakes, Lee Wilkes
      Abstract: The fire sector within the United Kingdom has identified a need to further develop their systematic use of academic literature and develop mechanisms to include academic knowledge to inform evidence-based policy and practice. By increasing knowledge exchange between the fire sector and academia, the ability to horizon scan and identify future relevant phenomena of interest to the fire sector will be achieved. Consequently, the evidence base and horizon scanning will increase the specificity of techniques, approaches and practices needed to continually improve the safety of the activities completed within the firefighting occupation, and it will also provide priority areas for investment and increase firefighter safety. This technical paper primarily features an initial scoping review of academic and grey literature and an operational incident data review. This was completed to provide an initial and updated review of disciplines and areas of academia that are actively engaged in research relevant to the fire and rescue service. Consequently, this method sought to identify and examine the various disciplines of academia involved in fire research. This paper then uses that outcome to suggest a model of multidisciplinarity to inform the fire sector. As a result of the scoping review, each academic discipline was identified and an initial review developed a predetermined set of key search terms. This was established through identifying the most frequently used fire-related terms within each discipline. This allowed for a comprehensive understanding of the breadth of activity and depth of complexity of fire related research within each discipline and an indicative set of key search terms to be developed. Recommendations are formulated to suggest next steps to routinely incorporate the academic knowledge base in the learning process of the fire and rescue services in the United Kingdom. This paper provides an initial scoping map of academic literature and disciplines relevant to activities completed in the UK fire sector, which can be used to further develop the evidence base to inform the fire and rescue service of the United Kingdom. It also outlines possible mechanisms and a model to systematically facilitate knowledge exchange between academia and the fire sector by which knowledge exchange could further support the development of evidence-based policy and practice. The broad range of benefits of collaboration between the fire and rescue service and academia are explored. This paper provides clear evidence as to why fire related research should have an increased priority status to inform the national fire and rescue services learning process and evidence for national policy and guidance development within the UK fire and rescue service. Additionally, recommendations are made to support the consideration of academic evidence in the systematic sector wide learning process. Previously, the UK fire and rescue service had limited coordinated strategic engagement with academic disciplines to further develop their learning processes in order to produce an evidence base, which is cognisant of academic research to inform practice and guidance. This paper begins the narrowing of that gap by categorising academic literature relevant to fire research into clear disciplines, mapping these to an updated breadth of current activities undertaken by the fire and rescue service across the United Kingdom. The process also details a pilot of the proposed model to support knowledge exchange by producing an academically evidence-based submission to the National Fire Chiefs Council organisational learning process.
      Citation: International Journal of Emergency Services
      PubDate: 2023-08-15
      DOI: 10.1108/IJES-01-2022-0001
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2023)
       
  • Thinking styles of Australasian paramedics and paramedicine students

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      Authors: Toby Keene, Kristen Pammer, Eryn Newman, Bill Lord
      Abstract: Paramedics play important roles in healthcare, yet little is known about their decision-making. There is evidence that thinking style is associated with individual preference for intuitive or deliberative decision-making. Australian and New Zealand paramedics (n = 103; mean age: 38.7; mean 12 years’ experience; 44% female) and paramedic students (n = 101; mean age: 25.7; 59% female) completed a thinking style survey measuring active open-mindedness (AOT), close mindedness (CMT), preference for intuitive thinking (PIT) and preference for effortful thinking (PET). Participants also completed the 7-item Cognitive Reflection Test (CRT) to assess ability to override an attractive but incorrect intuition. With prior exposure to the CRT controlled, regression analysis found increasing AOT and decreasing age predicted cognitive reflection across all participants (R2/R2 adjusted: 0.198/0.157; F(10, 192) = 4.752, p 
      Citation: International Journal of Emergency Services
      PubDate: 2023-07-05
      DOI: 10.1108/IJES-08-2022-0042
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2023)
       
  • What effects did home working have on 999 clinician practice from one UK
           ambulance service during the Covid-19 pandemic'

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      Authors: Mike Brady, Edward Harry
      Abstract: Virtual care is any interaction between a patient and clinician or clinicians, occurring remotely using information technologies. Like many international services, United Kingdom (UK) ambulance services use paramedics and nurses to undertake telephone assessments of patients calling the 999 emergency service line. Using their clinical knowledge, experience, and, at times, computer decision support software, these clinicians assess patients from a range of clinical acuities to confirm the need for an emergency response or identify and support those patients who can be cared for with remote treatment advice and referral. The Covid-19 pandemic saw UK ambulance services change and adapt their operating models to meet social distancing requirements, increase clinical staff numbers and mitigate staff becoming unavailable for work due to self-isolation. One such strategy was moving clinicians from Emergency Operations Centres (EOCs) to working at home. Staff utilised digital phone systems, remote computer-aided dispatch modules, remote clinical decision support software and video platforms, which allowed close to full functionality compared to inside typical EOCs. There is a dearth of literature exploring the comparative practice of clinicians from home rather than from EOCs. Therefore, this study reports the findings of a qualitative analysis of these effects from the clinician's perspective. The authors hope that the findings from this study will inform the operating, education and leadership practices of those delivering such services. A convenience sample of telephone nurses and paramedics from one UK ambulance service in which home working had been implemented were contacted. 15 clinicians with recent home working experience responded to the invite out of a possible 31 (48%). All participants had previously practised remote assessment from within an EOC. Semi-structured interviews took place via video conferencing software and were recorded, transcribed and thematically analysed. An inductive approach was taken to generating codes and both researchers separately reading the transcripts before re-reading them, assigning initial themes and determining frequency. Four main themes were identified with further associated sub-themes: (1) performance, (2) support, (3) distractions and interruptions and (4) confidence in decision-making. There are very few studies exploring the practice of remote clinicians in emergency EOCs. This study identified that home working clinicians felt their productivity had increased, making them more satisfied in their practice. However, there were mixed feelings over the level of support they perceived they now received, despite the mechanisms of support being largely the same. Supervisors found it especially challenging to provide support to practitioners; and employers might need to clarify the support mechanisms they provide to homeworkers. The elimination of distractions and interruptions was seen as a largely positive result of homeworking; however, these interruptions were not seen as inappropriate, thus, identifying a need for role clarity and task coordination rather than interruption elimination. Finally, clinicians felt that they become more confident when working from home, researching more, trusting themselves more and relying less on others to reach safe outcomes. However, there were missed opportunities to learn from listening to others' clinical practice.
      Citation: International Journal of Emergency Services
      PubDate: 2023-06-27
      DOI: 10.1108/IJES-09-2022-0046
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2023)
       
  • EMS workers on the frontline of the opioid epidemic: effects of sleep and
           social support on depression

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      Authors: Paige Sable, Fengyan Tang, Jenifer A. Swab, Sheila Roth, Daniel Rosen
      Abstract: This study focuses on Emergency Medical Service (EMS) personnel and examines the impact of overdose calls for opioids and attitudes of EMS workers towards individuals with substance use disorders on EMS workers' mental well-being while accounting for self-reported sleep and social support. This cross-sectional study surveyed EMS workers (N = 608) across Pennsylvania on demographic variables, frequency of overdose calls, attitudes towards opioid use and naloxone administration on measures of mental health. Multiple logistic regression models were estimated to examine the relationship of perception of opioid use and treatment and likelihood that EMS workers might experience depression.
      Authors found two main findings: (1) There was a significant relationship between more negative perceptions about opioid use/naloxone and the likelihood that EMS workers might experience depression. (2) There was a significant relationship between number of overdose calls EMS workers responded to and likelihood of depression, which appeared to be alleviated by improvements in sleep and social support. There is potential opportunity for EMS employers to minimize the impact of the opioid epidemic on EMS worker mental health. Trainings to highlight effectiveness of treatment should be further explored, along with ways to enhance social support and improve sleep for EMS workers to protect against the stress associated with responding to this public health crisis. This study adds to the literature on the impact of the opioid epidemic as it relates to mental health outcomes for EMS professionals providing frontline care to those experiencing opioid use disorders.
      Citation: International Journal of Emergency Services
      PubDate: 2023-05-23
      DOI: 10.1108/IJES-08-2022-0037
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2023)
       
  • Preparative collaboration for missing persons with dementia
           in Sweden: a pilot study

         This is an Open Access Article Open Access Article

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      Authors: Rebecca Stenberg, Maria Wolmesjö
      Abstract: The purpose of this paper is to give an account for preparative collaboration between the police and municipal eldercare in Sweden concerning missing persons with dementia. Design/methodology/approach used was a qualitative case study design, consisting of one focus group with representatives for the participating organisations, followed by directed content analysis. The findings showed a lack of current collaboration and reluctance to new collaborative initiatives. However, when focussing on preparative collaboration of coordinated responses to missing incidents, possibilities for improvement could be identified. The improvements concerned updated personnel response checklists, along with suggestions for an elaborate life story document in eldercare, with police access. Finally, better coordination of the return of the found person and a follow up were proposed. It is suggested that collaboration must be given different meanings and use different approaches adapted to the different phases in a rescue operation. In the preparation and the response phase, the focus should be on coordination of the resources available. In the pre-planning and prevention phases, as well as in evaluation and learning, horizontal collaboration is more suitable. The amount of data in this study is a research limitation which calls for further research. It is suggested that collaboration must be given different meanings and use different approaches adapted to the different phases in a rescue operation. In the preparation and the response phase, the focus should be on coordination of the resources available. In the pre-planning and prevention phases, as well as in evaluation and learning, horizontal co-operation is more suitable. The originality/value of this paper can be found in the novelty of missing person research in Sweden, and in practical suggestions for preparative collaboration concerning persons with dementia who go missing. Finally, it can be found in the suggested need for a more dynamic and process-sensitive view of collaboration in SAR or rescue operations.
      Citation: International Journal of Emergency Services
      PubDate: 2023-03-29
      DOI: 10.1108/IJES-09-2020-0054
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2023)
       
  • The evaluation of Safe and Well visits as part of the prevention
           activities of fire and Rescue Services in England

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      Authors: Katarzyna Lakoma, Peter Murphy
      Abstract: Safe and Well visits are the primary preventative vehicle now used by all Fire and Rescue Services in England. The purpose of this paper is to examine their recent development to identify notable practice and potential improvements. A literature review and archival document analysis have been supplemented by data and information from the evaluation of a case study at Nottinghamshire Fire and Rescue Service. There is considerable scope to improve Safe and Well visits, although individual services and the sector are not yet able to implement effective benchmarking across services or commission a more appropriate evaluation methodology such as a social return on investment. The research is situationally bound to England, although there may be transferable lessons to other services and jurisdictions. Potential future improvements are identified and recommended at local and national levels, both in the data and information available, and for policy, operationalisation and public assurance. Although a small number of professional reviews have been undertaken, the authors are not aware of any academic evaluation of Safe and Well visits since they superseded the previous Home Fire Safety Checks.
      Citation: International Journal of Emergency Services
      PubDate: 2023-02-28
      DOI: 10.1108/IJES-09-2022-0053
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2023)
       
  • From EAP to BHAP: a conceptual framework to develop and implement a
           comprehensive behavioral health access program within the fire service

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      Authors: Kellie ODare, Chris Bator, Lance Butler, Jeffrey Orrange, Lauren Porter, Michelle Rehbein, John Dilks, Dana R. Dillard, Erin King, Joseph Herzog, Robert Rotunda
      Abstract: The purpose of this paper is to articulate the results of a comprehensive literature review and grassroots outreach with first responder organizations to present an operationalized framework for organizations to utilize as a blueprint in developing customized behavioral health access program (BHAP) programs. Historically, authorities having jurisdiction (AHJ)over fire service organizations have primarily offered behavioral health interventions through Employee Assistance Programs (EAPs) or commercial insurance carriers. These programs are necessary but may prove insufficient to meet the scope and needs of trauma-exposed firefighters and the firefighters' families. A BHAP is a comprehensive and operationalized plan which clearly specifies the mental health services fire department members and families need, where those services are available within their communities and levels and standards of care that are expected in the provision of these services. The BHAP is becoming a world standard of behavioral health care for first responders. While some fire service agencies are beginning to create BHAP guides, developing and implementing a BHAP can be time consuming and overwhelming, particularly for departments with limited internal and external resources. While the results of this review focus on BHAP within the fire service, this framework is applicable across all first responder professions.
      Citation: International Journal of Emergency Services
      PubDate: 2023-02-07
      DOI: 10.1108/IJES-11-2021-0078
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2023)
       
  • Participation of pre-hospital emergency physicians at ambulance missions
           in Germany's federal states

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      Authors: Thomas Hofmann, Luis Möckel
      Abstract: This study aims to determine the differences in the involvement of pre-hospital emergency physicians (PHEPs) within the ambulance service over time and between the federal states and identify possible reasons for the differences. The federal state-specific PHEP rates from 2012 to 2017 were analysed using publicly available data or data provided by the responsible state ministries. In addition, various correlations between PHEP rates and sociodemographic and health data were calculated. The PHEP rates differ significantly between the 16 federal states. In 2017, Schleswig–Holstein had a PHEP participation rate of 19.00%, while in Mecklenburg-Western Pomerania the rate was 41.08%. In all surveyed states, the rate fell over time. Only in Mecklenburg-Western Pomerania, the rate increased from 37.68% in 2012 to 41.08% in 2017 (OR: 1.15 [95% CI: 1.14; 1.17]). Federal state-specific PHEP rates indicated strong deviations from the overall PHEP rate of all included federal states with ORs ranging from 0.61 (95% CI: 0,61; 0,62) for Schleswig–Holstein to 1.82 (95% CI: 1.81; 1.84) for Mecklenburg-Western Pomerania. Socioeconomic factors indicated (inverse) correlations with the federal state-specific PHEP rate. The PHEP rates differ significantly between the federal states. The correlations indicate possible connections but do not show clear causes within state-specific characteristics. Consequently, the occupational autonomy of paramedics differs between the states.
      Citation: International Journal of Emergency Services
      PubDate: 2023-01-03
      DOI: 10.1108/IJES-09-2021-0057
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2023)
       
  • Editorial: International Journal of Emergency Services, volume 12, issue 3

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      Authors: Paresh Wankhade
      Abstract: Editorial: International Journal of Emergency Services, volume 12, issue 3
      Citation: International Journal of Emergency Services
      PubDate: 2023-11-23
      DOI: 10.1108/IJES-10-2023-090
      Issue No: Vol. 12, No. 3 (2023)
       
  • Extinguishing injustice: growing equity, diversity and inclusion in
           Canadian fire departments

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      Authors: Keith A. Fredin
      Abstract: This paper evaluates the value and necessity of greater equity, diversity and inclusion (EDI) in Canadian fire departments. Rather than focussing on changing hiring practices, the paper seeks to highlight how leadership can implement a culture of EDI that will encourage all people to participate. From a leadership perspective, this paper aims to show how EDI can improve firefighter teamwork and job performance whilst satisfying moral obligations to better represent Canadian communities. Strategies and their limitations for communication and culture change are discussed. Leaders of Canadian fire departments can utilise organisational change models focussing on improved communication techniques and models to implement cultural changes needed to allow for more EDI. Specific recommendations based on business research into culture change, communication and EDI are outlined. Recommendations to fire department leadership for cultural changes and communication are provided. Further, strategies and reasoning for why inclusive departments are more effective are given. Creating a more inclusive culture in fire departments will lead to an increase in applications from people who have not typically applied in the past. There has been little research or recommendations on increasing EDI in Canadian fire departments through cultural changes. Most existing literature is vague and tends to focus on hiring practices over an analysis of internal culture. This article provides analysis of best business practices and applies those to the cultural context of fire departments to promote culture change.
      Citation: International Journal of Emergency Services
      PubDate: 2022-09-27
      DOI: 10.1108/IJES-03-2022-0016
      Issue No: Vol. 12, No. 3 (2022)
       
 
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Showing 1 - 18 of 18 Journals sorted by number of followers
Studies in Conflict & Terrorism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 365)
Aggression and Violent Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 347)
Canadian Journal of Remote Sensing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 55)
Disasters     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
International Journal of Emergency Services     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
International Journal of Emergency Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Evolution, Medicine, and Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Prehospital and Disaster Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Strategic Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Risk, Hazards & Crisis in Public Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
International Journal of Intelligent Defence Support Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Critical Infrastructure Protection     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Disaster Recovery Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Applied Security Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Health Care Law and Policy     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Forensic Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Global & Regional Health Technology Assessment     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Korean Journal of Defense Analysis     Hybrid Journal  
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JournalTOCs
School of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
Heriot-Watt University
Edinburgh, EH14 4AS, UK
Email: journaltocs@hw.ac.uk
Tel: +00 44 (0)131 4513762
 


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