Subjects -> MANUFACTURING AND TECHNOLOGY (Total: 363 journals)
    - CERAMICS, GLASS AND POTTERY (31 journals)
    - MACHINERY (34 journals)
    - MANUFACTURING AND TECHNOLOGY (223 journals)
    - METROLOGY AND STANDARDIZATION (6 journals)
    - PACKAGING (19 journals)
    - PAINTS AND PROTECTIVE COATINGS (4 journals)
    - PLASTICS (42 journals)
    - RUBBER (4 journals)

PACKAGING (19 journals)

Showing 1 - 17 of 17 Journals sorted alphabetically
Asian Journal of Shipping and Logistics     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Canadian Journal on Aging     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
European Journal of Ageing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Food Packaging and Shelf Life     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
IEEE Transactions on Components and Packaging Technologies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
International Journal of Aging and Human Development     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Aerosol Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Applied Packaging Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Electronic Packaging     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Journal of Manufacturing and Materials Processing     Open Access  
Journal of Microelectronics and Electronic Packaging     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Packaging Technology and Research     Hybrid Journal  
Packaging Technology and Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Packaging, Transport, Storage & Security of Radioactive Material     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Psychology and Aging     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Rejuvenation Research     Hybrid Journal  
Research on Aging     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Similar Journals
Journal Cover
European Journal of Ageing
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.55
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 16  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1613-9380 - ISSN (Online) 1613-9372
Published by Springer-Verlag Homepage  [2469 journals]
  • Social inequalities in ageing in the Nordic countries

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      PubDate: 2022-05-11
       
  • Choice models in nordic long-term care: care managers' experiences of
           privilege and disadvantage among older adults

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      Abstract: Abstract Consumer choice models have been introduced in eldercare services in several Western welfare societies. Choice models in eldercare emphasise the importance of individuals’ abilities to make informed choices and therefore entail a risk for increased inequalities among older adults with care needs. In the Nordic countries, such inequality risks are in stark contrast to universal policy ambitions of equal access to care services. Care managers, who are responsible for needs assessment for eldercare services, have a central role in implementing policies and, thus, have first-hand experience of their impact on older adults’ access to care. The aim of this study was to explore care managers’ experiences of how user choice affects older adults’ access to care services in three Nordic cities: Copenhagen, Tampere, and Stockholm. These cities were purposely selected as forerunners in marketisation, with different ways of implementing choice models. Semi-structured interviews with care managers were conducted in Copenhagen, Tampere, and Stockholm and analysed thematically. The findings indicate there are difficulties related to older adults’ ability to access information needed to make informed choices, as well as limitations in choice related to available services and personal finances. Further, care managers find that older adults’ abilities to overcome these difficulties are shaped by their health, education, language skills, and assistance from relatives. In order to reduce the risk of choice models increasing the gap between older adults with different resources and capabilities, there is a need to develop accessible information, as well as models for professional guidance.
      PubDate: 2022-05-06
       
  • Effects on clients' daily functioning and common features of reablement
           interventions: a systematic literature review

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      Abstract: Abstract This systematic review aimed to provide an overview of reablement interventions according to the recently published ReAble definition and their effect on Activities of Daily Living (ADL). In addition, the most common and promising features of these reablement interventions were identified. Four electronic bibliographic databases were searched. Articles were included when published between 2002 and 2020, which described a Randomised or Clinical Controlled Trial of a reablement intervention matching the criteria of the ReAble definition, and had ADL functioning as an outcome. Snowball sampling and expert completion were used to detect additional publications. Two researchers screened and extracted the identified articles and assessed methodological quality; discrepancies were resolved by discussion and arbitration by a third researcher. Twenty relevant studies from eight countries were included. Ten of these studies were effective in improving ADL functioning. Identifying promising features was challenging as an equal amount of effective and non-effective interventions were included, content descriptions were often lacking, and study quality was moderate to low. However, there are indications that the use of more diverse interdisciplinary teams, a standardised assessment and goal-setting method and four or more intervention components (i.e. ADL-training, physical and/or functional exercise, education, management of functional disorders) can improve daily functioning. No conclusions could be drawn concerning the effectiveness on ADL functioning. The common elements identified can provide guidance when developing reablement programmes. Intervention protocols and process evaluations should be published more often using reporting guidelines. Collecting additional data from reablement experts could help to unpack the black box of reablement.
      PubDate: 2022-05-03
       
  • Revisiting the Nordic long-term care model for older people—still
           equal' Special issue EJA, edited by Fritzell, Jylhä and Rostgaard

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      Abstract: Abstract With the extensive long-term care services for older people, the Nordic countries have been labelled ‘caring states’ as reported (Leira, Welfare state and working mothers: the Scandinavian experience, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, 1992). The emphasis on services and not cash benefits ensures the Nordics a central place in the public service model (Anttonen and Sipilä, J Eur Soc Policy 6:87–100, 1996). The main feature of this ideal model is public social care services, such as home care and residential care services, which can cover the need for personal and medical care, as well as assistance with household chores. These services are provided within a formally and professionally based long-term care system, where the main responsibility for the organization, provision and financing of care traditionally lays with the public sector. According to the principle of universalism (in: Antonnen et al. (eds), Welfare state, universalism and diversity, Elgar, Cheltenham, 2013), access to benefits such as home care and residential care is based on citizenship and need, not contributions nor merit. Also, care services should be made available for all and generally be used by all, with no stigma associated. Vabø and Szebehely (in: Anttonen (ed), Welfare State, universalism and diversity, Edward Elgar Publishing, London, 2012)) further argue that the Nordic service universalism is more than merely issues of eligibility and accessibility, in that it also encompasses whether services are attractive, affordable and flexible in order to meet a diversity of needs and preferences. However, recent decades have seen a continuous tendency towards prioritization of care for the most frail, contributing to unmet need, informalization of care and privatization in the use of topping up with market-based services. These changes have raised questions about increasing inequalities within Nordic long-term care systems. We investigate in the article what effect changes have for equality across social class and gender, for users and informal carers. The article is based on analysis of comparable national and international statistics and a review of national research literature and policy documents.
      PubDate: 2022-05-03
       
  • A conceptual framework addressing the complex labour market dynamics of
           the work-to-retirement process

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      Abstract: Abstract The way in which retirement is conceptualized and measured is likely to influence the research findings. The previous literature has addressed a wide range of elements related to the complex work-to-retirement process, such as early, late and partial retirement, statutory retirement, work disability and unemployment paths to retirement, or different types of bridge employment. However, conceptual clarity in terms of connections between the different elements is called for. We introduce a conceptual framework of the work-to-retirement process to guide its future measurement. Together with information on the statutory retirement age, the main elements of the framework are based on employment and pension receipt, acknowledging that these may overlap. The framework is flexible to the user, providing the possibility to add various specifications—e.g. of types of employment, types of pension receipt, unemployment, and being outside the labour force—depending on the study context and aims. The framework highlights the complexity of the work-to-retirement process, bringing forth its multifaceted, multiphased and multidirectional features. Accounting for such complexity in later-life labour market dynamics helps to elaborate what is actually addressed when investigating “retirement”. Our conceptual framework can be utilized to enhance well-defined, precise and comparable measurement of the work-to-retirement process in studies.
      PubDate: 2022-04-27
       
  • Perceived deterioration in health status among older adults in Europe and
           Israel following the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic

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      Abstract: Abstract The COVID-19 pandemic has created challenges in providing medical care for people with health conditions other than COVID-19. The study aims to assess the prevalence of older adults’ reportage of decline in health relative to pre-pandemic and to identify its determinants. The study is based on the Survey of Health, Ageing and Retirement in Europe (SHARE) data collected during the pandemic. It comprised 51,778 people in twenty-seven European countries and Israel. Participants were asked about changes in their health status relative to pre-pandemic. Bivariate analysis and logistic regression were used to identify factors associated with worsening of health. Nine percent of people (average age 70 years) reported a worsening of health relative to pre-pandemic. A logistic regression revealed a significant relation of the probability of a downturn in health to forgoing, postponing, or being denied an appointment for medical care. Multiple chronic illnesses, developing COVID-19, having at least one form of psychosocial distress, higher age, and lower economic capacity were also found significantly related to the probability of a decline in health. Older adults’ comprehensive health needs must be addressed even when healthcare services are under strain due to pandemic outbreaks. Policymakers should attend to the healthcare needs of people whose vulnerability to the pandemic is amplified by chronic health conditions and low socioeconomic status. Public healthcare systems may experience a massive rebound of demand for health care, a challenge that should be mitigated by delivery of healthcare services and the provision of the financial resources that they need.
      PubDate: 2022-04-22
       
  • Responding to Covid-19: an analysis of position statements of
           gerontological societies worldwide

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      Abstract: Abstract The Covid-19 pandemic, with its adverse implications for older adults, has generated unprecedented public interest in issues around age and ageing globally. We systematically investigated the responses of national gerontological and geriatric societies (NGGS) to emerging challenges during the first wave of the pandemic. Framed within traditional research topics in gerontology, the aim was to identify the spectrum of focal points and positions directed towards governments, policy makers, researchers and society. A comprehensive, two-phased data collection strategy generated N = 22 position statements of NGGS affiliated to the International Association of Gerontology and Geriatrics. Using Ayalon et al. (J Gerontol Ser B, 2020. https://doi.org/10.1093/geronb/gbaa066) thematic categorisation of gerontological research, we applied quantitative and qualitative content analysis to analyse “calls for action” within the statements. The content of NGGS’ position statements show a high level of agreement on the salient topics during the first wave of the pandemic and reveal shared values such as equality, diversity and inclusion of older adults and the discipline of gerontology to be an applied one with relevance to policy and practice. The results can support future interdisciplinary research in gerontology post Covid-19 based on a vision to contribute to a society of all ages.
      PubDate: 2022-04-18
       
  • Changes in socioeconomic differentials in old age life expectancy in four
           Nordic countries: the impact of educational expansion and
           education-specific mortality

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      Abstract: Abstract which poses a risk for the future increase of inequalities in LE.
      PubDate: 2022-04-15
       
  • Health system reforms and the needs of the ageing population—an analysis
           of recent policy paths and reform trends in Finland and Sweden

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      Abstract: Abstract Population ageing with an increasing number of people experiencing complex health and social care needs challenges health systems. We explore whether and how health system reforms and policy measures adopted during the past two decades in Finland and Sweden reflect and address the needs of the older people. We discuss health system characteristics that are important to meet the care needs of older people and analyse how health policy agendas have highlighted these aspects in Finland and Sweden. The analysis is based on “most similar cases”. The two countries have rather similar health systems and are facing similar challenges. However, the policy paths to address these challenges are different. The Swedish health system is better resourced, and the affordability of care better ensured, but choice and market-oriented competition reforms do not address the needs of the people with complex health and social care needs, rather it has led to increased fragmentation. In Finland, the level of public funding is lower which may have negative impacts on people who need multiple services. However, in terms of integration and care coordination, Finland seems to follow a path which may pave the way for improved coordination of care for people with multiple care needs. Intensified monitoring and analysis of patterns of health care utilization among older people are warranted in both countries to ensure that care is provided equitably.
      PubDate: 2022-04-15
       
  • The influence of sociodemographic factors and close relatives at hospital
           discharge and post hospital care of older people with complex care needs:
           nurses’ perceptions on health inequity in three Nordic cities

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      Abstract: Abstract Hospital discharge of older people in need of both medical and social care following their hospital stay requires extensive coordination. This study aims to examine and compare the views of nurses in three Nordic cities on the influence of sociodemographic factors and having close relatives, for the hospital discharge and post hospital care of older people with complex health and social care needs. Thirty-five semi-structured interviews (Copenhagen n = 11, Tampere n = 8, Stockholm n = 16) with nurses were conducted. The nurses were identified through the researchers’ networks, invitation and snowball sampling, and recruited from hospitals, primary care practices, home care units, home nursing units, and geriatric departments. The interviews were transcribed and analysed using thematic analysis. Interpretations were discussed and agreed within the team. Four main themes and 13 sub-themes were identified. Across the cities, informants reported that the patient’s health status, rather than their gender or ethnicity, steered the discharge date and further care. Care costs, commonly reported in Tampere but also in Copenhagen and Stockholm including costs for medications and home help, were considered barriers for disadvantaged older people. Home situation, local arrangements and differences in collaboration between healthcare professionals at different sites also influenced the hospital discharge. Generally, the patient’s health status steered the hospital discharge and post-hospital care. Close relatives were regarded important and a potential advantage. Some informants tried to compensate for the absence of close relatives, highlighting the importance of care systems that can compensate for this to minimise avoidable inequity.
      PubDate: 2022-04-11
       
  • Life expectancy at 65, associated factors for women and men in Europe

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      Abstract: Abstract In Europe, the epidemiological transition has already taken place, while the demographic transition continues. Life expectancy at 65 is expanding for both women and men. The primary aim of this work is to identify the factors associated with life expectancy at 65 for women and men in Europe. The second aim is to confirm the influence of cultural factors on life expectancy. Finally, the link between spending on pensions, soil pollution, and life expectancy is also tested. Data for 31 European countries for the period 2004–2018 have been collected to estimate a linear panel data model. Life expectancy at 65 for women and men is the dependent variable. Independent variables are grouped into socioeconomic, cultural, and environmental conditions. The main result of this work is the importance of GDP per capita, and education and pension expenditure in explaining the heterogeneity of life expectancy at 65 across countries. Other significant results include the association of cultural characteristics, air pollution, and soil pollution with life expectancy. The design of policies for older adults and the improvement of their health and active life should consider not only differences in education but cultural characteristics, too. European directives that disregard people’s cultural differences may not have the expected result.
      PubDate: 2022-04-08
       
  • Buddy or burden' Patterns, perceptions, and experiences of pet
           ownership among older adults in Switzerland

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      Abstract: Abstract While interactions with pets may yield significant emotional, social, and physical benefits, taking care of them can also be demanding and experienced as a burden, especially among persons with physical restrictions or economically disadvantaged individuals. This study investigates pet ownership and corresponding perceptions and experiences in a nationally representative sample of adults aged 55 years and older in Switzerland. We use data from a questionnaire on human-animal interactions from 1832 respondents administered during wave 7 (2017) in the Swiss country study of the Survey of Health, Ageing, and Retirement in Europe. Multivariable associations between pet ownership and pet owners’ corresponding perceptions and experiences with respondents’ socio-demographic characteristics were estimated using probit and ordered probit models. Slightly more than one-third of adults aged 55 years and older reported owning a pet. Pet owners reported mostly positive experiences with pet ownership, with women showing higher pet bonding levels than men. Moreover, pet ownership was less common among adults aged 75 and older and individuals living in apartments. At the same time, older pet owners aged 75 and above, pet owners living in apartments, and pet owners without a partner reported more positive perceptions and experiences of owning a pet. These findings suggest that promoting pet ownership may help individual well-being and feelings of companionship, especially among women, older adults, and individuals without a partner but also points toward potential selection effects into pet ownership. Financial costs of pet ownership appear to be an important challenge for some older pet owners, notably those with relatively low levels of education and more limited financial resources.
      PubDate: 2022-04-02
       
  • The health advantage of volunteering is larger for older and less healthy
           volunteers in Europe: a mega-analysis

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      Abstract: Abstract There is a vast literature on the health benefits associated with volunteering for volunteers. Such health advantages are likely to vary across groups of volunteers with different characteristics. The current paper aims to examine the health advantages of volunteering for European volunteers and explore heterogeneity in the association between volunteering and health. We carry out a mega-analysis on microdata from six panel surveys, covering 952,026 observations from 267,212 respondents in 22 European countries. We provide open access to the code we developed for data harmonization. We use ordinary least squares, fixed effects, first difference, and fixed effect quantile regressions to estimate how volunteering activities and changes therein are related to self-rated health for different groups. Our results indicate a small but consistently positive association between changes in volunteering and changes in health within individuals. This association is stronger for older adults. For respondents 60 years and older, within-person changes in volunteering are significantly related to changes in self-rated health. Additionally, the health advantage of volunteering is larger for respondents in worse health. The advantage is largest at the lowest decile and gradually declines along the health distribution. The magnitude of the association at the first decile is about twice the magnitude of the association at the ninth decile. These results suggest that volunteering may be more beneficial for the health of specific groups in society. With small health advantages from year to year, volunteering may protect older and less healthy adults from health decline in the long run.
      PubDate: 2022-03-30
       
  • A social exclusion perspective on loneliness in older adults in the Nordic
           countries

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      Abstract: Abstract Several factors associated with loneliness are also considered indicators of social exclusion. While loneliness has been proposed as an outcome of social exclusion, there is limited empirical evidence of a link. This study examines the associations between social exclusion indicators and loneliness in older adults (60+ years) in four Nordic countries. Data from four waves of the European Social Survey were pooled, providing a total of 7755 respondents (Denmark n = 1647; Finland n = 2501, Norway n = 1540; Sweden n = 2067). Measures of loneliness, demographic characteristics, health, and eight indicators of social exclusion were selected from the survey for analysis. Country-specific and total sample hierarchical logistic regression models of loneliness were developed. Significant model improvement occurred for all models after social exclusion indicators were added to models containing only demographic and health variables. Country models explained between 15.1 (Finland) and 21.5% (Sweden) of the variance in loneliness. Lower frequency of social contacts and living alone compared to in a two-person household was associated with a higher probability of loneliness in all countries, while other indicators were associated with loneliness in specific countries: lower neighbourhood safety (Sweden and Denmark); income concern (Sweden and Finland); and no emotional support (Denmark, Finland, and Sweden). A robust relationship was apparent between indicators of social exclusion and loneliness with the direction of associations being highly consistent across countries, even if their strength and statistical significance varied. Social exclusion has considerable potential for understanding and addressing risk factors for loneliness.
      PubDate: 2022-03-29
       
  • No clear associations between subjective memory concerns and subsequent
           change in cognitive function: the PATH through life study

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      Abstract: Abstract The literature on subjective memory concerns (SMC) as a predictor for future cognitive decline is varied. Furthermore, recent research has pointed to additional complexity arising from variability in the experience of SMC themselves (i.e. whether they are remitting or sustained over time). We investigated the associations between SMC and objectively measured cognition in an Australian population-based cohort. Four waves (4-year intervals between waves) of data from 1236 participants (aged 62.4 ± 1.5 years, 53% male) were used. We categorized participants as experiencing SMC, when they indicated that their memory problems might interfere with their day-to-day life and/or they had seen a doctor about their memory. SMC was categorized as “no” reported SMC, “remitting”, “new-onset” or “sustained” SMC. Cognitive assessment of immediate and delayed recall, working memory, psychomotor speed, attention and processing speed were assessed using a neuropsychological battery. Eighteen percent of participants were characterised as having SMC: 6% (77) “remitting”, 6% (77) “new-onset” and 6% (69) “sustained” SMC. There was no consistent evidence for an association between SMC and subsequent decline in cognition. However, SMC was associated with poorer performance on contemporaneous tasks of attention and processing speed compared to “no” SMC. Asking about SMC may indicate a current decline in cognitive function but, in this sample at least, did not indicate an increased risk of future decline.
      PubDate: 2022-03-28
       
  • Age integration in later life social networks and self-perceptions of
           aging: examining their reciprocal associations

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      Abstract: Abstract Relying on the age segregation theory (limited contact between age groups), this study examined the temporal reciprocal associations between age integration—the inclusion of older and younger people in one’s personal network—and one's self-perceptions of aging (SPA). Data came from the 2014 and 2017 waves of the German Ageing Survey and focused on adults aged 60 and above (N = 5239). Age composition of the network was assessed as the number of kin and non-kin in the social network who are either more than 10 years older or more than 10 years younger than the respondent. A latent change score model assessed the bidirectional associations. The results showed that adults who had younger social network members, both kin and non-kin, had better SPA 3 years later. A positive SPA at baseline also predicted a higher number of younger non-kin and older non-kin relationships over time. These results stress the role of SPA in adults' social network as well as the role of age integration in shaping adults' SPA. Practitioners and policy makers should encourage connections between people of different ages and should strive to decrease the age segregation in society.
      PubDate: 2022-03-14
       
  • Trends in activities of daily living disability among Chinese older adults
           from 1998 to 2018: an age-period-cohort analysis

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      Abstract: Abstract This study aims to investigate the age, period, and cohort effects on trends in activities of daily living (ADL) disability among Chinese older adults; and to explore these three temporal effects on gender and residence disparities in disability. We utilized multiple cross-sectional waves of the Chinese Longitudinal Healthy Longevity Survey data (1998–2018), including 89,511 participants aged above 65 years old. Our measurement of disability is the number of ADL items (dressing, bathing, indoor transferring, toileting, eating, and continence) participants can’t perform independently. Hierarchical age-period-cohort cross-classified random effects models were conducted to investigate age, period and cohort trends in ADL disability. Results showed that ADL disability increased with age at an increasing rate. A V-shaped cohort trend and a fluctuated period trend were identified. Females and urban residents were associated with more ADL limitations. When age increased, the gender and residence gaps in disability further increased. The cohort-based gender and residence inequalities in ADL limitations converged with successive cohorts. The period-based residence gap in ADL limitations diverged throughout the 20-year period, while the corresponding period-based change in gender disparity was not significant. These findings suggested that age, period, and cohort had different and independent effects on ADL disability among Chinese older adults. The age effect on trends in ADL is stronger compared to period and cohort effects. The gender and residence disparities in disability increased with age and decreased with successive cohorts. These patterns might help inform healthcare planning and the priorities for medical resource allocation accordingly.
      PubDate: 2022-03-14
       
  • The longitudinal relationship between meaning in life, depressive
           symptoms, life satisfaction, and cognitive functioning for older adults
           with Alzheimer’s disease

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      Abstract: Abstract Studies show the importance of the personal experience of meaning in life for older adults, but adults with dementia have been largely excluded from this research. The current study examined the longitudinal predictive effect of meaning in life for the psychological and cognitive functioning of older adults with Alzheimer’s disease and whether cognitive decline predicted presence of meaning in life. On three yearly measurement occasions, presence of meaning in life, depressive symptoms, life satisfaction, and cognitive functioning were assessed in structured interviews with a convenience sample of 140 older adults with Alzheimer’s disease from nine nursing homes in Belgium. Cross-lagged panel and latent growth curve models were used to analyze the longitudinal relationships between the variables. Over the three measurement waves, participants with higher presence of meaning reported lower depressive symptoms one year later. Presence of meaning and life satisfaction predicted each other over time, but only between the first and second wave. The analyses showed no strong evidence for a longitudinal association between meaning in life and cognitive functioning in either direction. The findings emphasize the importance of the experience of meaning in life for the psychological functioning of older adults with Alzheimer’s disease. The lack of evidence for associations between meaning and cognitive functioning questions the prevailing view that intact cognitive abilities are a necessity for experiencing meaning. More attention to the potential of meaning interventions for persons with dementia is warranted.
      PubDate: 2022-03-04
      DOI: 10.1007/s10433-022-00689-z
       
  • Correction to: The concept of disability and its causal mechanisms in
           older people over time from a theoretical perspective: a literature review
           

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      PubDate: 2022-03-03
      DOI: 10.1007/s10433-022-00687-1
       
  • Perceived neighbourhood environment and falls among community-dwelling
           adults: cross-sectional and prospective findings from the Survey of
           Health, Ageing and Retirement in Europe (SHARE)

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      Abstract: Abstract We investigated the association between perceived neighbourhood characteristics and falls in community-dwelling adults, using data from Wave 5 and 6 of the Survey of Health, Ageing and Retirement in Europe (SHARE). We included 25,467 participants aged 50 to 103 years (mean age 66.2 ± 9.6, 58.5% women), from fourteen European countries (Austria, Belgium, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, France, Germany, Israel, Italy, Luxembourg, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland). At baseline, we recorded individual-level factors (socio-demographic, socio-economic and clinical factors), contextual-level factors (country, urban versus rural area, European region) and perceived neighbourhood characteristics (vandalism or crime, cleanliness, feeling part of neighbourhood, helpful neighbours, accessibility to services) for each participant. We recorded falls in the six months prior to the baseline and 2-year follow-up interviews. The associations between neighbourhood characteristics and falls were analysed by binary logistic regression models; odds ratios (95% confidence intervals) were calculated. Participants reporting-versus not reporting-vandalism or crime had an increased falls risk of 1.16 (1.02–1.31) at follow-up, after full adjustment; lack of cleanliness, feeling part of the neighbourhood, perceiving neighbours as helpful and difficult accessibility to services were not associated with falls. Vandalism or crime was consistently associated with increased falls risks in women, adults without functional impairment and urban areas residents. In conclusion, adverse neighbourhood environments may account for inequality in falls risk among middle-aged and older adults and could be added to fall risk stratification tools.
      PubDate: 2022-03-02
      DOI: 10.1007/s10433-022-00685-3
       
 
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