Subjects -> MANUFACTURING AND TECHNOLOGY (Total: 363 journals)
    - CERAMICS, GLASS AND POTTERY (31 journals)
    - MACHINERY (34 journals)
    - MANUFACTURING AND TECHNOLOGY (223 journals)
    - METROLOGY AND STANDARDIZATION (6 journals)
    - PACKAGING (19 journals)
    - PAINTS AND PROTECTIVE COATINGS (4 journals)
    - PLASTICS (42 journals)
    - RUBBER (4 journals)

PACKAGING (19 journals)

Showing 1 - 17 of 17 Journals sorted alphabetically
Asian Journal of Shipping and Logistics     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Canadian Journal on Aging     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
European Journal of Ageing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Food Packaging and Shelf Life     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
IEEE Transactions on Components and Packaging Technologies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
International Journal of Aging and Human Development     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Aerosol Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Applied Packaging Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Electronic Packaging     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Journal of Manufacturing and Materials Processing     Open Access  
Journal of Microelectronics and Electronic Packaging     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Packaging Technology and Research     Hybrid Journal  
Packaging Technology and Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Packaging, Transport, Storage & Security of Radioactive Material     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Psychology and Aging     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Rejuvenation Research     Hybrid Journal  
Research on Aging     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Canadian Journal on Aging
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.426
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 17  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0714-9808 - ISSN (Online) 1710-1107
Published by Cambridge University Press Homepage  [353 journals]
  • CJG volume 40 issue 4 Cover and Front matter

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      Pages: 1 - 4
      PubDate: 2021-12-06
      DOI: 10.1017/S0714980821000519
       
  • CJG volume 40 issue 4 Cover and Back matter

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      Pages: 1 - 4
      PubDate: 2021-12-06
      DOI: 10.1017/S0714980821000520
       
  • Occupational Disruption during the COVID-19 Pandemic: The Lived Experience
           of Community-Dwelling Older Adults

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      Authors: Rotenberg; Shlomit, Oreper, Julie S., Bar, Yael, Davids-Brumer, Naomi, Arbel, Ifah, Dawson, Deirdre R.
      Pages: 521 - 532
      Abstract: This qualitative descriptive study presents the experience of an abrupt disruption of daily activities among community-dwelling older adults during the early months of the COVID-19 pandemic. Sixteen older adults (age: 71 ± 6.4) were interviewed in April–June, 2020. Five themes were identified: (1) Understanding and applying COVID-19 guidelines: guidelines were clear and participants adhered closely to them, motivated mainly by fear; ageing-specific guidelines are needed. (2) Daily life during lockdown: the abrupt occupational disruption was managed by transitioning to virtual activities, and/or performing more activities at home. New daily activities were generally more sedentary and less meaningful. (3) Social context: family assistance aroused mixed feelings, as it compromised independence; limited compliance at the community level created stress. (4) Mood and affect: mood often fluctuated, and participants employed various coping strategies. (5) Aging: participants became more aware of their age and were concerned about negative health implications of adherence to COVID-19 guidelines.
      PubDate: 2021-10-11
      DOI: 10.1017/S0714980821000465
       
  • Exploring the Interpretation of COVID-19 Messaging on Older Adults’
           Experiences of Vulnerability

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      Authors: Sangrar; Ruheena, Porter, Michelle M., Chesser, Stephanie
      Pages: 533 - 542
      Abstract: Public health messages and societal discourse during the COVID-19 pandemic have consistently indicated a higher morbidity and mortality risk for older people, particularly those with multiple health conditions. Older adults’ interpretations of pandemic messaging can shape their perceived vulnerability and behaviours. This study examined their perspectives on COVID-19 messaging. Eighteen community-dwelling older adults residing in Manitoba (Canada) participated in semi-structured telephone interviews between July and August 2020, a period of low COVID-19 cases within the province. Inductive thematic analysis was used to identify key themes that described participants’ processes of information interpretation when consuming pandemic-related messages, their emotional responses to messaging and consequent vulnerability, and the impacts of messaging on their everyday lives. Understanding how older adults have construed COVID-19 and pandemic-related messages, and the subsequent impact on their daily behaviours, is the first step towards shaping societal discourse and sets the stage for examining the pandemic’s long-term effects.
      PubDate: 2021-10-20
      DOI: 10.1017/S071498082100043X
       
  • In Their Own Words: How COVID-19 Has Impacted the Well-Being of Persons
           Living with Dementia in the Community

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      Authors: McAiney; Carrie, Conway, Emma, Koch, Melissa, Middleton, Laura, Dupuis, Sherry, Keller, Heather, Dupuis, Kate, Lee, Linda, Fehr, Phyllis, Beleno, Ron, Kuepfer, Jane, Boger, Jennifer
      Pages: 543 - 553
      Abstract: COVID-19 has had a devasting impact on older adults in Canada, including persons living with dementia. This intrinsic case study sought to understand the perceptions of persons living with dementia regarding how COVID-19 has impacted their well-being. Ten persons living with dementia participated in in-depth qualitative interviews about their experience with COVID-19. Using thematic analysis, four themes were identified: (1) expressing current and future concerns; (2) social connections and isolation; (3) adapting to change and resilience through engagement and hope; and (4) we’re not all the same: reflecting individual experiences of the pandemic. Results highlight that while COVID-19 contributed to isolation, concerns, and frustrations, persons with dementia also demonstrated adaptation and resilience. This study reinforced that persons with dementia and their responses to challenges are unique. Therefore, interventions to support persons with dementia must also be individualized to each person’s abilities and circumstances.
      PubDate: 2021-11-04
      DOI: 10.1017/S0714980821000441
       
  • Mental Health and Social Connectedness Across the Adult Lifespan in the
           Context of the COVID-19 Pandemic

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      Authors: Gregory; Madeline A., Legg, Nicole K., Senay, Zachary, Barden, Jamie-Lee, Phiri, Peter, Rathod, Shanaya, Turner, Brianna J., Paterson, Theone S. E.
      Pages: 554 - 569
      Abstract: The coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic has had profound consequences on collective mental health and well-being, and yet, older adults appear better off than younger adults. The current study examined mental health impacts of the pandemic across adult age groups in a large sample (n = 5,320) of Canadians using multiple hierarchical regression analyses. Results suggest older adults are experiencing better mental health and more social connectedness relative to younger adults. Loneliness predicted negative mental health outcomes across all age groups, while the negative association between social support and mental health was only significant at average and high levels of loneliness in the 65–69 age group. Results point towards differential mental health impacts of the pandemic across adult age groups and indicate that loneliness and social support may be key intervention targets during the COVID-19 pandemic. Future research should further examine mechanisms of resiliency among older Canadian adults during the pandemic.
      PubDate: 2021-10-11
      DOI: 10.1017/S0714980821000477
       
  • (Dis)Connecting Through COVID-19: Experiences of Older Persons in the
           Context of a Volunteer–Client Relationship

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      Authors: Bruce; Paxton, Pesut, Barbara, Dunlop, Rowena, Puurveen, Gloria, Duggleby, Wendy
      Pages: 570 - 580
      Abstract: The coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic and mandated physical distancing requirements significantly impacted volunteer programs for older persons with many long-standing programs either ceasing altogether or pivoting to connecting through virtual technologies. In this study, we collected qualitative interview data from 23 clients and 33 volunteers to investigate their experiences during the COVID-19 pandemic and the effects on the volunteer–client relationship. Three themes were identified: pandemic emotions, negotiating social interactions, and growing through the COVID-19 pandemic. These findings provide important insights into the experiences of hospice organizations and their volunteers and clients during the COVID 19 pandemic, further highlighting the importance of acknowledging both older persons’ vulnerability and their resilience, of building in compassionate community approaches to care, and of finding innovative ways to foster volunteer–client relationships during times when physical visiting is not possible.
      PubDate: 2021-10-20
      DOI: 10.1017/S0714980821000404
       
  • Rural Aging during COVID-19: A Case Study of Older Voluntarism

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      Authors: Colibaba; Amber, Skinner, Mark W., Russell, Elizabeth
      Pages: 581 - 590
      Abstract: During large-scale crises such as the COVID-19 pandemic, the precarity of older people and older volunteers can become exacerbated, especially in under-serviced rural regions and small towns. To understand how the pandemic has affected “older voluntarism”, this article presents a case study of three volunteer-based programs in rural Ontario, Canada. Interviews with 34 volunteers and administrators reveal both challenging and growth-oriented experiences of volunteers and the programs during the first wave of COVID-19. The findings demonstrate the vulnerability and resiliency of older volunteers and the adaptability and uncertainty of programs that rely on older voluntarism, as the community and its older residents navigate pandemic-related changes. The article advances a framework for understanding the pandemic’s impacts on older voluntarism in relation to personal, program, and community dimensions of sustainable rural aging. Further, it explores ways that older volunteers, organizations that depend on them, and communities experiencing population aging can persevere post-pandemic.
      PubDate: 2021-09-03
      DOI: 10.1017/S0714980821000386
       
  • Challenges and Strategies to Adapt the Provision of Support Services to
           Older Adults and Caregivers During the COVID-19 Pandemic: The Perspective
           of Community Organizations

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      Authors: Poulin; Valérie, Provencher, Véronique, Nicole, Mélodie, Shea, Victoria, Aubin, Ginette, Beaulieu, Marie, Bier, Nathalie, Fortier, Julie, Giroux, Dominique, Levasseur, Mélanie, Lord, Marie-Michèle
      Pages: 591 - 603
      Abstract: This study documented the provision of services and issues experienced by community organizations supporting older adults and caregivers in the province of Quebec during the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic, as well as promising strategies to adapt the provision of services in this context. A cross-sectional electronic survey using open- and closed-ended questions was conducted in July 2020. Almost three-quarters of the 307 respondents (71.4%) reported having maintained services at least partially throughout the lockdown, and the majority (85.3%) adapted their services. Among key challenges, participants reported difficulties identifying and supporting older adults at greater risk of vulnerability (54.8%), managing health risks for service users (60.2%), and recruiting volunteers (59.5%). Promising strategies included strategies to reach out to older adults and understand their needs (e.g., systematic phone calls) in addition to direct interventions supporting them (e.g., activities promoting social ties); implementing prevention and protection measures; accessing and using technologies; human resources management (e.g., recruiting new volunteers); finding financial support for their organization; developing intersectoral partnerships (e.g., multisectoral crisis cell); and promoting a positive view of older adults. The integration of multiple perspectives from different stakeholders may help identify strategies potentially transferable to other crises in order to meet older adults’ needs.
      PubDate: 2021-11-02
      DOI: 10.1017/S0714980821000507
       
  • Impact of COVID-19 on Relationship-Centred Residential Dining Practices

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      Authors: Keller; Heather H., Trinca, Vanessa, Dakkak, Hana, Wu, Sarah A., Bovee, Sabrina, Carrier, Natalie, Cammer, Allison, Lengyel, Christina, O’Rourke, Hannah M., Rowe, Natalie, Slaughter, Susan E., Quiring, Suzanne
      Pages: 604 - 618
      Abstract: This study describes changes in dining practices and provider perspectives on meal-related challenges due to the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic. An online survey was disseminated between July and September 2020 through stakeholder networks and social media with 1,036 respondents. Altered dining practices included residents eating in rooms (54.3%), spacing residents in common areas for meals (69.3%), and disposable dish use (44.9%). The most common mealtime challenges were reduced socializing opportunities at meals (29.3%), inadequate staffing (22.8%), reduced family/volunteer help (16.7%), and assisting residents to eat (10.5%). Many participants (72.2%) felt conflict balancing safety and relationship-centred care. Geographic region, home size, building age, respondent’s job title, pre-pandemic relationship-centred practices, and mealtime satisfaction, and some pandemic-initiated practices were associated with mealtime challenges and feeling conflicted in binary logistic regression analyses. Considering trade-offs between safety and relational aspects of mealtimes during the pandemic is crucial.
      PubDate: 2021-11-02
      DOI: 10.1017/S0714980821000568
       
  • Maltraitance entre résidents en temps de pandémie: Effets dans les
           résidences privées pour aînés au Québec

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      Authors: Falardeau; Marie-Chantal, Beaulieu, Marie, Carbonneau, Hélène, Levasseur, Mélanie, Belley, Roxanne
      Pages: 619 - 627
      Abstract: The measures implemented to limit the spread of COVID-19 affect the social relationships of the elderly. The aim of this article is to understand the effects of the pandemic on residents and resident-to-resident aggression (RRA). In total, 21 individual interviews were conducted with three groups of actors of four independent living facilities who have experienced RRA (residents) or who intervene in this type of situation (members of staff and external stakeholders). The participants reported that the pandemic has effects on residents and, specifically, on RRA. Among other things, the management and resolution of these situations have changed, and new manifestations of RRA are observed. To our knowledge, this study is the first to examine the effects of the pandemic on residents living in independent living facilities and on RRA. It raises the need to further consider residents’ voices in this context and to combine them with those of other actors to better understand how RRA manifest itself.
      PubDate: 2021-10-20
      DOI: 10.1017/S0714980821000428
       
  • “Be Their Advocate”: Families’ Experience with a Relative in LTC
           during the COVID-19 Pandemic

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      Authors: Dupuis-Blanchard; Suzanne, Maillet, Danica, Thériault, Danielle, LeBlanc, Félix, Bigonnesse, Catherine
      Pages: 628 - 638
      Abstract: Shortly after the COVID-19 pandemic was declared, strict visitor restrictions were issued for long-term care facilities (LTCFs). A year later, restrictions are still in place and they continue to impact family members who have limited or no in-person contact with their relative in LTCFs. The goal of this qualitative longitudinal focused ethnography was to understand the experience of family members who have a relative in a LTCF where visiting has been restricted during the pandemic. Seventeen family members participated in two interviews that were 6 months apart. Data analysis highlighted five key drivers, defined as the workforce, communication deficits, characteristics of care, public health directives, and autonomy of relative which in turn resulted in three main themes: psychological distress, surveillance, and visiting challenges. This study provides a glimpse into the difficult experiences of families with a relative residing in a LTCF in the province of New Brunswick.
      PubDate: 2021-09-13
      DOI: 10.1017/S0714980821000398
       
  • Adult Day Program Directors’ Experiences Managing the COVID-19
           Pandemic

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      Authors: Vervaecke; Deanna, Owaisi, Rumia B., Meisner, Brad A.
      Pages: 639 - 650
      Abstract: Adult day programs (ADPs) provide community-based supervised recreational services to older adults living with chronic conditions and their caregivers. Most ADPs continued operating during the pandemic, tasking directors with the responsibility of managing the complexities of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic. This study explored how ADP directors managed and experienced the COVID-19 pandemic. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 18 ADP directors from a large health care region in Ontario. Thematic analysis resulted in four themes that detailed how participants: 1) responded to the pandemic with adapted services; 2) navigated the pandemic responses within systems and organizations, and with each other, clients, and caregivers; 3) felt personally during the pandemic; and 4) gained new insights on their clients and the importance of ADPs in the health care system due to the pandemic. Findings highlight pre-existing and emerging gaps and opportunities within ADP service provision for clients and caregivers, as well as service providers and directors.
      PubDate: 2021-10-22
      DOI: 10.1017/S0714980821000490
       
  • How Will COVID-19 Alter the Politics of Long-Term Care' A Comparative
           Policy Analysis of Popular Reform Options

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      Authors: Marier; Patrik
      Pages: 651 - 660
      Abstract: This policy analysis reviews three popular proposals with significant political endorsement to enhance long-term care (LTC), here defined broadly to include residential care facilities, home care, and community care, in the wake of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) crisis: national standards, provincial autonomy, and de-privatization. The proposals are summarized succinctly followed by a neo-institutionalist analysis of the obstacles to enact them based upon a series of interviews conducted prior to COVID-19 with senior civil servants in Canadian provinces for a newly published book (Marier, 2021) and political considerations. While the federal government has pursued the avenue of instituting national standards, the provinces have clearly expressed a desire to secure higher federal health transfers and pursue LTC reforms on their own. Considering the diversity of LTC arrangements across the provinces, which impact the politics of LTC within each jurisdiction, and the presence of many Conservative governments in provincial capitals, Ottawa faces an uphill battle to transform profoundly the LTC landscape.
      PubDate: 2021-10-29
      DOI: 10.1017/S0714980821000489
       
  • A SHARP Response: Developing COVID-19 Research Aims in Partnership with
           the Seniors Helping as Research Partners (SHARP) Group

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      Authors: Elliott; Jacobi, Whate, Alexandra, McNeil, Heather, Kernoghan, Alison, Stolee, Paul, ,
      Pages: 661 - 668
      Abstract: COVID-19 has disproportionally impacted older adults, and has highlighted many issues, including extreme deficiencies in Canadian long-term care homes and gaps in home and community care services for older adults. In recent years, there has been a push towards better patient and family engagement in health system research, and with the onset of the pandemic, engaging older adults in research and policy planning is more important than ever. In this article, we describe the Seniors Helping as Research Partners (SHARP) approach to engagement with older adults as an example of how partnerships that engage older adults in the development of research aims and processes can help to ensure that future research meets the needs of older adults. SHARP members highlighted a number of areas for future COVID-19 research such as improvements to long-term care, enhancing access to home and community care, and a focus on aging and social isolation.
      PubDate: 2021-10-27
      DOI: 10.1017/S0714980821000453
       
  • Re-engaging in Aging and Mobility Research in the COVID-19 Era: Early
           Lessons from Pivoting a Large-Scale, Interdisciplinary Study amidst a
           Pandemic

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      Authors: Vrkljan; Brenda, Beauchamp, Marla K., Gardner, Paula, Fang, Qiyin, Kuspinar, Ayse, McNicholas, Paul D., Newbold, K. Bruce, Richardson, Julie, Scott, Darren, Zargoush, Manaf, Gruppuso, Vincenza
      Pages: 669 - 675
      Abstract: In the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic, those planning and conducting research involving older adults have faced many challenges, in part because of the public health measures in place. This article details the early steps and corresponding strategies implemented by our multidisciplinary team to pivot our large-scale aging and mobility study. Based on the premise that all current and emerging research in aging has been impacted by the pandemic, we propose a continuum approach whereby the research question, analysis, and interpretation are situated in accordance with the stage of the pandemic. Using examples from our own study, we outline potential ways to partner with older adults and other stakeholders as well as to encourage collaboration beyond disciplinary silos even under the current circumstances. Finally, we suggest the formation of a Canadian-led consortium that leverages cross-disciplinary expertise to address the complexities of our aging population in the COVID-19 era and beyond.
      PubDate: 2021-08-27
      DOI: 10.1017/S0714980821000374
       
 
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