Subjects -> MANUFACTURING AND TECHNOLOGY (Total: 363 journals)
    - CERAMICS, GLASS AND POTTERY (31 journals)
    - MACHINERY (34 journals)
    - MANUFACTURING AND TECHNOLOGY (223 journals)
    - METROLOGY AND STANDARDIZATION (6 journals)
    - PACKAGING (19 journals)
    - PAINTS AND PROTECTIVE COATINGS (4 journals)
    - PLASTICS (42 journals)
    - RUBBER (4 journals)

PACKAGING (19 journals)

Showing 1 - 17 of 17 Journals sorted alphabetically
Asian Journal of Shipping and Logistics     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Canadian Journal on Aging     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
European Journal of Ageing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Food Packaging and Shelf Life     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
IEEE Transactions on Components and Packaging Technologies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
International Journal of Aging and Human Development     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Aerosol Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Applied Packaging Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Electronic Packaging     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Journal of Manufacturing and Materials Processing     Open Access  
Journal of Microelectronics and Electronic Packaging     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Packaging Technology and Research     Hybrid Journal  
Packaging Technology and Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Packaging, Transport, Storage & Security of Radioactive Material     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Psychology and Aging     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Rejuvenation Research     Hybrid Journal  
Research on Aging     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Similar Journals
Journal Cover
International Journal of Aging and Human Development
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.456
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 11  
 
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
ISSN (Print) 0091-4150 - ISSN (Online) 1541-3535
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1174 journals]
  • Big Five Personality Traits, Social Networks, and Depression Among Older
           Adults in Japan: A Multiple Mediation Analysis

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      Authors: Ken Harada, Hidehiro Sugisawa, Yoko Sugihara, Shizuko Yanagisawa, Masaya Shimmei
      Abstract: The International Journal of Aging and Human Development, Ahead of Print.
      This study examines the mediating effect of social network size on depression among older adults in Japan in association with the Big Five personality traits: extraversion, agreeableness, conscientiousness, neuroticism, and openness. Cross-sectional data were obtained from 739 older adults (Mean age = 75.13, SD = 6.86) residing in Tokyo. Multiple mediation analyses estimated total, indirect, and direct effects between personality and depression. Extraversion was associated with the number of kin and friend networks and agreeableness with the number of kin networks. Moreover, these social networks partially mediated the effects of extraversion and agreeableness on depression. The findings show that personality traits such as extraversion and agreeableness are associated with social network size, which contributes to better mental health in old age.
      Citation: The International Journal of Aging and Human Development
      PubDate: 2022-06-23T05:46:14Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00914150221109893
       
  • The Role of Physical Vulnerability in the Association Between Social
           Activities and Cognitive Performance in Rural Older Adults: A Longitudinal
           Study

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      Authors: Pedro San Martin Soares, Tatiane Nogueira Gonzalez, Cristina dos Santos Paludo, Rodrigo Dalke Meucci
      Abstract: The International Journal of Aging and Human Development, Ahead of Print.
      The aim of this study was to examine the association of social activities with cognitive performance in older adults in the southern area of Brazil, considering the important moderating role of physical vulnerability. A prospective population-based study was conducted in the rural area of Rio Grande, Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. Self-reported social activities were collected at baseline. Cognitive performance and physical vulnerability were measured in the second wave of data collection. The association of social activities with cognitive performance was determined using robust generalized linear models. In adjusted analysis, the social activities were positively associated with cognitive performance in physically vulnerable older adults. However, this association was not found in those who were nonvulnerable. Our findings may contribute to future investigations of possible explanatory avenues for the association between social activities and cognitive performance as well as the development of interventions aimed at improving cognitive skills.
      Citation: The International Journal of Aging and Human Development
      PubDate: 2022-06-22T06:48:35Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00914150221109917
       
  • Growth Mindset Predicts Cognitive Gains in an Older Adult Multi-Skill
           Learning Intervention

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      Authors: Pamela Sheffler, Esra Kürüm, Angelica M. Sheen, Annie S. Ditta, Leah Ferguson, Diamond Bravo, George W. Rebok, Carla M. Strickland-Hughes, Rachel Wu
      Abstract: The International Journal of Aging and Human Development, Ahead of Print.
      Growth mindset (belief in the malleability of intelligence) is a unique predictor of young learners’ increased motivation and learning, and may have broader implications for cognitive functioning. Its role in learning in older adulthood is unclear. As part of a larger longitudinal study, we examined growth mindset and cognitive functioning in older adults engaged in a 3-month multi-skill learning intervention that included growth mindset discussions. Before, during, and after the intervention, participants reported on their growth mindset beliefs and completed a cognitive battery. Study 1 indicated that intervention participants, but not control participants, increased their growth mindset during the intervention. Study 2 replicated these results and found that older adults with higher preexisting growth mindsets showed larger cognitive gains at posttest compared to those with lower preexisting growth mindsets. Our findings highlight the potential role of growth mindset in supporting positive learning cycles for cognitive gains in older adulthood.
      Citation: The International Journal of Aging and Human Development
      PubDate: 2022-06-21T05:07:49Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00914150221106095
       
  • Self-reported Adverse Childhood Experiences Among Custodial Grandmothers:
           Frequencies, Patterns, and Correlates

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      Authors: Gregory Carl Smith, Megan Dolbin-MacNab, Frank Infurna, Britney Webster, Carol Musil, Saul Castro, Daniel Max Crowley
      Abstract: The International Journal of Aging and Human Development, Ahead of Print.
      Given the scarce past research on custodial grandparents’ early life circumstances, we investigated frequencies, patterns, and predictors of 14 adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) reported by 355 custodial grandmothers (CGMs). Predominant ACEs were bullying (54.6%), verbal abuse (51.5%), physical abuse (45.4%), and living with a substance abuser (41.1%). Only 11% of CGMs reported 0 ACEs, whereas 52.4% reported>4. Latent class analyses yielded three classes of ACE exposure: minimal (54.1%), physical/emotional abuse (25.9%), and complex (20.0%). Age was the only demographic factor related to ACE class, with the complex class being younger than the other two. MANCOVAs with age as a covariate revealed that different ACE profiles have unique impacts on CGMs’ physical and psychological well-being. We conclude that ACEs are highly prevalent among CGMs and a serious public health concern. Future research addressing ACEs among CGMs is critical in order to support these caregivers and promote resilience in custodial grandfamilies.
      Citation: The International Journal of Aging and Human Development
      PubDate: 2022-06-17T05:55:06Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00914150221106096
       
  • Associations Between COVID-19 Vaccine Hesitancy and Socio-Spatial Factors
           in NYC Transit Workers 50 Years and Older

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      Authors: Gabriella Y. Meltzer, Jordan Harris, Michelle Hefner, Paula Lanternier, Robyn R.M. Gershon, David Vlahov, Alexis A. Merdjanoff
      Abstract: The International Journal of Aging and Human Development, Ahead of Print.
      This analysis investigates how age, race/ethnicity, and geographic location contributed to vaccine hesitancy in a sample of 645 New York City (NYC) Transport Workers Union (TWU), Local 100 members surveyed in August 2020. Union members ages 50+ were 46% less likely to be vaccine hesitant than their younger counterparts (OR 0.64; 95% CI 0.42, 0.97). Non-Whites (OR 3.95; 95% 2.44, 6.39) and those who did not report their race (OR 3.10; 95% CI 1.87, 5.12) were significantly more likely to be vaccine hesitant than Whites. Those who were not concerned about contracting COVID-19 in the community had 1.83 greater odds (95% CI 1.12, 2.98) of being vaccine hesitant than those who were concerned. Older respondents tended to reside in Queens while vaccine hesitant and non-White respondents were clustered in Brooklyn. General trends observed in COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy persist in a population of high risk, non-healthcare essential workers.
      Citation: The International Journal of Aging and Human Development
      PubDate: 2022-06-15T05:23:58Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00914150221106709
       
  • Connecting Fathers: Fathers’ Impact on Adult Children's Social
           Networks

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      Authors: Christopher Soria, Leora Lawton
      Abstract: The International Journal of Aging and Human Development, Ahead of Print.
      We examine the relationship between having an emotionally close and active father in an adult child's social network compared to having a father who is not close, or a father who was not named. We hypothesize that fathers provide both essential and important contributions to their children's psychosocial development, and those contributions continue into active adulthood. Using the 2015 UC Berkeley Social Networks Study (UCNets), we find that adult children who name an emotionally close father in their network tend to have more males as social ties, but not more female ties. We conclude that fathers continue to play an important and active role in their children's lives long after childhood.
      Citation: The International Journal of Aging and Human Development
      PubDate: 2022-06-14T05:57:20Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00914150221106645
       
  • Research Education Program for Underrepresented Minority Students:
           Students’ Perception of Academic Enrichment and Research Activities

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      Authors: Nishika Edwards, Thomas Nathaniel, Richard Goodwin, Mohammed Khalil, Brooks McPhail, Lauren Fowler, Rebecca Russ-Sellers, Renee Chosed
      Abstract: The International Journal of Aging and Human Development, Ahead of Print.
      The Research Education Program (REP) is an NIH R25-funded training grant designed to increase the pipeline of underrepresented minority (URM) students entering graduate programs and pursuing biomedical research and health care careers. Each week, students participated in different academic enrichment activities during morning sessions. Research activities were during afternoon sessions. URM students presented their research findings in a local poster session with their peers, graduate medical students, and faculty members. They also attended national conferences to gain experience and expand their professional networks. Our participants included 14.3% rural, 42.85% suburban, and 42.85% urban students. Of this, 83.33% were females, while 16.67% were males. In addition, 100% of students indicated exceptional satisfaction in 64.0% of the academic enrichment activities offered by the REP, and 100% indicated exceptional satisfaction in 63.0% of the research activities. Future research will investigate the long-term effects of REP and graduate enrollments.
      Citation: The International Journal of Aging and Human Development
      PubDate: 2022-06-13T06:13:48Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00914150221106652
       
  • Grandchildren as Caregivers: Adding a New Layer to the Sandwich Generation

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      Authors: Julie Hicks Patrick, Laura E. Bernstein, Arianna Spaulding, Bianca E. Dominguez, Carly E. Pullen
      Abstract: The International Journal of Aging and Human Development, Ahead of Print.
      Although 10% of family caregivers are grandchildren, only a few studies have examined the experience of grandchildren who provide care to grandparents. The current study examined the caregiving processes and outcomes of grandchild caregivers to grandparents. Participants were (N  =  5,778) adults identified as a caregiver, including 311 adult grandchildren. Analyses showed that although caregivers to grandparents did not differ significantly from other family caregivers in terms of depression, grandchildren did differ on a variety of demographic and caregiving context variables. A hierarchical binary logistic regression showed that providing personal care and helping with household tasks contribute to the equation, however, grandchild status did not uniquely contribute to the equation after other elements of the caregiving and personal contexts were entered. Post-hoc analyses identified additional predictors within the group of grandchild caregivers. The current study is an important starting point in understanding the experiences of grandchildren caregivers.
      Citation: The International Journal of Aging and Human Development
      PubDate: 2022-06-10T06:34:38Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00914150221106726
       
  • Fear of Incompetence in Family Caregivers and Dementia Care Transitions

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      Authors: Anca M. Miron, Christopher L. Groves, Ashley E. Thompson, Susan H. McFadden, Haley R. Bowers, Jordyn M. DeBraal
      Abstract: The International Journal of Aging and Human Development, Ahead of Print.
      Research on interpersonal interaction dynamics in relationships between persons with dementia and their family caregivers has been limited. We examine the role of these dynamics in decisions to transition a family member from home care to congregate care, with a particular focus on the role of fear of incompetence. Fear of incompetence is the fear of being unable to interact, communicate in a meaningful way, or take care of a close family member with dementia. In this study (N  =  350 family caregivers), perceived negative changes in the family member with dementia predicted increased perceived dependency, which predicted both increased caregiver burden and greater Fear of incompetence in caregiver, which, in turn, predicted stronger care transition desire. Strategies should be aimed not only at reducing dependency of the care recipient but also teaching family caregivers interaction skills that decrease their fear of interactional incompetence and thus promote home care continuation.
      Citation: The International Journal of Aging and Human Development
      PubDate: 2022-06-10T06:34:18Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00914150221106075
       
  • Gender Disparities in Healthy Aging: A Cross-National Comparative Study in
           the United States and South Korea from 2006 to 2016

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      Authors: Lanlan Chu, Anjelynt Lor, Mary-Genevieve Moisan, Kieu My Phi
      Abstract: The International Journal of Aging and Human Development, Ahead of Print.
      Using the 2006–2016 wave of Health and Retirement Study and Korean Longitudinal Study of Aging, this study explores the gender disparities in the health of older adults in the United States and South Korea. A logit model is adopted to explore the differences in the likelihood of aging healthily by gender in two countries. Results indicate that older females in the United States have a significantly higher probability of healthy aging than their male counterparts. However, the opposite finding is demonstrated among the older population in South Korea. These results are verified using various robustness check methods. The heterogeneities in the gender disparities in healthy aging across age groups and income levels are further explored. The gender effect in each healthy aging domain is investigated to understand the underlying causes of gender disparities. These findings can provide cross-national insights for policymakers to establish targeted aging policies with a gender perspective.
      Citation: The International Journal of Aging and Human Development
      PubDate: 2022-06-08T05:48:44Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00914150221106643
       
  • Older Adults Place Greater Importance Than Younger Adults on a Purposeful
           Retirement

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      Authors: Patrick L. Hill, Rachel D. Best, Gabrielle N. Pfund, M. Teresa Cardador, Victor J. Strecher
      Abstract: The International Journal of Aging and Human Development, Ahead of Print.
      Objective: Regarding retirement, some but not all people decline in sense of purpose, and retirees may view maintaining a sense of purpose as nonessential. These findings suggest individual differences both in the importance placed on being purposeful during retirement in general and the discrepancy for purpose importance prior to and during retirement. Method: This study surveyed U.S. adults (n = 2009, Mage = 48.51) asking them about how they viewed having a purpose in two life stages: before and during retirement, as well as personality and demographic questions. Results: Findings suggest that, overall, people believe it is important to have a purpose and direction during retirement. This tendency was greater among older adults, and those higher on conscientiousness or lower on neuroticism. However, working status did not play a role in the perceived importance of purpose during the retirement period. Moreover, age differentiated who perceives during-retirement purpose as more important than prior-to-retirement purpose. Conclusion: The current findings add to our understanding of when individuals expect to be purposeful and counter the claims that older adults may place less importance on being purposeful. Instead, these findings point to the need for continuing work on how to help older adults maintain or find a purpose in life following retirement.
      Citation: The International Journal of Aging and Human Development
      PubDate: 2022-06-08T05:48:34Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00914150221106093
       
  • Barriers and Opportunities to Support the Oral Health of Older Adults: A
           Rapid Review of Health Policy and Systems

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      Authors: Stephanie L. de Sam Lazaro, Anchee M. Nitschke Durben, Juliette J. Kline
      Abstract: The International Journal of Aging and Human Development, Ahead of Print.
      Tooth decay and gum disease are reversible, preventable, and impact approximately 68% of older adults nationwide. While the Affordable Care Act added provisions to health prevention services, it did not cover oral health prevention for adults and older adults. A rapid review process was utilized to identify literature documenting system and policy level barriers and opportunities to address oral health equity issues for older adults in the United States. Twenty-five articles met inclusion criteria for analysis. Findings revealed four barrier and three opportunity themes. Recommendations of analysis include expansion of oral health coverage under Medicare and Medicaid along with community-based and co-located medical and dental services. This will address access and utilization barriers and provide education for older adults, health providers, and the general population. Increasing oral health literacy and population awareness, and prioritizing oral health can be met by capitalizing on opportunities found in this rapid review.
      Citation: The International Journal of Aging and Human Development
      PubDate: 2022-06-03T07:44:32Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00914150221106098
       
  • The DAS-6: A Short Form of the Dementia Attitudes Scale

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      Authors: Michaela S. Clark, Alexandria R. Ebert, Julie Hicks Patrick
      Abstract: The International Journal of Aging and Human Development, Ahead of Print.
      Attitudes toward persons with dementia (PWD) are important predictors of emotional and behavioral outcomes for PWD and their caregivers. It is often desirable to have short, psychometrically-sound measures of such attitudes for inclusion in large community-based surveillance surveys and quick training assessments. The Dementia Attitudes Scale (DAS) is a 20-item scale that examines person-centered knowledge and perceptions of comfort working with PWD. Shorter versions of this scale have been used in various settings, although the psychometric properties of this abbreviated scale are unknown. This study used a principal components analysis to examine the properties associated with scales using a reduced number of items. Our final scale, the DAS-6 includes three items in each of the comfort and person-centered knowledge subscales.
      Citation: The International Journal of Aging and Human Development
      PubDate: 2022-06-03T07:44:11Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00914150221106094
       
  • Dyadic Associations Between Grandparent–Grandchild Familial Values and
           Successful Aging: Mediating Role of Quality of Life

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      Authors: Saba Sajjad, Jamil A. Malik
      Abstract: The International Journal of Aging and Human Development, Ahead of Print.
      The current study aimed to determine the reciprocal associations between the familial values and successful aging of grandparents and grandchildren and the extent to which quality of life accounts for these reciprocal associations. Data was collected from 270 grandparent–grandchild pairs living together. Actor-Partner Independence Model indicated that familial values of both grandparents and grandchildren showed significant associations with their own successful aging (actor effects), whereas familial values of grandchildren showed significant associations with the successful aging of grandparents (partner effects). Grandchildren’s quality of life mediated the actor and partner effects of familial values on the successful aging of grandchildren; whereas grandparents’ quality of life only mediated the actor effect of familial values on the successful aging of grandparents. These findings showed the interdependence of grandparents and grandchildren while emphasizing the importance of grandparents-grandchildren familial values and quality of life in enhancing successful aging.
      Citation: The International Journal of Aging and Human Development
      PubDate: 2022-06-03T07:43:58Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00914150221106089
       
  • Managing One's Age in Age-Dissimilar Mentoring Relationships

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      Authors: Sara E. Barth, Jennifer L. Wessel, Eden B. King, Dewesh Agrawal
      Abstract: The International Journal of Aging and Human Development, Ahead of Print.
      The aging of the workforce creates opportunities for experienced employees to share expertise with newer employees, via mentoring relationships. Age-dissimilar interactions, however, like those between mentor and protégé, can engender challenging interpersonal dynamics such as concern about how others view and respond to them. The current study examines the unique challenges and opportunities of age-dissimilar mentoring relationships, using a sample of doctor and lawyer protégés. Findings suggest that age dissimilarity does not play as large of a role in mentoring relationship outcomes as age-related behaviors. How one manages their age seems to be more important, such that managing one's age in a positive way by redefining age-related stereotypes rather than switching attention away from stereotypes is better for mentoring relationship outcomes no matter the age difference between mentor and protégé. Implications, inferences, and limitations are discussed.
      Citation: The International Journal of Aging and Human Development
      PubDate: 2022-04-27T08:36:03Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00914150221092989
       
  • Gender and the Subjective Well-Being of Older Widows and Widowers

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      Authors: Jing Geng, Toni M. Calasanti
      Abstract: The International Journal of Aging and Human Development, Ahead of Print.
      Previous research on older adults who are widowed often focuses on the immediate subjective impacts of spousal loss, and how gender might influence this. Our interest here is on the factors that influence subjective well-being after a period of at least two years’ post-bereavement, and how this might differ for men and women. We draw on theoretical considerations from previous research on gender and on widowhood and use two different measures—life satisfaction and happiness—to assess possible differences in this subjective outcome. We used data from the 2014 Health and Retirement Study on 692 widowed adults aged 65 and over (578 females and 114 males) and employed regression and postestimation analyses to examine whether and how gender influences their subjective well-being. Our findings show that gender did not affect overall levels of subjective well-being, regardless of measure. However, gender did influence the predictors, such as total household income, total wealth, and social support from children and friends, for life satisfaction and happiness somewhat differently. Our study highlights the importance of examining gender differences among older widows and widowers and also underlines the importance of introducing different measures of subjective well-being that might yield different yet valuable findings.
      Citation: The International Journal of Aging and Human Development
      PubDate: 2022-04-26T06:33:25Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00914150221092990
       
  • Friendship in Later Life: Thirty Years of Progress and Inequalities

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      Authors: Marie Baeriswyl, Michel Oris
      Abstract: The International Journal of Aging and Human Development, Ahead of Print.
      Studies examining the impact of social change on individual development and aging postulate the growing importance of flexible relationships, such as friendship. Although friendship is well known as a factor of well-being in later life, the prevalence of friendship in older adult networks and its unequal distribution has been examined only in few studies. Through secondary data analysis of two cross-sectional surveys carried out in Switzerland in 1979 and 2011, respectively, the increasing presence of close friends was confirmed. Our results show that this trend was part of a broader lifestyle change after retirement, with increasing social engagements. However, this trend does not include a general decrease in social inequalities in friendship opportunities. Overall, friendship increase among older adults has contributed to a polarization of living conditions, with a majority of active, healthy persons contrasting with a minority of individuals who accumulate penalties.
      Citation: The International Journal of Aging and Human Development
      PubDate: 2022-04-15T05:41:56Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00914150221092991
       
  • Functional Disability Among Middle-Aged and Older Adults in China: The
           Intersecting Roles of Ethnicity, Social Class, and Urban/Rural Residency

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      Authors: Shen (Lamson) Lin
      Abstract: The International Journal of Aging and Human Development, Ahead of Print.
      This study explores how ethnicity, family income, and education level differentiate patterns of functional limitations among urban and rural Chinese (aged 45 ≥ years). Based on the 2018 China Family Panel Studies (CFPS) (n = 16,589), this nationwide study employed binary/multinomial logistic regression analyses, stratified by urban/rural residency, to estimate the likelihood of instrumental activities of daily living (IADLs) disability (0/1–2/≥3 limitations) by social determinants of health (SDoH). The estimated overall prevalence of IADLs disability was 14.3%. The multivariable analyses did not find significant ethnic disparity in IADLs disability in urban China, while in rural China, ethnic minorities were 44% more likely to have IADLs disability than Han Chinese. Among rural residents, Mongolians, Tibetans, and Yi minority more than tripled the odds of having ≥3 limitations than Han Chinese; and the intersections of ethnicity and social class were associated with functional limitations. Long-term care and anti-poverty programs should target minority aging populations in rural China.
      Citation: The International Journal of Aging and Human Development
      PubDate: 2022-04-15T05:41:38Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00914150221092129
       
  • Respect Your Elders: Generativity and Life Satisfaction in Caregiving
           Grandparents

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      Authors: Rachel K. Scott, Danielle K. Nadorff, Melissa Barnett, Loriena Yancura
      Abstract: The International Journal of Aging and Human Development, Ahead of Print.
      Erikson's theory of psychosocial development defines generativity as the drive to benefit future generations and leave a legacy. Generativity has been shown to predict life satisfaction, but generative concern and action can be impacted by factors such as perceived respect from younger generations. This study utilized caregiving grandparents aged 40 and older to assess the extent to which perceived respect mediated the relation between generativity and life satisfaction. Perceived respect from a grandchild mediated the relation between generative concern expressed by caregiving grandparents and life satisfaction after controlling for demographic variables that have been shown to influence heterogeneity and overall well-being in caregiving grandparent samples. These findings suggest that the relation between life satisfaction and generativity in grandparents may depend, in part, on perceived respect from grandchildren, intimating that the implications of generativity may be influenced by the perceived appreciation of its recipients.
      Citation: The International Journal of Aging and Human Development
      PubDate: 2022-04-11T01:48:25Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00914150221092128
       
  • Religiosity and Social Support Predict Resilience in Older Adults After a
           Flood

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      Authors: Katie E. Cherry, Matthew R. Calamia, Emily M. Elliott, Katelyn J. McKneely, Quyen P. Nguyen, Cayman A. Loader, Luke R. Miller, Laura Sampson, Sandro Galea
      Abstract: The International Journal of Aging and Human Development, Ahead of Print.
      In this study, we examined religiosity and social support as predictors of resilience after a devastating flood. Three flood exposure groups of primarily middle-aged and older adults were compared: (1) non-flooded adults as controls, (2) once-flooded adults with structural damage to homes and property in the 2016 flood, and (3) twice-flooded adults who had relocated inland because of prior catastrophic losses in the 2005 Hurricanes Katrina and Rita and then flooded again in 2016. Resilience was assessed using the Connor-Davidson Resilience Scale (CD-RISC). Correlation analyses confirmed that older age was correlated with higher religiosity, charitable work done for others, and resilience. Regression analyses indicated that religious beliefs and coping, social support, and charitable work done for others were associated with higher levels of resilience, whereas flood damage was unrelated to resilience. Implications for current views on post-disaster adversity and resilience in later life are discussed.
      Citation: The International Journal of Aging and Human Development
      PubDate: 2022-03-30T06:07:41Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00914150221088543
       
  • Factors Associated With Dietary Risks in Older Korean Americans

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      Authors: Yuri Jang, Jisook Ko, Min-Kyoung Rhee, Nan Sook Park, David A. Chiriboga, Miyong T. Kim
      Abstract: The International Journal of Aging and Human Development, Ahead of Print.
      Given the importance of healthy eating in the later years of life, the present study examined factors associated with dietary risks in older Korean Americans. We hypothesized that dietary risks would be associated with sociodemographic disadvantages, adverse health conditions, and limited sociocultural resources. Dietary risks were assessed with a scale covering five behavioral and situational risk factors (eating alone, skipping meals, functional challenges, oral health problems, and financial difficulties). Analyses of the data from the Study of Older Korean Americans (N = 2,150) showed that the sample on average had 1.13 risks (SD = 1.31), eating alone having the highest frequency (35.6%). Supporting the hypothesis, higher levels of dietary risks were found in individuals with sociodemographic disadvantages, poorer physical and mental health status, smaller social networks, and lower acculturation. Findings suggest concerted efforts to promote dietary behaviors and call attention to older immigrants who are socially and culturally isolated.
      Citation: The International Journal of Aging and Human Development
      PubDate: 2022-03-22T06:08:09Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00914150221088545
       
  • A Social-Ecological Approach to Understanding Activity Engagement Patterns
           Among Older Chinese Immigrants

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      Authors: Fengyan Tang, Ke Li, Mary E. Rauktis, Iris Chi, XinQi Dong
      Abstract: The International Journal of Aging and Human Development, Ahead of Print.
      Few studies have focused on activity engagement among older immigrants. We aim to map the patterns of activity engagement and examine the associations with social-ecological factors in a sample of older Chinese immigrants. Participants were from the Population Study of Chinese Elderly in Chicago (PINE). Four patterns of activity engagement were identified through latent class analysis: restricted, diverse, informal social, and community-based social. Intrapersonal, interpersonal, cultural, and environmental factors distinguished latent classes of activity engagement. In particular, acculturation and family-oriented immigration differentiated the restricted from the diverse class membership. Positive attributes of social environment such as social network size, positive social support, and neighborhood cohesion were associated with the likelihood of categorization in the diverse, informal social, and community-based social groups relative to the restricted group. Findings point to the importance of positive attributes of social environment in enhancing engagement with life among older Chinese immigrants.
      Citation: The International Journal of Aging and Human Development
      PubDate: 2022-03-16T06:52:21Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00914150221084648
       
  • The Effects of Osteoarthritis on Depressive Symptomatology Among Older
           U.S. Military Veterans

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      Authors: Christopher J. Burant, Gregory C. Graham, Gary Deimling, Denise Kresevic, Eva Kahana, May Wykle, C. Kent Kwoh, Said A. Ibrahim
      Abstract: The International Journal of Aging and Human Development, Ahead of Print.
      Osteoarthritis (OA) is a leading cause of disability among older adults. By 2050, approximately 60 million will suffer from arthritis adding up to a total societal cost of $65 billion. Chronic illnesses resulting in pain, and functional decline have been associated with depression in previous studies.A causal model was developed and tested using structural equation modeling that examined depression scores of 503 older (age 50-85), male Veterans with moderate to severe symptomatic OA of the knee\hip.The results of the structural equation modeling produced a final model of depressive symptomatology that fit the data well (Chi square = 12.23, DF = 11, p = .346; TLI = .99; CFI = 1.00; RMSEA = .02).The findings indicate the central role that OA severity (pain, stiffness, and functional difficulties) plays in the mental health of older Veterans in terms of the level of reported depressive symptoms.
      Citation: The International Journal of Aging and Human Development
      PubDate: 2022-03-14T11:32:55Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00914150221084952
       
  • Validity and Reliability of Persian Version of the 12-Item Expectations
           Regarding Aging Survey

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      Authors: Hamid Sharif Nia, Long She, Sotheeswari Somasundram, Fatemeh Khoshnavay Fomani, Omolhoda Kaveh, Lida Hosseini
      Abstract: The International Journal of Aging and Human Development, Ahead of Print.
      Objective:The present study was designed to assess the construct validity and reliability of the Persian version of the 12-item Expectations Regarding Aging (ERA) survey among the older adult Iranian population. Methods: The Persian version of this scale was developed using translation and revision in the current study. The construct validity was assessed through exploratory factor analysis (EFA) and confirmatory factor analysis (CFA). The reliability was assessed through internal consistency (Cronbach’s alpha and McDonald’s omega), composite reliability (CR), and maximal reliability (MaXR). The data compiled online was based on a sample of 400 older adults aged 65 years and older. Results: The Persian version includes 12 items loading onto three factors with 12 items explaining 46.633% of the total variance with excellent internal consistency and reliability. Conclusion: The Persian version of ERA is reliable and valid that can be used to assess the ERA concept among older adults.
      Citation: The International Journal of Aging and Human Development
      PubDate: 2022-03-10T10:14:02Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00914150221084650
       
  • Long-Term Impact of Grandchild Caregiving Trajectories on Depression in
           Middle-Aged and Older Chinese People: A Longitudinal Study

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      Authors: Haomiao Li, Li Gan, Dong (Roman) Xu, Jiangyun Chen
      Abstract: The International Journal of Aging and Human Development, Ahead of Print.
      There has been little research investigating the effects of caregiving for grandchildren on grandparents’ mental health from a dynamic perspective. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects on caregivers’ depression of changes in grandparenting intensity. The study population included 8,157 respondents obtained from the China Health and Retirement Longitudinal Study (CHARLS). Latent growth mixture modeling was used to group respondents into five classes of trajectory of caregiving intensity as follows: “sharply decreasing”, “never or rarely”, “slowly decreasing”, “increasing”, and “continuously high”. A generalized additive mixed model (GAMM) and a marginal structural model (MSM) both associated the “continuously high” and “sharply decreasing” intensities with depression. “Continuously high” intensity significantly increased the risk of depression in the male group only. Further research should be conducted to analyze the deep-seated mechanisms of association between grandparenting and mental health, in different cultural contexts and among subgroups with different characteristics.
      Citation: The International Journal of Aging and Human Development
      PubDate: 2022-03-04T01:18:32Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00914150221084644
       
  • Reciprocal Effects of Marital Idealization and Marital Satisfaction
           Between Long-Wed Spouses Over Time

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      Authors: Ariel Pollock Star, Ella Cohn-Schwartz, Norm O’Rourke
      Abstract: The International Journal of Aging and Human Development, Ahead of Print.
      Marital idealization is defined as an interpersonal mode of self-deception whereby husbands and wives convey an exceedingly positive portrayal of their spouse and relationship (e.g., “My spouse has never made me angry”). For the Marriage and Health Study, we obtained responses from 119 long-wed couples at baseline, 1- and 2-years later (M = 34 years married). We first computed and compared contemporaneous actor-partner interdependence models (APIMs) suggesting that marital satisfaction predicts marital idealization within and between spouses; the reverse APIM was not supported (i.e., marital idealization did not predict marital satisfaction). Yet our analyses suggest the question should be answered with longitudinal data. When reported contemporaneously, husbands’ marital satisfaction predicts marital idealization by their wives. The same cross-over effect is observed for wives—but not concomitantly, only in future. That is, marital satisfaction and idealization reported by wives predicts marital idealization reported by their husbands 2-years later.
      Citation: The International Journal of Aging and Human Development
      PubDate: 2022-02-28T01:13:09Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00914150221077953
       
  • Perceived Changes in Social Connectedness Across the Life Course: A Mixed
           Method Approach

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      Authors: Raven H. Weaver, Yoshie Sano, Jane Lanigan, Louise Parker, Linda Eddy, Thomas G. Power, Myah Houghten
      Abstract: The International Journal of Aging and Human Development, Ahead of Print.
      Social connection is important across the life course, but overall levels have been declining. The COVID-19 pandemic presented a unique context to examine social connectedness and adaptive capacity in times of social adversity. We used a parallel mixed method design to collect online survey data from a representative U.S. sample (N  =  359). Applying an exploratory sequential approach, we used a general linear model multivariate approach to repeated measures to test for differences in participants’ perceptions of social connectedness by time and age category and qualitative analysis to gain insights about disrupted social contexts. Results indicated that social connectedness decreased after mitigation restrictions for all age groups, but individuals in emerging and late adulthood felt the greatest impact. Two themes emerged: differing emotional responses to altered communication and intentionality of maintaining and/or creating social connections. Experiences of social connectedness need to be understood as a function of life stage and developmental timing.
      Citation: The International Journal of Aging and Human Development
      PubDate: 2022-02-09T01:19:15Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00914150221077955
       
  • Mental Health of Employed Family Caregivers in Canada: A Gender-Based
           Analysis on the Role of Workplace Support

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      Authors: Lun Li, Yeonjung Lee, Daniel W.L. Lai
      Abstract: The International Journal of Aging and Human Development, Ahead of Print.
      This study examines the effect of gender differences in mental health outcomes among employed family caregivers, focusing on the role of workplace support in balancing work and caregiving. Guided by the social role theory, this study analyzes nationally representative data from the 2012 Canada General Social Survey, with a sample of 2,426 participants. Women experience worse mental health outcomes than men when they require employment adjustment to fulfill their caregiving responsibilities. Workplace support could offset the negative effects of employment adjustment on mental health either directly or indirectly through family–work conflict, but gender difference is apparent in terms of the effect of workplace support. In general, women require more supportive workplace than men. Further study of the effects of various types of workplace support on the mental health among women who are employed family caregivers, and on more tailored support, is recommended.
      Citation: The International Journal of Aging and Human Development
      PubDate: 2022-02-07T09:05:38Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00914150221077948
       
  • The age-Related Positivity Effect and Emotion Regulation: Assessing
           Downstream Affective Outcomes

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      Authors: JohnBosco Chika Chukwuorji, Eric S. Allard
      Abstract: The International Journal of Aging and Human Development, Ahead of Print.
      While substantial literature suggests that positive preferences are in the service of emotion regulation pursuits, little evidence has directly linked positivity “processes” with well-being “outcomes.” The current study examined age-related differences in negative gaze preferences and how such preferences are related to subsequent regulatory outcomes. Participants were 79 older adults and 72 younger adults. They first provided a baseline mood assessment, which was followed by a standardized emotional video clip for three minutes during which visual fixation preferences were recorded via an eye tracker. Mood was again assessed after the film, which was followed by a standardized video recovery task, and completion of a recovery mood measure. Older adults fixated less on negative portions of the emotional video clip relative to younger adults, indicative of an age-related positivity effect. The indirect effect of age on mood recovery through fixation was not supported.
      Citation: The International Journal of Aging and Human Development
      PubDate: 2022-02-07T09:03:55Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00914150221077954
       
  • Pediatric Sleep Disturbances and Symptoms of Depression in Older Adults

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      Authors: Sarah T. Stahl, Salvatore P. Insana, Martica H. Hall, Daniel J. Buysse
      Abstract: The International Journal of Aging and Human Development, Ahead of Print.
      We investigated the association between retrospectively reported sleep disturbances during childhood and adolescence and current symptoms of depression and anxiety in older adults. Participants included 116 older adults (M age  =  68 years [SD  =  6.4 years]) who completed a battery of sleep and psychological assessments. We tested two multivariate regression models using age, sex, race, physical illness burden, insomnia status, and pediatric sleep disturbances as correlates of depressive symptoms and anxiety symptoms. Pediatric sleep disturbances were significantly associated with greater depressive symptomatology (β  =  0.247, p  =  .010), independent of current insomnia status. Medium effect sizes were reported. Our results suggest that pediatric sleep disturbances may be a biobehavioral signal for the development of poor emotional health across the lifespan. Future research should identify critical windows of development when sleep disturbances might be most impactful on emotional health trajectories.
      Citation: The International Journal of Aging and Human Development
      PubDate: 2022-02-07T09:03:19Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00914150221077950
       
 
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