Subjects -> MANUFACTURING AND TECHNOLOGY (Total: 363 journals)
    - CERAMICS, GLASS AND POTTERY (31 journals)
    - MACHINERY (34 journals)
    - MANUFACTURING AND TECHNOLOGY (223 journals)
    - METROLOGY AND STANDARDIZATION (6 journals)
    - PACKAGING (19 journals)
    - PAINTS AND PROTECTIVE COATINGS (4 journals)
    - PLASTICS (42 journals)
    - RUBBER (4 journals)

PACKAGING (19 journals)

Showing 1 - 17 of 17 Journals sorted alphabetically
Asian Journal of Shipping and Logistics     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Canadian Journal on Aging     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
European Journal of Ageing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Food Packaging and Shelf Life     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
IEEE Transactions on Components and Packaging Technologies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
International Journal of Aging and Human Development     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Aerosol Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Applied Packaging Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Electronic Packaging     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Journal of Manufacturing and Materials Processing     Open Access  
Journal of Microelectronics and Electronic Packaging     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Packaging Technology and Research     Hybrid Journal  
Packaging Technology and Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Packaging, Transport, Storage & Security of Radioactive Material     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Psychology and Aging     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Rejuvenation Research     Hybrid Journal  
Research on Aging     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Similar Journals
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Research on Aging
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.877
Citation Impact (citeScore): 2
Number of Followers: 13  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0164-0275 - ISSN (Online) 1552-7573
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1174 journals]
  • How the Senior Community Service Employment Program Influences Participant
           Well-Being: A Participatory Research Approach With Program Recommendations
           

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      Authors: Cal J. Halvorsen, Kelsey Werner, Elizabeth McColloch, Olga Yulikova
      Abstract: Research on Aging, Ahead of Print.
      The federal Senior Community Service Employment Program (SCSEP) provides on-the-job training to people 55 years and older with incomes at or below 125% of the federal poverty level with multiple barriers to employment. This study examined the processes by which SCSEP may influence participant financial, physical, and mental well-being. We engaged 15 SCSEP participants and case managers over four virtual and one telephone session using a participatory research method called community-based system dynamics. Activities included identifying key problem trends, variable elicitation, developing a causal map, and identifying changes to the system to increase participant well-being. Respondents identified how individual, organizational, and program and policy factors relate to participant well-being (e.g., SCSEP participation reduces social isolation, which increases desire to participate) and suggested program and policy recommendations to strengthen SCSEP (e.g., benchmarks of success should include health and well-being outcomes). These findings highlight the benefits and potential of this long-running program.
      Citation: Research on Aging
      PubDate: 2022-06-16T04:49:04Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01640275221098613
       
  • Ageing in Context: An Ecological Model to Understand Social Participation
           Among Indigenous Adults in Chile

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      Authors: Lorena Patricia Gallardo-Peralta, Émilie Raymond, José Luis Gálvez-Nieto
      Abstract: Research on Aging, Ahead of Print.
      The social participation of older adults occupies a central position in international discourse regarding ageing, the ecological model makes it possible to examine and assess the different factors that influence the understanding of what encourages social participation by older adults. This study used the ecological model to analyse how personal, community and environmental factors are related to satisfaction with social participation among Chilean older adults, a majority of whom are indigenous, living in rural areas (n = 800). The results confirmed that satisfaction with social participation was related to personal factors (feelings of depression, functioning into basic activities of daily living (ADL) and autonomy), community factors (perceived social support from social group) and environmental factors (accessibility of physical setting within the village). Our findings confirmed a high level of social participation among indigenous adults, with rural and indigenous surroundings appearing to be a factor that protects and promotes social integration.
      Citation: Research on Aging
      PubDate: 2022-06-14T04:59:06Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01640275221108502
       
  • Productive Aging Lifestyles: A Latent Class Analysis of Work and Volunteer
           Patterns over the Retirement Transition

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      Authors: Dawn C. Carr, Ben L. Kail, Miles Taylor
      Abstract: Research on Aging, Ahead of Print.
      Frank Caro and colleagues’ foundational work set the stage for a broad and multifaceted productive aging (PA) literature. Recent PA research has focused on health benefits associated with work and volunteering, respectively. However, these activities are often assumed to have independent associations with health and wellbeing. Less clear is whether and in what ways older adults participate in productive engagement lifestyles including multiple activities over a long period of time. This paper uses latent class analyses and the Health and Retirement Study to examine combined engagement in work and volunteer activities over 12 years between ages 56-68 to (1) identify patterns of work and volunteer activities across the retirement transition, (2) evaluate characteristics of individuals within these patterns, and (3) explore whether particular patterns are associated with markers of health and wellbeing. We describe how our findings inform successful aging by incentivizing socially and individually beneficial PA lifestyles.
      Citation: Research on Aging
      PubDate: 2022-06-14T01:53:29Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01640275221103793
       
  • Social Participation Through the Retirement Transition: Differences by
           Gender and Employment Status

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      Authors: Jeremy W. Lim-Soh, Yeonjin Lee
      Abstract: Research on Aging, Ahead of Print.
      This study examines how retirees’ formal and informal social participation change over time and investigates gendered differences. Seven waves of the Korean Longitudinal Study of Ageing track the frequency of social participation. A comparison group of employed individuals, weighted with coarsened exact matching, controls for age and time trends, and mixed model regressions estimate changes over time. Retirees show a gradual decline in the frequency of meeting friends and an abrupt decrease in the frequency of attending a social gathering, compared to their working peers. These trends are much stronger for men than women, and compound pre-existing gender differences in social participation. The more severe decline in the social participation of men is of great concern and points to the persistence of gendered employment structures into the retirement transition, putting Korean retirees at risk of social isolation and related health deterioration.
      Citation: Research on Aging
      PubDate: 2022-06-11T07:23:25Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01640275221104716
       
  • Intergenerational Proximity to Aging Parents and Depression Among Married
           Persons in China

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      Authors: Jin Fan, Weiguo Zhang, Hong Mi
      Abstract: Research on Aging, Ahead of Print.
      Using data from China Health and Retirement Longitudinal Study (N = 3864), we examined the relationship between proximity to aging parents and depression among middle-aged (45–64 years) married individuals in China. Our study depicted and explained the declining coresident rate and showed a majority of adult children live separately from their parents. Children living in different households had higher levels of depression than coresident children, including those living adjacently. Furthermore, having a coresident spouse increased the levels of depression of sons living in an adjacent dwelling and in the same city, and reduced the levels of depression of daughters living farther away. More intergenerational economic support increased the levels of depression of daughters living in an adjacent dwelling. These findings may offer a reference for married adult children to reconstruct intergenerational proximity and adjust intergenerational relations.
      Citation: Research on Aging
      PubDate: 2022-06-10T01:36:02Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01640275221107320
       
  • Helping Behavior of Older Adults during the Early COVID-19 Lockdown in
           Belgium

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      Authors: Sarah Dury, Dorien Brosens, Honghui Pan, Andrea Principi, An-Sofie Smetcoren, Jolanta Perek-Białas, Liesbeth De Donder
      Abstract: Research on Aging, Ahead of Print.
      This study aimed to understand whether older adults not only received but also provided help during the first COVID-19 lockdown in Belgium, which factors motivated them to help, and whether older adults differed from younger age groups in terms of helping behavior and motives. Bivariate analyses were performed using data generated from an online cross-sectional survey in Belgium (N = 1892).The results showed that older adults who received help also provided it. This “interdependence” – mutual or reciprocal dependence – occurred regardless of age. In terms of motives for providing help, both older adults and their younger peers were primarily motivated by present-oriented and emotion-related motivation: older people were motivated to provide help by altruistic values and humanism, and enhancement motives linked to self-development.Policy implications of these results entail: during crisis situations, make use of the bond between older adults and their neighbors, such as caring communities.
      Citation: Research on Aging
      PubDate: 2022-05-30T12:33:32Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01640275221105231
       
  • Can an Aging Leopard Change Its Spots' The Role of Mindset of Aging on
           Implicit and Explicit Attitudes in Older Adults

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      Authors: Kellie E. Brown, Anna Hall, Madisen Hillebrant-Openshaw, Erika K. Fulton
      Abstract: Research on Aging, Ahead of Print.
      Growth mindset of aging (MA) refers to the belief that aging processes are malleable, while fixed MA is the belief that how one ages is predetermined and unchangeable. Using experimental methods, we manipulated MA and explored its impact on implicit old-age attitudes and self-perceptions of aging. Eighty-six older adults were randomly placed into a growth or fixed MA condition. Next, we assessed implicit old-age attitudes and self-perceptions of aging. The experimental manipulation was successful in that group MA scores differed, but MA did not significantly influence implicit old-age attitudes or self-perceptions of aging. However, a regression analysis revealed a novel finding: More growth MA was related to less negative implicit old-age attitudes and more positive self-perceptions of aging. These findings are an important contribution to the MA literature, which is in its infancy.
      Citation: Research on Aging
      PubDate: 2022-05-26T09:30:40Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01640275221104827
       
  • Race-Discordant School Attendance and Cognitive Function in Later Life

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      Authors: Dawn C. Carr, John Reynolds
      Abstract: Research on Aging, Ahead of Print.
      Early schooling plays an important role in shaping cognitive development. This study explored benefits of cognitive functioning in later life related to attending diverse schools in early life. Specifically, we explored the effects of having attended schools composed primarily of different race peers—race discordant schools (RDS)—among Black and White older adults. Using retrospective and prospective data from the Health and Retirement Study, we examined the association between RDS exposure and two measures of cognitive function (working memory, episodic memory) at age 55 and at age 70. We found that RDS exposed Blacks experienced significant benefits in cognitive function at age 55 and at age 70. In general, RDS exposed Whites did not experience cognitive benefits or deficits. Results suggest that exposure to more racially diverse school environments provides potentially beneficial effects for cognitive function, particularly in later phases of the life course.
      Citation: Research on Aging
      PubDate: 2022-05-24T06:46:41Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01640275221103791
       
  • With You Until the End of the Age' A Longitudinal Study of Changes in
           Religiosity and Loneliness in Later Life

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      Authors: Laura Upenieks
      Abstract: Research on Aging, Ahead of Print.
      With few exceptions, a vast literature on religion and well-being in later life has largely ignored outcomes of loneliness. The current study considers how changes in religiosity and formal religious participation over time associate with loneliness, and whether there are age differences in how this process unfold. Using data from the first two waves (2005–2006, 2010–2011) of the National Social Life, Health, and Aging Project (NSHAP) from the United States, results suggest that consistent religious attendance was associated with lower loneliness, while decreases in attendance were associated with higher loneliness. The association between stable high religious attendance and loneliness was stronger for older cohorts of older adults (65–74, and 75+ years of age). We found no such patterns for religious integration in daily life. We discuss the implications for church communities and family and friends of older adults and provide insights for addressing loneliness as a public health problem.
      Citation: Research on Aging
      PubDate: 2022-05-23T08:51:47Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01640275221104720
       
  • Job Quality in the Late Career in Sweden, Japan and the United States

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      Authors: Loretta G. Platts, Lawrence B. Sacco, Ayako Hiyoshi, Hugo Westerlund, Kevin E. Cahill, Stefanie König
      Abstract: Research on Aging, Ahead of Print.
      Increasing numbers of older workers continue to work after being eligible to claim a state pension, yet little is known about the quality of these jobs. We examine how psychosocial and physical job quality as well as job satisfaction vary over the late career in three contrasting national settings: Sweden, Japan and the United States. Analyses using random effects modelling drew on data from the Swedish Longitudinal Occupational Survey of Health (n = 13,936–15,520), Japanese Study of Ageing and Retirement (n = 3704) and the Health and Retirement Study (n = 6239 and 8002). Age was modelled with spline functions in which two knots were placed at ages indicating eligibility for pensions claiming or mandatory retirement. In each country, post-pensionable-age jobs were generally less stressful, freer and more satisfying than jobs held by younger workers, results that held irrespective of gender or education level.
      Citation: Research on Aging
      PubDate: 2022-05-19T09:01:20Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01640275221075985
       
  • “How are You Doing'” on the Healthy Aging of the
           Community-Dwelling Oldest-Old in the Shadow of the COVID-19 Pandemic

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      Authors: Shirley K.L. Lo, Justina Y.W. Liu, Daphne S. K. Cheung, Yue-Heng Yin, Siu Ying Ng, Patrick P.K. Kor, Lin Yang, Siu Kay Chan, Rick Y.C. Kwan, Paul H. Lee, Vico C. L. Chiang
      Abstract: Research on Aging, Ahead of Print.
      ObjectiveGlobally, the oldest-old population is growing rapidly. Little is known about the perceived well-being of the community-dwelling oldest-old, especially during the COVID-19 pandemic. This study examined the oldest-old’s perceptions of aging well and the COVID-related impacts on them.MethodsSemi-structured in-depth interviews with 22 adults aged 85 or above were conducted with purposive sampling methods. Transcripts were analyzed using thematic analysis.ResultsFour main themes emerged: 1) sustaining functional ability; 2) staying active with a positive attitude; 3) feeling grateful for support from society and family; 4) COVID-19-related anxieties and policies destabilizing their well-being.DiscussionThis study provides direct evidence from the oldest-old on how they maintained their well-being. While they valued support from society and family, COVID-19-related measures disturbed their routines and prevented them from self-attaining well-being. The findings should be considered when developing interventions for this vulnerable group.
      Citation: Research on Aging
      PubDate: 2022-05-18T09:54:07Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01640275221100949
       
  • Life Events and Loneliness Among Older Women of Diverse Sexual Identities:
           Application of the Stress Process Model

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      Authors: Jack Lam, Alice Campbell
      Abstract: Research on Aging, Ahead of Print.
      Loneliness among older adults has been a topic of interest in recent years. We analyse four waves of data from the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women’s Health. We estimate growth models to examine differences in loneliness trajectories from age 50 for women who identify as exclusively heterosexual, plurisexual (bisexual, mainly heterosexual, mainly lesbian) and exclusively lesbian. We find no significant differences in levels of loneliness across sexual identity groups at age 50. We find that while loneliness trajectories of exclusively heterosexual women trend down, levels of loneliness increase with age among plurisexual women. Adverse health events and relationship problems increase loneliness to a greater extent among plurisexual women compared to exclusively heterosexual and exclusively lesbian women. Our results suggest older lesbian women may have accumulated social or personal resources or developed coping mechanisms over the courses of their lives, while plurisexual women remain a vulnerable group.
      Citation: Research on Aging
      PubDate: 2022-05-17T02:30:53Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01640275221090681
       
  • COVID-Related Perceptions of the Future and Purpose in Life Among Older
           Canadian Women

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      Authors: Nicky J. Newton, Hua Huo, Lauren Hytman, Cara Ryan
      Abstract: Research on Aging, Ahead of Print.
      Global events that prime thoughts of proximity to death (e.g., the COVID-19 pandemic) can compress individuals’ perceptions of future time horizons, and previous studies have found that compressed time horizons can be beneficial for older adults’ well-being. However, findings from recent studies are mixed, and studies of well-being during the early months of COVID-19 show that older adults have fared comparatively well. The current study examines relationships between Future Time Perspective (FTP), COVID-19 impact, and purpose in life (PIL) among older Canadian women (N = 190; ages 59+). We expected that total FTP would be positively associated with PIL but that FTP subscales would be associated with PIL in different ways; COVID-19 impact would not be associated with PIL, but COVID-19 impact would moderate the FTP-PIL relationship. We found partial support for these hypotheses, as well as prevalence of social connection themes in open-ended question responses regarding COVID-19 impact.
      Citation: Research on Aging
      PubDate: 2022-05-03T01:52:26Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01640275221092177
       
  • Loneliness as a Mediator in the Association Between Social Isolation and
           Psychological Distress: A Cross-Sectional Study With Older Korean
           Immigrants in the United States

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      Authors: Juyoung Park, Yuri Jang, Hans Oh, Iris Chi
      Abstract: Research on Aging, Ahead of Print.
      The present study explored the role of loneliness in the association between social isolation and psychological distress, using a cross-sectional sample of older Korean immigrants in the U.S. Considering structural (unmarried and living alone) and relational (isolation from family and friends) social isolation, we hypothesized that (1) both types of social isolation would be associated with loneliness and psychological distress and (2) their effect on psychological distress would be mediated through loneliness. Data came from the Study of Older Korean Americans (SOKA), a multisite survey of Korean immigrants aged 60 and older (n = 2,150). The multivariate analyses demonstrated that older individuals with structural and relational isolation reported higher levels of loneliness and psychological distress. Loneliness was found to mediate the effect of both types of social isolation on psychological distress. The intervening role of loneliness suggests strategies to alleviate the mental health consequences of social isolation in older immigrants.
      Citation: Research on Aging
      PubDate: 2022-04-30T05:20:11Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01640275221098180
       
  • Adverse Childhood Experiences and Oral Health Conditions Among Middle-aged
           and Older Chinese Adults: Exploring the Moderating Roles of Education and
           Gender

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      Authors: Keqing Zhang, Bei Wu, Wei Zhang
      Abstract: Research on Aging, Ahead of Print.
      This study aims to examine whether adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) are associated with oral health conditions (denture use, difficulty in chewing, and edentulism) among middle-aged and older adults in China and if gender and adulthood education moderate the associations. Data were obtained from the 2014 and 2018 surveys from the China Health and Retirement Longitudinal Study (N = 17,091) and logistic regressions were carried out. Results show that childhood hunger (OR = 1.12), loneliness (OR = 1.10) and family relations (OR = 1.07) were significantly associated with higher odds of denture use and there were significant associations between hunger (OR = 1.16) and difficulty in chewing. For the female subsample, education significantly moderated the adverse effect of childhood hunger on denture use and difficulty in chewing. Findings suggest that ACEs have long-lasting impacts on oral health conditions in later life and adulthood education might offer critical resources for females, helping them buffer the detrimental health impacts of ACEs.
      Citation: Research on Aging
      PubDate: 2022-04-29T09:11:54Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01640275221088926
       
  • Experiences of Civic Participation Among Older African American and Latinx
           Immigrant Adults in the Context of an Ageist and Racist Society

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      Authors: Laurent Reyes
      Abstract: Research on Aging, Ahead of Print.
      In the past 20 years, older adults’ civic participation has received considerable attention. Current literature shows that rates of voting and volunteering have been consistently lower among African Americans and Latinx older adults compared to White older adults. However, little research has explored civic participation in the context of historical structures of inequality that influence how Black and Latinx populations participate in civic life. I draw from an intersectional life course perspective and phenomenological methods to examine experiences of civic participation through participants’ lens. Findings draw our attention to how race/racism and age/ageism shape how, where, and with whom participants participate. Findings demonstrate how civic participation is embedded within systems of inequality that inform individual behavior as well as available opportunities for engagement. These findings call attention to the need to re-conceptualize and support civic participation that centers the experiences of historically ethnoracially oppressed populations.
      Citation: Research on Aging
      PubDate: 2022-04-25T08:44:13Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01640275221094288
       
  • Capacity or Necessity' Comparing the Socio-Economic Distribution of
           Productive Activities Between Italy and South Korea

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      Authors: Ginevra Floridi
      Abstract: Research on Aging, Ahead of Print.
      Much productive ageing research aims to identify the conditions under which older adults engage in productive roles within and outside the family. This study conceptualises two individual-level explanations for productive participation: capacity and necessity. I hypothesise that whether capacity or necessity prevails across different socio-economic groups depends on the degree of social protection guaranteed by pensions and long-term care systems, which varies across countries. Drawing on data from the SHARE and KLoSA surveys, this study compares socio-economic gradients in full-time work and informal caregiving across cohorts of men and women aged 50–75 in Italy and South Korea in 2006/07 and 2014/15. In Italy, where later-life social protection is generous, productive engagement is more common among wealthier and higher-educated individuals, who have greater capacity to engage in productive roles. In Korea, where social protection is limited, working is more common among socio-economically disadvantaged women, who have higher necessity to remain economically productive.
      Citation: Research on Aging
      PubDate: 2022-04-24T05:06:40Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01640275221089203
       
  • Changes in Generalized and Particularized Trust and Their Link to
           Depressive Symptoms: Exploring the Roles of Changes in Self-Rated Health,
           Family Support and Life Satisfaction Among Chinese Older Adults

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      Authors: Yen-H. Pan, To-H. Chang, Fang-H. Jhang
      Abstract: Research on Aging, Ahead of Print.
      This study aimed to examine whether changes in generalized trust (GT) and particularized trust (PT) predict changes in depressive symptoms (CES-D 8), and whether changes in self-rated health (SRH), family support (FS), and life satisfaction (LS) mediate the relationship between changes in the two types of trust and depressive symptoms in Chinese older adults. Structural equation modeling was employed to analyze two-wave data on 3770 participants aged 65 and over. Our results showed that in a context where GT was low and PT was high, an increase in GT was associated with more depressive symptoms, while an increase in PT was associated with fewer depressive symptoms. As such, GT cannot be viewed as protective against depression in older adults in a given context. LS partially mediated the relationship between changes in PT and depressive symptoms. The findings support psychosocial processes rather than health-problem and support pathways.
      Citation: Research on Aging
      PubDate: 2022-04-23T05:22:07Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01640275221092178
       
  • Exploring the Relationship Between Engagement in Enriching Early-Life
           Activities During Adolescence and Cognition in Later-Life: Results From
           the Health and Retirement Study

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      Authors: Breanna M. Crane, Karen Bandeen-Roche, Michelle C. Carlson
      Abstract: Research on Aging, Ahead of Print.
      The cognitive benefits associated with mid- to late-life engagement have been demonstrated in several studies. However, the link between engagement in enriching early-life activities (EELAs) during adolescence and later-life cognition has been relatively unexplored in major epidemiological studies. We examined the EELA-cognition relationship in a nationally representative sample of adults aged 50+. A subset of Health and Retirement Study respondents (n=3482) completed cognitive tests and returned a retrospective early-life activity inventory. Linear regression models analyzed the EELA-cognition relationship, and multiple imputation addressed missingness. Each additional EELA was associated with a 0.36 point higher cognitive score (95% CI: 0.24, 0.47). This relationship remained significant after adjusting for potential confounders (B=0.16; 95% CI: [0.06, 0.26]). EELA engagement was associated with better later-life cognitive performance. This study is understood to be the first to examine the EELA-cognition relationship using a large, nationally representative dataset. The findings highlight the importance of early-life engagement during an important developmental period (e.g., adolescence).
      Citation: Research on Aging
      PubDate: 2022-04-22T01:27:28Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01640275221085660
       
  • Transitions to Family Caregiving and Latent Variables of Systemic
           Inflammation Over Time

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      Authors: David L. Roth, John P. Bentley, Debora Kamin Mukaz, William E. Haley, Jeremy D. Walston, Karen Bandeen-Roche
      Abstract: Research on Aging, Ahead of Print.
      Circulating levels of inflammatory biomarkers may be influenced by chronic psychological stressors such as those experienced by family caregivers. However, previous studies have found mostly small and inconsistent differences between caregivers and control samples on individual measures of systemic inflammation. Latent variables of inflammation were extracted from six biomarkers collected from two blood samples over 9 years apart for 502 participants in a national cohort study. One-half of these participants transitioned into a sustained family caregiving role between the blood samples. Two latent factors, termed “up-regulation” and “inhibitory feedback,” were identified, and the transition to family caregiving was associated with a lower increase over time on the inhibitory feedback factor indexed by interleukin (IL)-2 and IL-10. No caregiving effect was found on the up-regulation factor indexed primarily by IL-6 and C-reactive protein. These findings illustrate the advantages of using latent variable models to study inflammation in response to caregiving stress.
      Citation: Research on Aging
      PubDate: 2022-04-15T08:50:57Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01640275221084729
       
  • Leisure Participation and Cognitive Impairment Among Healthy Older Adults
           in China

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      Authors: Wei Zhang, Qiushi Feng, Joelle H. Fong, Huashuai Chen
      Abstract: Research on Aging, Ahead of Print.
      Leisure participation is beneficial to various health outcomes. This study examined a comprehensive list of leisure activities in relation to incidence of cognitive impairment among healthy older adults (65+) in China. Using data from the 2002 to 2018 Chinese Longitudinal Healthy Longevity Survey, we found that most of the leisure activities were protective of cognitive decline and three leisure activities (watching TV, doing housework, and playing cards/mah-jong) stood out as the most important ones. Additionally, our results revealed subgroup variations in the association between leisure participation and cognitive function: Leisure activities such as reading newspapers/books (not significant for the illiterate), gardening (not significant for the illiterate), and regular exercise (not significant for the rural residents) had different effects across different demographic social groups. Our findings suggest that intervention programs designed to prevent cognitive decline for older adults should consider subgroup and cultural variations in order to yield the best outcomes.
      Citation: Research on Aging
      PubDate: 2022-04-15T05:08:44Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01640275221082151
       
  • Cognition and Diabetes: Examining Sex Differences Using a Longitudinal
           Sample of Older Adults

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      Authors: Justin V. Palarino, Jason D. Boardman, Richard G. Rogers
      Abstract: Research on Aging, Ahead of Print.
      ObjectivesThis study aims to investigate sex-based differences in the diabetes status and cognition relationship using a representative sample of older Americans.MethodsUsing a sample of 19,190 females and 15,580 males from the Health and Retirement Study, we conduct mixed-effects linear regression analyses to examine sex differences in the association between diabetes and cognition over a 20-year follow-up period among older adults in the United States.Main FindingsFemales experience slightly steeper declines in cognition that are further exacerbated by diabetes. At age 65, females without diabetes have significantly higher cognition than males; this gap is eliminated by age 85. Among diabetics, there is no initial sex disparity, but females’ cognition becomes significantly lower than males’ over the following 20 years.Principal ConclusionsRelative to males, females are particularly susceptible to diabetes-related declines in cognition with increasing age.
      Citation: Research on Aging
      PubDate: 2022-04-14T04:46:20Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01640275221084282
       
  • The Relationship Between Multimorbidity and Types of Chronic Diseases and
           Self-Rated Memory

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      Authors: Yujin Franco, Yuri Jang, Joseph L. Saenz, Jessica Y. Ho
      Abstract: Research on Aging, Ahead of Print.
      This study explores the impact of multimorbidity and types of chronic diseases on self-rated memory in older adults in the United States. Data were drawn from the 2011 wave of the National Health and Aging Trends Study (NHATS, N = 6,481). Logistic regressions were used to examine the associations between ㅠ multimorbidity and types of chronic diseases and fair/poor self-rated memory. Compared to respondents with no or one chronic disease, respondents with multimorbidity showed 35% higher odds of reporting fair/poor self-rated memory. Also, stroke, osteoporosis, and arthritis were identified as increasing the odds of reporting fair/poor self-rated memory by 41%, 20%, and 30%, respectively. Demonstrating the importance of both multimorbidity and types of chronic diseases in self-reporting of memory, our findings suggest the need to educate older adults with multimorbidity and certain types of diseases regarding negative self-rated memory and its consequences.
      Citation: Research on Aging
      PubDate: 2022-04-07T07:57:22Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01640275221087612
       
  • Political Trust, Mental Health, and the Coronavirus Pandemic: A
           Cross-National Study

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      Authors: Kyung Won Choi, Jong Hyun Jung, Harris Hyun-soo Kim
      Abstract: Research on Aging, Ahead of Print.
      Objectives: We investigate whether older adults who place greater trust in their political leadership fare better in terms of mental wellbeing during the COVID-19 pandemic. We also test if and how the trust-wellbeing relationship varies across individual- and country-level moderators. Methods: Based on cross-national data consisting of over 13,000 older adults in 66 countries, we estimate a series of multilevel models. Results: Within countries, political trust is significantly negatively associated with depressive symptoms. And this association is stronger for those who are subjectively less healthy. Between countries, the trust-depression link at the individual level is stronger in more “fragile” states. These findings are robust to a host of confounders including the experienced level of anxiety stemming from COVID-19. Discussion: During the novel coronavirus pandemic, political trust provides a significant mental health buffer for older adults. This protective role varies partly as a function of individual and contextual vulnerability.
      Citation: Research on Aging
      PubDate: 2022-04-05T08:19:44Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01640275221078959
       
  • Children’s Divorce and their Financial Support to Older Parents in
           Rural China

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      Authors: Zhen Cong, Yaolin Pei, Merril Silverstein, Shuzhuo Li, Bei Wu
      Abstract: Research on Aging, Ahead of Print.
      This study examined how adult children’s divorce affected their financial support to older parents in rural China and how that relationship was dependent on children’s gender. The sample was from rural Anhui Province and the working sample included 1629 older parents who reported their interactions with 6210 children across six waves of observations in 14 years (2001–2015). Generalized Estimating Equations showed that divorced sons provided less financial support to their parents than married sons. In contrast, divorced daughters did not necessarily provide less financial support than married daughters. This gender difference was statistically significant. The findings were discussed in the context of changing rural Chinese families, where the norm of filial piety is still strong but patrilineal tradition and gender ideology have experienced desynchronized changes.
      Citation: Research on Aging
      PubDate: 2022-04-01T07:11:43Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01640275221079400
       
  • Subjective Nearness-To-Death and Retirement Anxiety Among Older Workers: A
           Three-Way Interaction With Work Group Identification

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      Authors: Ariane Froidevaux, Yoav S. Bergman, Dikla Segel-Karpas
      Abstract: Research on Aging, Ahead of Print.
      Retirement anxiety represents a major challenge for older workers who hold negative expectations and concerns regarding the consequences of their future retirement. Although prior studies suggest that retirement is an age-related transition that may serve as a reminder that life is nearing its end, little is known about how subjective nearness-to-death is related to retirement anxiety, and the role of work group identification as a boundary condition. The current study draws on terror management and social identity theories to hypothesize and investigate these relationships. A three-way interaction model was tested on a sample of 327 Israeli older workers. We found a positive association between subjective nearness-to-death and retirement anxiety. Further, we demonstrated that the positive relationship between subjective nearness-to-death and retirement anxiety was more prominent for older workers whose work group self-definition and self-investment were both high or were both low. The theoretical and practical implications of these findings are discussed.
      Citation: Research on Aging
      PubDate: 2022-03-28T05:45:51Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01640275221079023
       
  • The Relationship Between Social Isolation and Mortality Among Adults Aged
           50 and Older in a 12-year Follow-Up Analysis in Mexico

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      Authors: Karla Moreno-Tamayo, Fatima Juárez, Betty Manrique-Espinoza, Gabriela Mejía-Pailles
      Abstract: Research on Aging, Ahead of Print.
      Social relationships have a complex nature shaped mainly by two dimensions: structure and function. Previous research raised the importance of considering both features simultaneously given that they may operate differently. However, research on social relationships and mortality mainly refers to European and U.S. populations. This study examines structural and functional features of social relationships to understand social isolation among adults aged 50 and older in Mexico. In addition, we analyze that association with mortality, using panel data from a 12-year follow-up from the Mexican Health and Aging Study (2003–2015). Results reveal that structural and functional features of social relationships are intertwined, and social isolation was shaped by two aspects that we label lack of socialization and being alone and feeling lonely. After controlling for a series of sociodemographic and health variables, Cox proportional hazard regression models indicate that both aspects significantly increase mortality among older adults in Mexico.
      Citation: Research on Aging
      PubDate: 2022-03-25T09:12:21Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01640275221078972
       
  • Children of the Revolution: The Impact of 1960s and 1970s Cultural
           Identification on Baby Boomers’ Views on Retirement

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      Authors: Orlaith Tunney, Kène Henkens, Hanna van Solinge
      Abstract: Research on Aging, Ahead of Print.
      There is widespread speculation that baby boomers will make significant changes to the retirement landscape. Some attribute these changes, at least in part, to countercultural movements this generation pioneered during the sixties and seventies. However, empirical investigation into the long-term impact of countercultural identification in youth is scarce. To address this, our study examines associations between baby boomers’ retirement views and identification with counterculture. Using data from 6024 pre-retired Dutch older workers, we investigate whether greater identification with counterculture is associated with more active retirement views. Our results show that greater identification with counterculture is associated with more active retirement views, even when controlling for potential confounders. Beyond highlighting the diversity of the baby boom generation, these findings support the idea that (counter)cultural identity in youth has an impact across the life course and may therefore have implications for other key questions of life’s third age beyond retirement.
      Citation: Research on Aging
      PubDate: 2022-03-25T07:51:47Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01640275211068456
       
  • Predictors of who Serves as an Alzheimer’s Disease Research
           Participant’s Study Partner and the Impact of their Relationship on
           Study Partners’ Reports on Participants

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      Authors: Shana D. Stites, Emily A. Largent, Jeanine Gill, Anna Gurian, Kristin Harkins, Jason Karlawish
      Abstract: Research on Aging, Ahead of Print.
      Background: Alzheimer’s disease and Alzheimer’s disease related dementias (AD/ADRD) research typically requires participants to enroll with a “study partner” (SP). Little is known about what predicts who steps into the SP role or whether the SP’s relationship to the participant affects their reports of disease severity.Methods: Health and Retirement Study data (HRS), collected prior to the Aging, Demographics and Memory Study (ADAMS), was used to identify sociocultural factors that predict who serves as a SP in ADAMS. SP-reported outcomes were compared between three types of participant-SP relationships: spousal, adult child, and other.Results: Spouses (35%) and adult children (39%) were similarly likely to serve as SPs. Factors predicting who served differed. In multivariable analyses, adult children rated participants less impaired than spouses on measures of memory, judgment, and organizational abilities (p < .05). Conclusions: The participant-SP relationship has independent effects on the SP’s reports of the severity of cognitive impairments.
      Citation: Research on Aging
      PubDate: 2022-03-24T07:50:25Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01640275221075739
       
  • Solitary Prosociality in Later Life: An Experience Sampling Study

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      Authors: Ajit Singh Mann, Jordan Boeder, Dwight C. K. Tse, Laura Graham, Jeanne Nakamura
      Abstract: Research on Aging, Ahead of Print.
      Loneliness is a risk factor for older adults, one exacerbated by the COVID-19 pandemic. Although time spent alone is associated with both loneliness and greater well-being, the experience of solitude may depend on the type of activity pursued. We examined formal prosocial activity as one facilitator of positive solitary experiences. Older adults (N = 165, Mage = 71.13, SD = 5.70) highly committed to prosocial-program work (e.g., tutoring) filled out surveys at six random times every day for a week. Using multilevel modeling, we investigated whether participating in prosocial-program activity alone was associated with greater well-being compared to other solitary activity. While prosocial-program activity did not buffer against negative affect in solitude, it promoted positive affect and relatedness when alone. To the extent that prosocial-program work can facilitate positive solitary experiences by enhancing feelings of connection, it may protect against threats to well-being posed by loneliness in later life.
      Citation: Research on Aging
      PubDate: 2022-03-10T08:23:07Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01640275211062124
       
  • Prospective Associations between Physical Activity and Memory in the
           Canadian Longitudinal Study on Aging: Examining Social Determinants

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      Authors: Nicole G. Hammond, Arne Stinchcombe
      Abstract: Research on Aging, Ahead of Print.
      ObjectivesTo examine associations between physical activity (PA) and prospectively assessed memory in a cohort of cognitively healthy adults, after accounting for understudied social determinants.MethodsWe used data from the Canadian Longitudinal Study on Aging (CLSA). PA (exposure) and memory (outcome) were assessed using validated measures in 2013–2015 and 2015–2018, respectively. Respondents reported their daily number of hours spent engaging in five different PAs. We conducted multiple imputation and used linear regression (n = 41,394), adjusting for five categories of covariates: demographics, sensory health characteristics, health behaviors, health status, and social determinants (sex/gender, education, income, social support, perceived social standing, race, and sexual orientation).ResultsIn crude models, nearly every intensity and duration of PA was associated with better memory. In fully adjusted models, protective associations were attenuated; however, some associations held: all durations of walking, most durations of light activities, moderate activities for ≥1 hour, and strenuous activities for 1 to
      Citation: Research on Aging
      PubDate: 2022-03-01T03:17:11Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01640275211070001
       
  • The Association Between Views of Aging and Subjective Cognitive Complaints
           in Older Adults: Findings From Two Samples

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      Authors: Gali H. Weissberger, Ehud Bodner, Yuval Palgi, Gitit Kavé, Dov Shmotkin, Amit Shrira
      Abstract: Research on Aging, Ahead of Print.
      This cross-sectional study examined whether views of aging (VoA) relate to subjective cognitive complaints in two separate cohorts of older adults. Ageist attitudes, attitudes to aging (psychological loss, physical change, and psychological growth), subjective age, and subjective successful aging were examined. A moderating effect of chronological age was also examined. Samples included 572 adults aged 50 or older (Sample 1; mean age = 67.63, SD = 11.39, 49.4% female) and 224 adults aged 65 or older (Sample 2; mean age = 81.50, SD = 6.61, 75.3% female). More negative VoA (higher ageist attitudes, lower psychological growth, lower physical change, older subjective age, and less successful aging) were associated with more subjective cognitive complaints after controlling for covariates. An increase in chronological age strengthened some of these associations. Findings suggest that improving dimensions of VoA may have a complementary positive effect on subjective cognitive complaints in older adults.
      Citation: Research on Aging
      PubDate: 2022-03-01T01:21:13Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01640275211065150
       
  • My Wife Is My Insurance Policy: Household Bargaining and Couples’
           Purchase of Long-Term Care Insurance

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      Authors: Sharon Tennyson, Hae Kyung Yang, Frances Woolley
      Abstract: Research on Aging, Ahead of Print.
      This paper examines household decisions over long-term care insurance (LTCI) purchases through a bargaining lens. Long-term care insurance purchase is a discrete decision around which spouses’ interests may diverge substantially. The cost of buying LTCI is typically borne by both spouses, but the benefits of LTCI go disproportionately to women, who are more likely to need long-term care for themselves, and to benefit from the asset protection and other support LTCI offers in the event their husband needs care. Using panel data on married couples ages 50–75 from the US Health and Retirement Study (HRS), we test and find support for the hypothesis that spouses’ relative bargaining power is related to LTCI purchase decisions. In particular, when husbands have final say in household decisions, LTCI coverage is less likely. The findings suggest that spouse’s relative bargaining power matters for health care choices and, therefore, for the welfare of older men and women.
      Citation: Research on Aging
      PubDate: 2022-02-28T06:39:34Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01640275211046322
       
  • Associations Between Gambling and Cognitive Function among U.S. Chinese
           Older Adults

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      Authors: Nannan Zhang, Mengting Li, XinQi Dong
      Abstract: Research on Aging, Ahead of Print.
      This study aims to examine the associations between gambling participation, problem gambling, and cognition. Data were derived from the PINE study. Gambling participation was measured by Modified South Oaks Gambling Screen. Problem gambling was assessed with Problem Gambling Severity Index. Cognition was measured by East Boston Memory Test, Digit Span Backward, Symbol Digit Modalities Test, and Mini-Mental State Examination. Of all participants, 41.940% were male. Higher gambling participation was significantly associated with higher global cognition (b = .008, SE = .003, p < .05), executive function (b = .118, SE = .049, p < .05), and episodic memory (b = .009, SE = .004, p < .05). Higher problem gambling was significantly related to lower Mini-Mental State Examination (b = -.105, SE = .031, p < .001). Guiding older adults’ gambling behaviors and intervening in problem gambling timely might be crucial for their cognitive function.
      Citation: Research on Aging
      PubDate: 2022-02-28T04:10:55Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01640275221074020
       
  • Changing Age Segregation in the US: 1990 to 2010

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      Authors: Debasree Das Gupta, David W. S. Wong
      Abstract: Research on Aging, Ahead of Print.
      Age segregation adversely impacts health and wellbeing. Prior studies, although limited, report increasing age segregation of the US. However, these studies are dated, do not comprehensively examine the spatiotemporal patterns and the correlates of intergenerational segregation, or suffer from methodological limitations. To address these gaps, we assess the spatiotemporal patterns of age segregation between 1990 and 2010 using census-tract data to compute the dissimilarity index (D) at the national, state, and county levels. Results contradict previous findings, providing robust evidence of decreasing age segregation for most parts of the country and across geographical levels. We also examine factors explaining adult-older adult segregation across counties between 1990 and 2010. Higher levels of rurality indicated lower levels of adult-older adult segregation, but this association diminished over time. Percent of older adults and percent of population in group quarters were inversely related to adult-older adult segregation, contrary to results from previous decades.
      Citation: Research on Aging
      PubDate: 2022-02-28T01:58:19Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01640275221074398
       
  • Concern About Falling, Confidence in Balance, Quality of Life, and
           Depression Symptoms in Community-Dwelling Older Adults After a 24-week
           Dual-Task Training With Variable and Fixed Priority: A Randomized
           Controlled Trial

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      Authors: Francis Trombini-Souza, Renata Taysa de Souza Azevedo Nogueira, Ana Cícera Batista Serafim, Thamires Medeiros Mendes de Lima, Michelle Katherine Andrade Xavier, Monica Rodrigues Perracini, Rodrigo Cappato de Araújo, Isabel CN Sacco, Marcelo de Maio Nascimento
      Abstract: Research on Aging, Ahead of Print.
      ObjectiveTo evaluate the effect of a 24-week dual-task training with progression from variable to fixed priority on the concern about falling, confidence in balance, quality of life, and depression symptoms in community-dwelling older adults.MethodsA total of 60 participants (60–80 y.o.) were randomly allocated into a dual-task training group with progression from variable to fixed priority (experimental group) or into a dual-task training group with variable priority (control group).ResultsNo between-group difference was observed after the intervention. A significant time effect showed a reduction in concern about falling [mean difference (MD) = -2.91)] and depression symptoms (MD = −1.66), an increase in the physical function (MD = 7.86), overall mental health (MD = 5.82), perception of vitality, energy, and less fatigue (MD = 10.45), general perception of overall health (MD = 6.81), and their health compared to the last year (MD = 11.89).ConclusionThe experimental protocol was not superior to the control one. However, both protocols improved these outcomes.
      Citation: Research on Aging
      PubDate: 2022-02-27T02:07:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01640275221073993
       
  • Responding to Disability Onset in the Late Working Years: What do Older
           Workers do'

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      Authors: Jody Schimmel Hyde, April Yanyuan Wu, Gina Livermore
      Abstract: Research on Aging, Ahead of Print.
      This study uses occupational data from the Health and Retirement Study to document the link between disability onset and occupational transitions among older adults who are working and do not report a disabling condition at age 55. We find that one-quarter of workers go on to experience new disabilities before full-retirement age. Relative to their peers who do not report disabilities, stopping work and significant occupational changes are more common among workers who experience new disabilities. Our results suggest that policies to support labor force attachment might consider the importance of new disability onset and whether employer accommodations might help workers with new disabling conditions remain in the jobs they held when their health began to limit their work.
      Citation: Research on Aging
      PubDate: 2022-02-25T10:14:19Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01640275221074634
       
  • Would It Kill You to Retire' Testing Short/Long Term/Recurrent Effects
           of Retirement on All-Cause Mortality Risk

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      Authors: Katsuya Oi
      Abstract: Research on Aging, Ahead of Print.
      This study traced all-cause mortality risk over the course of retirement and tested whether re-retirement impacts mortality risk differently than the first time. The study differentiated retirement on whether prompted by health (health retirement) or not (non-health retirement). Based on data from 1992 to 2016 Health and Retirement Study (HRS), the sample consists of 7747 women and 7958 men who were working at the baseline. Adjusting for physical health before/after retirement, the discrete-time logit model found increased mortality risk within the first year of non-health retirement only for men, regardless of physical health changes. Re-retirement did not raise mortality risk further. Furthermore, health retirement increased mortality for men and women but substantially less after their surviving the first year. The findings urge future study to explore non-physical pathways of an immediate mortality increase for men in retirement, as well as the monitoring of population trends in health retirement and its antecedents.
      Citation: Research on Aging
      PubDate: 2022-02-23T10:21:15Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01640275211068151
       
  • Changes in Attitudes Toward Aging, Older People and Elder Care From the
           Perspective of Former Migrant Care Workers

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      Authors: Liat Ayalon, Gražina Rapolienė
      Abstract: Research on Aging, Ahead of Print.
      Research on migrant home care workers has focused mainly on working conditions in the recipient countries and on the relationships between care recipients and their family members. However, because migrant care workers often are transnational, going back and forth between countries, some return to their home country, bringing with them newly acquired attitudes and practices. Based on a theoretical model of the transfer of innovation, this study aims to explore changes in attitudes toward aging and elder care among former migrant care workers. We conducted 13 in-depth interviews with migrant care workers who permanently returned to Lithuania. Data were analyzed thematically. Findings revealed changes in workers’ perceptions of aging, including perceptions of their own old age, older people, and elder care. These changes were mainly attributed to their personal connections and encounters with different cultural attitudes and practices in the host country. Our findings indicate that returning migrant home care workers may act as potential innovators who bring back to their home country new ideas about aging and elder care.
      Citation: Research on Aging
      PubDate: 2022-02-04T11:43:28Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01640275211069605
       
  • The Effects of Charitable Giving on Life Satisfaction of Older Korean
           

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      Authors: Hey Jung Jun, Miseon Kang, Do Kyung Yoon, Seol Ah Lee, Hayoung Park
      Abstract: Research on Aging, Ahead of Print.
      Objectives: This study investigates the effects of charitable giving on the life satisfaction of older Korean adults, examining the moderating role of relationship satisfaction and social trust, as the indicators for social capital. Methods: Nationally representative sample of individuals aged 65 to100 (N = 8,359) from the 2019 Social Survey was used for the analyses. Results: The results from Coarsened Exact Matching and Structural Equation Modeling show that charitable giving positively affects older Korean adults’ life satisfaction. Moreover, the results of moderation analyses suggest that the effects of charitable giving on life satisfaction are stronger for those with lower levels of relationship satisfaction and social trust. Discussion: The results imply that social capital, such as relationship satisfaction or social trust, needs to be taken into consideration when exploring the effects of charitable giving in later life.
      Citation: Research on Aging
      PubDate: 2022-01-21T08:18:15Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01640275211065441
       
  • What Could Interfere with a Good Night’s Sleep' The Risks of Social
           Isolation, Poor Physical and Psychological Health among Older Adults in
           China

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      Authors: Dan Zhang, Zhiyong Lin, Feinian Chen, Shuzhuo Li
      Abstract: Research on Aging, Ahead of Print.
      This study provides one of the first population-based investigations of the longitudinal association between social isolation and sleep difficulty among older adults in China. We analyzed three waves of longitudinal data from the China Longitudinal Aging Social Survey (2014–2018), in which 8456 respondents contributed 16,156 person-year observations. Results from multilevel logistic regression models showed that social isolation was related to a higher risk of sleep difficulty. We also found that socially isolated older adults were more likely to report higher levels of depressive symptoms, a greater prevalence of loneliness and pain, and more chronic diseases compared to their socially integrated counterparts, which in turn increased their risks of sleep difficulty. Moreover, socially isolated older adults with chronic diseases were particularly vulnerable to the risk of sleep difficulty. These findings provide helpful guidance for policymakers and practitioners to design effective intervention strategies to help older adults with sleep problems.
      Citation: Research on Aging
      PubDate: 2022-01-07T08:00:28Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01640275211065103
       
 
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