Subjects -> MANUFACTURING AND TECHNOLOGY (Total: 363 journals)
    - CERAMICS, GLASS AND POTTERY (31 journals)
    - MACHINERY (34 journals)
    - MANUFACTURING AND TECHNOLOGY (223 journals)
    - METROLOGY AND STANDARDIZATION (6 journals)
    - PACKAGING (19 journals)
    - PAINTS AND PROTECTIVE COATINGS (4 journals)
    - PLASTICS (42 journals)
    - RUBBER (4 journals)

PACKAGING (19 journals)

Showing 1 - 17 of 17 Journals sorted alphabetically
Asian Journal of Shipping and Logistics     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Canadian Journal on Aging     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
European Journal of Ageing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Food Packaging and Shelf Life     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
IEEE Transactions on Components and Packaging Technologies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
International Journal of Aging and Human Development     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Aerosol Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Applied Packaging Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Electronic Packaging     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Journal of Manufacturing and Materials Processing     Open Access  
Journal of Microelectronics and Electronic Packaging     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Packaging Technology and Research     Hybrid Journal  
Packaging Technology and Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Packaging, Transport, Storage & Security of Radioactive Material     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Psychology and Aging     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Rejuvenation Research     Hybrid Journal  
Research on Aging     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Psychology and Aging
Journal Prestige (SJR): 1.661
Citation Impact (citeScore): 3
Number of Followers: 16  
 
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
ISSN (Print) 0882-7974 - ISSN (Online) 1939-1498
Published by APA Homepage  [89 journals]
  • Are older adults more risky readers' Evidence from meta-analysis.

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      Abstract: According to an influential account of aging effects on reading, older adults (65+ years) employ a more “risky” reading strategy compared to young adults (18–30 years), in which they attempt to compensate for slower processing by using lexical and contextual knowledge to guess upcoming (i.e., parafoveal) words more often. Consequently, while older adults may read more slowly, they might also skip words more often (by moving their gaze past words without fixating them), especially when these are of higher lexical frequency or more predictable from context. However, this characterization of aging effects on reading has been challenged recently following several failures to replicate key aspects of the risky reading hypothesis, as well as evidence that key effects predicted by the hypothesis are not observed in Chinese reading. To resolve this controversy, we conducted a meta-analysis of 102 eye movement experiments comparing the reading performance of young and older adults. We focused on the reading of sentences displayed normally (i.e., without unusual formatting or structures, or use of gaze-contingent display-change techniques), conducted using an alphabetic script or Chinese, and including experiments manipulating the frequency or predictability of a specific target word. Meta-analysis confirmed that slower reading by older compared to younger adults is accompanied by increased word-skipping, although only for alphabetic scripts. Meta-analysis additionally showed that word-skipping probabilities are unaffected by age differences in word frequency or predictability effects, casting doubt on a central component of the risky reading hypothesis. We consider implications for future research on aging effects on reading. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2022 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Mon, 31 Jan 2022 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • The influence of verbatim versus gist formatting on younger and older
           adults’ information acquisition and decision-making.

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      Abstract: Fuzzy-Trace Theory suggests that decision makers encode gist representations (bottom-line meaning) and verbatim representations (details) of information but rely more on gist, a tendency that increases with age. The present study examined implications for age differences in information seeking and decision-making by presenting gist and verbatim formatted choice scenarios. Participants comprised 68 younger and 66 older adults. Predecisional information seeking, indices of decision outcomes and recall, and relevant covariates were assessed. In line with theory, older adults self-reported and demonstrated stronger preferences for gist-based processing than younger adults did. Consistent with hypotheses, the total number of reviewed grid cells (including repeat views) was higher for gist than verbatim conditions, and this effect was stronger among older adults. Also, the proportion of unique cells reviewed and the accuracy of decision attribute recall were higher in the verbatim than gist condition and these effects were stronger among younger versus older adults. Further, gist formatting was associated with stronger use of option-wise information search, more value-concordant decisions (i.e., choices aligning with self-reported choice preferences), and decreased choice satisfaction, but these effects did not vary by age. Covariates, including information-processing preferences, partially accounted for these effects. Consistent with Fuzzy-Trace Theory, this suggests that information formatting and preferences modulate age differences in predecisional information acquisition: Depending on age, using either verbatim or gist formatting to communicate information can offer different benefits. Across age groups, however, gist formatting may facilitate value-concordant (and arguably higher-quality) decision-making. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2022 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Thu, 27 Jan 2022 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Emotional reactivity to daily stressors: Does stressor pile-up within a
           day matter for young-old and very old adults'

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      Abstract: Over the past decade, many studies have reported individual differences in negative emotional reactions to daily stressful events. However, whether and how individual and age-related differences in emotional reactivity also depend on the temporal characteristics of stressors has received little attention. In this project, we focused on the temporal characteristics of stressor occurrence and examined the pile-up of stressors within a day—referring to multiple stressors encountered within a relatively narrow time window. To do so, we used data from 123 young-old (66–69 years, 47% women) and 47 very old adults (84–90 years, 60% women). Participants reported their momentary feelings and exposure to stressors six times a day over 7 consecutive days in their everyday life. Emotional reactivity to stressor pile-up over the day followed an exponential decay trajectory, with higher stressor burden in close proximity to the stressor occurrence. The exact shape of the decay trajectory differed among participants. Most importantly, both stressor pile-up and ongoing stress predicted greater emotional reactivity. We also found interaction effects of stressor pile-up and current stressor occurrence in that increases in negative affect under ongoing stress were stronger when stressors had piled-up before. No evidence was found for increased vulnerability to stressor pile-up in very old adults; rather, the impact of preceding stressors attenuated faster for individuals in this age group. The findings highlight the utility of comprehensively studying how stressor characteristics such as their pile-up within short time periods shape emotional reactivity. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2022 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Thu, 30 Dec 2021 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Well-being trajectories of middle-aged and older adults and the corona
           pandemic: No “COVID-19 effect” on life satisfaction, but increase in
           depressive symptoms.

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      Abstract: The coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic has led to profound changes in individuals’ lives and might have meaningful implications for well-being. We investigated if and how two major indicators of well-being (life satisfaction and depressive symptoms) changed in Germany from a prepandemic measurement occasion (2017) to June/July 2020, the time of the fading first wave of COVID-19. This change was compared with prepandemic change between 2014 and 2017. We also analyzed whether change in well-being varied according to age, self-rated health, corona-specific attitudes, and subjective standard of living. Ten thousand seven-hundred and ninety three individuals had taken part in at least one of the measurement occasions between 2014 and 2020 (mean age in 2014: 64.30 years; SD = 11.58 years). Based on latent change score models controlling for baseline well-being and sociodemographic indicators, we found, across both time intervals (2014–2017, 2017–2020) and independent of individuals’ age, a small mean-level increase in life satisfaction. In contrast, depressive symptoms increased from 2017 to 2020, particularly among older participants, whereas they remained, on average, stable between 2014 and 2017. Individuals with a poorer self-rated health, who felt more threatened by the pandemic and whose subjective standard of living was lower revealed a decrease in life satisfaction and a steeper increase in depressive symptoms between 2017 and 2020. Our findings thus suggest that whereas life satisfaction remained quite stable, the pandemic was, already 3–4 months after its onset in Germany, accompanied by an increase in depressive symptoms, particularly among adults who were older, felt less healthy and were more concerned about COVID-19. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2022 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Thu, 30 Dec 2021 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Relative effectiveness of general versus specific cognitive training for
           aging adults.

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      Abstract: In the present study, we examined three experimental cognitive interventions, two targeted at training general cognitive abilities and one targeted at training specific instrumental activities of daily living (IADL) abilities, along with one active control group to compare benefits of these interventions beyond expectation effects, in a group of older adults (N = 230). Those engaged in general training did so with either the web-based brain game suite BrainHQ or the strategy video game Rise of Nations, while those trained on IADL skills completed instructional programs on driving and fraud awareness. Active control participants completed sets of puzzles. Comparing baseline and postintervention data across conditions, none of the preregistered primary outcome measures demonstrated a significant interaction between session and intervention condition, indicating no differential benefits. Analysis of expectation effects showed differences between intervention groups consistent with the type of training. Those in the IADL training condition did demonstrate superior knowledge for specific trained information (driving and finances). Twelve months after training, significant interactions between session and intervention were present in the primary measure of fraud detection, as well as the secondary measures of the letter sets task and Rey’s Auditory Verbal Learning Test. However, the specific source of these interactions was difficult to discern. At 1-year follow-up those in the IADL condition did not maintain superior knowledge of driving and finances gained through training, as was present immediately postintervention. Hence, the interventions, when compared to an active control condition, failed to show general or specific transfer in a meaningful or consistent way. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2022 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Thu, 30 Dec 2021 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Age differences in sadness reactivity and variability.

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      Abstract: Sadness is a negative emotion typically elicited by loss experiences. Given that losses increase with age, sadness should be relatively salient in this life phase. Such sadness experiences may serve an adaptive function in old age, if they facilitate detachment from unattainable goals. Thus, we predicted increased and less variable levels of sadness to occur among older, as compared with younger, adults in response to film clips involving loss-related themes. To test this prediction, a sample of 52 younger (Mage = 23.75 years, SD = 4.52) and 52 older adults (Mage = 71.21 years, SD = 6.11) watched four films and reported their sadness on multiple occasions during each film. In partial support of the hypotheses, the results showed that older, as compared with younger, adults reported greater sadness in response to one out of four film clips. However, there was no conclusive evidence for age differences in sadness variability within or across the films. Additional analyses revealed that age differences were not significant for another emotion, anxiety, in neither reactivity nor variability. Finally, although there were no age differences in mean levels of interest in the films, interest showed less variability among older, as compared with younger, adults. These findings are discussed from the perspective of a discrete emotions theory proposing distinct functions and associated differential age-related changes for different negative emotions. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2022 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Thu, 23 Dec 2021 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Quality of experience in prosocial activity and intent to continue: An
           experience sampling study.

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      Abstract: According to socioemotional selectivity theory (SST), older adults prefer activities that provide immediate experiential rewards—specifically, emotionally meaningful experiences—but research is needed to establish the posited association. We conducted an experience sampling study of older adults intensively serving formal prosocial programs, which can offer them meaningful social roles, N = 165; Mage (SD) = 71.13 (5.70), range = 60–88. Consistent with SST, intention to continue serving one’s prosocial program in the future was positively associated with emotional meaning (EM) experienced within the prosocial-program activity. This association was not amplified by age within this older group. Instead, dispositional EM interacted negatively with age (stronger, positive relationship with future intentions among younger old). Our findings illuminate the possibility that socioemotional selection based on experiences during prosocial-program activity may contribute to the continuity of specific prosocial endeavors in late adulthood. Future research should assess the EM–prosocial endeavors relationship across a wider age range. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2022 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Thu, 23 Dec 2021 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Predictability effects and parafoveal processing in older readers.

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      Abstract: Normative aging is accompanied by visual and cognitive changes that impact the systems that are critical for fluent reading. The patterns of eye movements during reading displayed by older adults have been characterized as demonstrating a trade-off between longer forward saccades and more word skipping versus higher rates of regressions back to previously read text. This pattern is assumed to reflect older readers’ reliance on top-down contextual information to compensate for reduced uptake of parafoveal information from yet-to-be fixated words. However, the empirical evidence for these assumptions is equivocal. This study investigated the depth of older readers’ parafoveal processing as indexed by sensitivity to the contextual plausibility of parafoveal words in both neutral and highly constraining sentence contexts. The eye movements of 65 cognitively intact older adults (61–87 years) were compared with data previously collected from young adults in two sentence reading experiments in which critical target words were replaced by valid, plausible, related, or implausible previews until the reader fixated on the target word location. Older and younger adults showed equivalent plausibility preview benefits on first-pass reading measures of both predictable and unpredictable words. However, older readers did not show the benefit of preview orthographic relatedness that was observed in young adults and showed significantly attenuated preview validity effects. Taken together, the data suggest that older readers are specifically impaired in the integration of parafoveal and foveal information but do not show deficits in the depth of parafoveal processing. The implications for understanding the effects of aging on reading are discussed. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2022 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Mon, 29 Nov 2021 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • COVID-19 and perceiving finitude: Associations with future time
           perspective, death anxiety, and ideal life expectancy.

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      Abstract: The coronavirus pandemic threatens the health, future, and life of individuals and might hence accentuate perceptions of the fragility and finitude of life. We investigated how different perceptions of the pandemic (regarding the virus as a health threat and perceiving social and financial restrictions due to the pandemic) relate to different perceptions of life’s finitude (i.e., future time perspective, death anxiety, and ideal life expectancy). Using longitudinal data from 1,042 adults (68% women; aged 18–95 years) gathered within the first and within the second peak of the pandemic in Germany, we expected decreases in future time perspective and ideal life expectancy, as well as increases in death anxiety in response to threatening perceptions of the pandemic. The results indicated decreasing future time perspectives, an accentuation of death anxiety right at the beginning of the pandemic, as well as stable ideal life expectancies. There was a tendency for more pronounced change among older adults. Initial levels and changes in the perceptions of finitude could partly be explained by initial and changing perceptions of the pandemic. Next to perceptions targeting the threat of the virus itself, perceptions of strong social and financial restrictions during the pandemic contributed to an altered stance toward the finitude of life. Concluding, we discuss stability and variation in perceptions of the finitude of life during a time of major societal change and a potentially life-threatening pandemic. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2022 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Mon, 29 Nov 2021 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Future time perspective and personality trait change during the retirement
           transition: Insights from a six-wave longitudinal study in Sweden.

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      Abstract: The present study examined associations between two future time perspective (FTP) dimensions (perceived opportunities and perceived time) and the Big Five personality traits during older adulthood, a developmental period that has received limited attention in personality development. Specifically, it tested whether FTP dimensions were cross-sectionally associated with personality traits, as well as if they predicted changes on those traits during a time when participants were transitioning to retirement. Participants from the Health, Ageing and Retirement Transitions in Sweden (HEARTS) study (N = 5,913, Mage = 63.09 years) reported on their FTP at the initial assessment and on their Big Five personality traits on six assessments 1 year apart. Latent growth curve models were fit to examine FTP as a predictor of level and change in the Big Five traits over time, with perceived time and opportunities included as unique predictors. Results found that broader FTP was associated with higher extraversion, agreeableness, openness to experience, and conscientiousness, but lower neuroticism initially. However, results indicated associations were stronger and sometimes only significant for perceived opportunities not time. Regarding FTP as a predictor of personality trait change, modest evidence was found that perceived opportunities predicted changes in neuroticism and openness over time. The present study extends past work by showing the importance of capturing different components of FTP when examining personality traits during older adulthood. Research needs to further explore the longitudinal predictive effects of FTP, focusing on more proximal assessments and how FTP changes during retirement. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2022 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Mon, 04 Oct 2021 00:00:00 GMT
       
 
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