Subjects -> JOURNALISM AND PUBLICATION (Total: 219 journals)
    - JOURNALISM (31 journals)
    - JOURNALISM AND PUBLICATION (148 journals)
    - NEW AGE PUBLICATIONS (8 journals)
    - PUBLISHING AND BOOK TRADE (32 journals)

JOURNALISM (31 journals)

Showing 1 - 27 of 27 Journals sorted by number of followers
Convergence The International Journal of Research into New Media Technologies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 49)
Financial Times     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 38)
Critical Studies in Media Communication     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
Journalism Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Journalism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Journal of International and Intercultural Communication     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Media, War & Conflict     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Journalism Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
British Journalism Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Applied Journalism & Media Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
IEEE Transactions on Professional Communication     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
International Journal of Press/Politics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
New Writing The International Journal for the Practice and Theory of Creative Writing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Australian Journalism Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Asian Journal of Information Management     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Bronte Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Publizistik     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Media Practice and Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Technical Communication     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Women's Writing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Sports Media     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
African Journalism Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
MATRIZes : Revista do Programa de Pós-Graduação em Comunicação da Universidade de São Paulo     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Electronic News     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Asia Pacific Media Educator     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Ambitos     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Modern Periodical Studies     Full-text available via subscription  
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IEEE Transactions on Professional Communication
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.845
Citation Impact (citeScore): 2
Number of Followers: 12  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0361-1434
Published by IEEE Homepage  [228 journals]
  • IEEE Professional Communication Society Information

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Presents a listing of the editorial board, board of governors, current staff, committee members, and/or society editors for this issue of the publication.
      PubDate: Dec. 2022
      Issue No: Vol. 65, No. 4 (2022)
       
  • IEEE Transactions on Professional Communication Information for Authors

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      Abstract: These instructions give guidelines for preparing papers for this publication. Presents information for authors publishing in this journal.
      PubDate: Dec. 2022
      Issue No: Vol. 65, No. 4 (2022)
       
  • IEEE Professional Communication Society Information

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Presents a listing of the editorial board, board of governors, current staff, committee members, and/or society editors for this issue of the publication.
      PubDate: Dec. 2022
      Issue No: Vol. 65, No. 4 (2022)
       
  • 2022 Index IEEE Transactions on Professional Communication Vol. 65

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      Pages: 1 - 7
      Abstract: Presents the 2022 author/subject index for this issue of the publication.
      PubDate: Dec. 2022
      Issue No: Vol. 65, No. 4 (2022)
       
  • A Corpus-Assisted Critical Discourse Analysis of News Construction of the
           Flint Water Crisis

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      Authors: Yeqing Kong;
      Pages: 450 - 466
      Abstract: Background: News media play a critical role in communicating risks and shaping public perceptions of social issues. Covering a multilayered disaster that grew from a local story to a national one, the ways that news media at different levels construct the Flint water crisis have not been previously explored. Literature review: Despite the well-established role of journalism as a government watchdog, news media do not neutrally mirror every social event. Instead, news reporting, highly mediated by language, is filled with political interests, values, and attitudes. Research questions: 1. How did local/regional and national newspapers construct the Flint water crisis? 2. Are there any similarities and/or differences in local/regional and national news construction of the Flint water crisis? 3. What are the practical implications for media coverage of risks, emergencies, or crises? 4. What are the methodological implications of this study for professional communication research? Methodology: This study integrates corpus linguistics and critical discourse analysis to analyze 1858 news reports about the Flint water crisis published between 2014 and 2018. I use keywords as a core analytical technique to compare the local/regional and national news coverage. Results: The results show that both local and national news reports overemphasized government activities while downplaying the unofficial voices of Flint residents and community activists. In addition, national newspapers were more likely than local newspapers to use racial cues in describing the Flint community and to associate the crisis with other social problems. Conclusions: This study suggests that news media should provide wide coverage of the affected community's ef-orts in risk/crisis communication rather than reproducing official messages. News representations should be cautious of strengthening stereotypes or forming negative conceptual associations of traditionally disenfranchised communities.
      PubDate: Dec. 2022
      Issue No: Vol. 65, No. 4 (2022)
       
  • Power, Freedom, and Privacy on a Discipline-and-Control Facebook, and the
           Implications for Internet Governance

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      Authors: Ming Cheung;Zhen Troy Chen;
      Pages: 467 - 484
      Abstract: Background: The proliferation and penetration of social media into professional and everyday lives have reshaped the way in which people deal with their personal information and call for refreshed perceptions and conceptualizations of the power relationship between individual users and technology giants. Despite intensified privacy concerns and crises over social media, there is little research on the correlations between users’ privacy perception and protection in non-Western settings. Research question: To what extent are Hong Kong Facebook users willing to sacrifice control over their information in exchange for self-expression, sociality, and intimacy in their social roles and relationships? Literature review: We first identified a gap in the literature on user perceptions and concerns over privacy in Eastern cultures, which is scarce despite the increasing concern over privacy in professional communication. Informed by the recent literature on the privacy paradox and Foucault and Deleuze's work on power, the unbalanced and normalizing power relationship between Facebook and its users in Eastern contexts is identified as a synthesis of discipline and control. Research methodology: Data from a survey of 797 young users in Hong Kong were used for our analysis of privacy perception and protection. The survey contained three sections: Facebook usage, attitudes and behaviors, and basic demographics. Results: The findings support our hypotheses in revealing that the privacy paradox is evident for Facebook users in Hong Kong. In addition, excessive Facebook use leads to reactive privacy awareness and normalization behaviors. Conclusion: We believe that technology giants, such as Facebook, should be pioneers in safeguarding users’ privacy while encouraging the establishment of social relationships and freedom of expre-sion. The implications for internet governance are discussed from a multistakeholder perspective.
      PubDate: Dec. 2022
      Issue No: Vol. 65, No. 4 (2022)
       
  • Minimalism for the Win: User-Centered Design for Guidance in Industrial
           Maintenance

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      Authors: Hanna Heinonen;Jenni Virtaluoto;Tiia Suomivuori;Kristian Forsman;Tuomas Kangas;Sanni Siltanen;
      Pages: 485 - 501
      Abstract: We conducted an exploratory study to test the delivery of technical instructions built on the principles of minimalism. The aim was to investigate how we could support target users’ skill levels in a context-sensitive manner. Literature review: Related work examines minimalism, user needs and profiling, and industrial maintenance and technician experience. Research questions: 1. How can the semantic structure of DITA XML be utilized in delivering technical information to users based on their skill levels? 2. How would a layered system of information support the principles of minimalism? Methodology: We created material and tested the concept in user studies with maintenance personnel in three countries. We collected feedback through participant observation, interviews, and questionnaires. Results and discussion: The minimalist approach of delivering information to maintenance technicians was well received and supported users with varying skill levels. Conclusion: The context-sensitive level of expertise concept empowers users to decide on the depth of technical information that they require to complete the task at hand. The semantic structure of DITA XML works well in the delivery of technical information to the users based on their skill levels. Many of the key principles of minimalism are applicable to hardware maintenance instructions.
      PubDate: Dec. 2022
      Issue No: Vol. 65, No. 4 (2022)
       
  • Connecting Twitter With Scholarly Networks: Exploring HCI Scholars’
           Interactions From an SNA Approach

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      Authors: Long-Jing Hsu;Weijane Lin;Hsiu-Ping Yueh;
      Pages: 502 - 515
      Abstract: Background: Building a reputable network on Twitter is viewed as impactful in several scholarly disciplines, but little is known about the professional and interdisciplinary human-computer interaction (HCI) community. This study combined two approaches from scholarly communication and technical communication to capture the static and dynamic features of the HCI scholar Twitter network. Literature review: Related studies that described the scholarly reputation built through Twitter and social networking in the field of HCI were reviewed and discussed. Research questions: 1. In which countries are HCI scholars more likely to follow their peers in the same country? 2. What are the characteristics (country, reputation) and actions (reciprocity) of HCI scholars who are more likely to build HCI scholarly network profiles on Twitter? Research methodology: The network analysis method of the exponential random graph model (ERGM) was adopted to trace and visualize current follower networks on Twitter. Results and discussion: We found that 22.9% of HCI scholars use Twitter and that reciprocity and country of current employment best drive the Twitter connections of scholars. Characteristics of HCI scholars’ tie formation online are also illustrated and discussed. Implications for practice: This study contributes to field studies of professional networks by identifying the structural properties and factors that influence scholars’ search for professional development on Twitter. The empirical findings should be a helpful reference for HCI professional societies and individual scholars in operating online professional networks.
      PubDate: Dec. 2022
      Issue No: Vol. 65, No. 4 (2022)
       
  • Heuristic Evaluation Versus Guideline Reviews: A Tale of Comparing Two
           Domain Usability Expert's Evaluation Methods

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      Authors: Sehrish Nizamani;Saad Nizamani;Nazish Basir;Gulsher Laghari;Khalil Khoumbati;Sarwat Nizamani;
      Pages: 516 - 529
      Abstract: Background: The usability of university websites is important to ascertain that they serve their intended purpose. Their usability can be evaluated either by testing methods that rely on actual users or by inspection methods that rely on experts for evaluation. Heuristic evaluation and guideline reviews are two inspection methods of usability evaluation. A heuristic evaluation consists of a few general heuristics (rules), which are limited to checking general flaws in the design. A guideline review uses a much larger set of guidelines/suggestions that fit a specific business domain. Literature review: Most of the literature has equated usability studies with testing methods and has given less focus to inspection methods. Moreover, those studies have examined usability in a general sense and not in domain- and culture-specific contexts. Research questions: 1. Do domain- and culture-specific heuristic evaluation and guideline reviews work similarly in evaluating the usability of applications? 2. Which of these methods is better in terms of the nature of evaluation, time needed for evaluation, evaluation procedure, templates adopted, and evaluation results? 3. Which method is better in terms of thoroughness and reliability? Research methodology: This study uses a comparative methodology. The two inspection methods—guideline reviews and heuristic evaluation—are compared in a domain- and the culture-specific context in terms of the nature, time required, approach, templates, and results. Results: The results reflect that both methods identify similar usability issues; however, they differ in terms of the nature, time duration, evaluation procedure, templates, and results of the evaluation. Conclusion: This study contributes by providing insights for practitioners and researchers about the choice of an evaluation method for domain- and culture-specific evaluation of university websites.
      PubDate: Dec. 2022
      Issue No: Vol. 65, No. 4 (2022)
       
  • So, You Have to Write a Literature Review: A Guided Workbook for
           Engineers: Catherine G. P. Berdanier and Joshua B. Lenart: [Book Review]

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      Authors: Nancy Barr;
      Pages: 530 - 531
      Abstract: The book offers a range of plans including a 32-week plan to craft chapter-length literature reviews for a dissertation, a 16-week plan for those more time-crunched or experienced, an 8-week plan for the “highly motivated” or those with shorter literature review requirements such as for a conference paper, and finally two-week and one-week plans for the truly desperate. Activities in each chapter take the writer step-by-step through the process of preparing the review for evaluation by an advisor. The book is further divided into 12 chapters, the last of which is geared more toward advisors and writing instructors. This book fills a long-standing gap in resources for novice research writers. Too often, graduate students receive feedback on only grammar and punctuation issues—surface concerns—rather than the structure and clarity of their narratives. Berdanier and Lenart provide a step-by-step guide for graduate students, postdoctoral researchers, and new graduate advisors in writing effective, impactful literature reviews, the backbone of journal articles that get cited and grant proposals that get funded. Not to be overlooked, though, are writing center coaches, who often see engineering students and faculty in their sessions but may not have the background to feel comfortable providing guidance on such projects. At a minimum, this book is a must-have for engineering graduate students seeking a path through one of the more challenging writing tasks early in their careers.
      PubDate: Dec. 2022
      Issue No: Vol. 65, No. 4 (2022)
       
  • Writing Futures: Collaborative, Algorithmic, Autonomous: Ann Hill Duin and
           Isabel Pedersen: [Book Review]

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      Authors: Alan Houser;
      Pages: 532 - 533
      Abstract: The authors of the book present a broad survey of technologies and applications of AI as they particularly impact technical and professional communications. This book presents a broad treatment of its subjects, particularly given the framework of social implications, necessary literacy, and civic engagement that the authors use to explore the three facets of writing futures: collaboration, algorithms, and autonomous agents. The work is a survey of many technologies, applications, and developments, any of which may or may not play a substantial future role in the future of writing. Some of the authors’ examples may seem tangential to the TPC profession, but one cannot always predict future effects. The authors situate the book as “positioning scholars, instructors, and practitioners to plan for rapidly evolving technological and social contexts.” With its broad coverage of emerging technologies, rich citations, and wealth of backing resources, Writing Futures provides a launching point for deeper, focused study in the myriad areas of collaborative technologies, autonomous agents, and AI as they profoundly impact the TPC profession and the human experience.
      PubDate: Dec. 2022
      Issue No: Vol. 65, No. 4 (2022)
       
  • Assembling Critical Components: A Framework for Sustaining Technical and
           Professional Communication: Joanna Schreiber and Lisa Melonçon: [Book
           Review]

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      Authors: Varun Gupta;Chetna Gupta;
      Pages: 534 - 535
      Abstract: This book provides a compilation of scholarly chapters that focus on the various components of technical and professional communication (TPC) that, together, give it a distinct identity, and that must be sustainable. Reflection and upkeep of TPC components maintain the longevity of its identity. By critically analyzing what these fragments signify collectively as an identity, it is possible to develop a perspective that is durable for visualizing the TPC identity. Some of the TPC components included in this work are genres, ethics, procedural knowledge, procedural discourse, sociotechnical contexts, applied rhetoric, and participatory action research. The book’s 10 chapters are divided into three sections, each of which is underpinned by a strong research technique, strong theoretical foundation, and the authors’ real-world experiences. This book may be helpful to academics, industry professionals, and students alike. It provides professionals with a novel viewpoint on several TPC facets across various application fields, such as biomedical writing. This book offers a deep understanding of TPC and focuses on several intriguing subjects, such as intercultural and transnational dimensions, and accessibility and disability. One of the strengths of the book is the abundance of real-world examples and research studies with trustworthy research protocols spread throughout several chapters. This book is undoubtedly a great resource for learning about the subject, its trends, and new problems that may arise in the future.
      PubDate: Dec. 2022
      Issue No: Vol. 65, No. 4 (2022)
       
 
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