Subjects -> JOURNALISM AND PUBLICATION (Total: 219 journals)
    - JOURNALISM (31 journals)
    - JOURNALISM AND PUBLICATION (148 journals)
    - NEW AGE PUBLICATIONS (8 journals)
    - PUBLISHING AND BOOK TRADE (32 journals)

JOURNALISM (31 journals)

Showing 1 - 27 of 27 Journals sorted by number of followers
Convergence The International Journal of Research into New Media Technologies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 49)
Financial Times     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 38)
Critical Studies in Media Communication     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
Journalism Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Journalism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Journal of International and Intercultural Communication     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Media, War & Conflict     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Journalism Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
British Journalism Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Applied Journalism & Media Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
IEEE Transactions on Professional Communication     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
International Journal of Press/Politics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
New Writing The International Journal for the Practice and Theory of Creative Writing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Australian Journalism Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Asian Journal of Information Management     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Bronte Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Publizistik     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Media Practice and Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Technical Communication     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Women's Writing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Sports Media     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
African Journalism Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
MATRIZes : Revista do Programa de Pós-Graduação em Comunicação da Universidade de São Paulo     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Electronic News     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Asia Pacific Media Educator     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Ambitos     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Modern Periodical Studies     Full-text available via subscription  
Similar Journals
Journal Cover
International Journal of Press/Politics
Journal Prestige (SJR): 2.458
Citation Impact (citeScore): 3
Number of Followers: 12  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1940-1612 - ISSN (Online) 1940-1620
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1176 journals]
  • ‘Keeping an Eye on the Other Side’ RT, Sputnik, and Their Peculiar
           Appeal in Democratic Societies

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      Authors: Charlotte Wagnsson, Torsten Blad, Aiden Hoyle
      Abstract: The International Journal of Press/Politics, Ahead of Print.
      The reach of illiberal international propaganda outlets rests on citizens in democratic countries as recipients and potential disseminators. However, little research has scrutinised the audiences for such platforms. Why do audiences in democratic states consume content from such outlets, and how far do they actually align with it ideologically' The present research seeks to address this gap. Building on and extending the recent research findings of a large-scale survey, interviews with Swedish media consumers were conducted between 23 March and 13 April 2022, providing a unique close-up on a group of media consumers who stated that they consumed, among other alternative media, the Russian state-sponsored media outlets RT and Sputnik as part of their media diet. The findings, elicited through interviews and the Q-sort method, challenge previous research that presents this audience in a one-dimensional way. First, we investigate their alignment with different political narratives, identifying three different profiles. Although only one profile generally aligned with the RT/Sputnik messaging, almost all the participants appreciate the content and share it on social media. Secondly, we examine their rationale for consumption, revealing a diverse array of motivations, and leading us to theorise four distinct consumption profiles: Distant Observers, Reluctant Consumers, Media Nihilists and Establishment Critics. We interpret these results and discuss their broader implications, before reflecting on the complexities of characterising audiences consuming authoritarian international broadcasting.
      Citation: The International Journal of Press/Politics
      PubDate: 2023-01-18T08:19:34Z
      DOI: 10.1177/19401612221147492
       
  • The Medium and the Message in Argentina's Presidential Campaigns

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      Authors: Kevin Pallister, Erin Fitzpatrick
      Abstract: The International Journal of Press/Politics, Ahead of Print.
      Do campaigns message to voters consistently across different media' And do competing candidates tend to converge over time on a single national style of campaign messaging' To address these questions, this article employs novel data from a content analysis of campaign spots and candidate tweets from the 2015 and 2019 presidential elections in Argentina. We find that the policy orientation of candidate messaging is similar across different media, with spots and tweets addressing specific issues in similar proportions. We also find that, consistent with the theory of success contagion, campaign messaging across candidates and election cycles varies along a wide range of variables as candidates have failed to converge on a similar campaigning style. Contrary to expectations drawn from prior research, we find that candidate tweets contain policy content and attacks on opponents just as often as do campaign spots.
      Citation: The International Journal of Press/Politics
      PubDate: 2023-01-06T06:43:45Z
      DOI: 10.1177/19401612221149272
       
  • Book Review: The Routledge Companion to Political Journalism by James
           Morrison, Jen Birks, and Mike Berry

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      Authors: Denis Muller
      Pages: 326 - 327
      Abstract: The International Journal of Press/Politics, Volume 28, Issue 1, Page 326-327, January 2023.

      Citation: The International Journal of Press/Politics
      PubDate: 2022-11-10T06:17:50Z
      DOI: 10.1177/19401612221132527
      Issue No: Vol. 28, No. 1 (2022)
       
  • Just a “Mouthpiece of Biased Elites'” Populist Party Sympathizers
           and Trust in Czech Public Service Media

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      Authors: Klára Smejkal, Jakub Macek, Lukáš Slavík, Jan Šerek
      Abstract: The International Journal of Press/Politics, Ahead of Print.
      Existing research indicates that people with populist attitudes express lower trust in media, especially in Public Service Media. It is assumed that these people are alienated because of their values: populist ideology stems from anti-pluralism whereas Public Service Media promotes pluralism. This study tests this assumption by comparing the predictors of trust in Public Service Media between the populist party sympathizers and the sympathizers of other political parties in the Czech Republic. Two main expectations were included as predictors for trust in Public Service Media, specifically that media should conform to one's worldview (i.e., the cohesive dimension of trust in media) and that media should adhere to the normative standards of journalism (i.e., the normative dimension of trust in media). Using multigroup structural equation modeling, the study analyzes data from a 2019–2020 representative survey of the adult Czech population (N  =  3,251). The results suggest that, for the populist party sympathizers, trust in Public Service Media links only to their expectation that media should conform to their worldview, while the sympathizers of other political parties expect normative standards to be maintained. This is interpreted and discussed as support for the assumption that this value-based mismatch links to the populist audience members' lower trust in Public Service Media.
      Citation: The International Journal of Press/Politics
      PubDate: 2022-12-07T06:41:37Z
      DOI: 10.1177/19401612221143067
       
  • Gender Imbalance in the Media: Time Lag or Hysteresis'—French
           Newspapers, Gender Parity Shocks, and the Long and Winding Road to the
           Demasculinization of Political Reporting (1990–2020)

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      Authors: Gilles Bastin
      Abstract: The International Journal of Press/Politics, Ahead of Print.
      A large corpus of scientific literature details how the media generates an imbalance in their portrayal of society and thus contributes to the reproduction of extant power structures, particularly gender. However, there has been scant attention paid to understanding how the media adapt to changes in the social environment, especially with power structures modified by exogenous shocks such as new laws requiring gender parity in politics. This study examines how such shocks affected gender imbalance in the coverage of politics in France between 1990 and 2020. It highlights the shortcomings of an overly linear approach to the time lag effect in understanding the parameters and substance of gender imbalance in political news and advocates instead for utilizing the concept of gender imbalance hysteresis to understand why media stories do not demasculinize as quickly as the gender composition of Parliament.
      Citation: The International Journal of Press/Politics
      PubDate: 2022-12-02T06:41:22Z
      DOI: 10.1177/19401612221143074
       
  • Who Fact-checks and Does It Matter' Examining the Antecedents and
           Consequences of Audience Fact-Checking Behaviour in Hong Kong

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      Authors: Stella C. Chia, Fangcao Lu, Albert C. Gunther
      Abstract: The International Journal of Press/Politics, Ahead of Print.
      This study investigated the ways in which people engaged in fact-checking in a highly divided context—the Anti-Extradition Bill Movement (AEBM) in Hong Kong. A telephone survey representative of the Hong Kong population was conducted in 2020 (N = 1,004). The findings showed that males with greater news consumption and issue involvement were more likely to engage in fact-checking behavior. Nevertheless, the effects of fact-checking appeared mixed. We first found that fact-checking behavior reduced belief in disagreeable misinformation only for supporters of the AEBM. More robust evidence showed that frequent fact-checking behavior reinforced, rather than reduced, partisans’ belief in misinformation regarding the opponent group. A warning of the backfire effects of fact-checking on exacerbating opinion polarization and social division is issued.
      Citation: The International Journal of Press/Politics
      PubDate: 2022-12-02T06:40:03Z
      DOI: 10.1177/19401612221142439
       
  • Bringing History back into Media Systems Theory. Multiple Modernities and
           Institutional Legacies in Latin America

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      Authors: Martin Echeverria, Rubén Arnoldo González, Vıctor Hugo Reyna
      Abstract: The International Journal of Press/Politics, Ahead of Print.
      Since Hallin and Mancini's (2004) seminal work, many scholars from around the world have proposed different models of media systems for countries and regions outside the Western world. Particular challenges have arisen when conceptualizing the systems in Latin America, where shifting liberal and polarized pluralist models have been proposed, and where media traits like clientelism and collusion remain in spite of political, economic and social changes. We contend that one obstacle to the characterization of the resilience of certain structures and practices in this region is the lack of a historical perspective to account for specific processes of media modernization. Drawing on the multiple modernization paradigm, as well as on post-colonial theories, system differentiation theories of the Global South, and theories of uneven regional development, we understand Latin American modernization processes as the appropriation, adaptation, or rejection of certain elements of Western institutions, ideals and values. In media systems, this might produce: (a) centralization of power, (b) a struggle between elites, (c) state-driven differentiation, and (d) regional or local subsystems. Our historical perspective aims to explain the prevalence of several media structures, and show how institutional legacies yield core media traits, in order to pave the way for further model inference.
      Citation: The International Journal of Press/Politics
      PubDate: 2022-11-25T08:15:03Z
      DOI: 10.1177/19401612221141315
       
  • Book Review: The Journalism Manifesto by Barbie Zelizer, Pablo J.
           Boczkowski, & C. W. Anderson

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      Authors: Alfred Hermida
      Abstract: The International Journal of Press/Politics, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: The International Journal of Press/Politics
      PubDate: 2022-11-11T04:08:26Z
      DOI: 10.1177/19401612221138198
       
  • Looking in the Mirror: US and French Coverage of Black Lives Matter in
           France

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      Authors: Erik Bleich, Amelia Pollard, A. Maurits van der Veen
      Abstract: The International Journal of Press/Politics, Ahead of Print.
      We demonstrate how sociological theories of discursive opportunity structures illuminate key elements of US and French media coverage of Black Lives Matter (BLM) in France. Fundamental discursive differences between the two countries shape the visibility, resonance, and legitimacy of claims made on behalf of racially identified groups. A textual analysis of thirty-five articles from each country that discuss BLM and France published between 2015 and 2020 reveals that the US journalists commonly identify BLM activists as members of marginalized communities, interpret French circumstances as similar to the racial dynamics found in the United States, critique France's “republican” model of citizenship, and are relatively positively disposed toward BLM activity in France. By comparison, French coverage largely eschews identifying actors by racial identities, avoids or rejects comparisons with the United States, and at times contains implicit or explicit valorization of the French color-blind republican model, with some authors casting BLM as a product of the excesses of the American system. Our findings demonstrate the relevance of discursive opportunity structure theories to comparative media analysis, suggesting that coverage of race-based movements abroad may respond to different dynamics than coverage within the United States.
      Citation: The International Journal of Press/Politics
      PubDate: 2022-10-19T07:16:41Z
      DOI: 10.1177/19401612221132729
       
  • Compromise-Building in the Spotlight of the Media' Individual and
           Situational Influences on the Self-Mediatization of Parliamentary
           Negotiations

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      Authors: Gerrit Philipps
      Abstract: The International Journal of Press/Politics, Ahead of Print.
      Political actors in negotiations often face the challenge of contradictory logics of discreet compromise-building on the one hand and generating media publicity to enhance transparency and gain public support on the other. This paper examines how members of parliament (MPs) handle this dilemma within intra-coalition parliamentary negotiations that are essential for legislative decision-making. By referring to the mediatization approach, the concept of self-mediatization of political negotiation systems is introduced to theoretically capture politicians’ self-initiated media publications regarding negotiations and associated changes in their negotiation behavior. It is hypothesized that the self-mediatization of negotiations is influenced by negotiators’ general tendency to seek media attention as well as situational pressures and incentives. The hypotheses were tested with a factorial survey among German state-level MPs (n = 258) using experimental vignettes. Results show that both individual and situational factors affect parliamentarians’ tendency to publicly communicate about negotiations and consequently negotiate in a more news-media-logic-compatible, that is, more conflictual, manner. However, since the surveyed MPs on average show a high willingness to agree with their coalition partner on the explicit secrecy of negotiations, independent of the influencing parameters examined, self-mediatization does not seem to be an existential threat to the intra-coalition compromise-building capacity of parliamentary negotiation systems.
      Citation: The International Journal of Press/Politics
      PubDate: 2022-10-17T06:40:45Z
      DOI: 10.1177/19401612221132719
       
  • Ideology, Polarization, and News Culture: The Secular-Islamist Tension in
           Turkish Journalism

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      Authors: Ozan Aşık
      Abstract: The International Journal of Press/Politics, Ahead of Print.
      What role does political ideology play in the production of news in a contentious cultural context' To address this question, this article investigates how Turkish Islamic conservative journalists produced and circulated representations of two dramatic uprisings in 2013: the Gezi Park protests in Turkey and the military coup in Egypt. I chose these two cases because the Islamic political bias and activism that shaped the production of news about these two events are symptomatic of the way in which Islamism as a political ideology instrumentalizes news making. Based on newsroom ethnography conducted at an Islamic national mainstream television channel in Turkey between 2011 and 2014, the article demonstrates how Islamism shapes the ways in which Islamic conservative journalists interpreted and articulated the two events in the newsroom, and represented them in news coverage. In this context, journalistic practice gains an ideological character when the journalists utilize journalistic representations as strategic instruments to advance the political agenda of Islamic conservatives against secular forces in Turkey. As the polarization between Islamic and secular groups is based on cultural distinctions, I argue that the political ideology determining journalistic practices is defined not only by party affiliations or socioeconomic class positions but also by the common cultural ways of living and thinking of journalists who work and live as members of a sociocultural group. Islamic ideology serves as a social cement that creates bonds among the IslamicTV journalists as a sociocultural group, and a degree of unity and common purpose in their professional practices.
      Citation: The International Journal of Press/Politics
      PubDate: 2022-10-13T07:17:48Z
      DOI: 10.1177/19401612221132716
       
  • Diffusion-Proofing Protest Paradigm: Mass Media and China's Prevention of
           Social Movement Spillover During the Hong Kong Anti-Extradition Law
           Amendment Bill Movement

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      Authors: Vincent Guangsheng Huang, Xueqing Li
      Abstract: The International Journal of Press/Politics, Ahead of Print.
      Studies on the “protest paradigm” have long explored how a society's mass media system frames the social movements occurring within that society. This study adopts a social movement diffusion perspective to sharpen the transborder dimension of the protest paradigm. Specifically, we introduce the concept of the “diffusion-proofing” protest paradigm, given that an understudied and undertheorized function of the protest paradigm is the prevention of the import of exogenous social movements. Taking the Hong Kong Anti-Extradition Law Amendment Bill Movement as an example, we investigate how mainland China's mass media acted to prevent movement diffusion. Four transborder components of the diffusion-proofing protest paradigm are proposed: reactions, attributions, consequences, and solutions. Through content analysis, we argue that by highlighting these transborder components, China's newspapers attributed the movement's rise to foreign intervention, emphasized the movement's negative effects on both Hong Kong and mainland China, and revealed the uncompromising nature of China's reaction and the urgency of cross-border cooperation for containing the movement and its diffusion. Further, we identify two modes of reporting: a mainly descriptive mode that relied on a local framework to depict the movement and its local context and an evaluative mode that emphasized the level of deviance and foreign intervention, thus amplifying the movement's transborder effects and the need to prevent its diffusion. Notably, the level of deviance acts as a mediating channel between the two modes, transforming the local framework into a transborder one. The diffusion-proofing protest paradigm is also found to vary across media types and periods.
      Citation: The International Journal of Press/Politics
      PubDate: 2022-09-02T06:25:26Z
      DOI: 10.1177/19401612221123243
       
  • How Information Flows from the World to China

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      Authors: Yingdan Lu, Jack Schaefer, Kunwoo Park, Jungseock Joo, Jennifer Pan
      Abstract: The International Journal of Press/Politics, Ahead of Print.
      Government censorship—internet shutdowns, blockages, firewalls—impose significant barriers to the transnational flow of information despite the connective power of digital technologies. In this paper, we examine whether and how information flows across borders despite government censorship. We develop a semi-automated system that combines deep learning and human annotation to find co-occurring content across different social media platforms and languages. We use this system to detect co-occurring content between Twitter and Sina Weibo as Covid-19 spread globally, and we conduct in-depth investigations of co-occurring content to identify those that constitute an inflow of information from the global information ecosystem into China. We find that approximately one-fourth of content with relevance for China that gains widespread public attention on Twitter makes its way to Weibo. Unsurprisingly, Chinese state-controlled media and commercialized domestic media play a dominant role in facilitating these inflows of information. However, we find that Weibo users without traditional media or government affiliations are also an important mechanism for transmitting information into China. These results imply that while censorship combined with media control provide substantial leeway for the government to set the agenda, social media provides opportunities for non-institutional actors to influence the information environment. Methodologically, the system we develop offers a new approach for the quantitative analysis of cross-platform and cross-lingual communication.
      Citation: The International Journal of Press/Politics
      PubDate: 2022-08-08T07:03:36Z
      DOI: 10.1177/19401612221117470
       
  • Government Digital Repression and Political Engagement: A Cross-National
           Multilevel Analysis Examining the Roles of Online Surveillance and
           Censorship

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      Authors: Michael Chan, Jingjing Yi, Dmitry Kuznetsov
      Abstract: The International Journal of Press/Politics, Ahead of Print.
      Much research has shown that online news engenders greater political participation, but less attention has been paid to how the relationship can be suppressed by government online surveillance and censorship, especially as Internet freedoms continue to decline in many parts of the world. Drawing from 2017–20 World Value Survey and Varieties of Democracy project data, we conducted multilevel analyses across forty-four countries from seven continents that have different political and media systems. Results showed that online news and online surveillance were positively related to political engagement while online censorship was negatively related. Cross-level interactions also showed some support for the informational theory of repression, whereby the relationships among online news, surveillance, and engagement were conditioned at different levels of online censorship. The results suggest that while country-level online surveillance and censorship is highly correlated, varying levels can engender or suppress political engagement in different ways, which have implications for future studies on the dynamics of government digital repression and citizen participation in politics from a global comparative perspective.
      Citation: The International Journal of Press/Politics
      PubDate: 2022-08-04T07:28:59Z
      DOI: 10.1177/19401612221117106
       
  • Protesting the Protest Paradigm: TikTok as a Space for Media Criticism

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      Authors: Ioana Literat, Lillian Boxman-Shabtai, Neta Kligler-Vilenchik
      Abstract: The International Journal of Press/Politics, Ahead of Print.
      Though news representations of protest have been studied extensively, little is known about how media audiences critique such representations. Focusing on TikTok as a space for media criticism, this article examines how users employ the app to respond to representations of protest in mainstream news media. Content collected in the spring of 2021 illuminated two very distinct foci of discussion about news representations of protest: the Black Lives Matter movement and the Capitol riot. Our qualitative content analysis of TikTok videos and their related comments demonstrates how users employed TikTok’s creative affordances to dissect specific news representations, critique the media apparatus, and expand news narratives. These findings shed light on the complex role of TikTok as a platform for media criticism—one that can be used for both democratic and non-democratic ends.
      Citation: The International Journal of Press/Politics
      PubDate: 2022-08-01T07:45:23Z
      DOI: 10.1177/19401612221117481
       
  • The Watchdog Press in the Doghouse: A Comparative Study of Attitudes about
           Accountability Journalism, Trust in News, and News Avoidance

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      Authors: Antonis Kalogeropoulos, Benjamin Toff, Richard Fletcher
      Abstract: The International Journal of Press/Politics, Ahead of Print.
      The watchdog role has been one of the most widely discussed normative functions of the press. In this study, we examine the public’s attitudes toward the news media’s watchdog performance and how they correlate with trust in news and news avoidance, two important phenomena for democracy and the health of the public sphere. We further examine how individual predispositions (e.g. political interest, ideology) and contextual variables (e.g. press freedom) moderate these relationships. Based on data from the 2019 Reuters Institute Digital News Report, and controlling for a range of factors, we find that across 38 countries, watchdog performance evaluations are positively associated with trust in news but that they are also positively associated with higher levels of news avoidance. Last, we find that evaluations of media in other functions like helping citizens understand the most important topics of the day and choosing relevant topics were more strongly associated to trust in news and lower news avoidance levels than watchdog performance evaluations.
      Citation: The International Journal of Press/Politics
      PubDate: 2022-07-14T08:10:18Z
      DOI: 10.1177/19401612221112572
       
  • Election Campaigns, News Consumption Gaps, and Social Media: Equalizing
           Political News Use When It Matters'

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      Authors: Atle Haugsgjerd, Rune Karlsen
      Abstract: The International Journal of Press/Politics, Ahead of Print.
      We investigate how inequalities in political media use develop throughout election campaigns, and in particular whether social media use helps counterbalance traditional news consumption gaps. Using a four-wave individual-level panel survey of the Norwegian 2017 national election campaign, we run a series of latent growth models to investigate whether differences in news consumption based on gender, age, education, and political interest increase or decrease during campaigns. We find that news consumption gaps are either stable or converge throughout the campaign. Importantly, social media provides political information to those groups that use traditional media channels the least and thereby reduce overall gaps in political media consumption. In this way, election campaigns, to some extent, equalize inequalities in political news consumption when it matters the most.
      Citation: The International Journal of Press/Politics
      PubDate: 2022-07-11T03:33:20Z
      DOI: 10.1177/19401612221112014
       
  • Selective Exposure and New Political Cleavages: Media Use and Ideological
           Reinforcement Over Time

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      Authors: Adam Shehata, Mats Ekström, Per Oleskog Tryggvason
      Abstract: The International Journal of Press/Politics, Ahead of Print.
      New political cleavages are reshaping the political landscape in established democracies. The classic left-right ideological dimension that has structured politics for decades is increasingly challenged by a sociocultural value dimension. At the same time, growing opportunities for media choice open for new forms of selective news exposure along political lines. We argue that previous research has too narrowly focused on traditional ideological cleavages, neglecting the increasingly important sociocultural value dimension of politics. Using four waves of panel survey data collected in Sweden during 2020 and 2021, this study analyses ideological selective exposure, audience composition, and reinforcing spirals across a range of mainstream and alternative news outlets. Findings show (1) that the sociocultural value dimension is more important than the socioeconomic dimension for explaining news choices, (2) that it structures news audiences in uniquely distinct ways, and (3) that these relationships are highly stable over time—reflecting patterns of de facto selective exposure and ideological maintenance, rather than reinforcement. These findings bring new insights to research on selective news exposure, political polarization, and changing ideological cleavages in Western democracies.
      Citation: The International Journal of Press/Politics
      PubDate: 2022-07-11T03:33:04Z
      DOI: 10.1177/19401612221112003
       
  • Power Struggles in a Small Town Community: The Intersection of Rural
           Environmental Protest, Politics, and Hyperlocal News Media

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      Authors: Julie Freeman, Brett Hutchins
      Abstract: The International Journal of Press/Politics, Ahead of Print.
      This article presents an in-depth case study of large-scale conflict in a small town, and reveals the complex ways that community groups and activism, hyperlocal news media, and political power intersect through rural environmental disputes. An important but under-recognized feature of such conflicts is the unique role performed by notions of rurality in the construction of environmental protests, discourses, and decisions; that is, the ways in which rural communities’ conservation efforts can be unfairly characterized as “backwards” and “anti-development”. Through a series of interviews and focus groups with protestors and residents, our case study examines a controversial boat ramp development that had a marked environmental impact on the isolated coastal town of Mallacoota (population 1,000) in the state of Victoria, Australia. We show that the environmental activism of protesters lifted the issue's visibility to the level of regional, state, and national news and politics. But the community consultation processes that occurred in response to protests raise significant concerns about government decision making that fails to acknowledge and negotiate the diverse understandings of place and rurality that exist within a community. The outcomes of struggles for power in this small town are lamentable and lasting, damaging the hyperlocal news environment and undermining the community newspaper's reputation among citizens.
      Citation: The International Journal of Press/Politics
      PubDate: 2022-07-06T06:50:31Z
      DOI: 10.1177/19401612221112029
       
  • Trump Lies, Truth Dies' Epistemic Crisis and the Effect of False
           Balance Reporting on Beliefs About Voter Fraud

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      Authors: Matthew David Jenkins, Daniel Gomez
      Abstract: The International Journal of Press/Politics, Ahead of Print.
      Media scholars have long recognized the potential for falsely balanced reporting to distort public opinion, but existing empirical evidence is inconclusive. In this study, we examine the effect of falsely balanced reporting and explicit journalistic intervention on perceptions of voter fraud in U.S. elections through original internet survey experiments conducted in the United States shortly before and after the 2020 U.S. presidential election held on November 3, 2020. The results show that exposure to falsely balanced reporting largely has a null effect on perceptions of voter fraud, though we also find evidence of partisan-based heterogeneity in its effect. The results of the study also show that explicit journalistic intervention equally decreases belief in voter fraud among both Democrats and Republicans before the election, but among Republicans the corrective effect of intervention disappears in the post-election period, suggesting that there are sharp contextual limits on the effect of explicit journalistic intervention.
      Citation: The International Journal of Press/Politics
      PubDate: 2022-07-06T06:50:15Z
      DOI: 10.1177/19401612221111997
       
  • How Climate Movement Actors and News Media Frame Climate Change and
           Strike: Evidence from Analyzing Twitter and News Media Discourse from 2018
           to 2021

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      Authors: Kaiping Chen, Amanda L. Molder, Zening Duan, Shelley Boulianne, Christopher Eckart, Prince Mallari, Diyi Yang
      Abstract: The International Journal of Press/Politics, Ahead of Print.
      Twitter enables an online public sphere for social movement actors, news organizations, and others to frame climate change and the climate movement. In this paper, we analyze five million English tweets posted from 2018 to 2021 demonstrating how peaks in Twitter activity relate to key events and how the framing of the climate strike discourse has evolved over the past three years. We also collected over 30,000 news articles from major news sources in English-speaking countries (Australia, Canada, United States, United Kingdom) to demonstrate how climate movement actors and media differ in their framing of this issue, attention to policy solutions, attribution of blame, and efforts to mobilize citizens to act on this issue. News outlets tend to report on global politicians’ (in)action toward climate policy, the consequences of climate change, and industry's response to the climate crisis. Differently, climate movement actors on Twitter advocate for political actions and policy changes as well as addressing the social justice issues surrounding climate change. We also revealed that conversations around the climate movement on Twitter are highly politicized, with a substantial number of tweets targeting politicians, partisans, and country actors. These findings contribute to our understanding of how people use social media to frame political issues and collective action, in comparison to the traditional mainstream news outlets.
      Citation: The International Journal of Press/Politics
      PubDate: 2022-06-20T03:59:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/19401612221106405
       
  • Neither Absent nor Ambient: Incidental News Exposure From the Perspective
           of News Avoiders in the UK, United States, and Spain

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      Authors: Ruth Palmer, Benjamin Toff
      Abstract: The International Journal of Press/Politics, Ahead of Print.
      Scholars have long argued that incidental news exposure (INE) is a potentially valuable way citizens gain political information and learn about current affairs. Yet growing scholarship on news avoidance suggests many people still manage to consume little news, and algorithmic curation may decrease the likelihood that they will be exposed to it incidentally. In this article, we put the literatures on INE, news avoidance, and political talk into dialogue with one another. Then, by inductively analyzing over a hundred in-depth interviews conducted from 2016 to 2020 with news avoiders in the UK, Spain, and the United States, we explore how they encounter news incidentally and to what extent they feel the news is accessible and available to them. Our audience-centric approach highlights that interviewees often did not make a clear distinction between direct encounters with professional news (“firsthand news”) and discussions of news (“secondhand news”), especially online. When they did make a distinction, the latter was often more salient for them. We also find that just as news consumers have repertoires of news sources on which they habitually rely, news avoiders have repertoires of sources for incidental exposure to news to stay informed about major events and anything that might affect them directly. And yet, those repertoires catch only the biggest and most sensational stories of the day and do little to help them contextualize or understand the news they encounter, contributing to their sense that news is neither entirely absent nor ambient in the way scholars have theorized.
      Citation: The International Journal of Press/Politics
      PubDate: 2022-06-09T03:32:55Z
      DOI: 10.1177/19401612221103144
       
  • My Voters Should See This! What News Items Are Shared by Politicians on
           Facebook'

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      Authors: Tobias Heidenreich, Jakob-Moritz Eberl, Petro Tolochko, Fabienne Lind, Hajo G. Boomgaarden
      Abstract: The International Journal of Press/Politics, Ahead of Print.
      Political actors play an increasingly important role in the dissemination of political information on social media. However, relatively little is known about the mechanisms why specific news items are shared with the support base instead of others. For a timespan between December 2017 and the end of 2018, we combine the analysis of Facebook content from 1,022 politicians associated with 20 political parties from Germany, Spain, and the UK, with an automated content analysis of media coverage from 22 major online news outlets, and survey data in a multilevel binomial regression approach. By comparing news items that have been shared by one or several political parties with news items that have not been shared by any of them, we overcome the selection biases of previous studies in the field of news dissemination. Findings show that a news item's likelihood to be shared by a politician increases (1) if that politician's party is mentioned in the news item, (2) the more salient their party's owned issues are in the news item, and (3) the more party supporters tend to read the news outlet in which the news item is published. We contextualize these findings in light of political actors’ multi-faceted motivations for news sharing on social media and discuss how this process potentially reinforces an information bias that may contribute to the polarization and fragmentation of audiences.
      Citation: The International Journal of Press/Politics
      PubDate: 2022-06-07T05:22:22Z
      DOI: 10.1177/19401612221104740
       
  • Troublemakers in the Streets' A Framing Analysis of Newspaper Coverage
           of Protests in the UK 1992[math]2017

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      Authors: Johannes B. Gruber
      Abstract: The International Journal of Press/Politics, Ahead of Print.
      Research indicates that when mainstream news media report about demonstrations, protesters often face delegitimizing coverage. This phenomenon, known as the “(journalistic) protest paradigm,” is thought to be a default mindset that leads journalists to emphasize the method of protesters over their message. However, empirical work has so far limited itself to specific protest movements or events and only covers brief periods. This study first identifies and then codes the main frames in all reports about domestic protest in the United Kingdom. Analysing data that covers eight national newspapers during a 26 year period (N = 27,496), I provide a more systematic understanding of how the mainstream news media in liberal democracies report about protests. The analysis shows that a stable majority of articles uses frames linked to the protest paradigm throughout the time period. However, a substantial and growing number of articles employ legitimizing frames—either on their own or co-existing with delegitimizing framing.
      Citation: The International Journal of Press/Politics
      PubDate: 2022-05-23T05:36:44Z
      DOI: 10.1177/19401612221102058
       
  • Distract and Divert: How World Leaders Use Social Media During Contentious
           Politics

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      Authors: Pablo Barberá, Anita R. Gohdes, Evgeniia Iakhnis, Thomas Zeitzoff
      Abstract: The International Journal of Press/Politics, Ahead of Print.
      How do leaders communicate during domestic crises' We provide the first global analysis of world leader communication on social media during social unrest. We develop a theory of leaders’ digital communication strategies, building on the diversionary theory of foreign policy, as well as research on the role of democratic institutions in explaining elite responsiveness. To test our theory, we construct a new dataset that characterizes leader communication through social media posts published by any head of state or government on Twitter or Facebook, employing a combination of automated translation and supervised machine learning methods. Our findings show that leaders increase their social media activity and shift the topic from domestic to foreign policy issues during moments of social unrest, which is consistent with a conscious strategy to divert public attention when their position could be at risk. These effects are larger in democracies and in particular in the run-up to elections, which we attribute to incentives created by democratic institutions. Our results demonstrate how social media provide meaningful comparative insight into leaders’ political behavior in the digital age.
      Citation: The International Journal of Press/Politics
      PubDate: 2022-05-23T05:35:48Z
      DOI: 10.1177/19401612221102030
       
  • How Do Populists Visually Represent ‘The People’' A Systematic
           Comparative Visual Content Analysis of Donald Trump and Bernie Sanders’
           Instagram Accounts

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      Authors: Benjamin Moffitt
      Abstract: The International Journal of Press/Politics, Ahead of Print.
      How do populists visually represent “the people”' While the literature on populism has tended to focus on text- and language-based documents, such as speeches, policies, and party documents to consider how populists characterize “the people,” in this article I undertake a systematic visual content analysis to consider how populist leaders on either side of the ideological spectrum visually represent “the people” in images from their official Instagram accounts (N = 432). Comparing the cases of Donald Trump on the populist right and Bernie Sanders on the populist left, I code for the majority gender, race, and age of “the people” in each image, and supplement this with a discussion of the depictions of these categories. I find that Trump’s images of “the people” are significantly more homogenous across all categories—specifically more white, more masculine, and with less young people—than Sanders’, and situate these findings in the context of the literature on the differences between left and right populism. This article contributes to the study of populist communication by highlighting the role of images in representing “the people”; analyzing how left and right populists do this differently; and developing a method for measuring the demographic characteristics of “the people” in populists’ images that can be used in future studies. In doing so, it seeks to push the literature forward by highlighting that images are not something “extra” to be studied in populist communication, but rather are a central battleground for the construction of populist identities.
      Citation: The International Journal of Press/Politics
      PubDate: 2022-05-19T04:28:16Z
      DOI: 10.1177/19401612221100418
       
  • No Laughing Matter: Armin Laschet and the Photographic Exposé

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      Authors: Thomas Olesen
      Abstract: The International Journal of Press/Politics, Ahead of Print.
      On July 17, 2021, the CDU's chancellor candidate Armin Laschet was photographed laughing during a speech by the German Federal President in the flood-stricken city of Erftstadt. The photographic images caused an uproar and contributed to the CDU's defeat in the September 23 election. The paper analyzes why these images resonated with such damaging effects. Theoretically, it sets the analysis on the background of the moralization and personalization of politics and argues that photography, with its ability to capture behavior at a distance, plays a prominent role in these processes. While this condition explains why an image of a laughing politician can generate such indignation in the first place, the paper discusses how this effect was amplified in the case of Laschet by a range of contextual features: (a) the timing of the images in the middle of an election period where politicians come under intense scrutiny; (b) their appearance in a crisis situation (the German flooding disaster) where politicians are surrounded by other role expectations than in routine periods; (3) Laschet's new, insecure position as leader of the CDU; (d) his history of scandals and poor political judgment; and (e) the frivolous and boisterous manner of his laughter. At a general theoretical level, the paper's insights caution us to avoid prima facie conclusions about the autonomous power of photographs. Instead, they encourage analytical sensitivity to the importance of timing and context as explanatory elements in our understanding of photographic exposés.
      Citation: The International Journal of Press/Politics
      PubDate: 2022-05-17T05:07:25Z
      DOI: 10.1177/19401612221102027
       
  • Online and Offline Battles: Usage of Different Political Conflict Frames

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      Authors: Emma van der Goot, Sanne Kruikemeier, Jeroen de Ridder, Rens Vliegenthart
      Abstract: The International Journal of Press/Politics, Ahead of Print.
      Conflict framing is key in political communication. Politicians use conflict framing in their online messages (e.g., criticizing other politicians) and journalists in their political coverage (e.g., reporting on political tensions). Conflicts can take a variety of forms and can provoke different reactions. However, the literature still lacks a systematic and theoretically-grounded conceptual framework that accounts for the multi-dimensionality of political conflict frames. Based on literature from political epistemology, political communication, and related fields such as psychology, we present four conceptual dimensions of political conflicts: (1) the style (civil/uncivil); (2) the subject (personal/substantive); (3) whether it is about underlying moral/epistemic principles or not (deep/superficial conflict); and (4) whether it concerns a normative or factual issue. Results of a content analysis of newspaper articles and politicians’ tweets confirm the usage of these conflict dimensions in the Netherlands during a non-election period. Interestingly, most of the conflicts are civil, substantive, and do not highlight deep fundamental clashes. In light of the current societal concerns about the lack of respect in political debates and the deepening of our political divides, these findings can be considered encouraging.
      Citation: The International Journal of Press/Politics
      PubDate: 2022-04-27T08:40:29Z
      DOI: 10.1177/19401612221096633
       
  • From Statistics to Stories: Indices and Indicators as Communication Tools
           for Social Change

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      Authors: Lauren Kogen
      Abstract: The International Journal of Press/Politics, Ahead of Print.
      The terms ‘indices’ and ‘indicators’ may immediately cause eyelids to droop. How, then, might they serve to impassion publics and, ultimately, promote social change' This paper examines the extent to which indices and indicators can be considered communication tools for social movements and social change. The analysis is based on a 2018 evaluation of one index based in the United States – the Ranking Digital Rights Index, which assesses privacy and freedom of expression in the ICT space – and incorporates interviews with civil society stakeholders. Bringing theory from the fields of journalism and social movements together with the data from the evaluation, the findings suggest indices can serve as useful communication resources for social movements under certain circumstances. In particular, the analysis suggests three communication resources – legitimate information, newsworthy information, and flexible information – that human rights indices are most likely to provide.
      Citation: The International Journal of Press/Politics
      PubDate: 2022-04-15T05:51:02Z
      DOI: 10.1177/19401612221094246
       
  • News, Threats, and Trust: How COVID-19 News Shaped Political Trust, and
           How Threat Perceptions Conditioned This Relationship

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      Authors: Ernesto de León, Mykola Makhortykh, Teresa Gil-Lopez, Aleksandra Urman, Silke Adam
      Abstract: The International Journal of Press/Politics, Ahead of Print.
      This study explores shifts in political trust during the outbreak of the COVID-19 pandemic in Switzerland, examining the role that media consumption and threat perceptions played in individuals’ trust in politics. We combine panel surveys taken before and during the first nation-wide lockdown with webtracking data of participants' online behaviour to paint a nuanced picture of media effects during the crisis. Our work has several findings. First, political trust, an attitude known for its stability, increased following lockdown. Second, consumption of mainstream news on COVID-19 directly hindered this increase, with those reading more news having lower over-time trust, while the relatively minor alternative news consumption had no direct effect on political trust. Third, threat perceptions a) to health and b) from the policy response to the pandemic, have strong and opposite effects on political trust, with threats to health increasing trust, and threats from the government policy response decreasing it. Lastly, these threat perceptions condition the effect of COVID-19 news consumption on political trust: perceptions of threat had the power to both exacerbate and mute the effect of media consumption on government trust during the pandemic. Notably, we show that the expected negative effect of alternative news on political trust only exists for those who did not think COVID-19 posed a threat to their health, while public service news consumption reduced the negative effect produced by government threat perceptions. The paper therefore advances our understanding of the nuanced nature of media effects, particularly as relates to alternative media, especially during moments of crisis.
      Citation: The International Journal of Press/Politics
      PubDate: 2022-04-13T07:10:44Z
      DOI: 10.1177/19401612221087179
       
  • Power Hierarchies and Visibility in the News: Exploring Determinants of
           

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      Authors: Ximena Orchard, Bastián González-Bustamante
      Abstract: The International Journal of Press/Politics, Ahead of Print.
      This article studies determinants of political actors’ visibility in the news, and their stability over time, observing the press coverage received by Chilean politicians in the elite press since the beginning of the democratic transition in 1991 and until 2019. In dialogue with theories of news values, we test how political positions in a markedly presidential system, the belonging to a government coalition, gender, and the association to conflict frames behave as determinants of the presence and prominence of politicians in the news in the three decades following the recovery of democracy in Chile. We have three key findings. Firstly, the visibility of political actors in the news follows a clear institutional hierarchy led by the president and cabinet members. Secondly, female politicians are less likely to be mentioned or have speaking space in newspapers than male politicians. Lastly, although an association with conflict-framed news boosts politicians’ visibility, such association is unable to disturb structural power hierarchies, and the value of conflict does not increase over time.
      Citation: The International Journal of Press/Politics
      PubDate: 2022-03-30T06:50:25Z
      DOI: 10.1177/19401612221089482
       
  • Social Media and Belief in Misinformation in Mexico: A Case of Maximal
           Panic, Minimal Effects'

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      Authors: Sebastián Valenzuela, Carlos Muñiz, Marcelo Santos
      Abstract: The International Journal of Press/Politics, Ahead of Print.
      Contrary to popular narratives, it is not clear whether using social media for news increases belief in political misinformation. Several of the most methodologically sound studies find small to nonexistent effects. However, extant research is limited by focusing on few platforms (usually Facebook, Twitter or YouTube) and is heavily U.S. centered. This leaves open the possibility that other platforms, such as those that rely on visual communication (e.g., Instagram) or are tailored to strong-tie network communication (e.g., WhatsApp), are more influential. Furthermore, the few studies conducted in other countries suggest that social media use increases political misperceptions. Still, these works use cross-sectional designs, which are ill suited to dealing with omitted variable bias and temporal ordering of processes. Using a two-wave survey fielded in Mexico during the 2021 midterm elections (N = 596), we estimate the relationship between frequency of news exposure on Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, Instagram and WhatsApp, and belief in political misinformation, while controlling for both time-invariant and time-dependent individual differences. In contrast to political discussion, information literacy and digital skills, none of the social platforms analyzed exhibits a significant association with misinformed beliefs. We also tested for possible indirect, moderated, and reciprocal relationships, but none of these analyses yielded a statistically significant result. We conclude that the study is consistent with the “minimal media effects” paradigm, which suggests that efforts to address misinformation need to go beyond social platforms.
      Citation: The International Journal of Press/Politics
      PubDate: 2022-03-24T09:42:22Z
      DOI: 10.1177/19401612221088988
       
  • The Effects of Flagging Propaganda Sources on News Sharing:
           Quasi-Experimental Evidence from Twitter

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      Authors: Fan Liang, Qinfeng Zhu, Gabriel Miao Li
      Abstract: The International Journal of Press/Politics, Ahead of Print.
      While research on flagging misinformation and disinformation has received much attention, we know very little about how the flagging of propaganda sources could affect news sharing on social media. Using a quasi-experimental design, we test the effect of source flagging on people’s actual sharing behaviors. By analyzing tweets (N = 49,126) posted by 30 China's media accounts before and after Twitter's practice of labeling state-affiliated media, we reveal the corrective role that flagging plays in preventing people's sharing of information from propaganda sources. The findings suggest that the corrective effect occurs immediately after these accounts are labeled as state-affiliated media and it leads to a long-term reduction in news sharing, particularly for political content. The results contribute to the understanding of how flagging efforts affect user engagement in real-world conversations and highlight that the effect of corrective measures takes place in a dynamic process.
      Citation: The International Journal of Press/Politics
      PubDate: 2022-03-24T09:41:29Z
      DOI: 10.1177/19401612221086905
       
  • Poll Wars: Perceptions of Poll Credibility and Voting Behaviour

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      Authors: Stephen Dawson
      Abstract: The International Journal of Press/Politics, Ahead of Print.
      Pre-election opinion polls are an increasingly prominent aspect of political campaigns, yet they often vary in terms of their results, sources, and where they are published. Citizens are therefore increasingly confronted with the proposition of which polls to give more credence to than others in shaping their voting behaviour. This study investigates the relationship between subjective determinations of poll credibility and voting behaviour in the polarised context of Turkish mayoral elections. The theoretical perspective of motivated reasoning is employed to consider how individuals determine and act upon credible opinion polls in mixed information environments. Using an original two-step experimental approach conducted in 2020, this paper establishes that while the effects of opinion poll credibility on party choice are limited to the strategic considerations of the supporters of smaller parties, opinion polls can have considerable demobilising effects when polling environments are conflicting or deemed not credible. The findings produced in this study are more suggestive of accuracy-seeking than directional motivations, and they have considerable implications for how we think about the relationship between polls, politicians, and voters.
      Citation: The International Journal of Press/Politics
      PubDate: 2022-03-18T11:57:12Z
      DOI: 10.1177/19401612221087181
       
  • Motivated Mobilization: The Role of Emotions in the Processing of Poll
           Messages

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      Authors: Taberez Ahmed Neyazi, Ozan Kuru
      Abstract: The International Journal of Press/Politics, Ahead of Print.
      This study investigates how exposure to favorable messages about one's preferred party can affect emotional reactions and subsequent behavioral intentions. Integrating the motivated reasoning and discrete emotions’ frameworks, we offer a theoretical framework of motivated mobilization for explaining political engagement in response to poll exposure. Specifically, we examine the mediating role of emotions in the relationship between motivated assessments of polls and political mobilization. To test this model, we offer empirical evidence from an online survey-experiment (N = 540) conducted during the 2019 Indian general election. We find that exposure to favorable poll results increases enthusiasm and decreases anger, while both enthusiasm and anger activate behavioral intention for political participation. While our study supports the existing findings which show that partisanship is an important predictor of mobilization for a party and candidate, we uncover the affective routes through which partisanship operates to shape poll reactions. The results underscore the importance of capturing individual variability in preexisting affiliations and their shaping of poll reactions through affect-driven motivated reactions. We discuss these results with regard to the dynamics of political mobilization during election campaigns, the role of emotions in political cognition at large, and in understanding and mitigating biases in poll perceptions.
      Citation: The International Journal of Press/Politics
      PubDate: 2022-03-18T11:56:47Z
      DOI: 10.1177/19401612221086907
       
  • Unpacking the Determinants of Outrage and Recognition in Public Discourse:
           Insights Across Socio-Cultural Divides, Political Systems, and Media Types
           

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      Authors: Charlotte Löb, Eike Mark Rinke, Carina Weinmann, Hartmut Wessler
      Abstract: The International Journal of Press/Politics, Ahead of Print.
      The degree to which civility norms are upheld or violated is an important criterion in evaluating the democratic quality of public debates. We investigate civility across media types, political systems, and levels of socio-cultural division, offering a comparative perspective on how these factors shape levels of civility in public debates around a key question for societies around the world: What is the proper role of religion in public life' Capturing both positive and negative forms of civility (i.e., recognition and outrage) on multiple levels of analysis, we compile and analyze an original large-scale dataset of news items published during August 2015 until July 2016 in six democracies (Australia, Germany, Lebanon, Switzerland, Turkey, and the USA) across three types of media (printed newspapers, news websites, and political blogs). We find that mediated discourse was heavier on outrage in mixed political systems (Germany and Turkey) than in ‘purely’ majoritarian and consensus systems. Public debate in deeply divided countries contained more outrage but also more recognition compared to less divided countries, with newspapers and news websites mitigating outrage discourse compared to political blogs. Blogs also emerged as less nurturing of recognition than newspapers and news websites.
      Citation: The International Journal of Press/Politics
      PubDate: 2022-03-11T02:26:53Z
      DOI: 10.1177/19401612221084206
       
  • Discursive Toolkits of Anti-Muslim Disinformation on Twitter

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      Authors: Kiran Vinod Bhatia, Payal Arora
      Abstract: The International Journal of Press/Politics, Ahead of Print.
      In this article, we investigate the socio-technical ecology of Twitter, including the technological affordances of the platform and the user-generated discursive strategies used to create and circulate anti-Muslim disinformation online. During the first wave of Covid-19, right-wing followers claimed that Muslims were spreading the virus to perform Jihad. We analyzed a sample of 7000 tweets using Critical Discourse Analysis to examine how the online disinformation accusing Muslims in India was initiated and sustained. We identify three critical discourse strategies used on Twitter to spread and sustain the anti-Muslim (dis)information: (1) creating mediatized hate solidarities, (2) appropriating instruments of legitimacy, and (3) practicing Internet Hindu vigilantism. Each strategy consists of a subset of discursive toolkits, highlighting the central routes of discursive engagement to produce disinformation online. We argue that understanding how the technical affordances of Social Networking Sites are leveraged in quotidian online practices to produce and sustain the phenomenon of online disinformation will prove to be a novel contribution to the field of disinformation studies and Internet research.
      Citation: The International Journal of Press/Politics
      PubDate: 2022-03-01T10:53:43Z
      DOI: 10.1177/19401612221084633
       
  • Playing Both Sides: Russian State-Backed Media Coverage of the
           #BlackLivesMatter Movement

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      Authors: Samantha Bradshaw, Renée DiResta, Carly Miller
      Abstract: The International Journal of Press/Politics, Ahead of Print.
      Russian influence operations on social media have received significant attention following the 2016 US presidential elections. Here, scholarship has largely focused on the covert strategies of the Russia-based Internet Research Agency and the overt strategies of Russia's largest international broadcaster RT (Russia Today). But since 2017, a number of new news media providers linked to the Russian state have emerged, and less research has focused on these channels and how they may support contemporary influence operations. We conduct a qualitative content analysis of 2,014 Facebook posts about the #BlackLivesMatter (BLM) protests in the United States over the summer of 2020 to comparatively examine the overt propaganda strategies of six Russian-linked news organizations—RT, Ruptly, Soapbox, In The NOW, Sputnik, and Redfish. We found that RT and Sputnik diverged in their framing of the BLM movement from the newer media properties. RT and Sputnik primarily produced negative coverage of the BLM movement, painting protestors as violent, or discussed the hypocrisy of racial justice in America. In contrast, newer media properties like In The NOW, Soapbox, and Redfish supported the BLM movement with clickbait-style videos highlighting racism in America. Video footage bearing the Ruptly brandmark appears in both traditional and new media properties, to illustrate, in real time, civil unrest across the US. By focusing on overt propaganda from the broad array of Russian-affiliated media, our data allows us to further understand the “full spectrum” and “counter-hegemonic” strategies at play in contemporary information operations.
      Citation: The International Journal of Press/Politics
      PubDate: 2022-02-28T03:37:52Z
      DOI: 10.1177/19401612221082052
       
  • Ideology Matters: The Influence of Competing Message Framings on Public
           Attitudes toward Humanitarian Interventions

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      Authors: Qihao Ji, Juris Pupcenoks
      Abstract: The International Journal of Press/Politics, Ahead of Print.
      This study assessed the effects of different message framing strategies on average Americans’ attitude towards interventions in humanitarian crises abroad. Two survey experiments were conducted via Amazon MTurk between late 2019 and early 2020, where participants were randomly assigned to read a mock news story about a foreign humanitarian crisis written using one of the three framing techniques. Results of both studies indicated that the framing effect on respondents’ support for intervention interacted with ones’ political ideology and prompted distinctive reactions among different populations. Most intriguingly, the results of Study 2, which employed a non-student sample and a secondary frame, suggested that the specific order of message framings also influences public opinion towards humanitarian intervention. These findings contribute to the growing body of literature on the persuasiveness of message design and framing in the context of military humanitarian interventions (MHI). Accordingly, news organizations and policymakers are encouraged to consider these findings in specific contexts.
      Citation: The International Journal of Press/Politics
      PubDate: 2022-02-21T04:47:16Z
      DOI: 10.1177/19401612221082063
       
  • Making African Suffering Legible: Co-Constructing Narrative of the Darfur
           Atrocities

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      Authors: j Siguru Wahutu
      Abstract: The International Journal of Press/Politics, Ahead of Print.
      Although the last two decades have seen a concerted effort to understand the role and place of African journalism in covering events on the continent, there has been little focus on who journalists chose to quote as sources in their stories. This despite scholarship on sources being vital to our understanding of how journalists gain the “raw materials” to produce stories about events. Thus, while scholarship has begun taking Africa's coverage of itself seriously, there has been a slower uptick in focusing on whom African journalists give voice to as co-constructors of events. This silence is even more perplexing, considering that scholars and observers have been critical of who is quoted as a source when the global north covers events unfolding in Africa. This paper shows that African suffering was made legible for African audiences through a combination of American, English, and Sudanese voices. Specifically, it finds that African journalists are –counterintuitively - vital players in silencing some African voices in their construction of knowledge about the atrocities in Darfur. Despite the criticism leveled at journalism fields in the global north over their perceived silencing of African voices, African journalists are similarly engaged in this silencing as well.
      Citation: The International Journal of Press/Politics
      PubDate: 2022-02-21T04:47:13Z
      DOI: 10.1177/19401612221082062
       
  • Antecedents of Political Consumerism: Modeling Online, Social Media and
           WhatsApp News Use Effects Through Political Expression and Political
           Discussion

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      Authors: Zicheng Cheng, Bingbing Zhang, Homero Gil de Zúñiga
      Abstract: The International Journal of Press/Politics, Ahead of Print.
      According to lifestyle politics theory, social media platforms introduce new ways for people to engage in civic life. Based on the communication mediation model, prior scholarship laid out theoretical and empirical foundations for how media exposure to the news positively influences people’s political participatory behavior through supplemental communicative processes. Building on this line of research, we rely on a two-wave panel survey of U.S. adults to examine how the different online and social media communicative patterns among U.S. citizens, such as news use, political expression, and discussion, predict political consumerism behavior - the purchase decision of consumers based on political or ethical reasons. Advancing diverse causal order structural equation models, this study highlights a positive influence of news consumption, social media political expression, and political discussion in explaining political consumerism (i.e., boycotting and buycotting). Specifically, results underscore the importance of political expression and discussion mediating the relationship between online, social media and WhatsApp news use and political consumerism. Implications for future research and limitations to the study are provided in the manuscript.
      Citation: The International Journal of Press/Politics
      PubDate: 2022-02-04T05:02:05Z
      DOI: 10.1177/19401612221075936
       
  • Identifying Informational Opportunities in Political Responsibility
           Reporting: A Study of Television News Coverage During the Coronavirus
           Pandemic in the UK's Devolved System

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      Authors: Stephen Cushion, Llion Carbis
      Abstract: The International Journal of Press/Politics, Ahead of Print.
      How the news media report who’s responsible for political decisions is fundamental to an informed citizenry. Our study develops a new way of examining political responsibility coverage by drawing on the concept of informational opportunities in order to explore how television news could enhance audience understanding. We examine how television news reported who was responsible for making policies across England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland during the coronavirus pandemic. Drawing on a content analysis study of five UK television news bulletins (N = 181), we found that reporting did not regularly attribute political responsibility to all four governments of the UK at the start of the pandemic. Once the nations began to adopt different lockdown measures the clarity of reporting legislative decisions improved, but there were still missed opportunities to clarify which government was responsible for specific policies. By way of conclusion, we argue that scholars examining how the media report political responsibility need to find creative ways of theorising and empirically studying informational opportunities in order to enhance public understanding.
      Citation: The International Journal of Press/Politics
      PubDate: 2022-01-28T01:12:14Z
      DOI: 10.1177/19401612221075571
       
  • The Evolution of Self-Censorship in Hong Kong Online Journalism:
           Influences from Digitalization and the State

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      Authors: Alex Zhi-Xiong Koo
      Abstract: The International Journal of Press/Politics, Ahead of Print.
      Studies about media self-censorship typically focus on its mechanism in traditional newsroom settings. But how media self-censorship may evolve in online journalism has remained largely unexplored. Using Hong Kong as a case, I examine the digital evolution of media self-censorship in a unique non-democratic context. Drawing on interviews with online journalists, my findings reveal that digital transformation has provided new valences for media self-censorship. With the financial hardship of legacy media in the digital age, Hong Kong online journalists are more directly exposed to external threats such as advertisement boycotts orchestrated by the state, and hence increasingly reluctant to offend external powerholders out of the fear of political and financial retaliation. Moreover, as online journalists adopt business-driven norms that favor the generation of clicks, political or policy news are further marginalized. These stories are often deemed boring, non-engaging to online audiences, and are not “sensationalizable” due to political risks, especially when compared to soft news types like crimes and lifestyles stories. Adapting to these changes, news managers are increasingly used to avoiding professional editorial debates that results are unpredictable but using “objective” web metrics as persuasive devices to discourage the production of sensitive news. Lastly, the dissemination of sensitive news is curbed in the social media gatekeeping process. These findings suggest that an authoritarian state can effectively influence online news production by controlling the capital that drives digital transformation, thereby limiting the liberating potential of the media in the digital age.
      Citation: The International Journal of Press/Politics
      PubDate: 2022-01-24T12:44:50Z
      DOI: 10.1177/19401612221075553
       
  • Rethinking Audience Fragmentation Using a Theory of News Reading Publics:
           Online India as a Case Study

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      Authors: Subhayan Mukerjee
      Abstract: The International Journal of Press/Politics, Ahead of Print.
      Scholarly work that seeks to theorize about fragmentation of media audiences has largely been restricted to the experiences of advanced democracies in the west. This has resulted in a preponderance of research endeavors that have sought to understand this phenomenon through ideas that are pertinent, perhaps solely to those contexts, and not as applicable outside, particularly in the Global South. This has potentially limited our imagination into various other ways in which audience fragmentation can manifest in these often-overlooked countries. In this paper, I use the case of online India as an example to offer a theoretical framework – that of news reading publics – for understanding audience fragmentation as a more global socio-political phenomenon that allows for rigorous comparative research, without being restrictive in scope. I draw from existing theories in communication and related disciplines and show how such a framework can be situated within existing social science theory. I argue that this framework should make us think of audience fragmentation in western contexts to be special cases of a more general model. I also show how network analysis can be used as a context-agnostic tool for identifying news reading publics and demonstrate the utility of such a method in complementing this theoretical framework. Finally, I discuss potential future research directions that this framework generates.
      Citation: The International Journal of Press/Politics
      PubDate: 2022-01-19T03:06:19Z
      DOI: 10.1177/19401612211072700
       
  • For People, For Policy: Journalists’ Perceptions of Peace Journalism
           in East Africa

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      Authors: Meagan E. Doll
      Abstract: The International Journal of Press/Politics, Ahead of Print.
      Compared to studies on peace-journalism content, little research examines journalists’ perceptions of peace journalism despite theoretical suggestions that individuals influence content production. To address this relative disparity, this study examines the social conditions shaping journalists’ perceptions of peace journalism using a hierarchy-of-influences perspective and data from 20 in-depth interviews with East African journalists, conducted between September 2020 and February 2021. Findings suggest that journalists generally understand peace journalism in one of two ways, each with distinct intended audiences, aims, and reporting interventions. Moreover, when examined alongside respondents’ professional situations, these perceptions tend to be stratified by varying degrees of professional precarity.
      Citation: The International Journal of Press/Politics
      PubDate: 2022-01-18T02:43:13Z
      DOI: 10.1177/19401612211072775
       
  • Perspectives from Journalism Professionals on the Application and Benefits
           of Constructive Reporting for Addressing Misinformation

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      Authors: Natasha van Antwerpen, Deborah Turnbull, Rachel A. Searston
      Abstract: The International Journal of Press/Politics, Ahead of Print.
      The proliferation of misinformation in contemporary information environments contributes to increasing polarization and decreasing trust in institutions and experts, both of which encourage further proliferation of misinformation. Increasing attention has been brought to the role of news media in the spread and uptake of misinformation, and to the role of journalists and news organizations in combatting this spread. Constructive journalism is a relatively new approach to reporting which, among other aims, looks to increase audience engagement, reduce polarization, and provide a more accurate view of events. In early 2020, we interviewed 16 journalism professionals from Europe (UK inclusive), Australia, Africa, and North America across a range formats to explore their perceptions of the use ‘constructive’ reporting strategies to address the spread of misinformation. We used thematic analysis to produce three themes and six subthemes in journalists’ responses, ‘apathy against the machine’, with subthemes ‘journalism as a moderator’, and ‘news and mental health’; ‘standards as shared reality’, with subthemes, ‘pluralism not postmodernism’, and ‘this means information war’; and ‘truth, trust, and the turn to transparency’, with subthemes, ‘facts necessary but not sufficient’, and ‘principles not particulars’. Constructive journalism was thought to address misinformation by increasing engagement with news and institutions, reducing polarization, providing a sense of shared reality amidst increasingly diverse perspectives, increasing trust, and reducing misperceptions encouraged by selection and reporting strategies. Constructive journalism may be a promising approach to addressing the spread and consequences of misinformation, however, empirical work is needed to evaluate the efficacy of the approach.
      Citation: The International Journal of Press/Politics
      PubDate: 2022-01-17T01:15:25Z
      DOI: 10.1177/19401612211072782
       
  • How right-wing populists instrumentalize news media: Deliberate
           provocations, scandalizing media coverage, and public awareness for the
           Alternative for Germany (AfD)

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      Authors: Marcus Maurer, Pablo Jost, Marlene Schaaf, Michael Sülflow, Simon Kruschinski
      Abstract: The International Journal of Press/Politics, Ahead of Print.
      The rise of right-wing populist parties in Western democracies is often attributed to populists’ ability to instrumentalize news media by making deliberate provocations (e.g., verbal attacks on migrants or politicians from other parties) that generate media coverage and public awareness. To explain the success of populists’ deliberate provocations, we drew from research on populism and scandal theory to develop a theoretical framework that we tested in two studies examining the rise of German right-wing populist party Alternative für Deutschland (AfD) between January 2015 and December 2018. In Study 1, an input–output analysis of 17 deliberate provocations by AfD politicians in German news media revealed much more coverage about their attacks on migrants than about their attacks on political elites, although all were covered in predominantly scandalizing ways. Next, Study 2, involving media database research and an analysis of Google Trends data, showed that the provocations had increased overall media coverage about the AfD and influenced public awareness of the party
      Citation: The International Journal of Press/Politics
      PubDate: 2022-01-12T11:57:07Z
      DOI: 10.1177/19401612211072692
       
  • A Media Repertoires Approach to Selective Exposure: News Consumption and
           Political Polarization in Eastern Europe

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      Authors: Fanni Tóth, Sabina Mihelj, Václav Štětka, Katherine Kondor
      Abstract: The International Journal of Press/Politics, Ahead of Print.
      In recent years, links between selective news exposure and political polarisation have attracted considerable attention among communication scholars. However, while the existence of selective exposure has been documented in both offline and online environments, the evidence of its extent and its impact on political polarisation is far from unanimous. To address these questions, and also to bridge methodological and geographical gaps in existing research, this paper adopts a media repertoires approach to investigate selective news exposure and polarisation in four Eastern European countries – the Czech Republic, Hungary, Poland and Serbia. Using a combination of population surveys, expert surveys and qualitative interviews, the data for the study were collected between November 2019 and May 2020. We identify five types of news repertoires based on their relative openness to counter-attitudinal sources, and show that selective news repertoires are present in 29% of the entire sample. Our findings also reveal significant cross-country differences, with the more selective news repertoires more prominent in countries characterised by higher levels of polarisation. Furthermore, while the selection of news sources is in line with people's electoral (and to a lesser extent ideological) preferences, our findings show that exposure to counter-attitudinal sources can also be strongly correlated with political and ideological leanings. Our qualitative data suggest that this is because exposure to counter-attitudinal sources can reinforce attitudes, and potentially contribute to polarisation. Qualitative data also highlight the influence of environmental factors (e.g., family), and suggest that selective news consumption is associated with normatively different conceptions of media trust.
      Citation: The International Journal of Press/Politics
      PubDate: 2022-01-12T02:59:41Z
      DOI: 10.1177/19401612211072552
       
  • Reactive and Asymmetric Communication Flows: Social Media Discourse and
           Partisan News Framing in the Wake of Mass Shootings

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      Authors: Yini Zhang, Dhavan Shah, Jon Pevehouse, Sebastián Valenzuela
      Abstract: The International Journal of Press/Politics, Ahead of Print.
      Marked by both deep interconnectedness and polarization, the contemporary media system in the United States features news outlets and social media that are bound together, yet deeply divided along partisan lines. This article formally analyzes communication flows surrounding mass shootings in the hybrid and polarized U.S. media system. We begin by integrating media system literature with agenda setting and news framing theories and then conduct automated text analysis and time series modeling. After accounting for exogenous event characteristics, results show that (a) sympathy and gun control discourses on Twitter preceded news framing of gun policy more than the other way around, and (b) conservatives on Twitter and conservative media reacted to progressive discourse on Twitter, without their progressive counterparts exhibiting a similar reactiveness. Such results shed light on the influence of social media on political communication flows and confirm an asymmetry in the ways partisan media ecosystems respond to social events.
      Citation: The International Journal of Press/Politics
      PubDate: 2022-01-10T01:07:05Z
      DOI: 10.1177/19401612211072793
       
  • The Intersection of Candidate Gender and Ethnicity: How Voters Respond to
           Campaign Messages from Latinas

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      Authors: Martina Santia, Nichole M. Bauer
      Abstract: The International Journal of Press/Politics, Ahead of Print.
      Despite the recent surge of women of color in elected political office in the U.S., the representation of Latinas is strikingly low. Past research offers unclear conclusions as to whether Latina political candidates face biases due to the intersection of their identities as women and as ethnic minorities, and how Latinas can navigate such biases. In this study, we identify how Latinas draw on their intersectional identities as both women and ethnic minorities to develop strategic campaign messages and how voters respond to such messages. Through an analysis of campaign advertising data and an original survey experiment, we show that Latina candidates do not face an automatic disadvantage based in gender and ethnic biases, but they can benefit from the intersection of these two identities, especially among female minority voters. These results are consequential because they offer insights into how to improve the descriptive and substantive representation of marginalized groups in the U.S.
      Citation: The International Journal of Press/Politics
      PubDate: 2022-01-10T01:06:57Z
      DOI: 10.1177/19401612211072697
       
  • Do Local Newspapers Mitigate the Effects of the Polarized National
           Rhetoric on COVID-19'

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      Authors: Catie Snow Bailard
      Abstract: The International Journal of Press/Politics, Ahead of Print.
      This analysis tests two distinct predictions regarding local newspapers’ coverage of the COVID-19 pandemic in the United States. A public service view of local newspapers predicts that a robust local newspaper sector would mitigate the politicized national partisan rhetoric surrounding COVID-19; reducing the disparity in social-distancing behaviors between predominantly Republican and predominantly Democratic counties by increasing compliance in Republican counties. The alternative hypothesis, informed by a demand-side view of the market pressures local newspapers face, predicts that increased competition between local newspapers will increase the degree to which local newspapers amplify the rhetoric of national officials in line with the partisan composition of their community, further polarizing adherence to social-distancing behaviors across predominantly Republican versus predominantly Democratic counties. The results of this analysis offer strong support for the second hypothesis; but, an additional analysis of vaccination rates offers a more nuanced perspective than a simple public service versus demand-side dichotomy would imply.
      Citation: The International Journal of Press/Politics
      PubDate: 2022-01-07T10:45:25Z
      DOI: 10.1177/19401612211072774
       
  • How Right-Wing Populists Engage with Cross-Cutting News on Online Message
           Boards: The Case of ForoCoches and Vox in Spain

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      Authors: Clara Juarez Miro, Benjamin Toff
      Abstract: The International Journal of Press/Politics, Ahead of Print.
      Anecdotal evidence suggests a link between online message boards and the rise of far-right movements, which have achieved growing electoral success globally. Press accounts and scholarship have suggested these message boards help to radicalize like-minded users through exposure to shared media insulated from cross-cutting viewpoints (e.g., Hine et al. 2017; Palmer 2019). To better understand what role online message boards might play for supporters of right-wing populist movements, we focus on the Spanish political party Vox and its supporters’ use of the message board ForoCoches, a fan site for car enthusiasts, which became an important platform for the party. Using more than 120,000 messages collected from threads mentioning the party between 2013–2019, we examine the URLs shared to show how mainstream news media events shape the conversation online and how users not only were exposed but deeply engaged with cross-cutting news sources. We argue that the use of sites such as ForoCoches should be viewed in the context of a broader increasingly hybrid political and media landscape where activity online and offline cannot be understood separate from one another. Moreover, our findings suggest that the online political discussions that take place in Vox-related threads on ForoCoches resemble normatively positive deliberative spaces—albeit in this case in support of illiberal political positions. In other words, our findings complicate conventional notions about the benefits of political talk, especially online, as a democratically desirable end in and of itself.
      Citation: The International Journal of Press/Politics
      PubDate: 2022-01-05T08:32:45Z
      DOI: 10.1177/19401612211072696
       
  • Book Review: Spin Dictators. The Changing Face of Tyranny in the 21st
           Century by Sergei Guriev and Daniel Treisman

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      Authors: Rodney Tiffen
      First page: 323
      Abstract: The International Journal of Press/Politics, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: The International Journal of Press/Politics
      PubDate: 2022-10-26T05:14:35Z
      DOI: 10.1177/19401612221132643
       
  • Corrigendum to Diffusion of Development Journalism Inside Egyptian
           Newsrooms

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      First page: 328
      Abstract: The International Journal of Press/Politics, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: The International Journal of Press/Politics
      PubDate: 2022-03-04T07:04:51Z
      DOI: 10.1177/19401612221083550
       
 
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