Subjects -> COMMUNICATIONS (Total: 518 journals)
    - COMMUNICATIONS (446 journals)
    - DIGITAL AND WIRELESS COMMUNICATION (31 journals)
    - HUMAN COMMUNICATION (19 journals)
    - MEETINGS AND CONGRESSES (7 journals)
    - RADIO, TELEVISION AND CABLE (15 journals)

HUMAN COMMUNICATION (19 journals)

Showing 1 - 20 of 20 Journals sorted alphabetically
Acta Universitatis Sapientiae Communicatio     Open Access  
Advances in Image and Video Processing     Open Access   (Followers: 24)
Argumentation and Advocacy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Asian Journal of Communication     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Atlantic Journal of Communication     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Communication Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Communication Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Communication Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Communication Research Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Communication Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Communication Teacher     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Cryptography     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
European Journal of Communication     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Health Communication     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Jurnal The Messenger     Open Access  
Language Learning Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
Mass Communication & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Political Communication     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Popular Communication     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Ukrainian Information Space     Open Access  
Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Communication Research
Journal Prestige (SJR): 2.171
Citation Impact (citeScore): 3
Number of Followers: 22  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0093-6502 - ISSN (Online) 1552-3810
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1176 journals]
  • Quality Conversation Can Increase Daily Well-Being

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      Authors: Jeffrey A. Hall, Amanda J. Holmstrom, Natalie Pennington, Evan K. Perrault, Daniel Totzkay
      Abstract: Communication Research, Ahead of Print.
      The associations among the frequency and quality of social interactions and in-the-moment and global well-being have been well-documented. Fewer studies explore whether the content of social interactions is associated with well-being using experimental methods. Drawing from the communicate bond belong theory, seven candidate communication episodes and behaviors were identified. In three studies, participants (NStudy 1 = 347, NStudy 2 = 310, NStudy 3 = 250) were randomly assigned to engage in one of these communication episodes or behaviors and then completed end-of-day measures of well-being. Compared to participants in the control groups, participants engaging in candidate behaviors experienced increased well-being. MANCOVA results from all studies suggest the frequency of engaging in candidate behaviors was associated with increased well-being. A mini-meta-analysis found a weighted average effect size of d = 0.255. Results suggest that engaging in as little as one communication behavior with one friend in a day can improve daily well-being.
      Citation: Communication Research
      PubDate: 2023-01-28T05:17:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00936502221139363
       
  • Overcoming Obstacles by Enacting Resilience: How Queer Adolescents Respond
           to Being Estranged From Their Parents

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      Authors: Kristina M. Scharp, Cimmiaron F. Alvarez, Brooke H. Wolfe, Pamela J. Lannutti, Leah E. Bryant
      Abstract: Communication Research, Ahead of Print.
      Queer adolescents experience compounding complications especially when they are estranged from their parents. Findings from a sample of 40 estranged queer adolescents revealed four triggers, five resilience processes, and three co-occurring relationships between the triggers and processes. Based on these findings, we advance the communication theory of resilience by (a) illustrating resilience enactments with an adolescent population, (b) introducing a new facet of putting alternative logics to work, and (c) arguing how access to LGBTQ+ vocabulary and embeddedness within the LGBTQ+ community can facilitate more and less resilient enactments. We also extend a new qualitative method, thematic co-occurrence analysis, to illuminate thematic ubiquity and inverse relationships between themes. Practical applications for primary/secondary school curriculum, counselors, and public policy are discussed.
      Citation: Communication Research
      PubDate: 2023-01-24T05:53:15Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00936502221142175
       
  • Framing as a Bridging Concept for Climate Change Communication: A
           Systematic Review Based on 25 Years of Literature

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      Authors: Lars Guenther, Susan Jörges, Daniela Mahl, Michael Brüggemann
      Abstract: Communication Research, Ahead of Print.
      In line with the urgency of problems related to climate change, studies on the framing of this issue have flourished in recent years. However, as in framing research overall, a lack of definitions complicates the synthesis of theoretical/empirical insights. This systematic review contrasts trends of framing in climate change communication to those observed in reviews of communication research overall and harnesses framing’s power to bridge perspectives by comparing frames across different frame locations (i.e., frame production, frame content, audience frames, and framing effects), as part of the wider cultural framing repository. Combining quantitative and qualitative approaches of content analysis, this review draws on 25 years of peer-reviewed literature on the framing of climate change (n = 275). Among the findings, we observe that research has not made use of framing’s bridging potential. Hence, the conceptual (mis)fit between frame locations will be discussed, and directions for future research will be given.
      Citation: Communication Research
      PubDate: 2023-01-20T10:27:05Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00936502221137165
       
  • The Enduring Effect of Internet Dating: Meeting Online and the Road to
           Marriage

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      Authors: Liesel L. Sharabi
      Abstract: Communication Research, Ahead of Print.
      This study takes a relational stage approach to understanding the role of online dating in the progression of relationships toward marriage. Fifty interviews were conducted with individuals from across the United States (ages 21–62; Mage = 33.42) who were married or engaged to someone they met via online dating. The results present a comprehensive view of online dating through 4 stages and 13 subcategories of relationship development. Participants described meeting through a process of technology-enabled relationship initiation. Once the relationship escalated offline, they entered a period of multimodal development that demonstrated the enduring influence technology continued to have after meeting in person. Throughout this process, participants stressed the role of online dating platforms in breaking down barriers and reinforcing divisions. Three outcomes for marriage were also uncovered. Findings from this study suggest that online dating is changing more than where couples meet and have theoretical and practical implications.
      Citation: Communication Research
      PubDate: 2023-01-19T10:44:15Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00936502221127498
       
  • Do Bandwagon Cues Affect Credibility Perceptions' A Meta-Analysis of
           the Experimental Evidence

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      Authors: Sai Wang, Tsz Hang Chu, Guanxiong Huang
      Abstract: Communication Research, Ahead of Print.
      Bandwagon cues are system-aggregated information about crowd behavior or peer endorsement displayed on a web interface (e.g., the number of likes on a Facebook post). Despite the recent proliferation of research on the effect of bandwagon cues on credibility perceptions, a comprehensive meta-analytic review of this effect has not yet been performed and published. Based on 161 effect sizes from 41 studies, the current meta-analysis revealed that bandwagon cues had a positive, albeit small, effect on credibility perceptions. Moderator analyses indicated that this effect was stronger (a) when the message was related to the marketing topic, (b) when the source was a non-expert (vs. an expert), and (c) when participants were from collectivistic (vs. individualistic) cultures. However, the bandwagon effect did not vary by cue feature (e.g., deliberateness). These findings are discussed in light of theoretical implications, practical guidelines, and directions for future research.
      Citation: Communication Research
      PubDate: 2023-01-19T10:34:35Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00936502221124395
       
  • The Matilda Effect in Communication Research: The Effects of Gender and
           Geography on Usage and Citations Across 11 Countries

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      Authors: Andrea Rajkó, Csilla Herendy, Manuel Goyanes, Marton Demeter
      Abstract: Communication Research, Ahead of Print.
      Across liberal democracies, optimalizing gender balance in communication research production and impact is a growing aspiration of scientific leaders and research-intensive universities alike. Despite eloquent motivations, the gender proportions of the most prolific scholars remain undetermined, along with the role gender plays in explaining research usage (i.e., views) and impact (i.e., citations) across countries. Drawing upon performance data of 5,500 communication scholars from 11 countries, this study found that amongst the most prolific communication authors, female scholars are still significantly underrepresented in all the analyzed regions. Furthermore, when examining views and citation scores, findings illustrate that female scholars’ papers are systematically more viewed, yet significantly less cited than male scholarship. All things considered, we provide insightful empirical evidence that point to a twofold Matilda effect playing at both the production and performance levels in communication studies, arguing that gender inequalities are still rampant in the field.
      Citation: Communication Research
      PubDate: 2023-01-19T10:21:21Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00936502221124389
       
  • Is Online Textual Political Expression Associated With Political
           Knowledge'

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      Authors: Toby Hopp, Pat Ferrucci, Chris J. Vargo, Luna Liu
      Abstract: Communication Research, Ahead of Print.
      Prior research has reliably shown a positive relationship between political talk and political knowledge. This study sought to build upon this research by assessing the association between internet-based textual political expression and political knowledge. Notably, while online textual political expression is closely linked to traditional conceptualizations of political talk, it is also different in several key ways. Accordingly, this study drew upon research and theorization in the areas of political talk, online expression, and communication self-effects to explore the association between political commentary frequency on Facebook and performance on a political knowledge quiz. Moreover, we investigated the degree to which expression-apparent elaborative thinking levels were differentially associated with political knowledge. The results indicated that Facebook-based textual political expression was, as predicted, positively associated with political knowledge. Therein, we found that textual political expression indicative of high levels of elaboration was much more strongly associated with political knowledge levels than textual political expression that was indicative of comparatively lower levels of elaboration. Finally, exploratory analyses suggested that highly elaborative textual political expression was at least as strongly related to political knowledge as traditional media consumption variables.
      Citation: Communication Research
      PubDate: 2023-01-19T10:15:16Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00936502221113808
       
  • Reviewer Acknowledgment for 2021

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      Pages: 1200 - 1205
      Abstract: Communication Research, Volume 49, Issue 8, Page 1200-1205, December 2022.

      Citation: Communication Research
      PubDate: 2022-11-09T05:14:44Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00936502221118710
      Issue No: Vol. 49, No. 8 (2022)
       
  • How Contextual Features Shape Incivility Over Time: An Analysis of the
           Evolution and Determinants of Political Incivility in Televised Election
           Debates (1985–2019)

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      Authors: Ine Goovaerts, Emma Turkenburg
      Abstract: Communication Research, Ahead of Print.
      Concerns are frequently raised about politicians’ increasing use of incivility. Yet, there is little longitudinal empirical work testing whether politicians’ use of incivility is actually rising, and little is known about the determinants that affect the prevalence of incivility. This study analyzes incivility over time and proposes a multi-layered framework of theoretically-driven incivility-inducing determinants. A quantitative content analysis of 4,102 speech acts in 24 Belgian televised election debates over the course of 35 years (1985–2019) shows that politicians’ incivility did not increase but occurs in a volatile pattern with ups and downs over the years. Confirmed by our analysis of the studied determinants, incivility shows to be highly context-specific. Particularly, incivility levels are affected both by characteristics of politicians, such as populism, incumbency, and gender, and by debate determinants, such as the topic under discussion, the number of politicians simultaneously debating each other, and previous incivility occurrences in the debate.
      Citation: Communication Research
      PubDate: 2022-12-01T04:40:59Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00936502221135694
       
  • Living is Easy With Eyes Closed: Avoidance of Targeted Political
           Advertising in Response to Privacy Concerns, Perceived Personalization,
           and Overload

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      Authors: Marlis Stubenvoll, Alice Binder, Selina Noetzel, Melanie Hirsch, Jörg Matthes
      Abstract: Communication Research, Ahead of Print.
      Political parties increasingly rely on sophisticated targeting strategies to persuade potential voters. However, questions have been raised about the effectiveness of targeted political ads, considering that citizens frequently oppose the use of their data for political purposes. In this study, we investigate three avoidance behaviors that citizens might employ in order to circumvent targeted political ads: cognitive avoidance, blocking behaviors, and privacy-protective behaviors. We test if privacy concerns, perceived personalization, and overload explain why individuals resort to avoidance behaviors. Moreover, we explore interrelations between the different avoidance strategies. Findings from a two-wave panel study (N = 428) in the context of the Viennese state election showed that privacy concerns increased cognitive avoidance and privacy-protective behaviors. In contrast, perceived personalization decreased cognitive avoidance and blocking behaviors. Cognitive avoidance further reduced privacy-protective behaviors over time, indicating that low-effort strategies might inhibit preventive actions against data collection practices.
      Citation: Communication Research
      PubDate: 2022-11-30T05:31:33Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00936502221130840
       
  • Selective Avoidance: Understanding How Position and Proportion of Online
           Incivility Influence News Engagement

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      Authors: Shuning Lu, Hai Liang, Gina M. Masullo
      Abstract: Communication Research, Ahead of Print.
      While most research has examined incivility in political contexts, few studies have explored the role of online incivility in contexts where partisan cues are lacking. Integrating insights from selective exposure, media salience, and serial position effects, we proposed the concept of “incivility salience” and examined how its two manifestations—position and proportion of uncivil messages in a comment thread—affected news engagement behavior. Through two conjoint experiments in the United States, we found that people avoided engaging with comment threads starting with uncivil content and the ones with a higher proportion of uncivil content. Furthermore, we identified that the salience of uncivil content could influence the extent to which people perceive such content as uncivil, which in turn impacts engagement behavior. Overall, this study offers a novel framework that considers incivility salience as a core element for understanding the perceptual and behavioral effects of online incivility.
      Citation: Communication Research
      PubDate: 2022-11-30T05:28:39Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00936502221130837
       
  • What Makes Populist Messages Persuasive' Experimental Evidence for How
           Emotions and Issue Characteristics Moderate Populist Framing Effects

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      Authors: Dieter Dekeyser, Henk Roose
      Abstract: Communication Research, Ahead of Print.
      Research asserts that populist messages are more persuasive when the audience’s predispositions align with the framing and topic of these messages. Yet, few studies have empirically analyzed this assertion. In this article, we examine how people’s emotional reactions to social issues (fear/anger) and the belief that society is in decline condition people’s reactions to populist framed messages, and whether a populist framing is more persuasive on specific issues—that is, the European refugee crisis, climate change, or the pension crisis. We also focus on two effects of populist messages: issue-specific attributions of responsibility and populist attitudes. Based on a survey experiment, we find that people who are more fearful about social issues express more populist attitudes after reading a populist framed message, compared to a pluralist framed message, and that populist messages increase the attribution of responsibility to politicians for the European refugee crisis and climate change (i.e., global issues).
      Citation: Communication Research
      PubDate: 2022-11-30T05:25:20Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00936502221127482
       
  • Testing the Communication During Sexual Activity Model: An Examination of
           the Associations among Personality Characteristics, Sexual Communication,
           and Sexual and Relationship Satisfaction

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      Authors: Margaret Bennett-Brown, Amanda Denes
      Abstract: Communication Research, Ahead of Print.
      Preliminary evidence suggests that communication during and after sexual activity is linked to positive sexual and relational assessments, but the process of communication during sexual activity (i.e., predictors and outcomes of such behavior) has yet to be explicated. As such, the current study puts forth the Communication During Sexual Activity model, which posits that one’s propensity for affectionate communication, sexual self-esteem, and sexual assertiveness predict verbal communication during sexual activity, which in turn is associated with sexual and relationship satisfaction. Within a sample of emerging adults, structural equation modeling revealed that sexual self-esteem and trait affection were positively associated with communication during sexual activity. However, sexual assertiveness did not significantly predict communication during sexual activity. Communication during sexual activity was also positively associated with sexual satisfaction, and indirectly associated with relationship satisfaction through sexual satisfaction. The implications of the findings for future sexual communication research and interventions are addressed.
      Citation: Communication Research
      PubDate: 2022-11-30T05:22:07Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00936502221124390
       
  • Education-Based Gap in Misinformation Acceptance: Does the Gap Increase as
           Misinformation Exposure Increases'

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      Authors: Yoori Hwang, Se-Hoon Jeong
      Abstract: Communication Research, Ahead of Print.
      Based on the knowledge gap hypothesis as a theoretical framework, the present study examines (a) whether there is an education-based gap in misinformation acceptance, (b) whether the education-based gap could be explained by differences in issue knowledge, information processing, and media dependency, and (c) whether the education-based gap in misinformation acceptance widens as the level of exposure to misinformation increases. We conducted a survey of 821 Korean adults regarding their acceptance of misinformation related to COVID-19 vaccination. First, we found that there was an education-based gap in misinformation acceptance such that those with lower education were more likely to accept misinformation. Second, we found that the effect was mediated by low issue knowledge, less systematic processing, and dependency on social media. Third, the education-based gap in misinformation acceptance widened when misinformation exposure increased. These results are consistent with the knowledge gap hypothesis and the theoretical and practical implications are further discussed.
      Citation: Communication Research
      PubDate: 2022-11-28T05:38:53Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00936502221121509
       
  • Perceived Influence of Partisan News and Online News Participation:
           Third-person Effect, Hostile Media Phenomenon, and Cognitive Elaboration

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      Authors: Seungsu Lee, Kyungmo Kim
      Abstract: Communication Research, Ahead of Print.
      This study suggests a unified framework to examine the third-person perception (TPP) in the context of partisan news use. By amalgamating social identity theories with the elaboration likelihood model or the heuristic-systematic model, Study 1 investigates the role of message features (source cues and content slant), targets (in-group vs. out-group), and audience characteristics (political identity and elaboration) on TPP. Two online experiments conducted in the US and South Korea show that differences between pro- and counter-attitudinal content are larger when the target is an out-group member. TPP is also amplified when audiences have high elaboration. Study 2 explores the interplay between TPP and the hostile media phenomenon (HMP) on news sharing and commenting online. The result reveals that TPP reduces news sharing/commenting intention by decreasing perceptions of news quality. In addition, HMP strengthens the indirect effect of TPP on news sharing/commenting for out-group members, but mitigates it for in-group members.
      Citation: Communication Research
      PubDate: 2022-11-14T06:19:18Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00936502221127494
       
  • Media Trust and the COVID-19 Pandemic: An Analysis of Short-Term Trust
           Changes, Their Ideological Drivers and Consequences in Switzerland

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      Authors: Silke Adam, Aleksandra Urman, Dorothee Arlt, Teresa Gil-Lopez, Mykola Makhortykh, Michaela Maier
      Abstract: Communication Research, Ahead of Print.
      We analyze short-term media trust changes during the COVID-19 pandemic, their ideological drivers and consequences based on panel data in German-speaking Switzerland. We thereby differentiate trust in political information from different types of traditional and non-traditional media. COVID-19 serves as a natural experiment, in which citizens’ media trust at the outbreak of the crisis is compared with the same variables after the severe lockdown measures were lifted. Our data reveal that (1) media trust is consequential as it is associated with people’s willingness to follow Covid-19 regulations; (2) media trust changes during the pandemic, with trust levels for most media decreasing, with the exception of public service broadcasting; (3) trust losses are hardly connected to ideological divides in Switzerland. Our findings highlight that public service broadcasting plays an exceptional role in the fight against a pandemic and that contrary to the US, no partisan trust divide occurs.
      Citation: Communication Research
      PubDate: 2022-11-14T06:15:30Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00936502221127484
       
  • Appraising Uncivil Comments in Online Political Discussions: How Do
           Preceding Incivility and Senders’ Stance Affect the Processing of an
           Uncivil Comment'

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      Authors: Jan P. Kluck, Nicole C. Krämer
      Abstract: Communication Research, Ahead of Print.
      Although the appraisal of online incivility highly depends on the social context in which it occurs, little research has focused on this aspect. Drawing on the general aggression model, we assumed that the appraisal of and the reaction to an uncivil discussion comment is affected by the represented stance and the appearance of accompanying comments. To examine these assumptions, we conducted an online experiment (N = 611) with a three (uncivil vs. civil vs. no preceding comments as a control) × two (opposing vs. conforming recipient’s views) between-subjects design. Data revealed that the influence of preceding comments is limited. However, people were more likely to attribute aggressive motives to senders of incivility when they opposed their opinion. In turn, these attributions increased individuals’ anger, anxiety, hostile cognitions, but also enthusiasm. Furthermore, aggressive motive attributions, participants’ emotions, and hostile cognitions guided participants’ intentions to answer in a discussion-centered and/or aggressive way.
      Citation: Communication Research
      PubDate: 2022-11-14T06:02:02Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00936502221113812
       
  • Competition, Cooperation, and Coexistence: An Ecological Approach to
           Public Agenda Dynamics in the United States (1958–2020)

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      Authors: Tai-Quan Peng, Jonathan J. H. Zhu
      Abstract: Communication Research, Ahead of Print.
      The public agenda is an ecosystem in which public issues interact and compete to gain public attention. Whether this ecosystem is primarily competitive or cooperative is an unsettled question in the literature on agenda-setting. This study employs an ecological approach to explicate interissue relationships. It quantifies the nature and evolution of the issue ecosystem and examines the roles of the value orientations of issues and of individuals’ education levels and political partisanship in interissue relationships. The study compiled and analyzed the Gallup Most Important Problem polls in the United States from 1958 to 2020. The findings indicate that the issue ecosystem of the American public is essentially competitive and that the balance of competition and cooperation has remained unchanged over time. The interaction between public issues involving materialistic values was more likely to be competitive and the interaction between issues involving postmaterialistic values was more likely to be cooperative.
      Citation: Communication Research
      PubDate: 2022-10-01T10:54:26Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00936502221125067
       
  • Encouraging Replotting to Promote Persuasion: How Imagining Alternative
           Plotlines Influences Message Processing and Intentions

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      Authors: Helen M. Lillie, Chelsea L. Ratcliff, Manusheela Pokharel, Jakob D. Jensen
      Abstract: Communication Research, Ahead of Print.
      This set of studies investigated replotting as a mechanism of narrative persuasion. Replotting involves both the cognitive act of imagining alternative plot lines to avoid an undesirable story outcome and an accompanying emotion such as anger, anxiety, or sadness. Both studies utilized a 2 (story outcome: death vs. survivor) × 2 (efficacy appeal: present vs. absent) message experiment design. Study 1 (N = 1,207) tested a non-narrative efficacy appeal appended to the story and assessed replotting anger. Study 2 (N = 716) tested an efficacy appeal embedded within the narrative and assessed replotting anger, anxiety, and sadness. Death narratives generated greater replotting sadness across efficacy conditions and greater replotting anger and anxiety when a narrative efficacy appeal was not included in the story. Replotting was negatively related to counterarguing and positively related to message elaboration. Replotting influenced behavioral intention either via counterarguing or message elaboration dependent on the efficacy condition.
      Citation: Communication Research
      PubDate: 2022-08-30T09:03:41Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00936502221114308
       
  • Moral Beauty During the COVID-19 Pandemic: Prosocial Behavior Among
           Adolescents and the Inspiring Role of the Media

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      Authors: Rebecca N. H. de Leeuw, Thabo J. van Woudenberg, Kayla H. Green, Sophie W. Sweijen, Suzanne van de Groep, Mariska Kleemans, Sanne L. Tamboer, Eveline A. Crone, Moniek Buijzen
      Abstract: Communication Research, Ahead of Print.
      In this study, we examined whether adolescents helped others during the COVID-19 pandemic and how stories in the media inspired them in doing so. Using an online daily diary design, 481 younger adolescents (M = 15.29, SD = 1.76) and 404 older adolescents (M = 21.48, SD = 1.91) were followed for 2 weeks. Findings from linear mixed effects models demonstrated that feelings of being moved by stories in the media were related to giving emotional support to family and friends, and to helping others, including strangers. Exposure to COVID-19 news and information was found to spark efforts to support and help as well and keeping physical distance in line with the advised protective behaviors against COVID-19. Moreover, helping others was related to increased happiness. Overall, the findings of this study highlight the potential role of the media in connecting people in times of crisis.
      Citation: Communication Research
      PubDate: 2022-08-05T05:06:03Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00936502221112804
       
  • The Role of Communication in Redressing Health Disparities: Mobilizing
           Public Support and Action

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      Authors: Chul-joo Lee, Cabral A. Bigman, Sukyoung Choi, Xiaoquan Zhao
      Abstract: Communication Research, Ahead of Print.
      This study examines whether and how exposure to information about health disparities from mediated and interpersonal sources and political trust are jointly associated with policy support and political advocacy. Using a two-wave panel survey design with a national U.S. sample, we found that political trust moderated the association between exposure to health-disparities information from interpersonal sources and policy support. Specifically, a negative relationship between exposure from interpersonal sources and policy support was observed among respondents with a lower than average level of political trust. In contrast, respondents with a higher than average level of political trust showed a positive association between exposure from interpersonal sources and policy support. Among respondents with average level of political trust, the relationship between exposure from interpersonal sources and policy support was generally flat. In addition, exposure to health-disparities information from media sources was positively related to political advocacy after controlling for possible confounders.
      Citation: Communication Research
      PubDate: 2022-08-05T05:04:22Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00936502221078408
       
  • Disentangling the Effects of Temporal Framing on Risk Perception,
           Attitude, Behavioral Intention, and Behavior: A Multilevel Meta-Analysis

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      Authors: Guanxiong Huang, Jie Xu
      Abstract: Communication Research, Ahead of Print.
      Temporal framing is a messaging strategy that highlights either the proximal or distal consequences of a recommended behavior in communication efforts. The results of this meta-analysis of experimental studies on temporal framing supported the overall small advantage of proximal versus distal frames in facilitating persuasion (r = .0659, k = 97, N = 6,808). Specifically, proximal frames were more effective than distal frames in increasing risk perception (r = .0996, k = 14, N = 977) and behavioral intention (r = .0715, k = 40, N = 5,888). However, no such effects were found on attitude or actual behavior. The temporal framing effect was stronger when (1) using specific time points for near future versus distant future, (2) applied to anti-smoking/drinking campaigns, and (3) using nonstudent samples. Besides, gain versus loss frame was a significant moderator of the temporal effect in studies on promoting healthy eating and anti-smoking/drinking.
      Citation: Communication Research
      PubDate: 2022-07-16T12:43:58Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00936502221102102
       
  • The Privacy Calculus Revisited: An Empirical Investigation of Online
           Privacy Decisions on Between- and Within-Person Levels

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      Authors: Yannic Meier, Nicole C. Krämer
      Abstract: Communication Research, Ahead of Print.
      The privacy calculus assumes that people weigh perceived privacy risks and benefits before disclosing personal information. So far, empirical studies investigated the privacy calculus on a between-person level and, therefore, were not able to make statements about the intrapersonal psychological processes. In the present preregistered online within-person experiment, participants (N = 485) were asked to imagine three different disclosure situations in which privacy risks were indicated by a privacy score. As personality variables, rational and intuitive privacy decision-making styles and privacy resignation were assessed. Results of a within-between random effects model showed that benefit perceptions were positively associated with self-disclosure intentions on between- and within-person levels. The privacy score was found to be effective in supporting users to make more privacy aware choices (within-person level). Finally, the rational decision-making style was positively related to privacy risk perception, while especially intuitive decision-makers can benefit from decision-making aids like the privacy score.
      Citation: Communication Research
      PubDate: 2022-07-16T10:37:08Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00936502221102101
       
  • Reconciling Conflicting Results of Cultural Diversity’s Effect on
           Project Team Performance: A Quasi-Experimental Examination

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      Authors: Mengqi Monica Zhan, Dale Hample
      Abstract: Communication Research, Ahead of Print.
      Guided by the Categorization-Elaboration Model, we developed and tested a model to reconcile the conflicting results of cultural diversity’s influence on team performance. Previous theory and studies have inconsistent arguments and evidence regarding cultural diversity’s effects on team performance. We recognize that member cultural diversity is one possible influence on the variety and meanings of messages generated within groups, and the messages’ meanings may then affect performance. Work-related information sharing, including information sharing openness and uniqueness, is proposed as an underlying mechanism that translates the effect of cultural diversity to project team performance. Additionally, team cultural intelligence may moderate the relationship between cultural diversity and the information sharing processes. Participants constituted three types of teams: all American (N = 32 teams), all Chinese (N = 34 teams), and mixed (N = 38 teams), in which team members finished a business problem identification task collectively. Results showed that in culturally diverse teams, high levels of cultural intelligence amplified the positive relationship between cultural diversity and information sharing uniqueness, which in turn led to higher team performance. Theoretical and practical implications are discussed.
      Citation: Communication Research
      PubDate: 2022-07-15T05:24:07Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00936502221097040
       
  • Predicting Public Cooperation Toward Government Actions in the Early
           Stages of an Influenza Pandemic in the United States: The Role of
           Authentic Governmental Communication and Relational Quality

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      Authors: Jo-Yun Li, Yeunjae Lee
      Abstract: Communication Research, Ahead of Print.
      During a public health crisis, government sector is considered the natural leader for overall preparedness and management efforts. Integrating the literature from public relations and public health disciplines, this study proposes a theoretical model to predict individuals’ perceptions, communicative action, as well as their behaviors to follow the governments’ instructions in the early stages of the COVID-19 outbreak in the United States. Linking relationship management factors and the framework of the situational theory of problem-solving, the findings of this study demonstrate that authentic communication and relational quality can help increase positive perceptual, attitudinal, and behavioral outcomes desired by governments regarding pandemic management. However, our findings suggested that unproductive uses of authentic governmental communication may create adverse effects on publics’ perceptions and interpretations and thus pose potential risks, particularly when a public health issue is significantly politicized. Specifically, this study found that, in the case of the COVID-19 pandemic in which the Trump administration was blamed for lack of planning and halting responses in the fight against the virus, conservatives who believe that the federal government is practicing authentic communication during the pandemic would consider the issue less important and irreverent; meanwhile, they would recognize more barriers to adopt preventive actions. Theoretical and practical implications are discussed.
      Citation: Communication Research
      PubDate: 2022-07-15T05:22:12Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00936502221096659
       
  • News Framing and Preference-Based Reinforcement: Evidence from a Real
           Framing Environment During the COVID-19 Pandemic

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      Authors: Florian Arendt, Michaela Forrai, Manina Mestas
      Abstract: Communication Research, Ahead of Print.
      COVID-19 is a news issue that can be covered from many different angles. When reporting, journalists have to select, accentuate, or exclude particular aspects, which, in turn, may evoke a specific, and possibly constricted, perspective in viewers, a phenomenon termed the news-framing effect. Guided by the reinforcing spiral framework, we conducted a multi-study project that investigated the news-framing effect’s underlying mechanism by studying the dynamic of self-reinforcing effects. Grounded in a real-life framing environment observed during the pandemic and systematically assessed via a content analysis (study 1) and survey (study 2), we offer supporting evidence for a preference-based reinforcement model by utilizing a combination of the selective exposure (i.e., self-selected exposure) and causal effects (i.e., forced exposure) paradigms within one randomized controlled study (study 3). Self-selection of news content by viewers was a necessary precondition for frame-consistent (reinforcement) effects. Forced exposure did not elicit causal effects in a frame-consistent direction.
      Citation: Communication Research
      PubDate: 2022-07-08T06:45:09Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00936502221102104
       
  • “Are You Doing What I Think You’re Doing'” Momentary Goal
           Projection and Goal Contagion in Romantic Conflict

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      Authors: Timothy Worley, Rachel Vanderbilt, Esther Liu
      Abstract: Communication Research, Ahead of Print.
      This study examined how individuals’ goals and inferences about partners’ goals vary moment-by-moment during romantic conflicts. Seventy romantic couples discussed a current relational conflict for 7 minutes. Participants individually reviewed video recordings of their discussion, rating the importance of their own goals and inferences about the importance of those goals for their partner during each minute. Individuals demonstrated mixed accuracy when inferring partners’ goals. We observed evidence of goal projection, as the more important a goal was to oneself, the more one inferred it was important to the partner. We also observed evidence of goal contagion, as inferences about a partner’s goals mediated several associations between the partner’s previous goals and individuals’ subsequent goals. Furthermore, inferences about partners’ goals also mediated associations between individuals’ own prior goals and their goals at the next minute.
      Citation: Communication Research
      PubDate: 2022-07-04T11:27:03Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00936502211046239
       
  • Toward a Deeper Understanding of Prolific Lying: Building a Profile of
           Situation-Level and Individual-Level Characteristics

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      Authors: David M. Markowitz
      Abstract: Communication Research, Ahead of Print.
      Prior work suggests those who lie prolifically tend to be younger and self-identify as male compared to those who engage in everyday lying, but little research has developed an understanding of prolific lying beyond demographics. Study 1 (N = 775) replicated the prior demographic effects and assessed prolific lying through situation-level (e.g., opportunistic cheating) and individual-level characteristics (e.g., dispositional traits, general communication patterns) for white and big lies. For these two lie types, prolific lying associated with more opportunistic cheating, the use of fewer adjectives, and being high on psychopathy compared to everyday lying. Study 2 (N = 1,022) replicated these results and observed a deception consensus effect reported in other studies: the more that people deceived, the more they believed that others deceived as well. This piece develops a deeper theoretical understanding of prolific lying for white and big lies, combining evidence of situational, dispositional, and communication characteristics.
      Citation: Communication Research
      PubDate: 2022-07-04T11:27:03Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00936502221097041
       
  • Psycho-Cardiac Distress Symptoms of Dyadic Communication Apprehension
           & The Role of Self-Esteem

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      Authors: Alejandro R. Campero-Oliart
      Abstract: Communication Research, Ahead of Print.
      This study examined the extent to which dyadic communication apprehension (CA) manifested in heart-rate (HR) and heart-rate variability (HRV) during dyadic interaction and explored the inhibiting role of self-esteem for dyadic-communication distress through two explanatory frameworks: A moderation and an indirect effect. Participants completed self-report measures for dyadic CA and self-esteem. Their cardiac activity was then monitored during noncommunicative and impromptu dyadic communication periods. During interaction, higher dyadic CA manifested strongly in higher HR and lower HRV independently of their mutual influence, suggesting dyadic CA induces psycho-cardiac distress via sympathetic and parasympathetic influences. Regarding self-esteem, there was tentative evidence of a moderating effect for the impact of dyadic CA on HR, but not on HRV. Tests of indirect effects showed significant evidence of its inhibitory influence on both distress symptoms via dyadic CA. Findings are interpreted in the context of arousal and emotion regulation when navigating one-on-one conversations.
      Citation: Communication Research
      PubDate: 2022-06-20T04:08:27Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00936502221085904
       
  • Reaching Science Skeptics: How Adaptive Framing of Climate Change Leads to
           Positive Responses Via Persuasion Knowledge and Perceived Behavioral
           Control

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      Authors: Renita Coleman, Esther Thorson, Cinthia Jimenez, Kami Vinton
      Abstract: Communication Research, Ahead of Print.
      This study extends framing theory by identifying two causal mechanisms and one contingent condition for a new type of frame to be used with issues where people dispute scientific claims. This new “adaptive frame” focuses on adapting to climate change impacts without cueing deeply held beliefs by discussing causes. An experiment shows this frame works by reducing persuasion knowledge and increasing perceived behavioral control, resulting in science skeptics being significantly more likely to intend to take action, engage with the news, and agree with the story’s perspective. This effect is moderated by science skepticism, with adaptive frames working significantly better on the very people the news media are not reaching. We contribute to theory with an understanding of how a frame that eliminates references to deep-seated beliefs is more effective than the existing frames of conflict, attribution of responsibility, and possibly others.
      Citation: Communication Research
      PubDate: 2022-05-19T08:47:49Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00936502221084925
       
  • Active vs. Passive Ambivalent Voters: Implications for Interactive
           Political Communication and Participation

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      Authors: Chingching Chang, Chung-li Wu
      Abstract: Communication Research, Ahead of Print.
      Voters express different attitudes toward competing political parties and the issues they support. In this study, a polytomous latent class analysis of their opinions regarding party-divided issues identifies several types of voters and highlights the distinction between active and passive ambivalent voters. Such a distinction is necessary to clarify the relationship between party ambivalence and political participation. Drawing on research into ambivalent attitudes, the current study postulates that active ambivalent citizens adopt amplification strategies, whereas passive ambivalent citizens adopt avoidance strategies. A comparison between them further indicates that active ambivalent citizens are motivated to fulfill their civic duties and be accountable when they seek political information, and they express more political interest than their passive counterparts. A three-wave panel survey confirms the influence of ambivalent voter types (wave 1) on political participation (wave 3), according to voters’ political orientation (i.e., civic duty motives to seek political information and interest in politics) and their interactive political communication (interactive engagement with digital political information and interpersonal political discussions) (wave 2).
      Citation: Communication Research
      PubDate: 2022-03-30T05:12:28Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00936502211066001
       
  • When the Stakes are Low: How Key Features of Momentary Suspense Contribute
           to a Global Evaluation of Enjoyment

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      Authors: Robert Madrigal, Colleen Bee, Johnny Chen
      Abstract: Communication Research, Ahead of Print.
      The enjoyment of suspenseful competitions is thought to be motivated by outcome preferences and outcome uncertainty. Prior research has focused more on the former than the latter. The current research considers how outcome uncertainty predicts a global evaluation of enjoyment for competitions in which the personal stakes associated with the outcome are relatively low. Using moment-to-moment (MTM) measures of suspense, we find that competitions with more (vs. less) outcome uncertainty positively predict both total suspense and a set of key features aggregated from MTM suspense (slope, end, peak, and time-to-peak). A global evaluation of enjoyment was also predicted by these same measures. Further, enjoyment in each experiment was more highly correlated with peak suspense than it was with total suspense. Our contribution therefore is a nuanced description of how certain key features of suspenseful competitions with low-stakes outcomes influence a global evaluation of enjoyment.
      Citation: Communication Research
      PubDate: 2022-03-28T05:21:35Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00936502221074645
       
  • Reading, Commenting and Sharing of Fake News: How Online Bandwagons and
           Bots Dictate User Engagement

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      Authors: Maria D. Molina, Jinping Wang, S. Shyam Sundar, Thai Le, Carlina DiRusso
      Abstract: Communication Research, Ahead of Print.
      Do social media users read, comment, and share false news more than real news' Does it matter if the story is written by a bot and whether it is endorsed by many others' We conducted a selective-exposure experiment (N = 171) to answer these questions. Results showed that real articles were more likely to receive “likes” whereas false articles were more likely to receive comments. Users commented more on a bot-written article when it received fewer likes. We explored the psychological mechanisms underlying these findings in Study 2 (N = 284). Data indicate that users’ engagement with online news is largely driven by emotions elicited by news content and heuristics triggered by interface cues, such that curiosity increases consumption of real news, whereas uneasiness triggered by a high number of “likes” encourages comments on fake news.
      Citation: Communication Research
      PubDate: 2022-03-28T05:19:54Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00936502211073398
       
  • Not All Norm Information is the Same: Effects of Normative Content in the
           Media on Young People’s Perceptions of E-Cigarette and Tobacco Use Norms
           

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      Authors: Leeann Siegel, Jiaying Liu, Laura Gibson, Robert Hornik
      Abstract: Communication Research, Ahead of Print.
      Norm information in media can predict individuals’ norm perceptions and, ultimately, their behavior. Little research has examined how descriptive norm information manifests in media and impacts beliefs in the real world. Previously, using automated content analysis, we measured and examined longitudinal trends in two types of descriptive norm information, individual use depictions and population norms, pertaining to tobacco and e-cigarette use across six media sources from 2014 to 2017. Here, we assess how this norm information affected norm perceptions over time by pairing these data with a rolling cross-sectional survey of young people’s beliefs and intentions related to these behaviors. We found that individual use depictions predicted some norm perceptions, although the direction of effects varied depending on the source, behavior, and type of perceptions considered. Population norm content did not affect perceptions. These findings highlight that real-world media norm information has real-world effects, and moderators of these effects should be studied.
      Citation: Communication Research
      PubDate: 2022-03-28T05:18:38Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00936502211073290
       
  • A Longitudinal Examination of Enacted Goal Attention in End-of-Life
           Communication in Families

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      Authors: Allison M. Scott
      Abstract: Communication Research, Ahead of Print.
      Drawing on theoretical principles related to goal pursuit and inference, the present study investigated the extent to which specific message features led to better or worse conversational outcomes of end-of-life discussions between older adults and their adult children. Actor-partner interdependence modeling analysis of longitudinal reports from 66 parent/child dyads revealed that tactical attention to identity, relational, and task goals in conversation predicted change over a 1-year period in advance directive completion, concordance accuracy, and relationship satisfaction and closeness. Quantity features of communication (i.e., number of conversations, number of topics discussed) were not related to the measured outcomes. Routine relationship maintenance and explicit decision making had a positive impact on the outcomes, and underaccommodation, strategic relationship maintenance, avoidance, elaboration, and implicit decision making had a negative impact on the outcomes of end-of-life family talk. The findings provide insight on how to practically improve the quality of end-of-life conversations in families.
      Citation: Communication Research
      PubDate: 2022-03-11T05:10:07Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00936502211058040
       
  • Screenertia: Understanding “Stickiness” of Media Through
           Temporal Changes in Screen Use

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      Authors: Miriam Brinberg, Nilam Ram, Jinping Wang, S. Shyam Sundar, James J. Cummings, Leo Yeykelis, Byron Reeves
      Abstract: Communication Research, Ahead of Print.
      Descriptions of moment-by-moment changes in attention contribute critical elements to theory and practice about how people process media. We introduce a new concept called screenertia and use new screen-capture methodology to empirically evaluate its occurrence. We unobtrusively obtained 400,000+ screenshots of 30 participants’ laptop screens every 5 seconds for 4 days to examine individuals’ attention to their screens and how the distribution of attention differs across media content. All individuals’ screen segments were best described by a log-normal survival function—evidence of screenertia. Consistent with the literature on uses and gratifications of media, news/entertainment activities were the most “sticky.” These findings indicate that screenertia is not only related to the level of interactivity of media content but is also related to its modality and agency. Discussion of the findings highlights the importance of theorizing, examining, and modeling the specific time scales at which media behaviors manifest and evolve.
      Citation: Communication Research
      PubDate: 2022-02-12T05:21:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00936502211062778
       
  • Privacy Cynicism and its Role in Privacy Decision-Making

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      Authors: Iris van Ooijen, Claire M. Segijn, Suzanna J. Opree
      Abstract: Communication Research, Ahead of Print.
      In the era of data-driven communication, managing one’s online privacy is a necessary, yet burdensome challenge. While individuals have concerns about firms’ data collection practices, they sometimes appear to disclose personal information for relatively small rewards. We demonstrate that privacy cynicism—an attitude toward privacy protection characterized by frustration, hopelessness, and disillusionment—explains this paradox by moderating the relationship between the appraisal of privacy threats and privacy coping behaviors on one side, and privacy protection behaviors on the other side. Results of a U.S. national survey (N = 993) show that privacy cynicism is negatively related to privacy protection behaviors and significantly moderates relationships of perceived vulnerability, response efficacy, disclosure benefits, and response costs on protection behaviors. Hence, this work has important implications for communication theory by extending existing models of privacy management behaviors, as well as for communication practice, by stressing the importance of creating awareness about privacy cynicism.
      Citation: Communication Research
      PubDate: 2022-02-12T05:19:42Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00936502211060984
       
  • Is Constructive Engagement Online a Lost Cause' Toxic Outrage in
           Online User Comments Across Democratic Political Systems and Discussion
           Arenas

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      Authors: Julia Jakob, Timo Dobbrick, Rainer Freudenthaler, Patrik Haffner, Hartmut Wessler
      Abstract: Communication Research, Ahead of Print.
      This study is the first to simultaneously investigate country-level and platform-related context factors of toxic outrage, that is, destructive incivility, in online discussions. It compares user comments on the public role of religion and secularism from 2015/16 in four democracies (Australia, United States, Germany, Switzerland) and four discussion arenas on three platforms (News websites, Facebook, Twitter). A novel automated content analysis (N = 1,236,551) combines LIWC dictionaries with machine learning. The level of toxic outrage is higher in majoritarian than in consensus-oriented democracies and in arenas that afford plural, issue-driven rather than like-minded, preference-driven debates. Yet, toxic outrage is lower in forums that tend to separate public and private conversations than in those that collapse varying contexts. This suggests that user-generated discussions flourish in environments that incentivize actors to strive for compromise, put relevant issues center stage and make room for public debate at a relative distance from purely social conversation.
      Citation: Communication Research
      PubDate: 2022-02-04T04:56:54Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00936502211062773
       
 
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