Subjects -> COMMUNICATIONS (Total: 518 journals)
    - COMMUNICATIONS (446 journals)
    - DIGITAL AND WIRELESS COMMUNICATION (31 journals)
    - HUMAN COMMUNICATION (19 journals)
    - MEETINGS AND CONGRESSES (7 journals)
    - RADIO, TELEVISION AND CABLE (15 journals)

HUMAN COMMUNICATION (19 journals)

Showing 1 - 20 of 20 Journals sorted by number of followers
Language Learning Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31)
Communication Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Advances in Image and Video Processing     Open Access   (Followers: 24)
Health Communication     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Communication Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Political Communication     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
European Journal of Communication     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Communication Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Mass Communication & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Asian Journal of Communication     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Atlantic Journal of Communication     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Communication Research Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Communication Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Communication Teacher     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Popular Communication     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Argumentation and Advocacy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Cryptography     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Ukrainian Information Space     Open Access  
Acta Universitatis Sapientiae Communicatio     Open Access  
Jurnal The Messenger     Open Access  
Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Communication Research
Journal Prestige (SJR): 2.171
Citation Impact (citeScore): 3
Number of Followers: 24  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0093-6502 - ISSN (Online) 1552-3810
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1176 journals]
  • When Adolescents’ Self-Worth Depends on Their Social Media Feedback: A
           Longitudinal Investigation With Depressive Symptoms

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      Authors: Lara Schreurs, Angela Y. Lee, Xun “Sunny” Liu, Jeffrey T. Hancock
      Abstract: Communication Research, Ahead of Print.
      While social media is assumed to exacerbate adolescents’ depressive symptoms, research findings are ambiguous. One way to move the field forward is by looking beyond time spent on social media and considering subjective experiences. The current three-wave longitudinal panel study examines the within- and between-person relations between adolescents’ self-worth dependency on social media feedback and depressive symptoms. About 1,607 adolescents participated in two of the three waves, yet a third had to be excluded due to failing an attention check. Among the analytical sample of 1,032 adolescents, we found that adolescents who derived more of their self-worth from social media feedback were also more depressed, as indicated by a positive correlation at the between-person level. No support was found for within-person associations over time. These results highlight the need to examine effects of subjective experiences with social media by separating within- and between-person dynamics to reach more precise conclusions.
      Citation: Communication Research
      PubDate: 2024-02-21T05:04:10Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00936502241233787
       
  • Why Do Users Stop Pleasurable Media Experiences' The Dynamics of Media
           Experiences and Their Impact on Media Disengagement

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      Authors: Susanne E. Baumgartner, Rinaldo Kühne
      Abstract: Communication Research, Ahead of Print.
      Given the vast amount of permanently available entertainment content and the high pleasure that viewers derive from it, the question of when and why users disengage from a media entertainment viewing session becomes more pressing. We argue in this paper that communication theories lack a conceptualization of the disengagement part of the communication process. The study presents a novel dynamic view on media use, and argues that specific processes that occur during media exposure contribute to its termination. The assumptions of the theoretical framework are tested with an event-based experience sampling study during TV series viewing sessions among 89 participants (1,952 answered surveys). The findings show that negative and positive response states evolve (partly) independently of each other in the course of entertainment viewing sessions: Despite an increase in negative experiences of goal conflict, guilt, and fatigue, individuals’ level of enjoyment remained stable during a viewing session. These results indicate that negative responses do not necessarily interfere with the experience of enjoyment. The level of enjoyment was the strongest predictor for whether someone stopped a viewing session indicating that hedonic experiences might overrule rational decisions to stop due to being fatigued or having other things to do.
      Citation: Communication Research
      PubDate: 2024-02-19T11:49:20Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00936502241233017
       
  • Active Listening in Integrative Negotiation

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      Authors: Elisabeth Jäckel, Alfred Zerres, Joachim Hüffmeier
      Abstract: Communication Research, Ahead of Print.
      Active listening is a promising communication technique to positively affect interactions and communication outcomes. However, theoretical propositions regarding its direct effects on interactions have rarely been empirically investigated. In the present research, we studied the role of naturally occurring active listening in the context of videotaped and coded integrative negotiations. Lag sequential analyses of 48 negotiations with 17,120 thought units show that active listening follows offers that comprise two or more issues (i.e., multi-issue offers) above chance level. These multi-issue offer—active listening patterns in turn promoted integrative statements (e.g., further multi-issue offers) and inhibited distributive statements (e.g., single-issue offers). Moreover, multi-issue offer—active listening patterns (and neither multi-issue offers nor active listening alone) also positively related to the achieved joint economic outcomes in the negotiation. Contrary to common expectations, we did not find evidence that active listening promotes the understanding of the other party or rapport between negotiators.
      Citation: Communication Research
      PubDate: 2024-02-14T12:32:58Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00936502241230711
       
  • The Impact of Machine Authorship on News Audience Perceptions: A
           Meta-Analysis of Experimental Studies

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      Authors: Sai Wang, Guanxiong Huang
      Abstract: Communication Research, Ahead of Print.
      The growing adoption of artificial intelligence in journalism has dramatically changed the way news is produced. Despite the recent proliferation of research on automated journalism, debate continues about how audiences perceive and evaluate news purportedly written by machines compared to the work of human authors. Based on a review of 30 experimental studies, this meta-analysis shows that machine authorship had a negative, albeit small, effect on credibility perceptions. Furthermore, machine authorship had a null effect on news evaluations, although this effect was significant and stronger (more negative) when (a) the news covered socio-political topics (vs. environmental topics) and (b) the actual source of the news articles was a machine (vs. a human). These findings are discussed in light of theoretical accounts of human–machine communication and practical implications for news media.
      Citation: Communication Research
      PubDate: 2024-02-14T12:20:59Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00936502241229794
       
  • The Interplay of Knowledge Overestimation, Social Media Use, and Populist
           Ideas: Cross-Sectional and Experimental Evidence From Germany and Taiwan

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      Authors: Niels G. Mede, Adrian Rauchfleisch, Julia Metag, Mike S. Schäfer
      Abstract: Communication Research, Ahead of Print.
      Social media expose users to an abundance of information about various issues. But they also make it difficult for users to assess the quality of this information. If users do not recognize this, they may overestimate their knowledge about those issues. Knowledge overestimation may lead to increased social media engagement and can be linked to attitudes deeming expert knowledge inferior to common sense, such as science-related populist attitudes. We investigate this during the COVID-19 pandemic in two preregistered, cross-sectional survey experiments in Germany and Taiwan, two countries with different cultures, media environments, and responses to the pandemic. Our study offers two contributions: First, we develop a novel measure of COVID-19-related knowledge. Second, we provide comparative evidence on how social media affordances shape the interplay between knowledge overestimation, social media exposure and engagement, and populist attitudes. We do not find that frequent exposure to COVID-19 information is associated with a higher likelihood of knowledge overestimation. However, we show that overestimation is linked to more user engagement with social media content about COVID-19. Experimental data indicate that engagement depends on whether users are in a private or public communication environment. We find minor differences between Germany and Taiwan.
      Citation: Communication Research
      PubDate: 2024-02-10T09:16:15Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00936502241230203
       
  • The Effects of Language Features and Accents on the Arousal of
           Psychological Reactance and Communication Outcomes

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      Authors: Doris E. Acheme, Chris Anderson, Claude Miller
      Abstract: Communication Research, Ahead of Print.
      Guided by psychological reactance theory, we examined the effects of language features on arousing reactance and communication outcomes. Results of a 2 (controllingness; high/low) × 2 (concreteness; concrete/abstract) × 2 (restoration postscript; present/absent) × 3 (accent; Standard American English [SAE]/Indian [non-SAE]/text-based message) between-subjects design (N = 1,099, studies 1 and 2), revealed high-controlling language increased freedom threat, was perceived as more explicit than low-controlling language. Concrete language was perceived as more demanding of attention, fair, and producing lesser freedom threat than abstract language. Furthermore, restoration postscripts reduced freedom threat and message explicitness, including differences in restoration postscripts for the non-SAE relative to the SAE accent. Compared to the non-SAE accent, the SAE accent was perceived as more fluent and less difficult to understand, yet elicited more anger, more negative cognitions, and was perceived as less competent (Study 2). The implications are discussed vis-à-vis social influence and intergroup communication.
      Citation: Communication Research
      PubDate: 2024-02-08T09:46:16Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00936502241229883
       
  • Emotional Markers of Disrespect: A Fourth Dimension of Perceived Political
           Incivility'

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      Authors: Robin Stryker, Bethany Anne Conway, Shawn Bauldry, Vasundhara Kaul
      Abstract: Communication Research, Ahead of Print.
      Research has investigated emotional responses to perceived political incivility but not whether aspects of emotionality may be perceived as uncivil. When politicians display or evoke anger, they may increase democratic participation; however, because manifesting or evoking some negative emotions suggests disrespect—a central component of extant conceptualizations of political incivility—displaying anger and evoking fear and anger may be perceived as aspects of incivility. We test this using confirmatory factor analysis on a national sample of over 2,000 Americans. We find an overarching construct of perceived political incivility including not only three previously identified dimensions but also a fourth dimension reflecting negative emotions including fear and anger. Despite heterogeneity in perceived incivility, about 70% or more of respondents view behaviors including trolling and intentionally evoking anger and fear as mostly or very uncivil.
      Citation: Communication Research
      PubDate: 2024-01-25T10:28:25Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00936502231221926
       
  • Selective News Avoidance: Consistency and Temporality

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      Authors: Kim Andersen, Adam Shehata, Morten Skovsgaard, Jesper Strömbäck
      Abstract: Communication Research, Ahead of Print.
      Can news avoidance be considered a stable personal “trait,” adhering to a specific group of consistent news avoiders, or is it rather a volatile “state” reflecting temporal variations in audience practices' Based on a five-wave panel survey collected in Sweden during the coronavirus pandemic, we show that selective avoidance of news about the pandemic varies both between persons, representing consistency, and within persons, representing temporality. Drawing on the information utility model, we additionally show that both dimensions are related to audience preferences, specifically news interest, news media trust, and societal concerns. These results illustrate that the practice of selective news avoidance is not restricted to a specific group of people with limited news use but also represents a more fluid audience behavior of adjusting news consumption patterns in response to individual and contextual changes. However, as the correlates of the two dimensions are similar, the results stress the polarizing potential of news avoidance in democracy.
      Citation: Communication Research
      PubDate: 2024-01-25T10:25:26Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00936502231221689
       
  • When a Chatbot Disappoints You: Expectancy Violation in Human-Chatbot
           Interaction in a Social Support Context

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      Authors: Minjin (MJ) Rheu, Yue (Nancy) Dai, Jingbo Meng, Wei Peng
      Abstract: Communication Research, Ahead of Print.
      Although users’ expectations of a chatbot’s performance could greatly shape their interaction experience, they have been underexplored in the context of social support where chatbots are gaining popularity. A 2 × 2 experiment created expectancy violation and confirmation conditions by matching or mismatching a chatbot’s expertise label (expert vs. non-expert) and its interactional contingency (contingent vs. generic feedback to users). Contingent feedback from chatbots was found to have positive effects on participants’ evaluation of the bot and their perceived emotional validation, regardless of the bot’s expertise label. When providing generic feedback to participants, a bot received worse evaluation and induced less emotional validation on participants when it was labeled as an expert, rather than a non-expert, highlighting the detrimental effect of negative expectancy violation than negative expectancy confirmation in interactions with a social support chatbot. Theoretical and practical implications are discussed.
      Citation: Communication Research
      PubDate: 2024-01-25T10:21:05Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00936502231221669
       
  • Navigating Multiple Identities for Positive Change Through Organizational
           Listening

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      Authors: Jiawei Sophia Fu, DaJung Woo, Katherine R. Cooper, Melanie Kwestel
      Abstract: Communication Research, Ahead of Print.
      Organizational listening is critical in times of change, especially for organizations that must meet diverse stakeholder interests. Organizations’ views on who they are—whether they are altruistic or self-oriented entities—may shape organizational listening practices in meaningful ways. To explore the undertheorized topic of organizational listening, we conducted a mixed-method sequential explanatory study. Drawing on survey and interview data from 122 U.S. nonprofits, we found an organization’s utilitarian identity for economic value creation is only related to practical motivation to engage in listening, whereas a normative identity for social mission is related to listening motivation, information analysis, and information integration. In addition, we found that organizational listening fully mediates the relationship between organizational identity and organizational change potential and implementation, indicating positive change would most likely occur through soliciting and incorporating stakeholder inputs. These results contribute to theorizing organizational listening and suggest implications for navigating multiple identities in organizational change processes.
      Citation: Communication Research
      PubDate: 2024-01-24T07:46:07Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00936502241227380
       
  • Conflicting Goals When Seeking Support for Mental Health Concerns: Testing
           a Stigma Support Activation Model

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      Authors: Jenny L. Crowley, Andrew C. High, Michael R. Kotowski, Dennis N. McCarty
      Abstract: Communication Research, Ahead of Print.
      A stigma support activation model (SSAM) describing how stigma influences support and impression management goals, which in turn shape support seeking message characteristics is proposed. The model was empirically tested with a national sample of people with mental health concerns (N = 317), who completed an online survey about a recent time they sought support for their mental health. Results were generally consistent with the proposed model, suggesting a paradox of support seeking, where internalized stigma enhances both support and impression management goals, with perceived public stigma moderating the relationship between internalized stigma and support goals. These conflicting goals put constraints on the depth and emotional expressiveness of support seeking messages. Implications of these findings for theory on supportive communication and the management of stigmatized traits are discussed.
      Citation: Communication Research
      PubDate: 2023-12-07T09:18:06Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00936502231213129
       
  • Tuning Out (Political and Science) News' A Selective Exposure Study of the
           News Finds Me Perception

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      Authors: Chris Skurka, Mengqi Liao, Homero Gil de Zúñiga
      Abstract: Communication Research, Ahead of Print.
      Individuals harboring perceptions that the “news will find me” (NFM) tend to be less active consuming traditional media, preferring news online and on social media. NFM has also been linked with lower political knowledge and political participation over time. What remains to be seen, however, is whether high-NFM individuals are in fact less likely to expose themselves to news once they do encounter it online. This preregistered study fills this gap in the literature by unobtrusively logging selection behaviors while U.S. adults browsed a mock news website featuring various hard and soft news stories. Consistent with our hypothesizing, NFM was associated with greater exposure to soft news. Additionally, we examined whether genre-specific NFM beliefs would predict less exposure to those news genres. We found support for this hypothesis in the context of science news, but for political news, this relationship depended on the news stories presented.
      Citation: Communication Research
      PubDate: 2023-12-05T11:56:20Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00936502231215528
       
  • Racializing Accents: The Impact of Language and Racial Cues on Intergroup
           Communicative Outcomes

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      Authors: Doris E. Acheme, Gretchen Montgomery, Ioana A. Cionea
      Abstract: Communication Research, Ahead of Print.
      This study reports the results of an experiment (N = 502) investigating how speakers are socially categorized based on accent (Standard American English [SAE] or Nigerian) and race (White or Black) separately and concurrently, as well as the intergroup outcomes of such categorizations as mediated by language attitudes (status, solidary, and dynamism). Findings revealed that SAE-accented speakers were evaluated more favorably than Nigerian-accented speakers on status. Status also mediated the relationship between accent and (a) symbolic threat and (b) social distance. Additionally, Black males were rated higher on solidarity and dynamism than White males. Finally, status mediated the combined effect of the speaker’s race and accent on symbolic threat, intergroup anxiety, and social distance. Theoretical and practical implications are discussed.
      Citation: Communication Research
      PubDate: 2023-12-05T11:53:05Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00936502231215211
       
  • Strategies of Blaming on Social Media: An Experimental Study of Linguistic
           Framing and Retweetability

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      Authors: Sten Hansson, Matteo Fuoli, Ruth Page
      Abstract: Communication Research, Ahead of Print.
      This article introduces an original theoretical model for understanding how the linguistic framing of political protest messages influences how blame spreads in social media. Our model of blame retweetability posits that the way in which the basis and focus of blame are linguistically construed affects people’s perception of the strength of criticism in the message and its likelihood to be reposted. Two online experiments provide empirical support for the model. We find that attacks on a person’s character are perceived as more critical than blaming focused on the negative outcomes of their actions, and that negative judgements of social sanction have a greater impact than those of social esteem. The study also uncovers a “retweetability paradox”—in contrast to earlier studies, we find that blame messages that are perceived as more critical are not more likely to be reposted.
      Citation: Communication Research
      PubDate: 2023-11-25T08:18:05Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00936502231211363
       
  • Spillover Effects of COVID-19 News Coverage on Willingness to Participate
           in Medical Research in a Diverse Sample of US Older Adults

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      Authors: Amy Bleakley, Erin K. Maloney, Dannagal G. Young, Michael Hennessy, John P. Crowley, Kami J. Silk, Jessica B. Langbaum
      Abstract: Communication Research, Ahead of Print.
      COVID-19 has dominated news coverage since the beginning of the pandemic. The extent to which exposure to such news affected perceptions of medical research and other health issues is not clear, especially among older adults who are more susceptible to infection and experience more COVID-19-related morbidity and mortality. This study uses a two-wave national panel of U.S. adults ages 50 years and older (n = 1,240) to examine the mechanism through which exposure to source-specific news outlets (e.g., national network broadcasts, CNN, Fox News, MSNBC) affected willingness to participate in medical research for COVID-19 and Alzheimer’s disease (AD), both of which afflicts millions of older adults. We hypothesized that spillover from COVID-19 information exposure influenced potential research participation in AD research through attitudes toward science and COVID-19 misperceptions. Path analysis results provide empirical support for spillover effects which vary by news outlet.
      Citation: Communication Research
      PubDate: 2023-11-20T06:01:31Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00936502231210416
       
  • Checking the Fact-Checkers: The Role of Source Type, Perceived
           Credibility, and Individual Differences in Fact-Checking Effectiveness

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      Authors: Xingyu Liu, Li Qi, Laurent Wang, Miriam J. Metzger
      Abstract: Communication Research, Ahead of Print.
      This study investigates fact-checking effectiveness in reducing belief in misinformation across various types of fact-check sources (i.e., professional fact-checkers, mainstream news outlets, social media platforms, artificial intelligence, and crowdsourcing). We examine fact-checker credibility perceptions as a mechanism to explain variance in fact-checking effectiveness across sources, while taking individual differences into account (i.e., analytic thinking and alignment with the fact-check verdict). An experiment with 859 participants revealed few differences in effectiveness across fact-checking sources but found that sources perceived as more credible are more effective. Indeed, the data show that perceived credibility of fact-check sources mediates the relationship between exposure to fact-checking messages and their effectiveness for some source types. Moreover, fact-checker credibility moderates the effect of alignment on effectiveness, while analytic thinking is unrelated to fact-checker credibility perceptions, alignment, and effectiveness. Other theoretical contributions include extending the scope of the credibility-persuasion association and the MAIN model to the fact-checking context, and empirically verifying a critical component of the two-step motivated reasoning model of misinformation correction.
      Citation: Communication Research
      PubDate: 2023-10-27T10:08:51Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00936502231206419
       
  • Intraparty and Interparty Political Disagreement as Predictors of
           Affective Polarization and Willingness to Engage in Interparty Contact:
           The Moderating Role of Political Difference Management Styles

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      Authors: Tatsuya Suzuki, Alcides Velasquez, Yan Bing Zhang
      Abstract: Communication Research, Ahead of Print.
      Interpersonal political discussion is a normatively valued practice in a democracy, shaping polarizing attitudes and influencing future contact intentions in divided political landscapes. Applying social identity, intergroup contact, and conflict management styles theories, in this article, we investigate the associations between political disagreement with in-party and out-party members, affective polarization, and willingness to engage in interparty contact. Additionally, we examine how these associations are contingent upon individuals’ styles for managing political disagreement. Using cross-sectional survey data (N = 732), we found that better quality of disagreement with out-party members and more frequent disagreement with in-party members are related to improved intergroup attitudes. Furthermore, these relationships vary depending on the competing disagreement management style.
      Citation: Communication Research
      PubDate: 2023-10-24T05:01:27Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00936502231207447
       
  • An Experimental Test of Mediated Supportive Communication and Resulting
           Outcomes

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      Authors: Lucas J. Youngvorst, Susanne M. Jones
      Abstract: Communication Research, Ahead of Print.
      The present study integrates theories of mediated and supportive communication to investigate the influence of communication context (i.e., channel) and content (i.e., quality) on support outcomes. 162 friend-dyads participated in an experiment by engaging in a supportive conversation that occurred either face-to-face, via video chat, or via text messaging and was manipulated to reflect either low- or high-quality support. Results showed channel richness, as operationalized by perceived synchronicity and bandwidth, varied across all three channels, and significantly predicted support receivers’ cognitive reappraisal and emotional improvement. Moderation analyses offered support consistent with the dual process theory of supportive message outcomes, such that the positive relationship between perceived bandwidth and support outcomes diminished as support quality increased. As one of the few experimental studies of enacted support reflecting varying quality levels across three distinct communication channels in the context of established friendships, implications for mediated supportive communication are discussed.
      Citation: Communication Research
      PubDate: 2023-10-21T05:40:28Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00936502231206028
       
  • Sexual Minorities’ Uncertainty About Their Romantic Partner’s
           Communication With Their Family: Applying the Theory of Motivated
           Information Management

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      Authors: Paul Schrodt, Andrew M. Ledbetter, Austyn Markham
      Abstract: Communication Research, Ahead of Print.
      Using the theory of motivated information management (TMIM), this study tested the degree to which sexual minorities’ uncertainty discrepancy about their partner’s communication about their relationship to their family of origin predicted their information management strategies and relational quality (i.e., closeness and satisfaction). Participants included 111 sexual minorities involved in a monogamous romantic relationship. Results supported the theoretic logic of the TMIM, as uncertainty discrepancy positively predicted negative emotions, which in turn negatively predicted SMs’ outcome expectancies and efficacy assessments but positively predicted direct and indirect information seeking. Indirect effects emerged for uncertainty discrepancy on direct information seeking and information avoidance, as well as for relational closeness and satisfaction, via the mechanisms specified by the TMIM. Importantly, this study reveals relational ambivalence that sexual minorities may experience as a result of managing their uncertainty about their partner’s relationship disclosures to their partner’s family-of-origin.
      Citation: Communication Research
      PubDate: 2023-10-03T11:14:38Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00936502231203159
       
  • Can We Counteract Hate' Effects of Online Hate Speech and Counter Speech
           on the Perception of Social Groups

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      Authors: Svenja Schäfer, Isabella Rebasso, Ming Manuel Boyer, Anna Maria Planitzer
      Abstract: Communication Research, Ahead of Print.
      Hate speech can increase stereotyped thinking and social distancing in a society. However, there is still a lack of variety in the social groups under study and research into possible solutions to the problem. Thus, our aim is to (1) study effects of hate speech against Chinese people and transgender people and (2) to investigate if counter speech can offset the detrimental effects of hate speech. We conducted a pre-registered online experiment with a 2 × 3 between-subject design, varying the attacked group (Chinese people/transgender people) and the type of comments (neutral/hate speech/hate speech and counter speech) for an Austrian sample (n = 1285). Findings reveal no effect of hate speech on the dependent variables, indicating that citizens might not be as vulnerable to hate speech after all. However, counter speech has a polarizing effect: attitudinal gaps and differences for social distancing increase between left-wing and right-wing participants if hate speech is countered.
      Citation: Communication Research
      PubDate: 2023-09-28T09:40:57Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00936502231201091
       
  • The Role of Person-Centered Messages, Parallel Disclosures, and Reactance
           When Communicating Support for Parental Death

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      Authors: Xi Tian, Denise Haunani Solomon
      Abstract: Communication Research, Ahead of Print.
      This article evaluates communicative strategies to reduce reactance and enhance outcomes when people receive supportive messages about the death of their parent. Two experiments, a laboratory study and an online survey, manipulated person-centeredness and the presence and timing of parallel bereavement disclosures by the support provider. In both studies, moderately person-centered messages produced less reactance and better support quality, compared to low person-centered messages, and were perceived to be as effective as highly person-centered messages. The inclusion of support providers’ parallel disclosures produced different outcomes depending on person-centeredness and the timing of disclosures. A perceived threat to freedom and reactance serially mediated the associations between person-centered messages and outcomes, including emotional improvement, support quality, and source derogation, but not the interactive effects of parallel disclosures and person-centered messages on outcomes. The discussion highlights the challenges of communicating support for major life stressors.
      Citation: Communication Research
      PubDate: 2023-09-23T04:43:49Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00936502231200554
       
  • Affective Responses to Counter-Attitudinal Testimonials Drive Persuasive
           Effects: The Case of Physician-Assisted Suicide

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      Authors: Judy Watts, Michael D. Slater, Emily Moyer-Gusé
      Abstract: Communication Research, Ahead of Print.
      Overtly persuasive narratives such as testimonials pose significant challenges for theories of narrative persuasion. Such theories argue that overt persuasive intent diminishes entertainment and entertaining narratives reduce counterarguing. We propose that testimonial narratives instead have persuasive advantages through their ability to arouse message-consistent emotions and reduce affective reactance to the messages. Participants (n = 1478) were randomly assigned to read a testimonial narrative or a non-narrative article about physician-assisted suicide. Articles were perceived as highly persuasive and low in entertainment intent; the testimonial was higher than the non-narrative in perceived eudaimonic intent. As predicted, testimonials reduced counterarguing via increased meaningful affect and decreased affective reactance to the message. Interaction tests showed that these effects were stronger in counterattitudinal participants. Theoretical implications for understanding the effects of testimonial narratives, particularly when the narratives are eudaimonic, are discussed, as are innovations for measuring counterarguing and perceived message intent.
      Citation: Communication Research
      PubDate: 2023-09-14T04:56:46Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00936502231198551
       
  • Not Bowling Alone: Revisiting Partisan Types and Participatory Behaviors
           Using the Communication Mediated Model

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      Authors: Hsuan-Ting Chen, Jing Guo
      Abstract: Communication Research, Ahead of Print.
      Drawing on the two-wave 2020 American National Election Studies (ANES) survey, this study revisits partisan types by categorizing individuals’ party identification and positions on party-divided issues. A Latent Class Analysis reveals six types of partisans, which were further clustered into three types: polarized partisans (i.e., polarized Democrats and polarized Republicans, 47.85%), incongruent partisans (i.e., conservative Democrats and liberal Republicans, 28.23%), and floating citizens (i.e., hesitant citizens and apathetic citizens, 23.92%) based on the partisan typology proposed in this study. Employing the O-S-R-O-R model, this study found that polarized partisans (O), who are the most politically active citizens, are more likely than incongruent partisans and floating citizens to seek pro-attitudinal news on multi-platforms (S), then to discuss politics (R), then to be politically knowledgeable (O), which finally leads to higher levels of political participation. The results highlight a worrisome tendency in US politics as participation is largely by biased polarized partisans. Nevertheless, incongruent partisans also have the potential to make contributions to both deliberative and participatory democracy because they are also politically active. Their discussion and participatory behaviors can be attributed to their mixed issue positions and counter-attitudinal news consumption on multi-platforms.
      Citation: Communication Research
      PubDate: 2023-08-31T06:00:52Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00936502231195658
       
  • Moral Balancing in Video Games: The Moderating Role of Issue Congruency

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      Authors: Yu-Hao Lee, Mo Chen, Joyce Guo, Qing Xu
      Abstract: Communication Research, Ahead of Print.
      Research has shown that performing moral or immoral actions in video games can affect the players’ moral self-worth and evoke moral emotions. People may compensate for their immoral behaviors by performing more moral actions, but sometimes performing moral actions can also license them to perform immoral behaviors later. The current study examines whether players engage in moral licensing or moral cleansing behaviors within and after video game moral scenarios. Study 1 is an exploratory study that examined a sequence of moral dilemmas in the game Papers, Please, and found that players alternated between choosing the moral choices and the accurate choices, indicating signs of moral balancing when faced with moral choices that conflict with their in-game goals. Study 2 utilized a 3 (moral vs. immoral vs. control) × 2 (congruent charity vs. incongruent charity) experiment using a moral event in the game Life is Strange to examine the moderating effects of issue congruency on moral balancing. Study 3 used three different games to replicate Study 2. The findings showed that players who performed moral actions in the game also devoted more efforts to a charity on a congruent issue. However, participants who performed a moral behavior in the game committed significantly less effort to a charity on an incongruent issue, indicating a moral licensing effect. Study 2 found that performing immoral actions in a game can motivate players to devote more efforts to a subsequent charity, regardless of issue congruity, but this moral cleansing effect was not observed in Study 3.
      Citation: Communication Research
      PubDate: 2023-08-30T06:50:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00936502231195106
       
  • Mechanisms for Employee Mobility Between Organizations: A Network Analysis
           of Faculty Turnover in Communication, 2013 to 2022

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      Authors: Yu Xu
      Abstract: Communication Research, Ahead of Print.
      Organizations compete for scarce resources such as talent. The mobility of employees between organizations means that the inflow side acquires resources at the expense of the outflow side. This study understands employee turnover from one place to another as a mobility network where directed edges indicate migration flows between organizations. Using observational data on the turnover of tenure-line communication faculty in 129 U.S. universities from 2013 to 2022, this paper investigates the formation mechanisms of the interorganizational mobility network. The results show that the creation of migration flows is driven by transitive closure, but not by cyclic closure. Community cohesion is not a driving force of network formation. While low-prestige universities are more likely to be sources of faculty mobility than high-prestige universities, migration flows are commonly observed between organizations with similar levels of prestige. Additionally, the probability of faculty mobility between universities first decreases and then increases with their geographic distance.
      Citation: Communication Research
      PubDate: 2023-08-22T10:46:56Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00936502231190950
       
  • Examining the Diffusion of Innovations from a Dynamic,
           Differential-Effects Perspective: A Longitudinal Study on AI Adoption
           Among Employees

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      Authors: Shan Xu, Kerk F. Kee, Wenbo Li, Masahiro Yamamoto, Rachel E. Riggs
      Abstract: Communication Research, Ahead of Print.
      This study extends the diffusion of innovations theory by considering the threat of technology and examining the adoption of artificial intelligence (AI) in the workplace over time from a dynamic, differential-effects perspective. Findings from a three-wave survey study reveal an association between the threat of AI (i.e., job security concerns) and increasingly negative attitudes toward AI adoption among employees over time. Relative advantage, compatibility, and observability correlated with more positive attitudes, whereas ease of use and trialability showed no significant association. In testing the differential effects on attitudes toward AI adoption among different groups of potential adopters, we found that trialability positively influenced attitudes only among employees who held a positive attitude previously. Observability and the threat of AI, however, were more influential among employees who held a negative attitude previously. Theoretical and practical implications were discussed.
      Citation: Communication Research
      PubDate: 2023-08-16T05:13:25Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00936502231191832
       
  • Longitudinal Relations Between Heterosexual Adolescents’ Perceived
           Exposure to Sex-Positive Television Messages and Their Supportive
           Attitudes and Behaviors Toward the LGBTQ+ Community

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      Authors: Chelly Maes, Laura Vandenbosch
      Abstract: Communication Research, Ahead of Print.
      The literature on heterosexual adolescents’ television viewing and its over-time impact on attitudes and behaviors regarding LGBTQ+ is limited. The current study aims to fill this gap in the literature by using three-wave data from 338 heterosexual adolescents (Mage = 15.29, SD = 1.48, 68.6% girls). We explored relations between adolescents’ perceived exposure to sex-positive television messages, their respectful approach to different sexual expressions, and their endorsement of supportive behavior regarding LGBTQ+. A Random Intercept Cross-Lagged Panel Model (RI-CLPM) showed that, at a between-person level, perceived exposure to sex-positive television messages was related to the endorsement of supportive behavior regarding LGBTQ+. Yet, results revealed that an increased perceived exposure to sex-positive television messages was not associated with respectful approach to different sexual expressions and endorsement of supportive behavior regarding LGBTQ+ at the individual level. No sex or traditional gender role orientation differences were found. Our findings hopefully encourage sexual media research to further distinguish between-and within-person relations and to consider potential testing effects that mask true within-person change.
      Citation: Communication Research
      PubDate: 2023-08-10T12:21:57Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00936502231191830
       
  • Stigma and Supportive Communication in the Context of Mental or Emotional
           Distress: An Extension of the Paradox of Support Seeking in Close
           Relationships

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      Authors: Rachael E. Bishop, Andrew C. High
      Abstract: Communication Research, Ahead of Print.
      Supportive communication can benefit people coping with the stigma that often accompanies mental or emotional distress; however, people might be reluctant to seek support effectively, if at all, for these types of stressors. Guided by the paradox of support seeking, this study expands understanding of how and why people seek support by examining multiple dimensions of stigma, exploring factors that hinder or facilitate people’s decision to seek support, and investigating nuanced support seeking behaviors in the context of mental or emotional distress. Results (N = 406) revealed that internalization and visibility of stigma differentially impacted strategies people chose to seek support. Whereas visibility corresponded with direct seeking and more emotional content, internalized stigma was associated with avoidance. Perceived costs served as barriers to seeking support, and efficacy buffered against the negative consequences of stigma by encouraging direct seeking and allowing for greater depth and emotional content when seeking support.
      Citation: Communication Research
      PubDate: 2023-08-08T09:30:40Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00936502231189811
       
  • Entering an Information Era of Parallel Truths' A Qualitative Analysis of
           Legitimizing and De-legitimizing Truth Claims in Established Versus
           Alternative Media Outlets

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      Authors: Michael Hameleers, Nilou Yekta
      Abstract: Communication Research, Ahead of Print.
      In today’s digital media ecology, alternative narratives and conspiracies spread rapidly, and may undermine the legitimacy of journalism and reinforce polarized divides in society. In this setting, constructions of truth may greatly vary across established and alternative media. In this paper, we use a comparative qualitative content analysis in the US and the Netherlands to offer in-depth insights into how factual claims are legitimized and delegitimized by alternative versus mainstream media outlets. We put the assumption of post-factual relativism and alternative truths to an empirical test: To what extent and how do alternative versus established media construct irreconcilable versions of reality' When political disagreement is no longer founded on a shared reality, representative democracy may be severely damaged and vulnerable to undermining discourses of untruthfulness.
      Citation: Communication Research
      PubDate: 2023-08-07T07:04:46Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00936502231189685
       
  • A Grounded Theory of Credibility Work and Illness: Explication and
           Application to the Case of Women on Trial in Health Care

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      Authors: Charee M. Thompson, Sara Babu, Shana Makos
      Abstract: Communication Research, Ahead of Print.
      We make the communicative labor of illness credibility explicit by moving the concept of work into critical interpersonal theory to develop a grounded theory of credibility work. Synthesizing multi-disciplinary literature and drawing on interviews with 36 women in the United States whose health issues have been dismissed by health care providers, friends, and family, we forward a definition of credibility work, six postulates about its nature, and a broad typology of credibility work strategies. We then apply our theory to the data, contextualizing the strategies women engaged with their health care providers using the metaphor of a trial—building a case and presenting the case—and including the communicative double binds that accompanied their efforts. We discuss the theoretical and practical implications of this research, namely attention to the cultural, material, and embodied significance of communication labor endured to be believed, understood, and taken seriously for health issues.
      Citation: Communication Research
      PubDate: 2023-07-08T12:19:25Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00936502231184318
       
  • How Can We Increase Privacy Protection Behavior' A Longitudinal Experiment
           Testing Three Intervention Strategies

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      Authors: Sophie C. Boerman, Joanna Strycharz, Edith G. Smit
      Abstract: Communication Research, Ahead of Print.
      This study investigates which intervention strategies most effectively increase privacy protection behavior. Drawing upon Protection Motivation Theory, we examine the short- and long-term effects of (combinations) of three strategies: (1) increasing awareness of the threat to privacy, (2) training effective privacy protection behavior, and (3) addressing and combating privacy fatigue. We conducted a longitudinal experiment in the Netherlands with three waves (Nwave1 = 1,000, 2 weeks later Nwave2 = 799, 2 months later Nwave3 = 465) and eight between subjects conditions (no strategy and all possible combinations of the strategies). Results show that the training strategy increased self-efficacy and response efficacy, immediately increased all privacy protection behaviors, and positively impacted tracking blocking behavior in the short- and long-term, actual cookie rejection in the short-term (2 weeks later), and deletion behavior in the long-term (2 months later). The threat and fatigue strategies did not have their anticipated effects, but the threat strategy did immediately increase tracking blocking intentions, and the fatigue strategy had a positive, short-term effect on cookie rejection behavior.
      Citation: Communication Research
      PubDate: 2023-06-12T08:33:29Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00936502231177786
       
  • The Effect of Dynamic Norms Messages and Group Identity on
           Pro-Environmental Behaviors

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      Authors: Minwoong Chung, Maria Knight Lapinski
      Abstract: Communication Research, Ahead of Print.
      This study investigates the influence of dynamic norms messages on behavioral intention via perceived future descriptive norms for two different pro-environmental behaviors and tests for the moderating role of group identity in the relationship between dynamic norms and behavior. The findings of an experiment show that perceived future descriptive norms mediate the effect of dynamic norms messages on behavioral intention. In addition, the pattern of dynamic norms message effects is dependent on group identity. When the reference group in a message is viewed as an in-group member and similar to oneself, dynamic norms messages are more influential than conventional low descriptive norms messages; on the other hand, when the reference group is perceived as an out-group and dissimilar to oneself, conventional low descriptive norms messages are more influential than dynamic norms messages. Theoretical and practical implications are discussed.
      Citation: Communication Research
      PubDate: 2023-05-26T12:38:21Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00936502231176670
       
  • To Pause With a Cliffhanger or a Temporary Closure' The Differential
           Impact of Serial Versus Episodic Narratives on Children’s Physical
           Activity Behaviors

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      Authors: Amy Shirong Lu, Melanie C. Green, Caio Victor Sousa, Jungyun Hwang, I-Min Lee, Debbe Thompson, Tom Baranowski
      Abstract: Communication Research, Ahead of Print.
      Research has supported the effectiveness of narratives for promoting health behavior, but different narrative presentation formats (serial vs. episodic) have seldom been compared. Suspense theories suggest that serial narratives, which do not provide a full resolution at the end of an episode, may create higher motivation for continued engagement with a story. Forty-four 8 to 12-year-old children were randomly assigned to watch an animation series designed for an existing active video game in which the plot was delivered either continuously across multiple episodes (serial) or in multiple yet relatively independent self-contained episodes (episodic). Controlling for social desirability, children who watched the serial narrative had significantly more moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA) and step counts while the episodic group’s gameplay duration decreased, especially during later visits. There was no difference in self-reported narrative immersion or physical activity intention. Serial narratives can result in more time spent in MVPA behaviors than episodic narratives.
      Citation: Communication Research
      PubDate: 2023-04-24T06:50:10Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00936502231166091
       
  • Expanding the Boundary Conditions of the Communicative Ecology Model of
           Successful Aging to Include Communication About Religion

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      Authors: Quinten S. Bernhold, Jalen Blue, Sarah Devereux, Victoria Bertram, Kylie Julius
      Abstract: Communication Research, Ahead of Print.
      This study expanded the communicative ecology model of successful aging (CEMSA) to include communication about religion. Older adults (N = 272, MAge = 64.96 years) reported on the most important memorable message about religion that has shaped their lives, as well as on their own religious communication (i.e., religious helping and seeking religious support). Memorable messages with a theme of (a) developing a personal relationship with God and (b) eternal damnation were associated with higher and lower perceptions of memorable message motivational effect, respectively. Perceived memorable message motivational effect, religious helping, and seeking religious support were indirectly associated with successful aging, via aging efficacy. Communication about religion is a worthwhile theoretical addition to the CEMSA. The use of multiple sources of data—namely the memorable message themes (as coded by outside research assistants) and subjective aging experiences (as self-reported by older adults)—is also a noteworthy methodological contribution to CEMSA research.
      Citation: Communication Research
      PubDate: 2023-04-18T01:11:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00936502231165844
       
  • Reciprocal Relationships Between Adolescents’ Incidental Exposure to
           

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      Authors: Ann Rousseau
      Abstract: Communication Research, Ahead of Print.
      This study examined whether incidental exposure (IE) to climate content on social media can foster online climate change engagement among mid-to-late adolescents, using two-wave panel data (Nw1 & w2 = 574) gathered among Flemish adolescents (14–19). Structural equation analyses indicated that online climate change engagement positively predicted IE 4 months later, but not vice versa. IE did not significantly relate to online engagement 4 months later, irrespective of level of climate interest. However, we observed an antecedent role for climate interest; Higher climate interest was reflected in more online climate change engagement. Moreover, IE translated into higher levels of online climate change engagement among adolescents reporting high levels of injunctive peer norms. These findings suggest that social media are reinforcing rather than equalizing gaps in online climate change engagement and demonstrate how dispositional and social factors interact in shaping adolescents’ incidental social media exposure and online engagement.
      Citation: Communication Research
      PubDate: 2023-04-17T11:17:12Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00936502231164675
       
  • Support Seeking Behavior During Supportive Conversations: The Role of
           Impression Management Concerns and the Communication Medium

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      Authors: Stephen A. Rains, Corey A. Pavlich, Eric Tsetsi, Bethany R. Lutovsky, Anjali Ashtaputre, Katerina Nemcova
      Abstract: Communication Research, Ahead of Print.
      An experiment was conducted to better understand how impression management concerns and the communication medium influence the messages produced by support seekers during supportive conversations. Support seekers were primed to anticipate a positive face threat (or not primed) and then completed a supportive conversation with a peer either face-to-face or using instant messaging. Seekers primed to anticipate a face threat were more likely to use avoidance behaviors and less likely to use incriminating justifications as conversations persisted compared to the no prime condition. Seekers in the instant messaging condition were less likely to use exonerating justifications as conversations persisted compared to participants who communicated face-to-face. A three-way interaction for approach behaviors showed that the decreased likelihood of approach behaviors over the course of a conversation was strongest in the face threat prime condition among participants using instant messaging. The implications of these findings for supportive communication theory are considered.
      Citation: Communication Research
      PubDate: 2023-04-17T11:00:53Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00936502221146035
       
  • Past Relational Experiences and Social Interaction: Direct, Moderated, and
           Mediated Associations Between Relational Difficulty, Communication, and
           Perception in Two Samples

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      Authors: Andy J. Merolla, Christopher D. Otmar, Abdullah S. Salehuddin
      Abstract: Communication Research, Ahead of Print.
      This study examined the relationship between perceptions of relational history, namely, past relational challenges, and everyday social interaction experiences. In efforts to build upon and extend previous research, hypotheses directed toward replication and extension were tested in two experience sampling datasets (N = 120 and 220). Consistent support was found for the idea that people with a history of relational difficulties tend to perceive less interaction partner responsiveness, lower well-being, and higher stress during social interactions. Support was also found in a sample of adults for a multilevel mediation model whereby negative relations with others negatively predicted partner responsiveness through stress and partner liking. Results are interpreted based on affection-, appraisal-, and resource-based theories and potential differences in relational experiences at unique life stages and phases of the COVID-19 pandemic.
      Citation: Communication Research
      PubDate: 2023-04-06T12:14:10Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00936502231162232
       
  • The Effects of Corrective Strategies on Romantic Belief Endorsement

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      Authors: Melissa M. Moore, Melanie C. Green, Yotam Ophir, Hua Wang
      Abstract: Communication Research, Ahead of Print.
      Romantic comedies have long been understood to create unrealistic views of relationships. In the current study, we tested theory-driven corrective strategies for counteracting potentially harmful beliefs about romantic relationships. In an online experiment (N = 626), participants were randomly assigned to one of four conditions: to a no exposure control, to watch a romantic comedy scene without correction, to read a corrective article before viewing, or to read a corrective article before viewing and complete a counterarguing exercise after viewing. Results showed that both corrective treatments significantly reduced romantic belief endorsement. We also investigated narrative engagement factors as mediators of these effects. Media enjoyment, realism of specific scenes, and overall movie realism each mediated the effect of corrections on romantic belief endorsement. Our findings suggest theory-driven corrective strategies are effective for reducing idealistic beliefs associated with entertainment media and highlight key persuasive variables for future interventions.
      Citation: Communication Research
      PubDate: 2023-04-06T11:58:29Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00936502221138428
       
  • Agenda Setting, Cross-cutting Effects, and Political Expression on Social
           Media: The Gun Violence Case

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      Authors: Lei Guo, Yiyan Zhang, Kate Mays, Afra Feyza Akyürek, Derry Wijaya, Margrit Betke
      Abstract: Communication Research, Ahead of Print.
      Focusing on a polarized issue—U.S. gun violence—this study examines agenda setting as an antecedent of political expression on social media. A state-of-the-art machine-learning model was used to analyze news coverage from 25 media outlets—mainstream and partisan. Those results were paired with a two-wave panel survey conducted during the 2018 U.S. midterm elections. Findings show mainstream media shape public opinion about gun violence, which then stimulates expression about the issue on social media. The study also reveals that partisan media’s gun violence coverage has significant cross-cutting effects. Notably, exposure to conservative media will decrease public salience of gun violence, pivot opinion in a more conservative direction, and discourage social media expression; and all of these effects are stronger among liberals.
      Citation: Communication Research
      PubDate: 2023-03-29T12:12:18Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00936502231151555
       
  • Adolescents’ Multi-Layered Media Processing: A Panel Study on Positive
           and Negative Perceptions Toward Ideals and Adolescents’ Appearance
           Anxiety

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      Authors: Jolien Trekels, Steven Eggermont
      Abstract: Communication Research, Ahead of Print.
      Selective exposure literature indicates that not all users take away the same messages from their media exposure; it is suggested that viewers are not merely exposed but rather reactive to multiple—and possibly opposing—messages. The current study aims to introduce an active media-processing perspective, focusing specifically on the media-body image association among an early adolescent sample. Results of a three-wave longitudinal survey among 971 early adolescents (Mage = 11.14; SD = 1.13) show that media-focused peer interactions (W1), but not media exposure (W1), were associated with contradictory perceptions of attractiveness (i.e., perceived benefits and perceived costs for investing in appearance) (W2). Polynomial regression analyses pointed out that the association between these contradictory perceptions (i.e., interaction between benefits and costs; W2) was curvilinearily related to body image investment (W3). The findings emphasize the variable vulnerability of adolescents to the media effect and the importance of acknowledging multi-layered media messages.
      Citation: Communication Research
      PubDate: 2023-03-29T12:08:38Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00936502231151471
       
  • The Role of Social Support in Disarming the Effects of Racial
           Microaggressions

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      Authors: Uttara Manohar, Susan L. Kline
      Abstract: Communication Research, Ahead of Print.
      Racial microaggressions are a significant source of stress for people of color. This study identified two support message features for disarming the effects of racial microaggressions and tested reasons for their effectiveness. In a between-groups design, Black/African Americans (n = 387), and Asian Americans (n = 374) evaluated a support message crafted by a friend in response to one of six racial microaggressions. Participants perceived high person-centered, racial identity-affirming, and combination support messages as more effective and collective self-esteem enhancing than low quality message versions. Person-centered emotional support and combination messages were partly related to enhanced collective self-esteem through cognitive reappraisal and reattribution, while racial identity affirmation message quality was partly related to enhanced collective self-esteem through reattribution. Conditional process analyses determined that indirect effects were not contingent on participants’ race. Practical and theoretical implications of studying support messages to address racial microaggressions are discussed.
      Citation: Communication Research
      PubDate: 2023-03-29T12:02:58Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00936502231151740
       
  • A Longitudinal Dynamic Perspective on Quality in Journalism: Investigating
           the Long-Term Macro-Level Media Effect of Suicide Reporting on Suicide
           Rates Across a Century

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      Authors: Manina Mestas, Florian Arendt
      Abstract: Communication Research, Ahead of Print.
      Quality of journalism is not a stable phenomenon, yet there is limited longitudinal evidence. We provide a content analysis of news reporting over a whole century within a specific thematic context: suicide reporting. Quality is a key dimension in this context as low-quality reporting is associated with imitative suicides (Werther effect). We took a historical perspective: suicide rates increased in many countries during the 19th century, with suicide reporting hypothesized as a contributory factor. Conducting the first longitudinal study of journalism quality that examines an entire century, we manually coded N = 14,638 articles. Our analyses indicated a strong nonlinear increase in low-quality reporting. Importantly, a high quantity of low-quality reporting predicted annual increases in suicide rates, a finding which is consistent with the idea of a long-term macro-level media effect. Despite limitations in causal interpretations, the findings support recommendations for high-quality suicide reporting in current media guidelines.
      Citation: Communication Research
      PubDate: 2023-03-28T05:00:33Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00936502221150315
       
  • Withholding Social Support Because Those in Need Do Not Deserve It: A
           Thematic Narrative Analysis

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      Authors: Colter D. Ray, Kristina M. Scharp, Emily Parker, Dana E. Donohoe
      Abstract: Communication Research, Ahead of Print.
      Close relationships have norms and expectations regarding the communication of support; however, recent research has illuminated the varied reasons why would-be supporters at times choose to forgo supporting those who are facing difficulties. One such reason is the perception that the other person is undeserving of support. The researchers conducted 28 semi-structured interviews with those who withheld support because they did not believe the other person deserved support. The researchers analyzed the transcripts using thematic narrative analysis, which yielded three identities that nonsupporters construct for themselves and five identities they constructed for those who were undeserving of support. Additionally, certain self-identities tended to co-occur (i.e., align) with certain undeserving identities. These findings provide practical insight into the dilemma of not providing support to others, as well as further support for narrative research that contends people create identities for both the self and others.
      Citation: Communication Research
      PubDate: 2023-03-28T04:58:18Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00936502221146629
       
  • Quality Conversation Can Increase Daily Well-Being

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      Authors: Jeffrey A. Hall, Amanda J. Holmstrom, Natalie Pennington, Evan K. Perrault, Daniel Totzkay
      Abstract: Communication Research, Ahead of Print.
      The associations among the frequency and quality of social interactions and in-the-moment and global well-being have been well-documented. Fewer studies explore whether the content of social interactions is associated with well-being using experimental methods. Drawing from the communicate bond belong theory, seven candidate communication episodes and behaviors were identified. In three studies, participants (NStudy 1 = 347, NStudy 2 = 310, NStudy 3 = 250) were randomly assigned to engage in one of these communication episodes or behaviors and then completed end-of-day measures of well-being. Compared to participants in the control groups, participants engaging in candidate behaviors experienced increased well-being. MANCOVA results from all studies suggest the frequency of engaging in candidate behaviors was associated with increased well-being. A mini-meta-analysis found a weighted average effect size of d = 0.255. Results suggest that engaging in as little as one communication behavior with one friend in a day can improve daily well-being.
      Citation: Communication Research
      PubDate: 2023-01-28T05:17:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00936502221139363
       
  • Overcoming Obstacles by Enacting Resilience: How Queer Adolescents Respond
           to Being Estranged From Their Parents

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      Authors: Kristina M. Scharp, Cimmiaron F. Alvarez, Brooke H. Wolfe, Pamela J. Lannutti, Leah E. Bryant
      Abstract: Communication Research, Ahead of Print.
      Queer adolescents experience compounding complications especially when they are estranged from their parents. Findings from a sample of 40 estranged queer adolescents revealed four triggers, five resilience processes, and three co-occurring relationships between the triggers and processes. Based on these findings, we advance the communication theory of resilience by (a) illustrating resilience enactments with an adolescent population, (b) introducing a new facet of putting alternative logics to work, and (c) arguing how access to LGBTQ+ vocabulary and embeddedness within the LGBTQ+ community can facilitate more and less resilient enactments. We also extend a new qualitative method, thematic co-occurrence analysis, to illuminate thematic ubiquity and inverse relationships between themes. Practical applications for primary/secondary school curriculum, counselors, and public policy are discussed.
      Citation: Communication Research
      PubDate: 2023-01-24T05:53:15Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00936502221142175
       
  • Framing as a Bridging Concept for Climate Change Communication: A
           Systematic Review Based on 25 Years of Literature

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      Authors: Lars Guenther, Susan Jörges, Daniela Mahl, Michael Brüggemann
      Abstract: Communication Research, Ahead of Print.
      In line with the urgency of problems related to climate change, studies on the framing of this issue have flourished in recent years. However, as in framing research overall, a lack of definitions complicates the synthesis of theoretical/empirical insights. This systematic review contrasts trends of framing in climate change communication to those observed in reviews of communication research overall and harnesses framing’s power to bridge perspectives by comparing frames across different frame locations (i.e., frame production, frame content, audience frames, and framing effects), as part of the wider cultural framing repository. Combining quantitative and qualitative approaches of content analysis, this review draws on 25 years of peer-reviewed literature on the framing of climate change (n = 275). Among the findings, we observe that research has not made use of framing’s bridging potential. Hence, the conceptual (mis)fit between frame locations will be discussed, and directions for future research will be given.
      Citation: Communication Research
      PubDate: 2023-01-20T10:27:05Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00936502221137165
       
  • The Enduring Effect of Internet Dating: Meeting Online and the Road to
           Marriage

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      Authors: Liesel L. Sharabi
      Abstract: Communication Research, Ahead of Print.
      This study takes a relational stage approach to understanding the role of online dating in the progression of relationships toward marriage. Fifty interviews were conducted with individuals from across the United States (ages 21–62; Mage = 33.42) who were married or engaged to someone they met via online dating. The results present a comprehensive view of online dating through 4 stages and 13 subcategories of relationship development. Participants described meeting through a process of technology-enabled relationship initiation. Once the relationship escalated offline, they entered a period of multimodal development that demonstrated the enduring influence technology continued to have after meeting in person. Throughout this process, participants stressed the role of online dating platforms in breaking down barriers and reinforcing divisions. Three outcomes for marriage were also uncovered. Findings from this study suggest that online dating is changing more than where couples meet and have theoretical and practical implications.
      Citation: Communication Research
      PubDate: 2023-01-19T10:44:15Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00936502221127498
       
  • The Matilda Effect in Communication Research: The Effects of Gender and
           Geography on Usage and Citations Across 11 Countries

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      Authors: Andrea Rajkó, Csilla Herendy, Manuel Goyanes, Marton Demeter
      Abstract: Communication Research, Ahead of Print.
      Across liberal democracies, optimalizing gender balance in communication research production and impact is a growing aspiration of scientific leaders and research-intensive universities alike. Despite eloquent motivations, the gender proportions of the most prolific scholars remain undetermined, along with the role gender plays in explaining research usage (i.e., views) and impact (i.e., citations) across countries. Drawing upon performance data of 5,500 communication scholars from 11 countries, this study found that amongst the most prolific communication authors, female scholars are still significantly underrepresented in all the analyzed regions. Furthermore, when examining views and citation scores, findings illustrate that female scholars’ papers are systematically more viewed, yet significantly less cited than male scholarship. All things considered, we provide insightful empirical evidence that point to a twofold Matilda effect playing at both the production and performance levels in communication studies, arguing that gender inequalities are still rampant in the field.
      Citation: Communication Research
      PubDate: 2023-01-19T10:21:21Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00936502221124389
       
  • Is Online Textual Political Expression Associated With Political
           Knowledge'

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      Authors: Toby Hopp, Pat Ferrucci, Chris J. Vargo, Luna Liu
      Abstract: Communication Research, Ahead of Print.
      Prior research has reliably shown a positive relationship between political talk and political knowledge. This study sought to build upon this research by assessing the association between internet-based textual political expression and political knowledge. Notably, while online textual political expression is closely linked to traditional conceptualizations of political talk, it is also different in several key ways. Accordingly, this study drew upon research and theorization in the areas of political talk, online expression, and communication self-effects to explore the association between political commentary frequency on Facebook and performance on a political knowledge quiz. Moreover, we investigated the degree to which expression-apparent elaborative thinking levels were differentially associated with political knowledge. The results indicated that Facebook-based textual political expression was, as predicted, positively associated with political knowledge. Therein, we found that textual political expression indicative of high levels of elaboration was much more strongly associated with political knowledge levels than textual political expression that was indicative of comparatively lower levels of elaboration. Finally, exploratory analyses suggested that highly elaborative textual political expression was at least as strongly related to political knowledge as traditional media consumption variables.
      Citation: Communication Research
      PubDate: 2023-01-19T10:15:16Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00936502221113808
       
 
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  Subjects -> COMMUNICATIONS (Total: 518 journals)
    - COMMUNICATIONS (446 journals)
    - DIGITAL AND WIRELESS COMMUNICATION (31 journals)
    - HUMAN COMMUNICATION (19 journals)
    - MEETINGS AND CONGRESSES (7 journals)
    - RADIO, TELEVISION AND CABLE (15 journals)

HUMAN COMMUNICATION (19 journals)

Showing 1 - 20 of 20 Journals sorted by number of followers
Language Learning Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31)
Communication Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Advances in Image and Video Processing     Open Access   (Followers: 24)
Health Communication     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Communication Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Political Communication     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
European Journal of Communication     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Communication Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Mass Communication & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Asian Journal of Communication     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Atlantic Journal of Communication     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Communication Research Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Communication Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Communication Teacher     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Popular Communication     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Argumentation and Advocacy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Cryptography     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Ukrainian Information Space     Open Access  
Acta Universitatis Sapientiae Communicatio     Open Access  
Jurnal The Messenger     Open Access  
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JournalTOCs
School of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
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