Subjects -> ART (Total: 882 journals)
    - ART (468 journals)
    - DANCE (26 journals)
    - FILM AND AUDIOVISUALS (125 journals)
    - MUSIC (171 journals)
    - THEATER (92 journals)

FILM AND AUDIOVISUALS (125 journals)                     

Showing 1 - 120 of 120 Journals sorted alphabetically
1895. Mille huit cent quatre-vingt-quinze     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
24 images     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Acta Universitatis Sapientiae, Film and Media Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Adaptation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Ambitos     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Aniki : Revista Portuguesa da Imagem em Movimento     Open Access  
Animation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Apparatus. Film, Media and Digital Cultures of Central and Eastern Europe     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Área Abierta     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Asian Cinema     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Baltic Screen Media Review     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Bioscope: South Asian Screen Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Black Camera     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Bulletin of Kyiv National University of Culture and Arts. Series in Audiovisual Art and Production     Open Access  
Celebrity Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Ciné-Bulles : Le cinéma d’auteur avant tout     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
CINEJ Cinema Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Cinema Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 25)
Cinémas : revue d'études cinématographiques / Cinémas: Journal of Film Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Con A de animación     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Continuum: Journal of Media & Cultural Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32)
Cuadernos de Cine Documental     Open Access  
East Asian Journal of Popular Culture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Entrelacs     Open Access  
Essais     Open Access  
Ética&Cine Journal     Open Access  
Film & History: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Film and Television Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 36)
Film Criticism     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Film History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 26)
Film International     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Film Matters     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Film Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Film, Fashion & Consumption     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Film-Philosophy Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
FILMHISTORIA Online     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Fotocinema : Revista Científica de Cine y Fotografía     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Framework : The Journal of Cinema and Media     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20)
French Forum     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
French Screen Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Genre en séries. Cinéma, télévision, médias     Open Access  
Getty Research Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Historical Journal of Film, Radio and Television     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Hitchcock Annual     Full-text available via subscription  
Horror Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Image & Narrative     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Images : The International Journal of European Film, Performing Arts and Audiovisual Communication     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Inside Film: If     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
International Journal of Image Mining     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Multimedia Intelligence and Security     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
International Journal of Screendance     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Jeunesse: Young People, Texts, Cultures     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Adaptation in Film & Performance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of African Cinemas     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Anthropological Films     Open Access  
Journal of British Cinema and Television     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Journal of European Popular Culture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Film and Video     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21)
Journal of Italian Cinema and Media Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Japanese and Korean Cinema     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Media Ethics : Exploring Questions of Media Morality     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Popular Film and Television     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 34)
Journal of Religion & Film     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Religion and Popular Culture     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20)
Journal of Scandinavian Cinema     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Screenwriting     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Kino : The Western Undergraduate Journal of Film Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
L'Atalante : Revista de estudios cinematográficos     Open Access  
L'Esprit Créateur     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
LiNQ (Literature in North Queensland)     Open Access  
Mechademia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Metro Magazine: Media & Education Magazine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Mise au Point     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Modernist Cultures     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Moving Image Review & Art Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Music and the Moving Image     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
New Cinemas Journal of Contemporary Film     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
New Soundtrack     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Nineteenth Century Theatre and Film     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Northern Lights     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
October     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Panoptikum     Open Access  
Projections     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Quarterly Review of Film and Video     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Rocky Mountain Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
S : Journal of the Circle for Lacanian Ideology Critique     Open Access  
Scene     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Schermi. Storie e culture del cinema e dei media in Italia     Open Access  
Science Fiction Film and Television     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Screen Bodies : An Interdisciplinary Journal of Experience, Perception, and Display     Full-text available via subscription  
Screen Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Secuencias. Revista de Historia del Cine     Open Access  
Senses of Cinema     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Séquences : La revue de cinéma     Full-text available via subscription  
Shakespeare Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Short Film Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
SMPTE Motion Imaging Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Social Interaction : Video-Based Studies of Human Sociality     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Sound Studies : An Interdisciplinary Journal     Hybrid Journal  
Studies In Australasian Cinema     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Studies in Documentary Film     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Studies in Eastern European Cinema     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Studies in European Cinema     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Studies in French Cinema     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Studies in Russian and Soviet Cinema     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Studies in South Asian Film & Media     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Studies in Spanish & Latin American Cinemas     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Studies in World Cinema     Full-text available via subscription  
The Big Picture Magazine     Hybrid Journal  
The Journal of Film Music     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
The Moving Image     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
The Soundtrack     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
The Velvet Light Trap     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Toma Uno     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Transnational Screens     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Trasvases Entre la Literatura y el Cine     Open Access  
Ventana Indiscreta     Open Access  
Visual Culture in Britain     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
VMIDEA     Open Access  
Wave Motion     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
WSQ: Women's Studies Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)

           

Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Adaptation
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.143
Number of Followers: 10  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1755-0637 - ISSN (Online) 1755-0645
Published by Oxford University Press Homepage  [419 journals]
  • ‘Welcome Foolish Muppets’: Spatial Transmedia and Corporate Synergy in
           Disney+’s Muppets Haunted Mansion (2021)

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Pages: 304 - 308
      Abstract: Muppets Haunted Mansion. Kirk Thatcher, director. Perf. GoeltzDave, BarrettaBill, JacobsonEric, VogelMatt, ArnettWill, CrissDarren and HensonTaraji P.. Disney+, 2021.
      PubDate: Wed, 30 Mar 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/adaptation/apac002
      Issue No: Vol. 15, No. 2 (2022)
       
  • Screen Shakespeares in a Time of Plague: Joel Coen’s The Tragedy of
           Macbeth (2021)

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Pages: 309 - 312
      Abstract: The Tragedy of Macbeth. Dir. Joel Coen. Perf. Denzel Washington, Frances McDormand, Alex Hassell, Kathryn Hunter. A24, 2021.
      PubDate: Wed, 30 Mar 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/adaptation/apac003
      Issue No: Vol. 15, No. 2 (2022)
       
  • Adapting Margaret Atwood: The Handmaid’s Tale and Beyond

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Pages: 313 - 315
      Abstract: Wells-LassagneShannon and McMahonFiona, eds. Adapting Margaret Atwood: The Handmaid’s Tale and Beyond. Palgrave Macmillan, 2021. pp. 266, £24.99. ISBN 978-3-030-73685-9
      PubDate: Tue, 31 May 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/adaptation/apac006
      Issue No: Vol. 15, No. 2 (2022)
       
  • ‘I’ll Get You, Tom and Jerry. And That Little Dog, Too!’:
           Adaptation, Transmedia, and Franchise Management in the Tom and Jerry and
           Wizard of Oz Crossovers

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Pages: 149 - 170
      Abstract: AbstractThis article will offer a close reading of two Warner Bros. direct-to-video animated features—Tom and Jerry & the Wizard of Oz (2011) and Tom and Jerry: Back to Oz (2016)—as an example of the transmedia tendencies of studios in the conglomerate era. Although The Wizard of Oz (1939) and Tom and Jerry were originally MGM productions, the modern distribution of these works provides an insight into the complicated post-‘Golden Age’ trajectories of studio archives. Ted Turner’s brief takeover of MGM in the mid-1980s stripped the studio of many of its assets, while the merger of Turner’s company with Warner Bros. in 1996 brought these MGM properties under Warner control. The Tom and Jerry/Wizard of Oz crossover films heavily reference the 1939 MGM movie (the songs, the ruby slippers, and so on)—something that other adaptations of Baum’s novels have not been permitted to do. This paper will suggest that these new extensions of old brands subtly rewrite MGM’s industrial history in favour of establishing them as Warner Bros. franchises, while also re-establishing the brand identity of the 1939 film at a time where Oz adaptations are facing greater competition, particularly from the successful stage musical Wicked (2003).
      PubDate: Mon, 16 Aug 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/adaptation/apab014
      Issue No: Vol. 15, No. 2 (2021)
       
  • The Paradox of Bazinian Adaptation: Translation and Fidelity in
           Saramago’s The Double and Villeneuve’s Enemy

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Pages: 171 - 186
      Abstract: AbstractDiscussing Enemy (2013), his adaptation of Portuguese novelist José Saramago’s The Double (2002), French-Canadian filmmaker Denis Villeneuve remarks: ‘the best way to respect an author is to be very honest about the way you adapted [their work] and to totally destroy the original and make it your own’. Villeneuve’s recreative (translational) use of ‘respect’ reverberates intertextually with André Bazin’s description of respect-based fidelity. For Bazin, utterly faithful yet completely original adaptations could be achieved through ‘a ceaselessly creative respect’ in which faithfulness and unfaithfulness paradoxically converge in translational acts of recreation. I term this paradoxical doubling the paradox of adaptation in Bazin. In part 1 of this article, I explore how Bazin illustrates that paradox in his essays about adaptation with examples of translation, and particularly with examples of Baudelaire’s and Mallarmé’s translations of Edgar Allan Poe (an emblem of intertextual rewriting in French literature). Bazin’s references to translation provide an aperture into a wider understanding of adaptation’s intertextual and heteroglossic nature. Bazinian adaptations are faithful reconstructions and unfaithful transformations. As I discus in part 2 of this essay, Villeneuve capitalizes on this paradox in his recreative translation of The Double. The film reflects and ‘destroys’ (as Villeneuve would say) Saramago’s novel in order to recreate it. Through its re-theorization of Bazin’s fidelity as a translational prism of recreation, this essay contributes to the ‘resurgence of (pro)fidelity criticism’ (Hermansson) as well as to ongoing calls (Krebs, Venuti) for greater attention to the hermeneutic synergy between translation and adaptation studies.
      PubDate: Tue, 21 Sep 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/adaptation/apab017
      Issue No: Vol. 15, No. 2 (2021)
       
  • Television Adaptation in the Age of Media Convergence: Chinese
           Intellectual Property Shows and the Case of All Is Well

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Pages: 187 - 206
      Abstract: AbstractThis article formally introduces the ‘intellectual property show’ concept currently inciting heated discussions among Chinese media studies scholars into English-language academia. Intellectual property show, a Chinese term generally referring to television shows adapted from internet fiction (and to a secondary extent, video games), explicitly suggests an adaptation form and logic particular to an environment characterized by converging media and digital transformations of cultural production. Using the 2019 Chinese hit show All is Well, adapted from an internet novel with the same name, I approach intellectual property show as a media artefact situated at the volatile convergence of political demand, business interest, and new media affordances through adopting an integrative approach to contemporary adaptations in China. By attending to both the material context of production and the media text itself, I join the current explorations in adaptation studies for methods that answer the why and how of adaptation.
      PubDate: Mon, 08 Mar 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/adaptation/apab002
      Issue No: Vol. 15, No. 2 (2021)
       
  • Adapting Mizoguchi’s Ugetsu in Kazuo Ishiguro’s The Buried
           Giant

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Pages: 207 - 227
      Abstract: AbstractThe Ishiguro archive in the Harry Ransom Center in Austin houses Ishiguro’s extensive research on Japanese ghost stories and films from his early film writing, revealing his fascination with Kenji Mizoguchi’s Ugetsu Monogatari and Sansho Dayu. This article explores Kazuo Ishiguro’s references to Ugetsu in The Buried Giant to reflect on the realistic portrayal of ghosts as a way to reveal a suppressed pagan narrative. Using materials from the Ishiguro archive, I argue that Ishiguro borrows tactics from Ugetsu and then incorporates the Japanese Buddhist myth and folklore underlying Sansho Dayu to build a hidden discourse of the dead that subverts the dominant discourse of God, creating an implicit supernatural plot that parallels the novel’s explicit realistic plot and that decentres Britain’s national beliefs.
      PubDate: Wed, 26 May 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/adaptation/apab010
      Issue No: Vol. 15, No. 2 (2021)
       
  • Victoria in Two Twenty-First-Century Film Re-visions of Frankenstein

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Pages: 228 - 243
      Abstract: AbstractIn this article, I will explore how the character of Victoria is represented in the British made-for-television film, Frankenstein (Jed Mercurio, 2007) and the US horror movie, The Frankenstein Syndrome (Scott Tretta, 2011). By approaching these productions through the lens of adaptation theory and, more specifically, via the concept of a re-vision, I will argue that we can better understand the ways in which they mutate the long-standing (though frequently updated) Frankenstein story. As intertexts that interrogate previous cinema and television versions, their focus on female synthetic biologists whose pioneering stem-cell research takes place within a capitalist biomedical framework is particularly innovative. As such, they disrupt the patriarchal paradigm upon which the Frankensteinian filmic tradition has, historically, been established. Most notably, both films celebrate maternality, personal responsibility, and compassion as key values for those who are involved in the biotechnological creation of life.
      PubDate: Mon, 31 May 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/adaptation/apab012
      Issue No: Vol. 15, No. 2 (2021)
       
  • Immigration, Passing, and the Racial Other in Neo-Victorian Imperialist
           Fiction: The Case of Carnival Row (2019–)

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Pages: 244 - 263
      Abstract: AbstractIn this article, I provide a close reading of Season 1 of the neo-Victorian TV series Carnival Row as both an ambivalent postcolonial and neo-passing narrative. I first draw on previous criticism on postcolonial neo-Victorianism and turn-of-the-century American passing novels in order to analyze Carnival Row’s contradictory revision of imperial London through its re-imagining in a fictional city named The Burgue. I then explore the conflicting ways in which the series tackles (neo-)imperialism and colonialization, as it simultaneously criticizes and reproduces imperial ideologies and stereotypes of the racial Other. Finally, I argue that Carnival Row seems to offer a new take on American passing novels by allowing Philo, the mixed-race male protagonist, to embrace his biracial nature without meeting a tragic fate at the end of Season 1. Nonetheless, by choosing a White actor (Orlando Bloom) to play the role of the passer, the series culturally appropriates a form of Black oppression for the entertainment of a White audience. Thus, despite the series’ well-intentioned attempts to criticize (neo-)imperial, racist, and xenophobic practices, it ultimately perpetuates—rather than subverts—those very same ideologies.
      PubDate: Thu, 07 Oct 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/adaptation/apab018
      Issue No: Vol. 15, No. 2 (2021)
       
  • Shakespeare in The Wilds: Experimenting with The Tempest

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Pages: 264 - 284
      Abstract: AbstractThis article discusses the TV series The Wilds (Amazon Prime, 2020) as an adaptational experiment with Shakespeare’s The Tempest in several respects: as one of the latest complex TV shows to engage with the Shakespearean legacy, it experiments with the serialization of Shakespeare’s plot. Further, being an ‘unmarked’ adaptation that never directly refers to Shakespeare, it tests the limits as to what is ‘Shakespeare’ and what is ‘not Shakespeare’ or ‘no longer Shakespeare’ in the adaptational rhizome created by The Tempest and its reworkings, among which Lord of the Flies, Brave New World, and the TV series Lost are of particular importance for The Wilds. Changing Shakespeare’s character constellation to an all-female group of teenage castaways overseen by a female social scientist modelled on Prospero who seeks to overcome master narratives of fraternal power struggles, colonial exploitation, and patriarchal sexual oppression, The Wilds tests which changes the Shakespeare material can and perhaps needs to undergo to continue to have cultural meaning today. As part of this radical re-gendering, the series multiplies and collates Miranda, Ariel, and Caliban to interrogate contemporary girlhood and the future of intersectional feminism. The article concludes by assessing how the series appeals to differently knowing viewers, some of whom will feel invited to partake in the Tempest experiment, while others will lose Shakespeare’s tracks in The Wilds.
      PubDate: Fri, 29 Oct 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/adaptation/apab019
      Issue No: Vol. 15, No. 2 (2021)
       
  • William Oldroyd’s Lady Macbeth, Shakespeare, and Adaptation Studies

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Pages: 285 - 303
      Abstract: AbstractThe title of Oldroyd’s taut thriller, Lady Macbeth (2016), invites audiences to approach the film intertextually. For a small number of viewers familiar with Nikolai Leskov’s 1865 novella Lady Macbeth of Mtsensk, from which the film draws its main inspiration, Shakespeare’s more well-known character will recede into a position of secondary importance. For the majority of viewers, however, a more direct relationship with Shakespeare will be assumed: is Oldroyd’s film an adaptation of the 1606 play' Is it an appropriation of the play’s famous character' Although such questions about an artwork’s relationship to previous texts can seem largely academic, in the case of Oldroyd’s film, they might reasonably be said to be inevitable and, therefore, potentially central to the work’s meaning. Adaptation scholars often struggle to classify such cases—since the line between what we call adaptations and what we call appropriations remains somewhat blurry. The essay uses Oldroyd’s Lady Macbeth as a practical tool for working through what is at stake in these ‘academic’ or ‘semantic’ debates about the frustrating varieties of textual adaptation. The larger intertextual history of Lady Macbeth illustrates the manner in which our critical debates about adaptation tend to reflect, and inform, our deepest desires for and anxieties about progress—or perhaps, more accurately, the apparent lack of such progress—from one historical moment to the next. In doing so, such debates almost mimic the trajectory and functions of adaptations themselves, helping us to understand better why definitions of adaptation must remain elastic and manifold.
      PubDate: Wed, 04 Aug 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/adaptation/apab015
      Issue No: Vol. 15, No. 2 (2021)
       
 
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