Subjects -> SOCIAL SCIENCES (Total: 1648 journals)
    - BIRTH CONTROL (22 journals)
    - CHILDREN AND YOUTH (262 journals)
    - FOLKLORE (30 journals)
    - MATRIMONY (16 journals)
    - MEN'S INTERESTS (16 journals)
    - MEN'S STUDIES (90 journals)
    - SEXUALITY (56 journals)
    - SOCIAL SCIENCES (937 journals)
    - WOMEN'S INTERESTS (44 journals)
    - WOMEN'S STUDIES (175 journals)

SEXUALITY (56 journals)

Showing 1 - 46 of 46 Journals sorted alphabetically
AIDS and Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
AIDS Research and Therapy     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
Archives of Sexual Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
BMJ Sexual & Reproductive Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Cadernos de Gênero e Diversidade     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Cadernos Pagu     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Culture, Health & Sexuality: An International Journal for Research, Intervention and Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Genre, sexualité & société     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
HIV/AIDS - Research and Palliative Care     Open Access   (Followers: 18)
Human Reproduction Update     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
International Journal of Transgender Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Bisexuality     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Black Sexuality and Relationships     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Gay & Lesbian Issues in Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Gay & Lesbian Psychotherapy     Partially Free   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Gay & Lesbian Social Services     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of GLBT Family Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Homosexuality     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Lesbian Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of LGBT Health Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of LGBT Issues in Counseling     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of LGBT Youth     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Psychosexual Health     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Sex & Marital Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Sex Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Sexual & Reproductive Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Psychology & Sexuality     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
QED : A Journal in GLBTQ Worldmaking     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Queer Cats Journal of LGBTQ Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Raheema     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Religion and Gender     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
Screen Bodies : An Interdisciplinary Journal of Experience, Perception, and Display     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Sex Roles     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Sexes     Open Access  
Sextant : Revue de recherche interdisciplinaire sur le genre et la sexualité     Open Access  
Sexual Addiction & Compulsivity: The Journal of Treatment & Prevention     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Sexual and Relationship Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Sexualities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Sexuality & Culture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Sexuality and Disability     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Sexuality Research and Social Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Sexualization, Media, & Society     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Simone de Beauvoir Studies     Full-text available via subscription  
Theology & Sexuality     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Transgender Health     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Whatever : A Transdisciplinary Journal of Queer Theories and Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Similar Journals
Journal Cover
AIDS and Behavior
Journal Prestige (SJR): 1.792
Citation Impact (citeScore): 3
Number of Followers: 17  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1573-3254 - ISSN (Online) 1090-7165
Published by Springer-Verlag Homepage  [2468 journals]
  • A Risk Prediction Model to Identify People Living with HIV Who are
           

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      Abstract: Abstract The provision of ART in South Africa has transformed the HIV epidemic, resulting in an increase in life expectancy by over 10 years. Despite this, nearly 2 million people living with HIV are not on treatment. The objective of this study was to develop and externally validate a practical risk assessment tool to identify people with HIV (PWH) at highest risk for attrition from care after testing. A machine learning model incorporating clinical and psychosocial factors was developed in a primary cohort of 498 PWH. LASSO regression analysis was used to optimize variable selection. Multivariable logistic regression analysis was applied to build a model using 80% of the primary cohort as a training dataset and validated using the remaining 20% of the primary cohort and data from an independent cohort of 96 participants. The risk score was developed using the Sullivan and D’Agostino point based method. Of 498 participants with mean age 35.7 years, 192 (38%) did not initiate ART after diagnosis. Controlling for site, factors associated with non-engagement in care included being < 35 years, feeling abandoned by God, maladaptive coping strategies using alcohol or other drugs, no difficulty concentrating, and having high levels of confidence in one’s ability to handle personal challenges. An effective risk score can enable clinicians and implementers to focus on tailoring care for those most in need of ongoing support. Further research should focus on potential strategies to enhance the generalizability and evaluate the implementation of the proposed risk prediction model in HIV treatment programs.
      PubDate: 2024-07-10
       
  • Leveraging A Digital Pill System to Understand Prevention-Effective
           Adherence to Oral Hiv Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis Among Men Who Have Sex with
           Men with Substance Use

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      Abstract: Abstract Daily oral pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) is highly effective for HIV prevention, though efficacy depends on adherence. Digital pill systems (DPS) can enable direct, real-time adherence measurement. HIV-negative men who have sex with men (MSM) with substance use (excluding alcohol) utilized a DPS over 90 days and completed weekly surveys reporting sexual activity, condom use, and substance use. Responses indicating (1) any sexual activity and substance use or (2) condomless anal intercourse (CAI) in the prior week were categorized as high risk for HIV acquisition. PrEP adherence data for the 7-day period preceding each response was dichotomized as ≤ 3 and ≥ 4 doses/week, indicating prevention-effective adherence, and compared by HIV risk level. Thirteen MSM were analyzed (median age: 32). Of 113 surveys, 48.7% indicated high HIV risk, with 12.4% reporting CAI alone, 16.8% any sexual activity and substance use, and 19.5% both CAI and substance use. Weekly mean PrEP adherence was 90.3% (6.3 of 7 doses/week), with ≥ 4 doses/week recorded during 92.0% of weeks. The proportion of participants with ≥ 4 recorded doses/week was 88.9% during weeks with CAI alone, 89.5% during weeks with any sexual activity and substance use, 92.0% during weeks with both CAI and substance use, and 92.8% during lower risk weeks. Participants ingested ≥ 4 doses/week during 89.1% of all high-risk weeks and 94.8% of low-risk weeks. Overall, participants maintained high levels of PrEP adherence while engaging in HIV risk behaviors. DPS can be deployed concurrently with data collection tools to assess ingestion patterns during periods of elevated risk.
      PubDate: 2024-07-10
       
  • Understanding Practical, Robust Implementation and Sustainability of
           Home-based Comprehensive Sexual Health Care: A Realist Review

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      Abstract: Abstract This review identifies which elements of home-based comprehensive sexual health care (home-based CSH) impacted which key populations, under which circumstances. A realist review of studies focused on home-based CSH with at least self-sampling or self-testing HIV and additional sexual health care (e.g., treatment, counseling). Peer-reviewed quantitative and qualitative literature from PubMed, Embase, Cochrane Register of Controlled Trials, and PsycINFO published between February 2012 and February 2023 was examined. The PRISM framework was used to systematically assess the reach of key populations, effectiveness of the intervention, and effects on the adoption, implementation, and maintenance within routine sexual health care. Of 730 uniquely identified records, 93 were selected for extraction. Of these studies, 60% reported actual interventions and 40% described the acceptability and feasibility. Studies were mainly based in Europe or North America and were mostly targeted to MSM (59%; 55/93) (R). Overall, self-sampling or self-testing was highly acceptable across key populations. The effectiveness of most studies was (expected) increased HIV testing. Adoption of the home-based CSH was acceptable for care providers if linkage to care was available, even though a minority of studies reported adoption by care providers and implementation fidelity of the intervention. Most studies suggested maintenance of home-based CSH complementary to clinic-based care. Context and mechanisms were identified which may enhance implementation and maintenance of home-based CSH. When providing the individual with a choice of testing, clear instructions, and tailored dissemination successful uptake of STI and HIV testing may increase. For implementers perceived care and treatment benefits for clients may increase their willingness to implement home-based CSH. Therefore, home-based CSH may determine more accessible sexual health care and increased uptake of STI and HIV testing among key populations.
      PubDate: 2024-07-04
       
  • Outcomes of Patients Living with HIV Hospitalized due to COVID-19: A
           3-Year Nationwide Study (2020–2022)

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      Abstract: Abstract Scientific reports on the association between human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in patients with COVID-19 and mortality have not been in agreement. In this nationwide study, we described and analyzed the demographic and clinical characteristics of people living with HIV (PLWH) and established that HIV infection is a risk factor for mortality in patients hospitalized due to COVID-19. We collected data from the National Hospital Data Information System at Hospitalization between 2020 and 2022. We included patients admitted to the hospital with a diagnosis of COVID-19. We established a cohort of patients with PLWH and compared them to patients without HIV (non-PLWH). For multivariate analyses, we performed binary logistic regression, using mortality as the dependent variable. To improve the interpretability of the results we also applied penalized regression and random forest, two well-known machine-learning algorithms. A broad range of comorbidities, as well as sex and age data, were included in the final model as adjusted estimators. Our data of 1,188,160 patients included 6,973 PLWH. The estimated hospitalization rate in this set was between 1.43% and 1.70%, while the rate among the general population was 0.83%. Among patients with COVID-19, HIV infection was a risk factor for mortality with an odds ratio (OR) of 1.25 (95% CI, 1.14–1.37, p < 0.001). PLWH are more likely to be hospitalized due to COVID-19 than are non-PLWH. PLWH are 25% more likely to die due to COVID-19 than non-PLWH. Our results highlight that PLWH should be considered a population at risk for both hospitalization and mortality.
      PubDate: 2024-07-04
       
  • Objective Neighborhood-Level Disorder Versus Subjective Safety as
           Predictors of HIV Transmission Risk and Momentary Well-Being

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      Abstract: Abstract Mental health and HIV risk behavior have been studied with ecological momentary assessment (EMA), but this approach has not been combined with tracking of activity space (where people go and what they encounter there) in people with HIV and their social relations, who may be HIV+ or HIV−. Activity space represents a modifiable risk or protective factor for behavior related to health status and quality of life, in both clinical and nonclinical populations. We conducted an observational study with 286 participants (243 HIV+ and 43 HIV−), roughly matched for socioeconomic status and neighborhood of residence via three waves of snowball sampling. Each participant carried a smartphone for up to 4 weeks, making 5 randomly prompted entries and 1 end-of-day entry each day, plus self-initiated event-contingent entries for sexual activity and drug use. Responses to randomly prompted items provided subjective evaluations of the safety of the participant’s current social and physical environment (the place they were and the people they were with). GPS-based location tracking—coupled with publicly available statistic indicating neighborhood-level physical disorder and socioeconomic disadvantage—provided an indicator of each participant’s exposure to objective psychosocial hazard. We examined possible relationships of these objective and subjective environmental exposures with risky sexual and intravenous drug-use behavior, knowledge and utilization of antiretroviral treatment and prophylaxis, and momentary mental health (mood and stress, which relate to risky behavior and overall well-being). We found that both risky behavior and mental health were more related to participants’ subjective evaluations of their activity space than to objective measures of neighborhood-level disorder, suggesting that, even within an objectively hazardous neighborhood, people who find a niche they perceive as socially and physically safe may engage in less risky behavior and have better well-being. Trial registration Clinicaltrials.gov Identifier NCT01571752.
      PubDate: 2024-07-04
       
  • Parent Facilitation of Condom Access and HIV Testing Associated with
           Improved Sexual Health Outcomes for Sexual Minority Young Men

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      Abstract: Abstract Sexual minority young men experience a high HIV incidence. Parent-based interventions are promising for prevention efforts, but further research is needed to identify specific, replicable parental behaviors associated with improved sexual health outcomes for sexual minority young men. We assessed parental behaviors in the domains of facilitating access to condoms, providing instruction in condom use, and supporting HIV testing, and tested whether parental behaviors were associated with sons’ condom use self-efficacy and intentions to get tested for HIV. Data came from the baseline assessment of a pilot trial of a parent-based HIV prevention program, and participants were dyads (n = 61) of sexual minority young men (M. age: 16.87; 46% racial/ethnic minority) and their parents (M. age: 44.31; 26% racial/ethnic minority). Parents and sons reported on parental behaviors in each domain. Results indicated that parents’ facilitation of access to condoms was associated with sons’ condom use self-efficacy, and parents’ facilitation of HIV testing was associated with sons’ HIV testing intentions. Findings were robust across both parent and son reports of parental behaviors. Parental condom use instruction was unrelated to sons’ condom use self-efficacy. Findings suggest that parent-based HIV prevention programs for sexual minority young men should encourage parents to provide instrumental assistance to their sons in accessing condoms and HIV testing. There is a need for further research to identify underlying mechanisms.
      PubDate: 2024-07-04
       
  • Barriers, Facilitators and Opportunities for HIV Status Disclosure Among
           Young Men Who Have Sex With Men: Qualitative Findings from the Tough Talks
           Intervention

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      Abstract: Abstract Disclosing one’s HIV status can involve complex individual and interpersonal processes interacting with discriminatory societal norms and institutionalized biases. To support disclosure decision-making among young men who have sex with men (YMSM) living with HIV, we developed Tough Talks™, an mHealth intervention that uses artificially intelligent-facilitated role-playing disclosure scenarios and informational activities that build disclosure skills and self-efficacy. Qualitative interviews were conducted with 30 YMSM living with HIV (mean age 24 years, 50% Black) who were enrolled in a randomized controlled trial assessing Tough Talks™ to understand their experiences with HIV status disclosure. Interviews were recorded, transcribed, and thematically coded. Barriers to disclosure focused on fear, anxiety, stigma, and trauma. Facilitators to disclosure are described in the context of these barriers including how participants built comfort and confidence in disclosure decisions and ways the Tough Talks™ intervention helped them. Participants’ narratives identified meaning-making within disclosure conversations including opportunities for educating others and advocacy. Findings revealed ongoing challenges to HIV status disclosure among YMSM and a need for clinical providers and others to support disclosure decision-making and affirm individuals’ autonomy over their decisions to disclose. Considering disclosure as a process rather than discrete events could inform future intervention approaches.
      PubDate: 2024-07-01
       
  • Willingness to Receive HIV Self-Testing Kits from Recent Sexual Partners
           Among Men in Dar Es Salam, Tanzania: Findings from the STEP Project
           Baseline Survey

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      Abstract: Abstract Globally, men are less likely to access HIV services, and addressing HIV service challenges among men is crucial to the global HIV/AIDS response. HIV self-testing (HIVST) has been shown to be a potentially effective strategy in improving HIV testing coverage among men. This study assessed and identified factors influencing willingness to receive HIVST kits from sexual partners among men in Tanzania. Data are from the baseline survey of the Self-Testing Education and Promotion (STEP) project, a five-year study comprising male participants aged 18 or older who self-reported as HIV-negative. Logistic regression models were used to assess factors associated with men’s willingness to receive HIVST kits from their sexual partners. There were 505 heterosexual male participants enrolled in the study with an average age of 29 years, of whom 69% reported being willing to receive HIVST kits from their sexual partner. Logistic regression models demonstrated that willingness to receive HIVST kits from sexual partners was significantly associated with number of sexual partners within 12 months (aOR = 1.2, 95% CI [1.1–1.3]), awareness of HIVST (aOR = 5.6, 95% CI [3.2–9.5]), previous discussion of HIVST with sexual partners aOR = 14.0, 95% CI [8.0–24.6]), and previous testing for HIV with sexual partners not (aOR = 2.5, 95% CI [1.3–4.7]). These findings suggest additional promotional strategies to improve men’s awareness of HIVST and support open conversations about HIVST and HIV testing with sexual partners could improve men’s willingness to receive HIVST kits when distributed through their sexual partners.
      PubDate: 2024-07-01
       
  • COVID-19 Vaccine Hesitancy Among People Living with HIV: A Systematic
           Review and Meta-Analysis

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      Abstract: Abstract Vaccine hesitancy is one of the top 10 threats to global health, which affects the prevalence and fatality of vaccine-preventable diseases over the world. During the COVID-19 pandemic, people living with HIV (PLWH) may have higher risks of infection, more serious complications, and worse prognosis without the protection of the COVID-19 vaccine. A systematic review and meta-analysis aiming to evaluate the prevalence of COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy among PLWH was conducted using PubMed, Embase, and Web of Science databases for studies published between January 1, 2020, and August 31, 2022. The pooled prevalence with a corresponding 95%CI of COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy among PLWH was reported. Subgroup analysis was conducted to explore variation in prevalence across different categories. 23 studies with a total of 19,922 PLWH were included in this study. The prevalence of COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy among PLWH was 34.0%, and the influencing factors included male, influenza vaccination experience, and a CD4 count of more than 200 cells/mm3. Subgroup analysis did not identify significant causes of heterogeneity but showed that the prevalence of COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy among PLWH varies by study period, region, and race. Although all PLWH are recommended to receive the COVID-19 vaccine, a large proportion of them remain hesitant to be vaccinated. Therefore, governments and relevant institutions should take specific measures to encourage and promote vaccination to improve the coverage of the COVID-19 vaccine among PLWH.
      PubDate: 2024-07-01
       
  • Socioeconomic Status and CD4 Count Among People with HIV Who Inject Drugs
           in St. Petersburg, Russia

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      Abstract: Abstract Lack of access to resources is a “fundamental cause” of poor HIV outcomes across the care cascade globally and may have the greatest impact on groups with co-existing marginalized identities. In a sample of people living with HIV (PWH) who inject drugs and were not on antiretroviral therapy (ART), we explored associations between access to resources and HIV severity. Fundamental Cause Theory (FCT) sees socioeconomic status/access to resources as a root cause of disease and emphasizes that individuals with limited resources have fewer means to mitigate health risks and implement protective behaviors, which ultimately generates disparities in health outcomes. Guided by the FCT, we hypothesized that resource depletion (primary aim) and lower income (secondary aim) were associated with increased HIV severity. Using baseline data from the Linking Infectious and Narcology Care (LINC-II) trial of ART-naive PWH who inject drugs in St. Petersburg, Russia (n = 225), we examined the association between “past year resource runout” (yes vs. no) and “low-income (< 300 USD a month)” and the outcome HIV severity (CD4 count, continuous). We fit two separate linear regression models adjusted for gender, age, time since HIV diagnosis, and prior ART use. Participants had a mean age of 37.5 years and were 60% male. Two thirds (66%) reported resource depletion, and 30% had income below 300 USD a month. Average CD4 count was 416 cells/mm3 (SD 285). No significant association was identified between either resource depletion or low-income and HIV severity (adjusted mean difference in CD4 count for resource depletion: − 4.16, 95% CI − 82.93, 74.62; adjusted mean difference in CD4 count for low-income: 68.13, 95% CI − 15.78, 152.04). Below-average income and running out of resources were common among PWH who inject drugs and are not on ART in St. Petersburg, Russia. Resource depletion and low-income were not significantly associated with HIV disease severity as captured by CD4 count. The nuanced relationship between socioeconomic status and HIV severity among people with HIV who inject drugs and not on ART merits further examination in a larger sample.
      PubDate: 2024-07-01
       
  • Empirical Development of a Behavioral Intervention for African
           American/Black and Latino Persons with Unsuppressed HIV Viral Load Levels:
           An Application of the Multiphase Optimization Strategy (MOST) Using
           Cost-Effectiveness as an Optimization Objective

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      Abstract: Abstract We used results from an optimization randomized controlled trial which tested five behavioral intervention components to support HIV antiretroviral adherence/HIV viral suppression, grounded in the multiphase optimization strategy and using a fractional factorial design to identify intervention components with cost-effectiveness sufficiently favorable for scalability. Results were incorporated into a validated HIV computer simulation to simulate longer-term effects of combinations of components on health and costs. We simulated the 32 corresponding long-term trajectories for viral load suppression, health related quality of life (HRQoL), and costs. The components were designed to be culturally and structurally salient. They were: motivational interviewing counseling sessions (MI), pre-adherence skill building (SB), peer mentorship (PM), focused support groups (SG), and patient navigation (short version [NS], long version [NL]. All participants also received health education on HIV treatment. We examined four scenarios: one-time intervention with and without discounting and continuous interventions with and without discounting. In all four scenarios, interventions that comprise or include SB and NL (and including health education) were cost effective (< $100,000/quality-adjusted life year). Further, with consideration of HRQoL impact, maximal intervention became cost-effective enough to be scalable. Thus, a fractional factorial experiment coupled with cost-effectiveness analysis is a promising approach to optimize multi-component interventions for scalability. The present study can guide service planning efforts for HIV care settings and health departments.
      PubDate: 2024-07-01
       
  • The Impact of Telemedicine on Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV)-Related
           Clinical Outcomes During the COVID-19 Pandemic

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      Abstract: Abstract The coronavirus disease of 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic exacerbated barriers to care for people living with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) (PLWH). The quick uptake of telemedicine in the outpatient setting provided promise for care continuity. In this study, we compared appointment and laboratory no-show rates in an urban outpatient HIV clinic during three time periods: (1) Pre-COVID-19: 9/15/2019–3/14/2020 (predominately in-person), (2) “Early” COVID-19: 3/15/2020-9/14/2020 (predominately telemedicine), and (3) “Later” COVID-19: 9/15/2020-3/14/2021 (mixed in-person/telemedicine). Multivariable logistic regression models evaluated the two study hypotheses: (i) equivalence of Period 2 with Period 1 and of Period 3 with Period 1 and (ii) improved outcomes with telemedicine over in-person visits. No-show rates were 1% in Period 1, 4% in Period 2, and 18% in Period 3. Compared to the pre-pandemic period, individuals had a higher rate of appointment no-shows during Period 2 [OR (90% CI): 7.67 (2.68, 21.93)] and 3 [OR (90% CI): 30.91 (12.83 to 75.06). During the total study period, those with telemedicine appointments were less likely to no-show than those with in-person appointments [OR (95% CI): 0.36 (0.16–0.80), p = 0.012]. There was no statistical difference between telemedicine and in-person appointments for laboratory completion rates. Our study failed to prove that no-show rates before and during the pandemic were similar; in fact, no-show rates were higher during both the early and later pandemic. Overall, telemedicine was associated with lower no-show rates compared to in-person appointments. In future pandemics, telemedicine may be a valuable component to maintain care in PLWH.
      PubDate: 2024-07-01
       
  • Socio-Behavioural Barriers to Viral Suppression in the Older Adult
           Population in Rural South Africa

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      Abstract: Abstract South Africa has the largest share of people living with HIV in the world and this population is ageing. The social context in which people seek HIV care is often ignored. Apart from clinical interventions, socio-behavioural factors impact successful HIV care outcomes for older adults living with HIV. We use cross-sectional data linked with demographic household surveillance data, consisting of HIV positive adults aged above 40, to identify socio-behavioural predictors of a detectable viral load. Older adults were more likely to have a detectable viral load if they did not disclose their HIV positive status to close family members (aOR 2.56, 95% CI 1.89-3.46), resided in the poorest households (aOR 1.98, 95% CI 1.23-3.18), or were not taking medications other than ART (aOR 1.83, 95% CI 1.02-1.99) likely to have a detectable. Clinical interventions in HIV care must be supported by understanding the socio-behavioural barriers that occur outside the health facility. The importance of community health care workers in bridging this gap may offer more optimum outcomes for older adults ageing with HIV.
      PubDate: 2024-07-01
       
  • Characteristics of Received HIV Prevention Advocacy from Persons Living
           with HIV in Uganda, and Associations with HIV Testing and Condom Use Among
           Social Network Members

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      Abstract: Abstract Receiving peer advocacy has been shown to result in increased HIV protective behaviors, but little research has gone beyond assessment of the mere presence of advocacy to examine aspects of advocacy driving these effects. With baseline data from a controlled trial of an advocacy training intervention, we studied characteristics of HIV prevention advocacy received among 599 social network members of persons living with HIV in Uganda and the association of these characteristics with the social network members’ recent HIV testing (past six months) and consistent condom use, as well as perceived influence of advocacy on these behaviors. Participants reported on receipt of advocacy specific to HIV testing and condom use, as well as on measures of advocacy content, tone of delivery, support for autonomous regulation, and perceived influence on behavior. Receiving HIV testing advocacy and condom use advocacy were associated with recent HIV testing [65.2% vs. 51.4%; OR (95% CI) = 1.77 (1.11–2.84)], and consistent condom use with main sex partner [19.3% vs. 10.0%; OR (95% CI) = 2.16 (1.12–4.13)], respectively, compared to not receiving advocacy. Among those who received condom advocacy, perceived influence of the advocacy was positively correlated with consistent condom use, regardless of type of sex partner; support of autonomous regulation was a correlate of consistent condom use with casual sex partners, while judgmental advocacy was a correlate of consistent condom use with serodiscordant main partners. Among those who received testing advocacy, HIV testing in the past 6 months was positively correlated with receipt of direct support for getting tested. In multiple regression analysis, perceived influence of both HIV testing and condom use advocacy were positively correlated with advocacy that included access information and support of autonomous regulation; confrontational advocacy and judgmental advocacy were independent positive correlates of perceived influence of testing and condom use advocacy, respectively. These findings support associations that suggest potential benefits of peer advocacy from PLWH on HIV testing and condom use among their social network members, and indicate that advocacy content, tone of delivery, and support of autonomous regulation advocacy may play an important role in the success of advocacy.
      PubDate: 2024-07-01
       
  • Depression Among Pregnant and Breastfeeding Persons Participating in Two
           Randomized Trials of the Dapivirine Vaginal Ring and Oral Pre-Exposure
           Prophylaxis (PrEP) in Malawi, South Africa, Uganda, and Zimbabwe

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      Abstract: Abstract Depression is associated with lower adherence to oral pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) to prevent HIV, but data are not currently available on how depression may affect use of other HIV prevention methods including the dapivirine vaginal ring (DVR). We conducted a mixed methods study using data from the Microbicide Trials Network (MTN) 042/DELIVER (n = 558) and MTN-043/B-PROTECTED (n = 197) studies to describe the prevalence of depressive symptoms and explore how depressive symptoms may have influenced attitudes about use of the monthly DVR and once-daily oral PrEP tablet among pregnant and breastfeeding persons, respectively, in Malawi, South Africa, Uganda, and Zimbabwe. Eleven participants had high Edinburgh Postnatal Depression scores ≥ 10 in MTN-042/DELIVER (2%) and four participants (2%) in MTN-043/B-PROTECTED. In interviews with 9 participants who had high scores (6 DVR, 3 oral PrEP), those with depressive symptoms described overlapping stressors which were magnified by job loss and economic instability during the COVID-19 pandemic, and by experiences of pregnancy/postpartum. These participants experienced a lack of support from partners or family members, and conflict with partners related to trust, and infidelity. While we did not find evidence of a change in product adherence, there was a strong sense of commitment and motivation to use the study products for protection from HIV for participants themselves and their baby. Although lack of social support is usually an obstacle to adherence, in this study, the participants’ lives and relationships seemed to have reinforced the need for HIV prevention and motivated women to protect themselves and their babies from HIV.
      PubDate: 2024-07-01
       
  • Pilot Trial Results of Mlambe: An Economic and Relationship-Strengthening
           Intervention to Address Heavy Drinking and Adherence to Antiretroviral
           Therapy in Malawi

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      Abstract: Abstract We evaluated the feasibility, acceptability, and preliminary efficacy of an economic and relationship-strengthening intervention to reduce heavy alcohol use among couples living with HIV in Malawi (Mlambe). Mlambe consisted of training on financial literacy and relationship skills, combined with 1:1 matched savings accounts to invest in an income-generating activity. In a randomized controlled trial, we compared Mlambe to enhanced usual care (EUC). We enrolled 78 married couples having a partner on antiretroviral therapy (ART) who reported heavy alcohol use based on the AUDIT-C. Using targets of 75%, primary outcomes included retention rates at 10 and 15-months, session attendance rates, and satisfaction with Mlambe. Exploratory outcomes were heavy alcohol use (AUDIT-C and/or PEth positive), number of drinking days in the past month, AUDIT-C score, optimal adherence to ART (95% or higher), and viral suppression. We exceeded our targets for feasibility and acceptability metrics. Retention rates were 96% at 15-months. Session attendance and satisfaction levels were both 100%. From baseline to 15-months, Mlambe participants reported decreases in mean number of drinking days (from 6.8 to 2.1) and AUDIT-C scores (from 7.5 to 3.1); while ART adherence rates improved across the same period (from 63.2 to 73.9%). Participants in Mlambe, as compared to those in EUC, had lower rates of heavy alcohol use (89.5% vs. 97.2%) and higher rates of viral suppression (100% vs. 91.9%) at 10-months. Differences between arms were not statistically significant in this small pilot study. Mlambe was highly feasible and acceptable, and shows promise for reducing heavy alcohol use and viral non-suppression among couples with HIV in a larger efficacy study.
      PubDate: 2024-07-01
       
  • Examining the Intrapersonal, Interpersonal and Community Level Correlates
           of Access to Medical Care Among Women Employed by Sex Work in Southern
           Uganda: A cross-sectional Analysis of the Kyaterekera Study

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      Abstract: Abstract Women employed by sex work (WESW) experience significant gaps in accessing necessary healthcare services, leading to unmet health needs. Yet, there is a dearth of literature on the barriers to medical care access among WESW in Uganda. We used data from the Kyaterekera baseline to examine the correlates of access to medical care among WESW, defined as the ability of individuals to obtain the necessary healthcare services they require in a timely, affordable, and equitable manner. The Kyaterekera study recruited 542 WESW aged 18–58 years from Southern Uganda. We conducted a multilevel linear regression model to determine the intrapersonal (age, education level, marital status, HIV knowledge, and asset ownership), interpersonal (family cohesion and domestic violence attitudes), and community (community satisfaction, sex work stigma and distance to health facility) level correlates of access to medical care among WESW. Intrapersonal and interpersonal factors were associated with access to medical care among WESW. There was no significant association between community level factors and access to medical care. WESW with secondary education (β = 0.928, 95% CI = 0.007, 1.849) were associated with increased access to medical care. WESW with high asset ownership (β = -1.154, 95% CI= -1.903, -0.405), high family cohesion (β = -0.069, 95% CI= -0.106, -0.031), and high domestic violence attitudes (β = -0.253, 95% CI= -0.438, -0.068) were associated with decreased access to medical care. The findings emphasize the critical need for targeted family strengthening interventions to enhance family support for WESW and address domestic violence.
      PubDate: 2024-07-01
       
  • Disparities in HIV Testing and PrEP Awareness for Black Women who Inject
           Drugs in San Francisco, California

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      Abstract: Abstract HIV disproportionately affects Black/African Americans (AA), while PrEP is under-utilized by Black/AA, women, and people who inject drugs (PWID). In San Francisco, California’s National HIV Behavioral Surveillance among PWID in 2022, Black/AA women were the least likely to be tested for HIV among all groups by sex and race/ethnicity and the least likely to be aware of PrEP among women. Yet, Black/AA women were no less likely to see a healthcare provider in the last year. Data suggest that providers’ failure to discuss and address HIV risk with Black/AA female PWID is a major barrier to accessing effective care and prevention. El VIH afecta de manera desproporcionada a Black/afroamericanos (AA), mientras que la PrEP está infrautilizada por los Black/AA, las mujeres y las personas que se inyectan drogas (PWID). En la National HIV Behavioral Surveillance de PWID de San Francisco, California en 2022, las mujeres Black/AA eran las que menos probabilidades tenían de someterse a la prueba del VIH entre todos los grupos por sexo y raza/etnia y las que menos probabilidades tenían de conocer la PrEP entre las mujeres. Sin embargo, las mujeres Black/AA no tenían menos probabilidades de acudir a un profesional sanitario en el último año. Los datos sugieren que el hecho de que los proveedores no hablen ni aborden el riesgo de VIH con las PWID de raza Black/AA es un obstáculo importante para acceder a una atención y prevención eficaces.
      PubDate: 2024-07-01
       
  • Avoiding Shots in the Dark: Learning from the Past To Inform the
           Implementation of Long-Acting Injectable Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis for
           Black American Cisgender Women

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      Abstract: Abstract The FDA’s approval of long-acting injectable cabotegravir pre-exposure prophylaxis (LAI PrEP) as an alternative to daily oral PrEP represents a crucial development in HIV prevention, particularly for American Black cisgender women who face high HIV-1 risks. Yet, uptake may be hindered by racial and gender inequities. Addressing these requires learning from the roll-out of oral PrEP, creating culturally tailored PrEP campaigns, and enhancing provider training to meet Black women’s needs. Tools for discussing PrEP within personal relationships and product preference research tailored to Black women’s needs are essential for effective LAI PrEP delivery. Deliberative implementation of LAI PrEP must employ strategies that are community-sensitive, -responsive, and -inclusive. It should prioritize the incorporation of Black women’s voices in decision-making and should promote community-led strategies. By addressing historical injustices and fostering trust, healthcare systems can enhance LAI PrEP uptake by Black women. Emphasizing a community-centered approach that ensures health equity and acknowledges the crucial role that social media and Black-led organizations play in promoting PrEP awareness and adoption within Black communities is necessary for successful implementation.
      PubDate: 2024-07-01
       
  • Improving Delivery and Use of HIV Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis in the US: A
           Systematic Review of Implementation Strategies and Adjunctive
           Interventions

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      Abstract: Abstract Implementation of pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) to prevent HIV transmission is suboptimal in the United States. To date, the literature has focused on identifying determinants of PrEP use, with a lesser focus on developing and testing change methods to improve PrEP implementation. Moreover, the change methods available for improving the uptake and sustained use of PrEP have not been systematically categorized. To summarize the state of the literature, we conducted a systematic review of the implementation strategies used to improve PrEP implementation among delivery systems and providers, as well as the adjunctive interventions used to improve the uptake and persistent adherence to PrEP among patients. Between November 2020 and January 2021, we searched Ovid MEDLINE, PsycINFO, and Web of Science for peer reviewed articles. We identified 44 change methods (18 implementation strategies and 26 adjunctive interventions) across a variety of clinical and community-based service settings. We coded implementation strategies and adjunctive interventions in accordance with established taxonomies and reporting guidelines. Most studies focused on improving patient adherence to PrEP and most conducted pilot trials. Just over one-third of included studies demonstrated a positive effect on outcomes. In order to end the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) epidemic in the U.S., future, large scale HIV prevention research is needed that develops and evaluates implementation strategies and adjunctive interventions for target populations disproportionately affected by HIV.
      PubDate: 2024-07-01
       
 
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  Subjects -> SOCIAL SCIENCES (Total: 1648 journals)
    - BIRTH CONTROL (22 journals)
    - CHILDREN AND YOUTH (262 journals)
    - FOLKLORE (30 journals)
    - MATRIMONY (16 journals)
    - MEN'S INTERESTS (16 journals)
    - MEN'S STUDIES (90 journals)
    - SEXUALITY (56 journals)
    - SOCIAL SCIENCES (937 journals)
    - WOMEN'S INTERESTS (44 journals)
    - WOMEN'S STUDIES (175 journals)

SEXUALITY (56 journals)

Showing 1 - 46 of 46 Journals sorted alphabetically
AIDS and Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
AIDS Research and Therapy     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
Archives of Sexual Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
BMJ Sexual & Reproductive Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Cadernos de Gênero e Diversidade     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Cadernos Pagu     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Culture, Health & Sexuality: An International Journal for Research, Intervention and Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Genre, sexualité & société     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
HIV/AIDS - Research and Palliative Care     Open Access   (Followers: 18)
Human Reproduction Update     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
International Journal of Transgender Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Bisexuality     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Black Sexuality and Relationships     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Gay & Lesbian Issues in Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Gay & Lesbian Psychotherapy     Partially Free   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Gay & Lesbian Social Services     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of GLBT Family Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Homosexuality     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Lesbian Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of LGBT Health Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of LGBT Issues in Counseling     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of LGBT Youth     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Psychosexual Health     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Sex & Marital Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Sex Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Sexual & Reproductive Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Psychology & Sexuality     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
QED : A Journal in GLBTQ Worldmaking     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Queer Cats Journal of LGBTQ Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Raheema     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Religion and Gender     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
Screen Bodies : An Interdisciplinary Journal of Experience, Perception, and Display     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Sex Roles     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Sexes     Open Access  
Sextant : Revue de recherche interdisciplinaire sur le genre et la sexualité     Open Access  
Sexual Addiction & Compulsivity: The Journal of Treatment & Prevention     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Sexual and Relationship Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Sexualities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Sexuality & Culture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Sexuality and Disability     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Sexuality Research and Social Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Sexualization, Media, & Society     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Simone de Beauvoir Studies     Full-text available via subscription  
Theology & Sexuality     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Transgender Health     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Whatever : A Transdisciplinary Journal of Queer Theories and Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
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JournalTOCs
School of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
Heriot-Watt University
Edinburgh, EH14 4AS, UK
Email: journaltocs@hw.ac.uk
Tel: +00 44 (0)131 4513762
 


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