Subjects -> SOCIAL SCIENCES (Total: 1648 journals)
    - BIRTH CONTROL (22 journals)
    - CHILDREN AND YOUTH (262 journals)
    - FOLKLORE (30 journals)
    - MATRIMONY (16 journals)
    - MEN'S INTERESTS (16 journals)
    - MEN'S STUDIES (90 journals)
    - SEXUALITY (56 journals)
    - SOCIAL SCIENCES (937 journals)
    - WOMEN'S INTERESTS (44 journals)
    - WOMEN'S STUDIES (175 journals)

SEXUALITY (56 journals)

Showing 1 - 56 of 56 Journals sorted alphabetically
AIDS and Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
AIDS Research and Therapy     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
Archives of Sexual Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
BMJ Sexual & Reproductive Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Cadernos de Gênero e Diversidade     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Cadernos Pagu     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Culture, Health & Sexuality: An International Journal for Research, Intervention and Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
European Journal of Politics and Gender     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Genre, sexualité & société     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
HIV/AIDS - Research and Palliative Care     Open Access   (Followers: 17)
Human Reproduction Update     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
International Journal of Transgender Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Bisexuality     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Black Sexuality and Relationships     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Gay & Lesbian Issues in Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Gay & Lesbian Psychotherapy     Partially Free   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Gay & Lesbian Social Services     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Gender and Power     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Journal of GLBT Family Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Homosexuality     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Lesbian Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of LGBT Health Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of LGBT Issues in Counseling     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of LGBT Youth     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Psychosexual Health     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Sex & Marital Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Sex Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Sexual & Reproductive Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Mandrágora     Open Access  
Psychology & Sexuality     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Psychology of Sexual Orientation and Gender Diversity     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
QED : A Journal in GLBTQ Worldmaking     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Queer Cats Journal of LGBTQ Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Queer Studies in Media & Popular Culture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Raheema     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Religion and Gender     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
Revista Periódicus     Open Access  
Screen Bodies : An Interdisciplinary Journal of Experience, Perception, and Display     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Seksuologia Polska     Full-text available via subscription  
Sex Roles     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Sexes     Open Access  
Sextant : Revue de recherche interdisciplinaire sur le genre et la sexualité     Open Access  
Sexual Addiction & Compulsivity: The Journal of Treatment & Prevention     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Sexual and Relationship Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Sexual Medicine     Open Access  
Sexualities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Sexuality & Culture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Sexuality and Disability     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Sexuality Research and Social Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Sexualization, Media, & Society     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Simone de Beauvoir Studies     Full-text available via subscription  
SQS - Suomen Queer-tutkimuksen Seuran lehti     Open Access  
Theology & Sexuality     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Transgender Health     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Whatever : A Transdisciplinary Journal of Queer Theories and Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Zeitschrift für Sexualforschung     Hybrid Journal  
Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Psychology of Sexual Orientation and Gender Diversity
Journal Prestige (SJR): 1.156
Citation Impact (citeScore): 3
Number of Followers: 15  
 
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
ISSN (Print) 2329-0382 - ISSN (Online) 2329-0390
Published by APA Homepage  [89 journals]
  • Clinician’s digest: Clinically oriented article summaries for volume
           10, issue 4.

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      Abstract: Article presents clinically oriented summaries for Volume 10, Issue 4 of Psychology of Sexual Orientation and Gender Diversity. Article titles covered include: How Deep is the Cut' The Influence of Daily Microaggressions on Bisexual Women's Health, by A. U. Smith, W. B. Bostwick, L. Burke, A. M. Hequembourg, A. Santuzzo, & T. Hughes; The Relationship Between Social Group Prejudice and Vulnerability to Sexual Violence in Bisexual Women, by M. B. Grove, & N. L. Johnson; Temporal Trends in Rates of Depression, Anxiety, and Suicidality Among Cisgender Sexual Minority and Heterosexual College Students, by M. J. Pellicane, & J. A. Ciesla; Barriers to LGBQ- and TGNB-Affirmative Clinical Training in Psychology Doctoral Programs, by H. F. Fitterman-Harris, H. M. Hughes, Z. A. Soulliard, & K. L. Zane; Mental Health Provider Training to Improve LGBTQ Competence and Reduce Implicit and Explicit Bias: A Randomized Controlled Trial of Online and In-Person Delivery, by C. Lelutiu-Weinberger, K. A. Clark, & J. E. Pachankis; What Does Transgender Mean to You' Transgender Definitions and Attitudes Toward Trans People, by V. N. Anderson; The Association Between Sexual Orientation Discrimination and Drinking Among Men Who Have Sex With Men: Results From an Ecological Momentary Assessment Study, by A. Surace, C. W. Kahler, & T. B. Wray; Sexual Minority Identity Development: Latent Profiles of Developmental Milestones in a National Probability Sample, by M. D. Bishop, A. B. Mallory, & S. T. Russell; “In Order to Be Bi, You Have to Prove It”: A Qualitative Examination of Plurisexual Women’s Experiences With External and Internalized Pressure to Prove Their Identities, by A. Cipriano, D. Nguyen, & K. J. Holland; Minority Stress, Pandemic Stress, and Mental Health Among Gender Diverse Young Adults: Gender Dysphoria and Emotion Dysregulation as Mediators, by M Pease, T. P. Le, & D. K. Iwamoto; “We Are Scared of Being Kicked Out of Our Religion!”: Common Challenges and Benefits for Sexual Minority Latter-day Saints, by S. J. Skidmore, G. T. Lefevor, E. Larsen, R. Golightly, & R. Abreu; Evaluating the Relationships Between Sexual Orientation, Weight-Related Teasing, Weight Bias Internalization, and Binge Eating, by D. Rosenbaum, & M. J. Berstein; Age-Varying Sexual Orientation Disparities in Mental Health, Treatment Utilization, and Social Stress: A Population-Based Study, by R. Bränström, D. Fellman, & J. E. Pachankis; and School Psychologists’ Perceptions of Transgender Training and Education: An Australian Qualitative Investigation, by G. Mackie, L. Patlamazoglou, & K. Lambert. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2023 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Thu, 14 Dec 2023 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1037/sgd0000704
       
  • Age-varying sexual orientation disparities in mental health, treatment
           utilization, and social stress: A population-based study.

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      Abstract: An increasing number of studies show a substantial increased risk of stress-sensitive mental health problems among sexual minority individuals compared with heterosexual individuals. However, existing data regarding the age patterning of this disparity in sparse and sometimes inconsistent. We therefore examined the age patterning of the sexual orientation disparity in mental health using a population-based survey with linkage to national health care registries. We also examined if social stressors might explain the sexual orientation disparities in mental health across ages. Data came from the Swedish National Public Health Survey 2018 (Public Health Agency of Sweden 2022; ages 16 to 84 years) and national health care registries, and the sample consisted of 5,115 self-identified sexual minority individuals (M age = 40.3, SD = 19.5) and 103,526 heterosexual individuals (M age = 48.5, SD = 18.3). Sexual minority individuals were more likely to report symptoms of depression and anxiety and to have received treatment for these conditions compared with heterosexual individuals, but they were not more likely to report high-risk alcohol use. The elevated risk of depression and anxiety among sexual minority individuals was strongest in early ages but the disparity remained significantly elevated among sexual minority individuals until about age 70. The risk of exposure to discrimination and victimization was consistently elevated among sexual minority individuals across age groups, and the sexual orientation disparity in social isolation increased with age. The increased risk of exposure to social stressors among sexual minority individuals fully or partially mediated the sexual orientation disparity in depression and anxiety across ages. Our results highlight that the sexual orientation disparity in depression and anxiety exists across ages and is at least partially explained by disparities in social stress across ages. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2023 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Mon, 06 Jun 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1037/sgd0000572
       
  • School psychologists’ perceptions of transgender training and education:
           An Australian qualitative investigation.

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      Abstract: Many school psychologists lack transgender training and education and feel underprepared to work with this population. However, little is known about school psychologists’ engagement with transgender training and education. To redress this gap, the current study explored cisgender school psychologists’ perceptions of transgender training and education. Seven Australian cisgender psychologists completed individual, semistructured interviews, and the data were analyzed using interpretative phenomenological analysis (IPA). Three superordinate themes were identified: practicality and utility of training, LGBTQ + curriculum within tertiary education, and addressing the needs of transgender young people. The findings demonstrate the importance of using real-life experiences and case studies within training, having access to available training opportunities, recognizing the global utility of transgender training, updating tertiary LGBTQ + curriculum, and using a queer-informed holistic lens within transgender training and education. Practical implications include promoting the global utility of transgender training, “queering” tertiary education, and incorporating lived experiences into training opportunities. Future research should further investigate the impact of certain types of transgender training and education opportunities on psychologists’ perceived competency and client outcomes. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2023 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Thu, 19 May 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1037/sgd0000579
       
  • Sexual minority identity development: Latent profiles of developmental
           milestones in a national probability sample.

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      Abstract: Sexual identity development milestones mark the ages at which sexual minority people first experience key developmental events including same-sex attraction, self-realization of a sexual minority identity, same-sex sexual behavior and romantic relationships, and sexual identity disclosure. Most studies of milestones use variable-centered, rather than person-centered approaches, potentially obscuring diversity in patterns across milestones. Using data from The Generations Study, the first national probability sample of White, Black, and Latinx sexual minority adults in the United States (n = 1,492), we examined variability in milestone timing and patterning using a latent profile analysis approach. We identified four distinct profiles, characterized by variability in milestone mean ages, pacing, and sequences: an early adolescence profile (22.9%), a middle adolescence profile (33.6%), a late adolescence profile (27.6%), and an adulthood profile (15.9%). Profiles were demographically distinct, varying by birth cohort, sexual identity, race/ethnicity, gender identity, and childhood gender nonconformity. Results suggest developmental and demographic diversity in the emergence of sexual identity development across the life course, with implications for sexual minority health and thriving. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2023 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Thu, 05 May 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1037/sgd0000569
       
  • Minority stress, pandemic stress, and mental health among gender diverse
           young adults: Gender dysphoria and emotion dysregulation as mediators.

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      Abstract: Gender diverse people in the United States are uniquely vulnerable to deleterious health outcomes because of long-enshrined systems of oppression and marginalization in American society. Trans young adults are especially vulnerable to these deleterious outcomes owing to their unique position in the life course. However, more research is needed on the mechanisms through which this marginalization contributes to mental health disparities in trans populations. Using a minority stress framework and online cross-sectional survey design, the current study examines potential mediators of the relationship between transgender identity-related distal stress and psychological distress from late May to early July 2020 in a sample of transgender young adults (N = 239; ages 18–29). More than half the sample scored above the K6 cutoff for severe psychological distress. Distal stress had a significant direct (β = .17, SE = .04, t = 2.76, p = .006) and indirect effect on psychological distress. Distal stress was indirectly associated with psychological distress through gender dysphoria (β = .04; 95% CI [.001, .10]) and emotion dysregulation (β = .16; 95% CI [.09, .23]). COVID-19 pandemic stressors were also positively associated with psychological distress (β = .36, SE = .12, t = 5.95, p < .001). Results highlight the significant mental health burden facing the trans community especially in the COVID-19 context, support a conceptualization of gender dysphoria as connected to experiences of oppression, and affirm the relevance of emotion dysregulation within minority stress frameworks. Mental health resources cognizant of the specific challenges experienced by trans young adults as well as policy changes that seek to address underlying structural transphobia in American culture and institutions are urgently needed. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2023 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Thu, 05 May 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1037/sgd0000574
       
  • “We are scared of being kicked out of our religion!”: Common
           challenges and benefits for sexual minority latter-day saints.

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      Abstract: This study explored common challenges and benefits reported by sexual minority people (SMP) in the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (CJCLDS). A sample of 438 SMP members of the CJCLDS responded to a qualitative survey that asked participants to identify the challenges and benefits of identifying as SMPs in their faith. Participants reported several common challenges to identifying as an SMP in the CJCLDS, including lack of belongingness, identity conflict/confusion, distal stressors, proximal stressors, religious/spiritual struggles, mental health problems, and sexuality struggles. Participants reported several common benefits including increased empathy or compassion, a sense of belonging and happiness, religious/spiritual improvements, and perspective/personal growth. The results suggest that some SMP members of the CJCLDS experience more religious and sexuality struggles as well as a lack of belongingness due to their intersecting identities, whereas others seem to benefit from their religious involvement and find a sense of belongingness. Therapists who work with SMPs in the CJCLDS, and potentially other SMPs in nonaffirming religions, should be aware of both the challenges and benefits reported by SMPs to help clients most effectively navigate difficulties arising from their intersecting identities. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2023 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Thu, 21 Apr 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1037/sgd0000571
       
  • Evaluating the relationships between sexual orientation, weight-related
           teasing, weight bias internalization, and binge eating.

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      Abstract: Despite the prevalence and impact of binge eating disorder (BED) symptoms among sexual minority individuals, few studies have examined factors that may be responsible for sexual orientation-based disparities in BED symptoms. We examined the relationship of sexual minority status to BED symptoms. Specifically, we hypothesized an indirect effect of sexual minority status on BED symptoms such that sexual minority individuals experienced more frequent weight-related teasing, which in turn was associated with greater weight bias internalization, which then led to greater BED symptoms. Undergraduate students (N = 688) of varying weight status, sexual orientation, and gender provided data. A path analysis model utilizing ordinary least squares regression was used to evaluate relationships between variables. Sexual minority participants had more frequent weight-related teasing, higher weight bias internalization, and more severe BED symptoms. Analyses supported both the indirect effect hypothesized above, and an indirect effect bypassing weight bias internalization. Additionally, a direct effect for sexual minority status on BED symptoms was found. Our results suggest that negative societal experiences are a key factor in understanding the greater BED symptoms that occur among sexual minority individuals. Future research is needed to evaluate these relationships longitudinally and using other samples. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2023 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Thu, 21 Apr 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1037/sgd0000576
       
  • What does transgender mean to you' Transgender definitions and
           attitudes toward trans people.

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      Abstract: In a partial replication and extension of Buck’s (2016) study, we examined lay people’s definitions of transgender and how those definitions are associated with attitudes toward trans people. We asked 497 cisgender people of diverse sexual orientations to define transgender and complete a measure of trans prejudice and indicate their level of agreement that trans people have a psychological disorder and that trans people are born with their gender identity. Cisgender women and people with nonheterosexual orientations endorsed less trans prejudice, less agreement that trans people have a psychological disorder, and more agreement that trans people are born with their gender identity. Definitions that referenced gender identity predicted lower levels of trans prejudice than definitions mentioning that trans people want to change their gender. The gender identity theme also predicted less agreement that trans people have a psychological disorder and more agreement that trans people are born with their gender identity than the change theme. Compared to heterosexual participants, nonheterosexual participants were more likely to mention the gender identity theme and less likely to describe trans people as being confused. Furthermore, the highest levels of trans prejudice were associated with definitions that included the confused theme. These results provide evidence that people’s conceptualizations of a transgender identity may reflect their attitudes toward trans people. These findings may have implications for how health care professionals interact with their trans clients. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2023 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Thu, 31 Mar 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1037/sgd0000566
       
  • Mental health provider training to improve LGBTQ competence and reduce
           implicit and explicit bias: A randomized controlled trial of online and
           in-person delivery.

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      Abstract: Lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer (LGBTQ) individuals in most countries face strong stigma and often rely on affirmative mental health care to foster coping and resilience. We tested an LGBTQ-affirmative mental health training for psychologists and psychiatrists by comparing in-person versus online modalities and the added benefit of supervision. Participants were randomized to a two-day training either in-person (n = 58) or via live-stream online broadcast (n = 55). Outcomes were assessed at baseline and 5, 10, and 15 months posttraining. Optional monthly online supervision was offered (n = 47) from months 5 to 15. Given the substantial need for LGBTQ-affirmative expertise in high-stigma contexts, the training took place in Romania, a Central-Eastern European country with some of the highest LGBTQ stigma in Europe. Participants (M age = 35.1) were mostly cisgender female (88%) and heterosexual (85%). Trainees, regardless of whether in-person or online, reported significant decreases from baseline to 15-month follow-up in implicit and explicit bias and significant increases in LGBTQ-affirmative clinical skills, beliefs, and behaviors. LGBTQ-affirmative practice intentions and number of LGBTQ clients did not change. Participants who attended at least one supervision session demonstrated greater reductions in explicit bias and increases in LGBTQ-affirmative behaviors from baseline to 15-month follow-up than participants who did not attend supervision. LGBTQ-affirmative mental health training can efficiently and sustainably improve LGBTQ competence and reduce provider bias in high-stigma contexts. Future research can identify additional ways to encourage mental health providers’ outreach to LGBTQ clients in need of affirmative care. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2023 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Mon, 28 Mar 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1037/sgd0000560
       
  • “In order to be bi, you have to prove it”: A qualitative examination
           of plurisexual women’s experiences with external and internalized
           pressure to prove their identities.

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      Abstract: Plurisexual women, or women attracted to multiple genders, are a large and vulnerable population in the United States. Plurisexual women experience higher rates of negative mental, physical, and sexual health outcomes compared with monosexual men and women (i.e., straight, lesbian, or gay). One potential factor underlying the high rates of negative health outcomes among plurisexual women is the pressure to “prove” one’s plurisexuality through sexual and/or romantic behavior with persons of more than one gender. The current study used qualitative interviews with 25 plurisexual women of varying identities (e.g., bisexual, pansexual, and queer) who discussed their experiences with the pressure to prove their sexual identities, and what effects this pressure has had on their lives and relationships. Using thematic analysis, we identified two themes across participant responses: (a) external pressure to prove sexual identity and (b) internalized pressure to prove sexual identity. External pressure arose from others demanding plurisexual women disclose their sexual and romantic history, accusing them of faking plurisexuality for attention, and pressuring them into performing sexual acts. The notion that plurisexual women must provide behavioral evidence to be validated as plurisexual was internalized by participants (e.g., checking behavioral boxes, questioning identity due to insufficient “evidence”). The women in our sample discussed how their experiences with external and internalized pressure to prove their plurisexuality were harmful to their sense of identity and their relationships with others. External and internal pressures to prove plurisexuality were also connected to sexually coercive experiences. Our findings highlight two different forms of pressure to prove one’s plurisexual identity, which may underlie negative health outcomes among plurisexual women. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2023 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Thu, 24 Mar 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1037/sgd0000567
       
  • Barriers to LGBQ- and TGNB-affirmative clinical training in psychology
           doctoral programs.

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      Abstract: Affirmative training for lesbian, gay, bisexual, or queer (LGBQ) and transgender and gender nonbinary (TGNB) communities is needed within clinical and counseling psychology training programs. While recommendations have been published, barriers in implementation may prevent students from receiving the training needed to effectively work with LGBQ/TGNB clients. The purpose of the current study was to examine doctoral-level psychology students’ perceived barriers to their program’s LGBQ/TGNB-affirmative training. As part of a larger study, participants (N = 115) completed two open-ended questions online about barriers to affirmative training for clinical work with LGBQ and TGNB clients. Using Consensual Qualitative Research as a framework, an analysis was conducted to identify domains and subdomains based on participants’ responses. A total of seven domains emerged across groups. Overall, statements about Uninformed and Negative Faculty and Inadequate Course Work appeared most often (Typical), along with comments about Insufficient Clinical Training and Insufficient General Training (Frequent). Comparison of participant subgroups revealed that LGBQ/TGNB respondents were more likely to report barriers related to Uninformed and Negative Faculty, as well as Poor Quality of Materials in relation to Inadequate Course Work and Insufficient General Training. Heterosexual/cisgender participants were instead more likely to address Lack of Preparation and Lack of Opportunities to work with these populations (Insufficient Clinical Training domain). Though few differences emerged between domains and subdomains regarding affirmative training for the LGBQ community and the TGNB community, results indicated that students receive less training about TGNB populations compared with LGBQ. Strategies to overcome identified barriers are discussed. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2023 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Thu, 17 Mar 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1037/sgd0000565
       
  • The association between sexual orientation discrimination and drinking
           among men who have sex with men: Results from an ecological momentary
           assessment study.

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      Abstract: Research has shown that experiencing discrimination increases substance use, including alcohol, among men who have sex with men (MSM). The goal of the present research was to replicate and expand upon this work to test whether perceptions of sexual orientation discrimination predict drinking among MSM on the same day as well as later in the same week. Data from this study came from an ecological momentary assessment study examining MSM sexual decision-making (N = 100). Participants were adult, sexually active, HIV-negative, cisgender MSM who engaged in recent alcohol use. Recruitment took place in the northeastern United States from January 2016 to October 2018. Mixed-effects models indicated that perceived sexual orientation discrimination was not significantly associated with the number of standard drinks consumed nor with the odds of heavy drinking at either the day or week level. In addition, we found a significant negative interaction between race/ethnicity and perceived discrimination: Black, Indigenous, and people of color (BIPOC) participants who perceived being discriminated against due to their sexual orientation drank less on days they did not perceive such discrimination. Our results suggest that the effect of discrimination on drinking in MSM is moderated by race, but these data cannot explain why. One possibility is that BIPOC MSM experience sexual orientation discrimination in different contexts or respond to discrimination differently than White MSM. Future research should expand upon how the intersection of identities, for example gender and BIPOC identities, further moderates the relationship between discrimination and drinking. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2023 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Thu, 10 Mar 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1037/sgd0000568
       
  • The relationship between social group prejudice and vulnerability to
           sexual violence in bisexual women.

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      Abstract: Researchers have consistently found an increased vulnerability to sexual violence in bisexual women. Much like the broader literature around sexual violence against women, the limited research examining this vulnerability in bisexual women has focused on intraindividual victim factors such as alcohol use, mental health, and previous sexual assault victimization. Sexual violence researchers are expanding their purview to include sociocultural factors manifested in the immediate context of sexual violence perpetration and victimization. Adding to this expanding awareness of the importance of these factors, the current study explored the relationships between bisexual women’s perceived experiences of dehumanization, hostile sexism, and biphobia in the social circle with which they spend the most time and their reported experience of sexual violence within the last year. Consistent with prior research indicating heightened vulnerability to sexual violence in bisexual women a substantial portion of participants (72.2%) reported experiencing sexual violence within the last year. Of those participants reporting experiences of sexual violence, most (93%) of those reporting sexual violence endorsing surviving rape. Hypotheses were partially supported, with peer hostile sexism, biphobia, and dehumanization of bisexual women significantly relating to sexual violence. When examined simultaneously, only peer hostile sexism and biphobia emerged as unique predictors of vulnerability to sexual violence. The current study adds to the literature supporting the need for increased focus on bisexual women’s unique vulnerability to sexual violence, as well as the important and underexamined roles of sexism and biphobia as contributing factors to this vulnerability through peer-level processes and social norms. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2023 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Thu, 24 Feb 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1037/sgd0000561
       
  • Temporal trends in rates of depression, anxiety, and suicidality among
           cisgender sexual minority and heterosexual college students.

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      Abstract: Sexual minority college students experience higher rates of depression, anxiety, and suicidality compared with their heterosexual peers. Significant social progress has been made in the last few decades, such that attitudes and policies toward sexual minorities in the United States have improved dramatically. It is unclear, however, whether this progress has decreased disparities in mental health outcomes between cisgender sexual minorities and heterosexuals. Therefore, the current study sought to determine whether disparities in depression, anxiety, and suicidality between cisgender sexual minority and heterosexual college students has decreased in the last 2 decades. Data were derived from the National College Health Assessment (NCHA), a national population-based survey of health outcomes among U.S. college students conducted every semester since 2000. Logistic regression was used to examine main and interaction effects of sexual orientation and time on lifetime and 12-month depression and anxiety diagnosis and treatment, suicidal ideation, and suicide attempt. As hypothesized, significant main effects of time and sexual orientation were observed such that sexual minorities had higher rates of all outcomes compared with heterosexuals, and rates of these outcomes increased over time for all participants. However, despite observed improvements in climate and policies toward sexual minority college students, disparities in rates of depression and anxiety diagnosis/treatment and suicidality among college students have expanded in recent years. These results indicate that further research is needed to determine the extent to which changes in minority stress and structural stigma lead to changes in rates of depression, anxiety, and suicidality in sexual minorities. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2023 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Mon, 14 Feb 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1037/sgd0000563
       
  • How deep is the cut' The influence of daily microaggressions on
           bisexual women’s health.

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      Abstract: Bisexual women experience disproportionately poorer health outcomes in comparison to lesbian and gay groups and the general population, including inequities related to mental and physical health. Although bisexual-specific health inequities are increasingly well-documented, research examining putative causes of such inequities, as well as research that accounts for differences within bisexual populations—particularly among racial minorities– remains limited. To address these gaps, this article reports findings from the Women’s Daily Experiences Study (WoDES), a multimethod study that explored the relationship between microaggressions and health outcomes among racially/ethnically diverse cisgender, bisexual women in Chicago. Data from 28 daily e-diaries (N = 2,104 observations; 99 participants, 57% women of color) were analyzed using multilevel modeling to (a) measure the frequency of microaggressions among bisexual women; (b) examine the influence of sexual orientation, racial, and gender microaggressions on mental and physical health; and (c) investigate how race influences relationships between microaggressions and health. Participants reported an average of 8.1 microaggressions in the previous 28 days, and at least one microaggression was reported for more than 42% of days (n = 802). Microaggressions of any type were associated with increased same-day negative affect and somatic complaints. Latina bisexual women experienced worse health outcomes in comparison to Black bisexual women. This study demonstrated the detrimental impact of microaggressions on the health of bisexual women and highlights the critical need for strategies on broader structural changes that could improve the health and well-being of bisexual women. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2023 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Mon, 07 Feb 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1037/sgd0000556
       
 
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  Subjects -> SOCIAL SCIENCES (Total: 1648 journals)
    - BIRTH CONTROL (22 journals)
    - CHILDREN AND YOUTH (262 journals)
    - FOLKLORE (30 journals)
    - MATRIMONY (16 journals)
    - MEN'S INTERESTS (16 journals)
    - MEN'S STUDIES (90 journals)
    - SEXUALITY (56 journals)
    - SOCIAL SCIENCES (937 journals)
    - WOMEN'S INTERESTS (44 journals)
    - WOMEN'S STUDIES (175 journals)

SEXUALITY (56 journals)

Showing 1 - 56 of 56 Journals sorted alphabetically
AIDS and Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
AIDS Research and Therapy     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
Archives of Sexual Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
BMJ Sexual & Reproductive Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Cadernos de Gênero e Diversidade     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Cadernos Pagu     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Culture, Health & Sexuality: An International Journal for Research, Intervention and Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
European Journal of Politics and Gender     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Genre, sexualité & société     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
HIV/AIDS - Research and Palliative Care     Open Access   (Followers: 17)
Human Reproduction Update     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
International Journal of Transgender Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Bisexuality     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Black Sexuality and Relationships     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Gay & Lesbian Issues in Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Gay & Lesbian Psychotherapy     Partially Free   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Gay & Lesbian Social Services     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Gender and Power     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Journal of GLBT Family Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Homosexuality     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Lesbian Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of LGBT Health Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of LGBT Issues in Counseling     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of LGBT Youth     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Psychosexual Health     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Sex & Marital Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Sex Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Sexual & Reproductive Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Mandrágora     Open Access  
Psychology & Sexuality     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Psychology of Sexual Orientation and Gender Diversity     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
QED : A Journal in GLBTQ Worldmaking     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Queer Cats Journal of LGBTQ Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Queer Studies in Media & Popular Culture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Raheema     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Religion and Gender     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
Revista Periódicus     Open Access  
Screen Bodies : An Interdisciplinary Journal of Experience, Perception, and Display     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Seksuologia Polska     Full-text available via subscription  
Sex Roles     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Sexes     Open Access  
Sextant : Revue de recherche interdisciplinaire sur le genre et la sexualité     Open Access  
Sexual Addiction & Compulsivity: The Journal of Treatment & Prevention     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Sexual and Relationship Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Sexual Medicine     Open Access  
Sexualities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Sexuality & Culture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Sexuality and Disability     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Sexuality Research and Social Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Sexualization, Media, & Society     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Simone de Beauvoir Studies     Full-text available via subscription  
SQS - Suomen Queer-tutkimuksen Seuran lehti     Open Access  
Theology & Sexuality     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Transgender Health     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Whatever : A Transdisciplinary Journal of Queer Theories and Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Zeitschrift für Sexualforschung     Hybrid Journal  
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