Subjects -> SOCIAL SCIENCES (Total: 1648 journals)
    - BIRTH CONTROL (22 journals)
    - CHILDREN AND YOUTH (262 journals)
    - FOLKLORE (30 journals)
    - MATRIMONY (16 journals)
    - MEN'S INTERESTS (16 journals)
    - MEN'S STUDIES (90 journals)
    - SEXUALITY (56 journals)
    - SOCIAL SCIENCES (937 journals)
    - WOMEN'S INTERESTS (44 journals)
    - WOMEN'S STUDIES (175 journals)

SEXUALITY (56 journals)

Showing 1 - 46 of 46 Journals sorted alphabetically
AIDS and Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
AIDS Research and Therapy     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
Archives of Sexual Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
BMJ Sexual & Reproductive Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Cadernos de Gênero e Diversidade     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Cadernos Pagu     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Culture, Health & Sexuality: An International Journal for Research, Intervention and Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Genre, sexualité & société     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
HIV/AIDS - Research and Palliative Care     Open Access   (Followers: 18)
Human Reproduction Update     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
International Journal of Transgender Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Bisexuality     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Black Sexuality and Relationships     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Gay & Lesbian Issues in Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Gay & Lesbian Psychotherapy     Partially Free   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Gay & Lesbian Social Services     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of GLBT Family Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Homosexuality     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Lesbian Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of LGBT Health Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of LGBT Issues in Counseling     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of LGBT Youth     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Psychosexual Health     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Sex & Marital Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Sex Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Sexual & Reproductive Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Psychology & Sexuality     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
QED : A Journal in GLBTQ Worldmaking     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Queer Cats Journal of LGBTQ Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Raheema     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Religion and Gender     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
Screen Bodies : An Interdisciplinary Journal of Experience, Perception, and Display     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Sex Roles     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Sexes     Open Access  
Sextant : Revue de recherche interdisciplinaire sur le genre et la sexualité     Open Access  
Sexual Addiction & Compulsivity: The Journal of Treatment & Prevention     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Sexual and Relationship Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Sexualities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Sexuality & Culture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Sexuality and Disability     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Sexuality Research and Social Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Sexualization, Media, & Society     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Simone de Beauvoir Studies     Full-text available via subscription  
Theology & Sexuality     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Transgender Health     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Whatever : A Transdisciplinary Journal of Queer Theories and Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Human Reproduction Update
Journal Prestige (SJR): 5.317
Citation Impact (citeScore): 10
Number of Followers: 13  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1355-4786 - ISSN (Online) 1460-2369
Published by Oxford University Press Homepage  [425 journals]
  • Navigating fertility dilemmas across the lifespan in girls with Turner
           syndrome—a scoping review

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Pages: 383 - 409
      Abstract: AbstractBACKGROUNDGirls with Turner syndrome (TS) lack a partial or complete sex chromosome, which causes an accelerated decline of their ovarian reserve. Girls have to deal with several dilemmas related to their fertility, while only a limited number of them are referred to a fertility specialist and counselled about options of family planning on time.OBJECTIVE AND RATIONALEThis scoping review provides an update of the literature on fertility in girls with TS throughout their lifespan and aims to propose a clinical practice guideline on fertility in TS.SEARCH METHODSDatabases of PubMed, Embase, and Web of science were searched using the following key terms: Turner syndrome, fertility, puberty, pregnancy, sex-hormones, karyotype, fertility preservation, assisted reproductive techniques, and counselling, alongside relevant subject headings and synonymous terms. English language articles published since 2007 were critically reviewed. Pregnancies after using donated oocytes and data about girls with TS with Y-chromosomal content were excluded.OUTCOMESThis search identified 1269 studies of which 120 were extracted for the review. The prevalence of natural conception ranged from 15% to 48% in women with 45,X/46,XX, 1% to 3% in women with 45,X, and 4% to 9% in women with other TS karyotypes. When assessing a girl’s fertility potential, it was crucial to determine the karyotype in two cell lines, because hidden mosaicism may exist. In addition to karyotype, assessment of anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH) played a significant role in estimating ovarian function. Girls with AMH above the detection limit were most likely to experience spontaneous thelarche, menarche, and ongoing ovarian function during the reproductive lifespan. Fertility preservation became more routine practice: vitrification of oocytes was reported in 58 girls with TS and a median of five oocytes were preserved per stimulation. Ovarian tissue cryopreservation has demonstrated the presence of follicles in approximately 30% of girls with TS, mostly in girls with mosaic-TS, spontaneous puberty, and AMH above the detection limit. Although girls and their parents appreciated receiving counselling on fertility in TS, only one in ten girls with TS received specialized counselling. Unfamiliarity with fertility preservation techniques or uncertainties regarding the eligibility of a girl for fertility preservation constituted barriers for healthcare professionals when discussing fertility with girls with TS.WIDER IMPLICATIONSThere currently is a high demand for fertility preservation techniques in girls with TS. A reliable prognostic model to determine which girls with TS might benefit from fertility preservation is lacking. Only a minority of these girls received comprehensive fertility counselling on the full spectrum of fertility, including uncertainties of fertility preservation, pregnancy risks, and alternatives, such as adoption. Fertility preservation could be a viable option for girls with TS. However, the question remains whether enough oocytes can be obtained for a realistic prospect of a live birth. It is important that girls and parents are empowered with the necessary information to make a well-informed decision.
      PubDate: Thu, 07 Mar 2024 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/humupd/dmae005
      Issue No: Vol. 30, No. 4 (2024)
       
  • Revealing the molecular landscape of human placenta: a systematic review
           and meta-analysis of single-cell RNA sequencing studies

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      Pages: 410 - 441
      Abstract: AbstractBACKGROUNDWith increasing significance of developmental programming effects associated with placental dysfunction, more investigations are devoted to improving the characterization and understanding of placental signatures in health and disease. The placenta is a transitory but dynamic organ adapting to the shifting demands of fetal development and available resources of the maternal supply throughout pregnancy. Trophoblasts (cytotrophoblasts, syncytiotrophoblasts, and extravillous trophoblasts) are placental-specific cell types responsible for the main placental exchanges and adaptations. Transcriptomic studies with single-cell resolution have led to advances in understanding the placenta’s role in health and disease. These studies, however, often show discrepancies in characterization of the different placental cell types.OBJECTIVE AND RATIONALEWe aim to review the knowledge regarding placental structure and function gained from the use of single-cell RNA sequencing (scRNAseq), followed by comparing cell-type-specific genes, highlighting their similarities and differences. Moreover, we intend to identify consensus marker genes for the various trophoblast cell types across studies. Finally, we will discuss the contributions and potential applications of scRNAseq in studying pregnancy-related diseases.SEARCH METHODSWe conducted a comprehensive systematic literature review to identify different cell types and their functions at the human maternal–fetal interface, focusing on all original scRNAseq studies on placentas published before March 2023 and published reviews (total of 28 studies identified) using PubMed search. Our approach involved curating cell types and subtypes that had previously been defined using scRNAseq and comparing the genes used as markers or identified as potential new markers. Next, we reanalyzed expression matrices from the six available scRNAseq raw datasets with cell annotations (four from first trimester and two at term), using Wilcoxon rank-sum tests to compare gene expression among studies and annotate trophoblast cell markers in both first trimester and term placentas. Furthermore, we integrated scRNAseq raw data available from 18 healthy first trimester and nine term placentas, and performed clustering and differential gene expression analysis. We further compared markers obtained with the analysis of annotated and raw datasets with the literature to obtain a common signature gene list for major placental cell types.OUTCOMESVariations in the sampling site, gestational age, fetal sex, and subsequent sequencing and analysis methods were observed between the studies. Although their proportions varied, the three trophoblast types were consistently identified across all scRNAseq studies, unlike other non-trophoblast cell types. Notably, no marker genes were shared by all studies for any of the investigated cell types. Moreover, most of the newly defined markers in one study were not observed in other studies. These discrepancies were confirmed by our analysis on trophoblast cell types, where hundreds of potential marker genes were identified in each study but with little overlap across studies. From 35 461 and 23 378 cells of high quality in the first trimester and term placentas, respectively, we obtained major placental cell types, including perivascular cells that previously had not been identified in the first trimester. Importantly, our meta-analysis provides marker genes for major placental cell types based on our extensive curation.WIDER IMPLICATIONSThis review and meta-analysis emphasizes the need for establishing a consensus for annotating placental cell types from scRNAseq data. The marker genes identified here can be deployed for defining human placental cell types, thereby facilitating and improving the reproducibility of trophoblast cell annotation.
      PubDate: Wed, 13 Mar 2024 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/humupd/dmae006
      Issue No: Vol. 30, No. 4 (2024)
       
  • TGFβ signalling: a nexus between inflammation, placental health and
           preeclampsia throughout pregnancy

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      Pages: 442 - 471
      Abstract: AbstractBACKGROUNDThe placenta is a unique and pivotal organ in reproduction, controlling crucial growth and cell differentiation processes that ensure a successful pregnancy. Placental development is a tightly regulated and dynamic process, in which the transforming growth factor beta (TGFβ) superfamily plays a central role. This family of pleiotropic growth factors is heavily involved in regulating various aspects of reproductive biology, particularly in trophoblast differentiation during the first trimester of pregnancy. TGFβ signalling precisely regulates trophoblast invasion and the cell transition from cytotrophoblasts to extravillous trophoblasts, which is an epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition-like process. Later in pregnancy, TGFβ signalling ensures proper vascularization and angiogenesis in placental endothelial cells. Beyond its role in trophoblasts and endothelial cells, TGFβ signalling contributes to the polarization and function of placental and decidual macrophages by promoting maternal tolerance of the semi-allogeneic foetus. Disturbances in early placental development have been associated with several pregnancy complications, including preeclampsia (PE) which is one of the severe complications. Emerging evidence suggests that TGFβ is involved in the pathogenesis of PE, thereby offering a potential target for intervention in the human placenta.OBJECTIVE AND RATIONALEThis comprehensive review aims to explore and elucidate the roles of the major members of the TGFβ superfamily, including TGFβs, bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs), activins, inhibins, nodals, and growth differentiation factors (GDFs), in the context of placental development and function. The review focusses on their interactions within the major cell types of the placenta, namely trophoblasts, endothelial cells, and immune cells, in both normal pregnancies and pregnancies complicated by PE throughout pregnancy.SEARCH METHODSA literature search was carried out using PubMed and Google Scholar, searching terms: ‘TGF signalling preeclampsia’, ‘pregnancy TGF signalling’, ‘preeclampsia tgfβ’, ‘preeclampsia bmp’, ‘preeclampsia gdf’, ‘preeclampsia activin’, ‘endoglin preeclampsia’, ‘endoglin pregnancy’, ‘tgfβ signalling pregnancy’, ‘bmp signalling pregnancy’, ‘gdf signalling pregnancy’, ‘activin signalling pregnancy’, ‘Hofbauer cell tgfβ signalling’, ‘placental macrophages tgfβ’, ‘endothelial cells tgfβ’, ‘endothelium tgfβ signalling’, ‘trophoblast invasion tgfβ signalling’, ‘trophoblast invasion Smad’, ‘trophoblast invasion bmp’, ‘trophoblast invasion tgfβ’, ‘tgfβ preeclampsia’, ‘tgfβ placental development’, ‘TGFβ placental function’, ‘endothelial dysfunction preeclampsia tgfβ signalling’, ‘vascular remodelling placenta TGFβ’, ‘inflammation pregnancy tgfβ’, ‘immune response pregnancy tgfβ’, ‘immune tolerance pregnancy tgfβ’, ‘TGFβ pregnancy NK cells’, ‘bmp pregnancy NK cells’, ‘bmp pregnancy tregs’, ‘tgfβ pregnancy tregs’, ‘TGFβ placenta NK cells’, ‘TGFβ placenta tregs’, ‘NK cells preeclampsia’, ‘Tregs preeclampsia’. Only articles published in English until 2023 were used.OUTCOMESA comprehensive understanding of TGFβ signalling and its role in regulating interconnected cell functions of the main placental cell types provides valuable insights into the processes essential for successful placental development and growth of the foetus during pregnancy. By orchestrating trophoblast invasion, vascularization, immune tolerance, and tissue remodelling, TGFβ ligands contribute to the proper functioning of a healthy maternal–foetal interface. However, dysregulation of TGFβ signalling has been implicated in the pathogenesis of PE, where the shallow trophoblast invasion, defective vascular remodelling, decreased uteroplacental perfusion, and endothelial cell and immune dysfunction observed in PE, are all affected by an altered TGFβ signalling.WIDER IMPLICATIONSThe dysregulation of TGFβ signalling in PE has important implications for research and clinical practice. Further investigation is required to understand the underlying mechanisms, including the role of different ligands and their regulation under pathophysiological conditions, in order to discover new therapeutic targets. Distinguishing between clinically manifested subtypes of PE and studying TGFβ signalling in different placental cell types holistically is an important first step. To put this knowledge into practice, pre-clinical animal models combined with new technologies are needed. This may also lead to improved human research models and identify potential therapeutic targets, ultimately improving outcomes for affected pregnancies and reducing the burden of PE.
      PubDate: Fri, 22 Mar 2024 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/humupd/dmae007
      Issue No: Vol. 30, No. 4 (2024)
       
  • Comparative efficacy of exercise, diet and/or pharmacological
           interventions on BMI, ovulation, and hormonal profile in reproductive-aged
           women with overweight or obesity: a systematic review and network
           meta-analysis

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      Pages: 472 - 487
      Abstract: AbstractBACKGROUNDThe increasing prevalence of obesity worldwide poses a significant threat to reproductive function owing, in part, to hormonal disturbances caused by negative feedback between excess adiposity and the hypothalamic–pituitary–ovarian axis. Consequently, finding the most appropriate strategies to lose weight and improve ovulation in women with overweight or obesity is a clinically relevant matter that needs to be investigated. A comprehensive comparison of the independent and combined efficacy of lifestyle and/or pharmacological interventions on BMI, ovulation, and hormonal profile in women with overweight or obesity at risk of anovulatory infertility would facilitate improving fertility strategies in this population.OBJECTIVE AND RATIONALEThis study aimed to evaluate the comparative efficacy of exercise, diet, and pharmacological interventions on BMI, ovulation, and hormonal profile in reproductive-aged women with overweight or obesity.SEARCH METHODSA systematic review was performed by searching PubMed, Scopus, Web of Science, PsycINFO, and Cochrane Library up to 14 December 2023, for randomized controlled trials assessing the effects of exercise, diet and/or pharmacological interventions (i.e. weight-lowering drugs or ovulation inducers) on BMI, ovulation, and/or hormonal profile in reproductive-aged women with overweight or obesity. We performed frequentist random-effect network meta-analyses and rated the certainty of the evidence. The primary outcomes were BMI and ovulation rate, and the secondary outcomes were serum reproductive hormone levels (gonadotrophins, androgens, or oestrogens). We performed sensitivity analyses, including the studies that only involved women with PCOS.OUTCOMESAmong 1190 records screened, 148 full texts were assessed for eligibility resulting in 95 trials (9910 women), of which 53% presented a high or unclear risk of bias. The network meta-analyses revealed that, compared to control: diet combined with weight-lowering drugs (mean difference (MD) −2.61 kg/m2; 95% CI −3.04 to −2.19; τ2 = 0.22) and adding exercise (MD −2.35 kg/m2; 95% CI −2.81 to −1.89; τ2 = 0.22) led to the greatest decrease in BMI; exercise combined with diet and ovulation inducers (risk ratio (RR) 7.15; 95% CI 1.94–26.40; τ2 = 0.07) and exercise combined with diet and weight-lowering drugs (RR 4.80; 95% CI 1.67–13.84; τ2 = 0.07) produced the highest increase in ovulation rate; and exercise combined with diet and weight-lowering drugs was the most effective strategy in reducing testosterone levels (standardized mean difference (SMD) −2.91; 95% CI −4.07 to −1.74; τ2 = 2.25), the third most effective strategy in increasing sex hormone-binding globulin levels (SMD 2.37; 95% CI 0.99–3.76; τ2 = 2.48), and it was coupled with being ranked first in terms of free androgen index reduction (SMD −1.59; 95% CI −3.18 to 0.01; τ2 = 1.91). The surface under the cumulative ranking curve scores suggested that: diet combined with weight-lowering drugs is the strategy most likely (94%) to produce the highest BMI reduction; and exercise combined with diet and ovulation inducers is the strategy most likely (89%) to produce the highest ovulation rate improvement. The sensitivity analyses, which exclusively included studies involving women diagnosed with PCOS, were consistent with the results presented above.WIDER IMPLICATIONSOverall, the findings of this network meta-analysis indicate that the combination of exercise, diet, and pharmacological interventions is effective for weight loss, improving ovulation, and normalizing the androgen levels of women with overweight or obesity. Although higher quality studies are needed, these results support that the optimal treatment strategy for women with overweight or obesity wishing to conceive must consider exercise, diet, and pharmacological interventions during the shared decision-making process.
      PubDate: Tue, 16 Apr 2024 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/humupd/dmae008
      Issue No: Vol. 30, No. 4 (2024)
       
  • Parents’ disclosure to their donor-conceived children in the last 10
           years and factors affecting disclosure: a narrative review

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      Pages: 488 - 527
      Abstract: AbstractBACKGROUNDDisclosure of donor conception has been advocated in several jurisdictions in recent years, especially in those that practice identity-release donation. However, research on disclosure decisions has not been consolidated systematically in the last 10 years to review if parents are telling and what factors may be impacting their decisions.OBJECTIVE AND RATIONALEAre parents disclosing to their donor-conceived children, and what factors have influenced their disclosure decisions across different contexts and family forms in the last 10 years'SEARCH METHODSA bibliographic search of English-language, peer-reviewed journal articles published between 2012 and 2022 from seven databases was undertaken. References cited in included articles were manually scrutinized to identify additional references and references that cited the included articles were also manually searched. Inclusion criteria were articles focused on parents (including heterosexual, single mothers by choice, same-sex couples, and transsexual) of donor-conceived persons in both jurisdictions with or without identity-release provisions. Studies focused solely on surrogacy, donors, donor-conceived persons, or medical/fertility staff were excluded as were studies where it was not possible to extract donor-recipient parents’ data separately. Both quantitative and qualitative studies were included. Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses guidelines were followed and Joanna Briggs Institute Critical Appraisal Tools for Systematic Reviews were used to assess article quality and bias.OUTCOMESThirty-seven articles met the inclusion criteria representing 34 studies and 4248 parents (including heterosexual, single, same-sex, and transsexual parents although the majority were heterosexual) from countries with anonymous donation and those with identity-release provisions or who had subsequently enacted these provisions (Australia, Belgium, Finland, France, Hong Kong, Middle East, Spain, Sweden, the UK, and the USA) A general trend towards disclosure was noted across these groups of parents with most disclosing to their donor-conceived children before the age of 10 years. Further, the majority of those who had not yet told, reported planning to disclose, although delayed decisions were also associated with lower disclosure overall. Same-sex and single parents were more likely to disclose than heterosexual parents. There was recognition of disclosure as a process involving ongoing conversations and that decisions were impacted by multiple interacting intrapersonal, interpersonal, and external contextual and social factors. Methodological limitations, such as the different population groups and contexts from which participants were drawn (including that those parents who choose not to disclose may be less likely to participate in research), are acknowledged in integrating findings.WIDER IMPLICATIONSThis review has reinforced the need for a theoretical model to explain parents’ disclosure decisions and research exploring the role of legislative provisions, culture, and donor/family type in decision-making. Greater ongoing access to psychological support around disclosure may be important to promote parent and family well-being.
      PubDate: Tue, 30 Apr 2024 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/humupd/dmae010
      Issue No: Vol. 30, No. 4 (2024)
       
 
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  Subjects -> SOCIAL SCIENCES (Total: 1648 journals)
    - BIRTH CONTROL (22 journals)
    - CHILDREN AND YOUTH (262 journals)
    - FOLKLORE (30 journals)
    - MATRIMONY (16 journals)
    - MEN'S INTERESTS (16 journals)
    - MEN'S STUDIES (90 journals)
    - SEXUALITY (56 journals)
    - SOCIAL SCIENCES (937 journals)
    - WOMEN'S INTERESTS (44 journals)
    - WOMEN'S STUDIES (175 journals)

SEXUALITY (56 journals)

Showing 1 - 46 of 46 Journals sorted alphabetically
AIDS and Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
AIDS Research and Therapy     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
Archives of Sexual Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
BMJ Sexual & Reproductive Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Cadernos de Gênero e Diversidade     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Cadernos Pagu     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Culture, Health & Sexuality: An International Journal for Research, Intervention and Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Genre, sexualité & société     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
HIV/AIDS - Research and Palliative Care     Open Access   (Followers: 18)
Human Reproduction Update     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
International Journal of Transgender Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Bisexuality     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Black Sexuality and Relationships     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Gay & Lesbian Issues in Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Gay & Lesbian Psychotherapy     Partially Free   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Gay & Lesbian Social Services     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of GLBT Family Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Homosexuality     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Lesbian Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of LGBT Health Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of LGBT Issues in Counseling     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of LGBT Youth     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Psychosexual Health     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Sex & Marital Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Sex Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Sexual & Reproductive Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Psychology & Sexuality     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
QED : A Journal in GLBTQ Worldmaking     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Queer Cats Journal of LGBTQ Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Raheema     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Religion and Gender     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
Screen Bodies : An Interdisciplinary Journal of Experience, Perception, and Display     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Sex Roles     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Sexes     Open Access  
Sextant : Revue de recherche interdisciplinaire sur le genre et la sexualité     Open Access  
Sexual Addiction & Compulsivity: The Journal of Treatment & Prevention     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Sexual and Relationship Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Sexualities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Sexuality & Culture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Sexuality and Disability     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Sexuality Research and Social Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Sexualization, Media, & Society     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Simone de Beauvoir Studies     Full-text available via subscription  
Theology & Sexuality     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Transgender Health     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Whatever : A Transdisciplinary Journal of Queer Theories and Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
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JournalTOCs
School of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
Heriot-Watt University
Edinburgh, EH14 4AS, UK
Email: journaltocs@hw.ac.uk
Tel: +00 44 (0)131 4513762
 


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