Subjects -> SOCIAL SCIENCES (Total: 1648 journals)
    - BIRTH CONTROL (22 journals)
    - CHILDREN AND YOUTH (262 journals)
    - FOLKLORE (30 journals)
    - MATRIMONY (16 journals)
    - MEN'S INTERESTS (16 journals)
    - MEN'S STUDIES (90 journals)
    - SEXUALITY (56 journals)
    - SOCIAL SCIENCES (937 journals)
    - WOMEN'S INTERESTS (44 journals)
    - WOMEN'S STUDIES (175 journals)

SEXUALITY (56 journals)

Showing 1 - 46 of 46 Journals sorted alphabetically
AIDS and Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
AIDS Research and Therapy     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
Archives of Sexual Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
BMJ Sexual & Reproductive Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Cadernos de Gênero e Diversidade     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Cadernos Pagu     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Culture, Health & Sexuality: An International Journal for Research, Intervention and Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Genre, sexualité & société     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
HIV/AIDS - Research and Palliative Care     Open Access   (Followers: 18)
Human Reproduction Update     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
International Journal of Transgender Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Bisexuality     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Black Sexuality and Relationships     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Gay & Lesbian Issues in Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Gay & Lesbian Psychotherapy     Partially Free   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Gay & Lesbian Social Services     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of GLBT Family Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Homosexuality     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Lesbian Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of LGBT Health Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of LGBT Issues in Counseling     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of LGBT Youth     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Psychosexual Health     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Sex & Marital Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Sex Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Sexual & Reproductive Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Psychology & Sexuality     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
QED : A Journal in GLBTQ Worldmaking     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Queer Cats Journal of LGBTQ Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Raheema     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Religion and Gender     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
Screen Bodies : An Interdisciplinary Journal of Experience, Perception, and Display     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Sex Roles     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Sexes     Open Access  
Sextant : Revue de recherche interdisciplinaire sur le genre et la sexualité     Open Access  
Sexual Addiction & Compulsivity: The Journal of Treatment & Prevention     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Sexual and Relationship Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Sexualities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Sexuality & Culture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Sexuality and Disability     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Sexuality Research and Social Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Sexualization, Media, & Society     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Simone de Beauvoir Studies     Full-text available via subscription  
Theology & Sexuality     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Transgender Health     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Whatever : A Transdisciplinary Journal of Queer Theories and Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Sexuality Research and Social Policy
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.752
Citation Impact (citeScore): 2
Number of Followers: 7  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1868-9884 - ISSN (Online) 1553-6610
Published by Springer-Verlag Homepage  [2468 journals]
  • Exploring the Underlying Social Conservative Mechanisms of
           Trans-negativity in a Convenient Greek Sample

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      Abstract: Introduction The current study examines how conservative social ideologies and religiosity interact to predict lower levels of knowledge, social intolerance, and negative attitudes toward interacting with transgender and gender nonbinary (TGNB) individuals in the Greek socio-cultural context. Methods An online cross-sectional research was conducted between March 2 and June 2, 2021. Two hundred and sixty-six participants were recruited for this study. The mean age was 29.30 (SD = 11.98, age range 18–60 years). The study used a between-subject correlational design. A multiple regression model was used to predict participants’ TGNB Knowledge, Attitudes, and Beliefs from the other research variables based on the importance of associations. We examined our hypotheses regarding the moderating role of conservative values and political positioning on the linkage between religiosity and TGNB knowledge, social tolerance, and attitudes toward interacting with TGNB individuals using PROCESS (model 1). Results This study’s results show that the conservative cis-normative system (i.e., religiosity, conservative values, and right-wing political orientation) seems significantly linked to TGNB social intolerance. Conclusions This study’s findings suggest that a broader definition of conservatism encompassing conservative values and right-wing political orientation may be useful in predicting trans-negativity. Policy Implications The levels of social tolerance, acceptance across the gender spectrum, and attitudes toward interacting with TGNB individuals should be considered by those working to change attitudes toward TGNB people.
      PubDate: 2024-07-03
       
  • Trans Rights and Safety, Political Self-efficacy, and Well-Being

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      Abstract: Introduction This mixed-methods study contributes to a growing body of research on trans political engagement by examining the interaction between trans political self-efficacy, political fatigue, and mental health. A total of 141 trans individuals completed an online mixed-methods survey assessing trans rights and safety concerns, political self-efficacy, and well-being. Methods Participants were asked to describe the reasons for their level of political engagement. Data was collected between June 2019 and August 2021, with a brief pause for COVID-19. Results Narrative analyses indicate that participants engaged with the political system due to concern for their trans rights and safety (35%), their sense of the personal (55%), communal relevance (26%), their mistrust of the political system (26%), and their political self-efficacy beliefs (26%). Though quantitative analyses indicate that participants’ well-being was significantly, positively correlated with both political security and political self-efficacy, some participants described their political engagement as being related to political fatigue (21%). Moreover, participants who reported political fatigue demonstrated significantly lower political self-efficacy than participants who did not report political fatigue. Conclusions These results suggest that trans political engagement can provide important benefits for well-being, via political self-efficacy, as well as risk factors for psychological harm, via political fatigue. Policy Implications Thus, it is recommended that social policy makers promote safe pathways for trans individuals to engage with the political system and reduce activists’ exposure to anti-trans stigma.
      PubDate: 2024-07-02
       
  • A Qualitative Analysis About Sexual Health of Foster Teenagers: What
           Concerns Do Their Caregivers Have'

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      Abstract: Introduction The social environment of children in foster care is one of the factors that impact on their sexual and reproductive development. Understanding these aspects is essential for the development of effective prevention strategies informed by research. Our aim is to explore the primary concerns of caregivers regarding the sexual development of teenagers in foster care. Methods The participants, 24 teenage foster caregivers, aged 32 to 55 years, were recruited through a social service network collaborating with foster families.Three focus groups’ discussion was conducted with foster caregivers using a semi-structured interview between April and June 2023. A qualitative reflexive thematic analysis was employed, focusing on themes related to foster caregivers’ concerns and challenges regarding the sexual development of the foster teenagers. Researchers conducted line-by-line coding inductively using NVIVO 14 software. Results The findings revealed that caregivers are concerned about teenagers’ exposure to sexual risks, challenges in establishing healthy relationship boundaries, dominant behaviors, and early expressions of sexuality. However, certain inaccuracies in attribution and interpretation were identified, which may be attributed to a lack of knowledge and information about normative sexual development, attachment, resilience, and insufficient training as an affective-sexual educator. The participating foster caregivers often linked sexual behaviors and distorted thoughts of teenagers with past childhood experiences. Conclusions The gathered information contributes to a deeper understanding of the needs and deficiencies of this group. Policy Implications This data lays the groundwork for designing more targeted interventions tailored to the needs identified by caregivers, which demand an immediate response.
      PubDate: 2024-07-02
       
  • Internalized Homonegativity and Demoralization Syndrome in Chinese Gay
           Men: The Mediating Role of Sexual Orientation Concealment and Sense of
           Self

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      Abstract: Introduction Chinese gay men face substantial stress, such as internalized homonegativity, and may have high levels of demoralization syndrome. However, few studies have examined the relationship between the two. This study aimed to investigate the relationship and the mediating mechanism between internalized homonegativity and demoralization syndrome in Chinese gay men. Methods From March to May 2022, 319 Chinese gay men were recruited nationwide through the Internet (mean age = 23.99, SD = 4.23). The researchers used the internalized homonegativity scale, the sexual orientation concealment scale, the sense of self scale, and the short version of the demoralization scale for the measurements. Results Sense of self plays a mediating role between internalized homonegativity and demoralization (standardized estimate = 0.104, 95% CI [0.004, 0.205]). Sexual orientation concealment and sense of self play a sequential mediating role between internalized homonegativity and demoralization (standardized estimate = 0.178, 95% CI [0.113, 0.258]). Internalized homonegativity contributes to increased demoralization among gay men through the increment of sexual orientation concealment and the reduction of sense of self. Conclusions Internalized homonegativity may be a risk factor for demoralization syndrome among Chinese gay men. Internalized homonegativity is associated with increased demoralization syndrome through increased sexual orientation concealment and decreased sense of self. Policy Implications Policymakers can formulate some corresponding laws, such as ensuring that sexual minorities are treated equally with heterosexuals in terms of studying and finding jobs in order to reduce the sources of internalized homonegativity formation and the symptoms of demoralization syndrome.
      PubDate: 2024-06-25
       
  • Balancing Community and Research Needs in Gender Measurement Decisions

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      Abstract: Introduction There has been increasing attention to—and debate about—best practices related to gender measurement. We add to this conversation by testing whether an approach of providing participants with an extensive list of gender options and then having them self-select into a more limited group of choices (that cohere with the research questions) could be useful. Methods In this study of adults (N = 1813), in 2021–2022, we measured gender using a three-part approach: the Gender EXPAND (EXPANsive responsive genDer) approach. Participants were first asked if they identified as transgender. They were then asked their current gender (check all that apply: woman, trans woman, trans feminine, man, trans man, trans masculine, nonbinary or genderqueer, agender, and an option to write in a response). Participants then selected a gender that best fit for them from a limited set of options (transgender, cisgender, nonbinary, unsure). Results We evaluated researcher reclassification from the expanded list of gender options compared to participant self-selection from the limited gender categories. We miscategorized 10.5% of participants when reclassifying their gender from the extensive list of options compared to their self-identification as transgender. We miscategorized 11.2% of participants compared to participants’ self-selection as cisgender, transgender, nonbinary, or unsure. Conclusions Participants generally responded well to the Gender EXPAND approach and our transparency in our explanations for our questions. This approach should be refined to reduce misclassification, potentially through different reclassification processes or modified response categories. Policy Implications Measurement of gender has downstream implications for representation in data, which informs policy. Inadequate measurement can lead to inaccurate data and undercounting of gender diverse individuals and further marginalizes transgender and nonbinary people at a time when stigma and anti-transgender legislation is at an all-time high.
      PubDate: 2024-06-22
       
  • Bisexual Discrimination, Internalized Binegativity and their Impact on
           Mental Health

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      Abstract: Introduction Bisexual individuals experience discrimination both from heterosexual individuals and from the Lesbian and Gay (LG) community. This double discrimination affects their mental health. This study aimed to explore the relationship between binegativity (from heterosexual and LB individuals) and internalized binegativity and symptoms of depression and anxiety, as well as the mediating role of social support. The second purpose was to explore whether these variables could predict the symptoms of depression and anxiety. Methods A sample of 110 bisexual individuals (77.3% cisgender women, Mage = 25.2) completed self-report measures. Results Most participants reported being discriminated against by heterosexual (93.2%) and LG (81.8%) individuals. However, they perceived and experienced higher discrimination from heterosexual people. The majority experienced internalized binegativity. As hypothesized, heterosexual discrimination predicted depressive and anxiety symptoms. Contrary to expectations, discrimination from the LG community and internalized binegativity did not predict symptoms, although bivariate correlations showed a positive relationship. Social support was a moderator of symptoms of depression, but not of anxiety. Conclusions These findings highlight the impact of binegativity on the mental health of bisexual individuals and the importance of social support. Policy implications Our results provide practitioners and policymakers with evidence of the effects of discrimination experienced by bisexual individuals. Educational campaigns and public awareness programs are needed to foster a more inclusive and accepting society.
      PubDate: 2024-06-20
       
  • Experiences with Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity Employment
           Discrimination in the USA: Analyzing EEOC Discrimination Charge Narratives
           

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      Abstract: Introduction In this article, we engage in the first content analysis of charge data filed with the United States Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) alleging employment discrimination based on sexual orientation and gender identity (SOGI) discrimination. Although the U.S. Supreme Court has classified SOGI discrimination as prohibited sex discrimination, little is known about the discriminatory experiences contained in formal charges or how allegations of sexual orientation discrimination compare to those of gender identity. Methods We draw upon charge data from 2012 to 2016 including both a quantitative administrative dataset of 8487 charges and a novel dataset derived from content analysis of 1628 charge narratives to present percentages and chi-square statistics for the issues alleged and bases of discrimination in sexual orientation and gender identity charges. Results Our findings demonstrate that individuals in the USA file formal grievances based on many of the same discriminatory experiences for sexual orientation as for gender identity, emphasizing their commonalities as sex-based discrimination. There are, however, notable differences, with sexual orientation charges containing more allegations of sexual harassment and relationship-based discrimination and gender identity charges alleging more gender stereotype claims. Conclusion Our findings suggest that sexual orientation discrimination is both individual and relational, focusing in part on discrimination surrounding a person’s partner or potential partners. In contrast, gender identity discrimination is predominantly directed toward the individual, often involving a rejection of that individual’s very identity. Policy Implications Our findings have important policy implications for those processing and adjudicating SOGI discrimination charges, as well as employers’ efforts to reduce and redress discrimination in their workplaces through workplace policies.
      PubDate: 2024-06-19
       
  • Changes in Online Sexual Activities During the Lockdown Caused by COVID-19
           in Spain: “INSIDE” Project

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      Abstract: Introduction The lockdown, as a measure to stop the spread of COVID-19, has had an impact on different areas of our life, including sexuality. This study aims to analyze its impact on online sexual activities (OSAs) in people who lived in Spain during confinement. Methods This study involved 1448 people aged 18–60 years who were assessed through an online survey during confinement in Spain (April, 2020). The design of this study was a cross-sectional design, in which information on OSA before confinement and OSA, physical and social environment, and other variables related to gender and negative mood during confinement were collected at a single point in time. Results Our results show that both men and women, regardless of their sexual orientation, have experienced an increase in time and frequency invested in OSAs. In addition, individuals have also innovated their OSAs, for example, contacting sex workers. Factors such as high sexual desire, being a man, and consuming pornography were positively related to the frequency of ASOs during confinement, while high sexual desire and sexting were related to the time spent on ASOs during confinement. Conclusions The COVID-19 lockdown has had an impact on online sexuality. Both men and women have experienced an increase in their online sexual activity during confinement. In addition, some factors related to the increase in the time and frequency of OSAs are identified. Policy Implications Identifying how these changes have been during this very restrictive period and what factors related to the increase in OSAs can help us prevent possible consequences in similar scenarios.
      PubDate: 2024-06-18
       
  • Transgender Rights in India’s Legal System: A Critical Analysis

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      Abstract: Introduction India’s transgender community has endured a distressing reality, battling violence and neglect enforced by discriminatory laws. While strides have been made in safeguarding their rights, significant challenges persist. This study delves into the somber realm of suffering and discrimination that this minority faces, while also evaluating India’s legislative framework to gauge the extent of decriminalization for transgender individuals. Methods This qualitative study employs content analysis as its methodology to investigate the research problem at hand, drawing upon a comprehensive range of primary and secondary sources. Results India’s transgender rights legal framework differs significantly from global practices. The Supreme Court, in the NALSA v. Union of India case, referred to international human rights treaties such as the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR) and the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights (ICCPR). These treaties recognize the principles of equality, right to life, liberty, personal security, legal recognition, and protection against torture and cruel treatment. However, India’s legal framework lacks the emotional depth expressed in the NALSA judgment. Alignment with global standards is necessary for India’s transgender rights legislation. Conclusions India’s transgender community has endured violence and marginalization due to oppressive laws, but recent progress has been made with the Transgender Persons (Protection and Rights) Act 2019. However, this legislation raises more questions than answers, appearing more like a mere checkbox exercise rather than an effective solution for the community’s pressing needs. Policy Implications The study emphasizes the policy implications of the findings, stressing the need to synchronize India’s legal framework for transgender rights with global practices. It suggests that a comprehensive and inclusive approach is necessary to ensure the protection and promotion of transgender rights in the country.
      PubDate: 2024-06-14
       
  • Attitudes Toward Mononormativity and Polyamorous Legal Rights in the US

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      Abstract: Introduction Recent research shows an increase in polyamory and acceptance of polyamorous relationships. However, there is still limited research on broader attitudes toward monogamy and polyamory, particularly regarding legal rights and with a national sample. This study examines the impact of cohort, sexual orientation, and contact with polyamorists on attitudes toward monogamy and polyamorous legal rights. This research has the potential to bring more attention to polyamorous relationships, disrupt heteronormative views of relationships, and consider legal rights for those in relationships involving more than two people. Methods We use data from a sample of 2665 adults from the 2021 American Marriage Survey, a national survey focused on attitudes toward marriage post-marriage equality, to consider the relationship between cohort, sexual orientation, contact, and attitudes toward mononormativity and polyamory. Results Overall, there is support for the idea that monogamy is the norm while people are generally not supportive of granting legal rights for polyamorous relationships. Younger cohorts, LGBQ individuals, and those who know a polyamorous person are less likely to support mononormativity and more likely to support legal rights for polyamorous relationships. Furthermore, contact has a stronger impact on attitudes of Millennials and LGBQ individuals. Conclusion While mononormativity remains the norm and polyamory is not widely supported, given patterns of greater acceptance among younger cohorts and LGBQ individuals, there is a good possibility that acceptance will increase over time. Policy Implications This research has the potential to bring more attention to polyamorous relationships, disrupt heteronormative views of relationships, and consider legal rights for those in relationships involving more than two people.
      PubDate: 2024-06-14
       
  • “Don’t Say Gay”: Implications for Outness and Desire to Move Among
           LGBTQ + Parents in Florida

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      Abstract: Introduction Curricular laws that ban schools from discussing sexual orientation and gender identity/expression, such as Florida’s Parental Rights in Education (“Don’t Say Gay”) law, reinforce structural stigma for LGBTQ + people, resulting in compromised well-being. Structural stigma likely affects LGBTQ + individuals’ identity disclosure/concealment processes, and desire to stay in or move out of states that enact these policies. Methods This mixed-method study includes a sample of 107 LGBTQ + parents in Florida, who were recruited via Prolific in April–May 2023, immediately following the expansion of Florida’s “Don’t Say Gay” law from K-3 to include all grades. Participants (Mage = 41.49; 82.2% White; 66.4% cisgender women) completed an online survey with closed- and open-ended questions. Logistic regression models examined predictors of self-reported decreases in outness and desire and probability of moving out of Florida. Thematic analyses of open-ended responses provided nuance to participants’ experiences. Results Parents who reported higher levels of bias, identified as trans/nonbinary, and reported that signifiers of LGBTQ + inclusion were removed from school were more likely to report decreased outness, and those with higher socioeconomic status and those who reported removal of LGBTQ + books from school were less likely to report decreased outness. Worries about the law were associated with both desire and perceived likelihood of moving, and White parents were more likely to report a desire to move. Qualitative analysis further revealed the importance of understanding multiple marginalized positions in identity disclosure and desire to move. Conclusions and Policy Implications Anti-LGBTQ + laws have implications for LGBTQ + parent-families, affecting their ability to live authentically and maintain residence in their communities.
      PubDate: 2024-06-12
       
  • Sociopolitical Trends and Attitudes Towards Transgender People: A
           Validation Study of the Transgender Knowledge, Attitudes, and Beliefs
           (T-KAB) Scale in a Portuguese Sample

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      Abstract: Introduction Attitudes towards transgender and gender diverse (TGD) individuals are associated with discrimination against TGD people and underly TGD minority stress. Despite Portugal’s progressive legal framework, anti-trans interactions and discourse are reported. Nonetheless, studies on trans attitudes are still incipient in Portugal. The Transgender Knowledge, Attitudes, and Beliefs (T-KAB) scale is a psychometrically sound measure of transgender attitudes. However, its convergent validity with transphobia is yet to be tested, and its ability to study sociopolitical factors driving pro-trans attitudes is unexplored. Methods We explored the psychometric properties of the European Portuguese version of T-KAB in an online collected (February 2022 to May 2022) sample of Portuguese adults (N = 447), and tested differences (ANOVA; t-test) in T-KAB according to sociopolitical factors. Results Results from the Principal Axis Factoring and Parallel Analysis showed a two-factor measure of acceptance, comfort, and social tolerance towards trans people. Both factors presented an excellent internal consistency (α = .94 and α = .95) and were significantly associated with the Genderism and Transphobia Scale. Conclusions Results found that participants with a heterosexual orientation, less contact with TGD people, less educated, religious, and who endorsed a right-wing or conservative political ideology showed lower T-KAB scores. These results corroborate the psychometric validity of the T-KAB, as well as its ability to identify sociopolitical segments of the population according to their attitudes towards TGD people. Policy Implications This study informs future research on tailored interventions to increase transgender acceptance, comfort, and social tolerance in the general population.
      PubDate: 2024-06-12
       
  • Sex Working Parents: Surveilled in the Parenting Panopticon

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      Abstract: Introduction Research suggests that many sex workers are parents. This paper furthers the literature’s understanding of everyday barriers plaguing sex working parents (SWP) that compound to complicate their ability to build connections with their child’s world and other sex workers. Methods This Participatory Action Research study employed five focus groups in 2022 with thirteen English-speaking SWP in Los Angeles. The focus groups utilized group discussion in tandem with an art-based exercise to explore the value of sex work to parenting and where SWP require support. Results SWP reported benefits of engaging in sex work in terms of strengthening their relationships with their children and a concurrent constant fear that they could lose their parental rights if they were outed. This study applies Foucault’s theoretical conceptualization of a discipline society (operating through the ever-present potential of punishment and surveillance, including by private actors) to the participant’s lived experiences and self-conceptualization. Conclusions The paper explores the value of a sex worker–driven critique of stigma discourse for a more targeted description of the apprehension SWP experience. Policy Implications SWP are positioned at the intersection of various forms of surveillance, criminalization, and stigma. Recommendations highlight a need for building interdependence and representation with SWP to combat carceral surveillance practices.
      PubDate: 2024-06-11
       
  • Maternal and Partner Pregnancy Impact Expectations Scales (PIES-M/P):
           Development, Evaluation, and Implications

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      Abstract: Introduction A number of studies have examined women’s and couples’ sexual experiences during pregnancy; few studies, however, have explored how pregnant couples expect their sex lives to change despite the possible relationship between sexual expectations and sexual function and satisfaction. The purpose of this study was to assess the utility of two scales: the Maternal Pregnancy Impact Expectations Scale (PIES-M) and the Partner Pregnancy Impact Expectations Scale (PIES-P), which measure newly pregnant couples’ sexual expectations later in the pregnancy. Methods The current project was split into three distinct phases across two data collection points: 1. language elicitation, 2. item development and revision, and 3. empirical validation. A total of 242 participants were included in Phase 1, and a total of 241 data points in 124 dyads for Phase 3 were obtained via a cross-sectional, web-based survey administered in 2011 and 2012. Exploratory factor analysis was used to assess the factor structure of the PIES-M and PIES-P. Multilevel modeling was used to understand the variability of PIES-M and PIES-P scores. Measures on sexual motivation, sexual interest, sexual anxiety, attitudes to sex, and somatic pregnancy symptoms were used to further assess the test scales. Results Findings demonstrated a two-factor structure for the PIES-M with sexual expectations and pain expectations loading on separate factors. For PIES-P, all items loaded onto one factor as no pain expectation items were included for partners. Conclusions Both the maternal and partner versions of the scales demonstrated acceptable construct validity and internal consistency, providing evidence for the validity of these measures of sexual expectations during pregnancy. Policy Implications A greater understanding of sexual expectations during pregnancy has social, clinical, and research implications. Policy makers and practitioners should assess and incorporate sexual expectations into their practice, especially with marginalized and minoritized populations.
      PubDate: 2024-06-11
       
  • LGBTQ Mental Health Peer Support: A Descriptive Survey

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      Abstract: Background Gender and sexual minority adults have significant unmet mental health care needs and are often faced with barriers to accessing appropriate services. In this context, LGBTQ individuals often turn to each other for mental health support. Methods In a sample of 326 LGBTQ adults (M age = 37.64) who were providing mental health support to their LGBTQ peers, we examined the nature of LGBTQ peer support, including who provides peer support, to whom, and for what issues. We also examined the experiences of those providing LGBTQ peer support, and the role of mental health training. Data were collected in 2020. Results Participants provided support to a range of individuals, including close friends, colleagues, and those who were previously strangers. The types of concerns they supported their peers with varied greatly, though depression, anxiety, suicidality, and coping with discrimination were common concerns. Participants were often managing multiple competing demands, and many appeared to be managing their own mental health concerns. Those who had received at least some mental health training appeared to fare better in their experiences of providing peer support compared to those without such training. Policy Implications Findings illustrate the importance of increasing access to LGBTQ-affirmative mental health services. We also highlight the importance of developing and disseminating initiatives designed to support those providing LGBTQ peer support, both to increase the effectiveness of peer support and to help manage the impact of providing LGBTQ peer support.
      PubDate: 2024-06-03
       
  • Timing the Talks: Exploring Children’s Ages at Parent-Child
           Conversations About Gender, Sexual Orientation, and Various Sexual
           Behaviors

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      Abstract: Introduction Using the theory of planned behavior, we examined parental characteristics associated with child ages at past and intended future parent-child sexual communication (PCSC) about topics with the potential to challenge cisheteronormative assumptions: (a) gender and sexual identities and (b) various sexual behaviors. Methods Data were collected in December 2019–January 2020 from 561 US parents of an oldest child 6–11 years old; parents were majority White (85%), cisgender (98%), heterosexual (86%) mothers (59%). Results On average, parents who had discussed these topics did so at 6–7 years old and those who had not planned to do so between 9 and 14 years old. Regression analyses showed that, among parents who had already discussed these topics, having more permissive sexual attitudes, being a woman or genderqueer parent, having a younger child, and having a girl or genderqueer child were associated with younger ages at past PCSC about at least one topic. For parents who were planning on discussing these topics in the future, perceiving more positive outcomes of PCSC, perceiving less responsibility for PCSC, identifying as LGBQA or a father, having a younger child, and having a girl or genderqueer child were associated with younger ages at intended future PCSC for at least one topic. Conclusions US parents (especially conservative heterosexual parents of boys with certain PCSC attitudes) need education about the importance of PCSC about these topics in order to meet experts’ recommendations for age-appropriate PCSC. Policy Implications Parent education can provide parents with tools to discuss these topics in age-appropriate ways.
      PubDate: 2024-06-01
       
  • From “Bad” and “Good” Motivations to Abort to “Bad” and
           “Good” Women: Abortion Stigma and Backlash Against Women Who Interrupt
           Their Pregnancy

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      Abstract: Introduction Abortion is a health practice that people might choose for a variety of reasons. In public discourse, a subtle hierarchy of legitimacy frequently emerges in relation to abortion’ motivations, thereby establishing an implicit distinction between abortions deemed acceptable or justifiable and those considered unacceptable or unjustifiable. Methods We conducted an experimental study to examine the impact of different motivations commonly perceived as “good and acceptable” (i.e., health risks or rape) and “bad and unacceptable” (i.e., lack of desire to have a child or incompatibility between women’s lives and their careers) on the stigmatization of women who choose to abort (i.e., moral outrage and attribution of humanness) and the perceived severity of hostile behaviors against them. Results Findings show that participants experienced more moral outrage towards the woman when she chose to abort for “bad and unacceptable” reasons (vs. “good and acceptable”), attributed her less humanness, and perceived hostile behaviors toward her as less severe. In addition, we found that “bad and unacceptable” reasons influenced participants’ perceptions of hostile behaviors through the mediation of moral outrage and the attribution of humanness to her. Conclusions and Policy Implications Highlighting motivations for abortion reinforces not only the divide between “good” and “bad” abortions but also between “good” and “bad” women. The key conclusions, limitations, and directions for the future are explored in the context of combating abortion stigma and backlash, ultimately advocating for reproductive justice.
      PubDate: 2024-06-01
       
  • Self-Care Practices and Associated Sexual Health Risks Among Cisgender
           Women Sex Workers in Colombia

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      Abstract: Introduction Sex work is a social phenomenon characterized by exchanging sexual services for money or goods. In Colombia, it generally occurs in clandestine and unsafe environments due to social exclusion related to stigma, discrimination, and criminalization of the occupation. Sex workers may experience health risks due to the ineffectiveness of some self-care measures in exercising sexual practices. Methods This qualitative, constructivist, hermeneutic phenomenological study explored the sexual health self-care practices of 34 cisgender women sex workers over 18 years of age in Colombia from the analytical lens of intersectionality. Data were obtained through in-depth interviews face-to-face and discussion groups between July 2021 and March 2022. Results After reflective thematic analysis with an inductive approach to the data, five general themes emerged: meaning of self-care promoting practices, relationship with the healthcare system, empowerment and personal autonomy, vulnerability of cisgender women sex workers, and low-risk perception. Conclusions and Policy Implications The findings show the need to promote and provide humanized, friendly, and self-sustainable sexual health care with educational strategies that favor the intersectional cooperation of preventive care linked to the body, conceptual, and cultural memory of sex workers, providing them with the necessary tools to manage sexual health risks from their situated and contextual reality with a perspective of rights, social justice, and gender equity.
      PubDate: 2024-06-01
       
  • Online Social Media Reactions to the Overturn of Roe v. Wade: Public
           Health Implications and Policy Insights

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      Abstract: Background The Supreme Court of the United States’ (SCOTUS) decision in Dobbs v. Jackson Women’s Health Organization overturned the Court’s previous decision in Roe v. Wade, the case that established abortion before fetal viability as a constitutionally protected right in the USA, thereby returning abortion legality prior to viability back to individual states. Social media reactions indicated strong rebukes of SCOTUS’ actions, potentially indicating support to maintain legal abortion to some extent. Yet, understanding the nuances in public opinion about abortion at the population scale is lacking. Objective To measure reactions to overturning Roe v. Wade (an outcome of the Dobbs v. Jackson decision) via social media. Methods We applied Latent Dirichlet Allocation (LDA) topic models to generate themes for tweets (N = 4,353,103) collected between 5–3-2022 and 7–6-2022. We then applied a Sentence Bi-directional Encoder from Transformers (S-BERT) analysis with a restricted sample to evaluate daily themes and longitudinal changes. Finally, we applied a sentiment analysis to measure affect and changes in daily posting volume. Results Social media reactions to overturning Roe v. Wade were largely negative. LDA and S-BERT topics indicated mostly unease at SCOTUS’ actions and changes to abortion access, though we also observe some support for SCOTUS and its decision. Increased abortion-related social media reactions lasted approximately 7 days before returning to baseline levels. Discussion and Conclusion Although initial reactions to overturning Roe v. Wade were in support of abortion, rapid news cycles may have diverted attention away from this monumental issue. Declining coverage about Dobbs, and overturning Roe v. Wade, and by extension social media reactions, holds serious implications for other social issues that will likely be heard before SCOTUS in coming terms. Our findings can inform US abortion climate and promote awareness of the tenuous nature of US social issues and associated rights.
      PubDate: 2024-06-01
       
  • Correction: Perspectives of Women of Reproductive Age Regarding Sexuality
           During Their Menstruation Period

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      PubDate: 2024-04-17
      DOI: 10.1007/s13178-024-00970-z
       
 
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  Subjects -> SOCIAL SCIENCES (Total: 1648 journals)
    - BIRTH CONTROL (22 journals)
    - CHILDREN AND YOUTH (262 journals)
    - FOLKLORE (30 journals)
    - MATRIMONY (16 journals)
    - MEN'S INTERESTS (16 journals)
    - MEN'S STUDIES (90 journals)
    - SEXUALITY (56 journals)
    - SOCIAL SCIENCES (937 journals)
    - WOMEN'S INTERESTS (44 journals)
    - WOMEN'S STUDIES (175 journals)

SEXUALITY (56 journals)

Showing 1 - 46 of 46 Journals sorted alphabetically
AIDS and Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
AIDS Research and Therapy     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
Archives of Sexual Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
BMJ Sexual & Reproductive Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Cadernos de Gênero e Diversidade     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Cadernos Pagu     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Culture, Health & Sexuality: An International Journal for Research, Intervention and Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Genre, sexualité & société     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
HIV/AIDS - Research and Palliative Care     Open Access   (Followers: 18)
Human Reproduction Update     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
International Journal of Transgender Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Bisexuality     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Black Sexuality and Relationships     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Gay & Lesbian Issues in Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Gay & Lesbian Psychotherapy     Partially Free   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Gay & Lesbian Social Services     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of GLBT Family Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Homosexuality     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Lesbian Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of LGBT Health Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of LGBT Issues in Counseling     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of LGBT Youth     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Psychosexual Health     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Sex & Marital Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Sex Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Sexual & Reproductive Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Psychology & Sexuality     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
QED : A Journal in GLBTQ Worldmaking     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Queer Cats Journal of LGBTQ Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Raheema     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Religion and Gender     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
Screen Bodies : An Interdisciplinary Journal of Experience, Perception, and Display     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Sex Roles     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Sexes     Open Access  
Sextant : Revue de recherche interdisciplinaire sur le genre et la sexualité     Open Access  
Sexual Addiction & Compulsivity: The Journal of Treatment & Prevention     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Sexual and Relationship Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Sexualities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Sexuality & Culture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Sexuality and Disability     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Sexuality Research and Social Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Sexualization, Media, & Society     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Simone de Beauvoir Studies     Full-text available via subscription  
Theology & Sexuality     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Transgender Health     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Whatever : A Transdisciplinary Journal of Queer Theories and Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
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JournalTOCs
School of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
Heriot-Watt University
Edinburgh, EH14 4AS, UK
Email: journaltocs@hw.ac.uk
Tel: +00 44 (0)131 4513762
 


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