Subjects -> SOCIAL SCIENCES (Total: 1648 journals)
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    - MATRIMONY (16 journals)
    - MEN'S INTERESTS (16 journals)
    - MEN'S STUDIES (90 journals)
    - SEXUALITY (56 journals)
    - SOCIAL SCIENCES (937 journals)
    - WOMEN'S INTERESTS (44 journals)
    - WOMEN'S STUDIES (175 journals)

SEXUALITY (56 journals)

Showing 1 - 46 of 46 Journals sorted alphabetically
AIDS and Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
AIDS Research and Therapy     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
Archives of Sexual Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
BMJ Sexual & Reproductive Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Cadernos de Gênero e Diversidade     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Cadernos Pagu     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Culture, Health & Sexuality: An International Journal for Research, Intervention and Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Genre, sexualité & société     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
HIV/AIDS - Research and Palliative Care     Open Access   (Followers: 18)
Human Reproduction Update     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
International Journal of Transgender Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Bisexuality     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Black Sexuality and Relationships     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Gay & Lesbian Issues in Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Gay & Lesbian Psychotherapy     Partially Free   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Gay & Lesbian Social Services     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of GLBT Family Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Homosexuality     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Lesbian Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of LGBT Health Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of LGBT Issues in Counseling     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of LGBT Youth     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Psychosexual Health     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Sex & Marital Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Sex Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Sexual & Reproductive Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Psychology & Sexuality     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
QED : A Journal in GLBTQ Worldmaking     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Queer Cats Journal of LGBTQ Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Raheema     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Religion and Gender     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
Screen Bodies : An Interdisciplinary Journal of Experience, Perception, and Display     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Sex Roles     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Sexes     Open Access  
Sextant : Revue de recherche interdisciplinaire sur le genre et la sexualité     Open Access  
Sexual Addiction & Compulsivity: The Journal of Treatment & Prevention     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Sexual and Relationship Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Sexualities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Sexuality & Culture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Sexuality and Disability     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Sexuality Research and Social Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Sexualization, Media, & Society     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Simone de Beauvoir Studies     Full-text available via subscription  
Theology & Sexuality     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Transgender Health     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Whatever : A Transdisciplinary Journal of Queer Theories and Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Sex Roles
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.789
Citation Impact (citeScore): 2
Number of Followers: 12  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1573-2762 - ISSN (Online) 0360-0025
Published by Springer-Verlag Homepage  [2468 journals]
  • “I Think I Just like Having Sex”: A Qualitative Study of Sexual
           Assault Survivors and Their Sexual Pleasure

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      Abstract: Abstract Sexual assaults’ effects on survivors’ sexual pleasure have been well-documented in the literature. However, much of this research is quantitative in nature and focuses on the negative effects of assault on sexual satisfaction. The present study seeks to address a gap in the literature that has failed to ask survivors what they enjoy about having sex and the pleasure they derive from sex. Through a qualitative interview study of a diverse, community sample of sexual assault survivors, we identified several themes around survivors’ sexual pleasure. Prior to the assault, survivors mentioned limited pleasure due to men not being interested in giving them sexual pleasure, but they also enjoyed the emotional connections felt during sex. Some survivors mentioned impacts on their ability to enjoy sex, but this was not universal in the sample. Finally, queer survivors mentioned feeling more sexual pleasure with women, and survivors found empowerment in exploring what they liked about having sex and sexual pleasure with current partners who supported them emotionally. We discuss the importance of a focus on the sexual pleasure of survivors from a sex-positive, rather than a “high risk”, framework in future research, along with suggestions to improve sexual health interventions with survivors.
      PubDate: 2024-07-02
       
  • Gendered Failures and Achievements in Women’s Experiences of
           Men’s Orgasms

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      Abstract: Abstract Previous research has shown that women’s orgasms function as a masculinity achievement for men. Less clear is whether men’s orgasms function as a gendered achievement for women. In the present study, we explored this question via an experimental design by randomly assigning 440 women (M age = 32.29, SD age = 11.91) to read a vignette in which they imagined that an attractive man either did or did not orgasm during a sexual encounter with them. The women then rated their feelings of achievement, failure, femininity, and masculinity in response to the scenario along with how much they would attribute the situation to themselves or to the man partner. Results showed that women experienced men’s orgasm presence as a femininity achievement and men’s orgasm absence as a femininity failure. There were lesser impacts on women’s feelings of masculinity. Feelings of achievement and failure were stronger for women who attributed the scenario more strongly to themselves. Further, greater sexual assertiveness in general predicted stronger feelings of achievement in response to men’s orgasm presence and greater feminine gender role stress predicted stronger feelings of failure in response to men’s orgasm absence. Together, findings highlight that men’s orgasm seems to function as an achievement for women; however, the connection to femininity (which is less valued and prescribed differently compared to masculinity) denotes that men’s orgasms for women are a different gendered experience with different stakes compared to women’s orgasms for men.
      PubDate: 2024-07-01
       
  • Women’s Experiences of Sexual Harassment and Reductions in
           Well-Being and System Justification

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      Abstract: Abstract This study examines the impact of personally experiencing sexual harassment on women’s subjective well-being and perceptions of gender relations and society. We draw upon large-scale national probability panel data and utilize propensity score matching to identify (1) women who reported sexual harassment in the past year and (2) a matched control group of women who were comparable in outcome and demographic variables in the previous year but did not report sexual harassment (Nmatched pairs = 609). We then compare pre- and post-event levels of well-being and system justification across groups, including the perceived fairness of gender relations and society in general. Women who reported sexual harassment experienced significant pre-to-post declines in well-being (lower life satisfaction, higher psychological distress) and reductions in perceptions that gender relations, and broader society, are fair. Critically, these changes were significantly different than matched controls who did not show the same pre-post changes in well-being or system justification. These results provide robust evidence that sexual harassment has detrimental effects on well-being and document the previously unexamined effect of sexual harassment on women’s reduced support for the (gendered) status quo, which has important implications for social change.
      PubDate: 2024-07-01
       
  • Piecing Together Respectability: Black Women’s Reflections on
           Familial Socialization Messages

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      Abstract: Abstract The politics of respectability continues to inform the messages that Black women receive from family members across a range of experiences, from comments on their hair and body to expectations around dating and marriage. In the current study, we explored Black college women’s perspectives on the types of respectability messages they received in familial contexts from girlhood through emerging adulthood. We used Black feminist theory and consensual qualitative research methods to analyze semi-structured interview data from 48 Black college women (18–24 years old) attending predominantly White institutions. We identified four themes of respectability socialization: (a) perpetuating gendered racialized scripts, (b) policing appropriate appearance, (c) protecting virtue in a patriarchal society, and (d) promoting a “lifting as we climb’’ mentality. Our findings indicate that family members try to prepare Black women for gendered racial stereotypes and oppression by tasking them with behavior modification starting in girlhood. We consider gendered racial socialization practices in Black families that can simultaneously disrupt the pressure to reinforce respectability politics and support Black girls’ identity development, even amidst the anti-Black and misogynoiristic realities of the United States.
      PubDate: 2024-06-27
       
  • Dual-Earner Couples’ Gender Role Attitudes and Their Parental Leave
           Decisions: A Longitudinal Study of Partner Influences

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      Abstract: Abstract This study examines how men and women in heterosexual partnerships influence each other’s parental leave decisions through their gender role attitudes. We differentiate between attitudes toward women’s parental role, women’s worker role, men’s parental role, and men’s worker role, and consider the role of traditional gender ideology denoting an attitude of negatively evaluating mothers’ employment when children are young. We investigated communal traits as a potential moderator to better understand partner effects, i.e., one partner’s role attitudes affecting the other partner’s leave decision. We analyzed longitudinal data from N = 365 heterosexual, mainly German dual-earner couples, collected between pregnancy and about 18 months after the birth of their first child, using the actor-partner interdependence model. We examined mothers’ and fathers’ attitudes toward all five types of gender roles and found that both mothers and fathers were influenced in their leave decisions by their partners’ attitudes toward early maternal employment. Mothers whose partners were more traditional in this regard took longer leaves; fathers whose partners were more traditional took shorter leaves. Fathers’ leave length was also influenced by their partners’ attitudes toward men’s worker role, with more traditional attitudes resulting in shorter leaves. The latter relationship was moderated by fathers’ communal traits, such that more communal fathers were more strongly influenced by their female partners’ attitudes. Overall, this research extends the understanding of mutual influences and decision-making dynamics in dual-earner couples in the early family phase.
      PubDate: 2024-06-25
       
  • Is Online Disinhibition Related to Cyberdating Abuse Perpetration through
           Moral Disengagement' The Moderating Role of Gender, Sexism, and
           Cybervictimization

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      Abstract: Abstract Evidence suggests that online disinhibition enhances the likelihood of perpetrating cyberbullying by increasing moral disengagement; however, these psychological mechanisms have not been examined in the context of cyberdating abuse. In the current study (N = 362), we examined whether online disinhibition would predict more frequent direct cyberaggression toward a partner through greater moral disengagement, and explored the moderating role of gender, sexism, and past experiences of cyberdating abuse victimization. The results indicated that online disinhibition was positively correlated with moral disengagement, which in turn predicted more frequent direct cyberaggression toward partners. In addition, participants' gender and past experiences of cyberdating abuse victimization moderated this relationship: (a) more online disinhibition was associated with greater moral disengagement in men (vs. women), which in turn predicted more direct cyberaggression toward partners and (b) more online disinhibition was linked to greater moral disengagement, which in turn predicted more direct cyberaggression perpetration toward partners among individuals with frequent past victimization experiences (vs. low past victimization experiences). These findings highlight online disinhibition and moral disengagement as potential risk factors that may heighten direct cyberaggression against partners, as well as enhance our understanding of the circumstances determining its occurrence. Scholars and practitioners may use this work to develop and test psychoeducational programs to prevent cyberdating abuse through mitigating the occurrence of these disinhibiting factors in romantic.
      PubDate: 2024-06-21
       
  • Growing Up Intersex: A Thematic Analysis of Intersex Emerging Adults’
           Key Socialization Experiences in Childhood and Adolescence

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      Abstract: Abstract Socialization experiences around having an intersex variation have lasting impacts on intersex individuals’ well-being. Understanding commonalities in socialization experiences of intersex children and adolescents can inform influential figures in the lives of intersex individuals on how to provide improved support and positive socialization. Guided by a critical intersex perspective, we interviewed 28 emerging adults (18–29 years old) who identified as intersex and/or had a variation in sex characteristics about their socialization experiences in childhood and adolescence. Consultants from interACT Advocates for Intersex Youth advised throughout all stages of this project. Using reflexive thematic analysis, the coding team identified six themes throughout the interviews of key socialization experiences that contributed to these intersex emerging adults’ meaning-making around having an intersex variation growing up: (a) We Don’t Talk About This, (b) We’re All In The Dark, (c) We Could Use Some Help, (d) I Should Be Less Me, (e) My Body Isn’t Mine, and (f) I Feel Supported and Empowered. These findings highlight commonalities and intersectionality across intersex experiences as well as the need for change at multiple levels to improve the socialization experiences of intersex young people and increase support.
      PubDate: 2024-06-20
       
  • Gender-Typical Appearance in Early Childhood: Role of Parental
           Gender-Typical Appearance and Children’s Gender Similarity

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      Abstract: Abstract The emergence of gender-typical appearance in childhood appears to have important implications not only for child and adolescent social-emotional functioning but also for later working life. In the current study, we examined how parents’ gender-typical appearance and children’s gender similarity (to same- and other-gender peers) were related to young children’s gender-typical appearance. We also explored differences in these associations between boys, girls, mothers, and fathers. Home visits were conducted with 74 Dutch two-parent (mother, father) families with both a son and daughter between the ages 3–6 years (96.6% White, 2.0% Asian, 1.4% other ethnicity). The gender-typical appearance of all four family members was assessed by trained and reliable coders in the videotaped observations from the home visits. As a measure of children’s gender similarity, both parents reported on the similarity of their son and daughter to same-gender and other-gender peers. Generalized estimating equations showed that more gender-typical appearance of parents was associated with more gender-typical appearance of girls, but not of boys. No differences were found between mothers and fathers for the association between parent and child appearance. Moreover, children’s gender similarity, evident in parents’ perceived similarity of their child to peers of the same gender and dissimilarity to peers of the other gender, was associated with more gender-typical appearance in children. To conclude, both children’s gender similarity and parents’ gender-typical appearance appear to play a role in the gender-typical appearance of young children.
      PubDate: 2024-06-19
       
  • Underrepresented Rather than Misrepresented' A Content Analysis of Female
           Characters’ (non)Sexualization in Virtual Reality (VR) Games

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      Abstract: Abstract With the increasing popularity and availability of virtual reality (VR) video games, the representation of women within these immersive environments becomes crucial to explore. Although the sexualization of female characters in traditional video games has been widely studied, the sensory-rich nature of VR may introduce changes in character representations and emergent adverse outcomes. In the present study we content analyzed female characters in popular VR video games to investigate the potential underrepresentation and misrepresentation of female characters. Results demonstrated that male characters were represented four times more frequently than female characters. The underrepresentation of female characters was more severe in competitive VR games than casual VR games, however there was no significant difference in the underrepresentation of women between game genres or ESRB ratings. In addition, female characters were presented in a sexualized manner in 30% of cases. The sexualization of female characters was associated with their portrayal as physically capable, violent, or a victim. We also found that sexualization of female characters did not differ based on the type of game (casual vs. competitive), game genres, or ESRB ratings. We discussed these findings in immersive VR video games in comparison with those in traditional 2-D screen media video games.
      PubDate: 2024-06-14
       
  • Status Markers in Popular Music Across Six Countries: A Content Analysis
           of Gender, Race/Ethnicity, Genre, and Capital in Music Lyrics

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      Abstract: Abstract Music artists can be powerful sources of representation about what it means to have a high status. Previous literature has shown that artists display their high status by singing about economic factors, such as driving expensive cars. Yet, we do not know whether artists also showcase a high status in their lyrics by identifying with a particular social group and showing power via sexual objectification and subjectification. Considering the gender and ethnicity of the artists, this study analyzed 4117 popular lyrics on Spotify between 2016 and 2019 in six Western countries (US, UK, Netherlands, Australia, New Zealand, Canada). A manual analysis of the lyrics showed that almost half (46%) of the songs depicted status in terms of economic capital (e.g., wearing jewels), 26% through social capital (e.g., knowing famous people), 16% through cultural capital (e.g., drinking champagne), and 6% through sexual objectification and subjectification (e.g., showing naked bodies on expensive cars). Most of these status representations were present in rap lyrics and among Black and Brown male artists. These findings offer new evidence and theoretical insights on the diffusion of neoliberal ideals of materialism, utilitarianism, hegemonic masculinity, and objectification in music lyrics and their potential reinforcement of racial-ethnic and gender hierarchies.
      PubDate: 2024-06-13
       
  • Bisexual Women’s Meaning Making of Same-Sex Performativity: Orientation
           Towards a Heteropatriarchal Context

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      Abstract: Abstract In the present study, we aimed to understand bisexual women’s lived experiences and meaning-making with regard to same-sex performativity (SSP)– that is, heterosexual women’s engagement in public same-sex behavior such as kissing. Cisgender bisexual women (N = 187) provided qualitative descriptions of their perceptions of SSP. Two research questions guided this feminist phenomenological study: (a) How do bisexual women perceive and make sense of SSP, including women who engage in SSP' and (b) What factors influence bisexual women’s perceptions and meaning making of SSP' We found that bisexual women made sense of SSP by situating their perceptions and experiences of SSP in a heteropatriarchal context. Bisexual women perceived the link between SSP and the male gaze as challenging bisexual legitimacy and reinforcing negative stereotypes about bisexuality; nevertheless, many bisexual women were resistant to decrying SSP. Our findings reveal bisexual women’s complex interpretive work and negotiation with tensions that underpin their sense of SSP— they perceive heterosexual women’s engagement in male-oriented SSP behavior as potentially harmful, yet are reluctant to condemn this behavior and limit women’s opportunities for sexual expression. These findings highlight the need to recognize the impact of heteronormativity and gendered power dynamics on bisexual and heterosexual women’s experiences, embodiment, and expressions of sexuality.
      PubDate: 2024-06-12
       
  • Identifying Pathways to the Incel Community and Where to Intervene: A
           Qualitative Study with Former Incels

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      Abstract: Abstract The term “Incel” refers to a group of boys and/or men who feel that they have been unjustly denied relationships and sex with women due to an unfair social system, and some Incels have committed violence based on these beliefs. More broadly, self-identified Incels face social and mental health issues and can hold negative beliefs about women and other marginalized genders, which may lead them to harm both themselves and others. In this research, we seek to understand the experiences that may lead men to become Incels. We interviewed 21 people who identified as former Incels about their experiences joining and leaving Incel groups, with the goal of understanding how men find their way into these groups, and how resources might be adapted to prevent young men from becoming Incels. A reflexive thematic analysis generated two major themes with subthemes. The first theme, Seeking help online for struggles meeting masculinity norms, had three subthemes that reflected the specific struggles being experienced: I’m a loser because I can’t get women, I’m all alone, and I have no value. The second theme, Down the rabbit hole: Finding help online from the Incel community, had three subthemes that reflected the several ways they were validated by the community: It’s not your fault, You belong here, and You are special. These findings highlight specific pathways that lead men to Incel communities and why they join them, and potential points for intervention that center pressures for boys and men to conform to masculine norms.
      PubDate: 2024-06-12
       
  • Parents’ Pre-Pandemic Benevolent Sexism Predicted Lower Parenting Strain
           and Psychological Distress During COVID-19 Lockdowns

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      Abstract: Abstract One way that benevolent sexism contributes to gender inequality is by offering wellbeing benefits to women and men who fulfil idealised gender roles, such as taking on differentiated parenting roles and priorities. Yet, how benevolent sexism relates to parenting outcomes has received little attention. Extending a pre-pandemic study of heterosexual couples with young children (N = 175 dyads), we provide initial tests of the associations between benevolent sexism, parenting strain, and psychological distress. We assess whether benevolent sexism predicted parenting strain and psychological distress during two lockdowns at the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic (Lockdown 2020) and 17 months later (Lockdown 2021). Accounting for pre-pandemic psychological distress, actors’ and partners’ higher pre-pandemic benevolent sexism was associated with lower psychological distress, and these associations were accounted for by lower parenting strain during lockdowns. However, the associations between mothers’ benevolent sexism and parenting outcomes dissipated at Lockdown 2021, suggesting that any protective benefits benevolent sexism offers to women are precarious. These results provide novel, preliminary evidence for the palliative function of benevolent sexism in the parenting domain, and advance understanding on why benevolent sexism is appealing and helps sustain gender inequalities.
      PubDate: 2024-06-11
       
  • Undoing Gendered Identities' Centrality and Meanings of Parental and Work
           Identities in Semi-Traditional, Equal-Sharing and Role-Reversed Couples

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      Abstract: Abstract This mixed-methods study explored the centrality and meanings of men’s and women’s parental and work-related identities by comparing semi-traditional, equal-sharing, and role-reversed couples. Quantitative analysis involved 2,813 British parents (1,380 men, 1,433 women) who were primary caregivers, primary breadwinners, or equal sharers with at least one child aged 11 or under. Qualitative analysis drew on 60 in-depth interviews with 10 couples from each of the three groups. Results indicated that the centrality of parental and work identities varied by role rather than gender, as both male and female caregivers reported less central work identities and more central parental identities compared to breadwinners and equal-sharers. Equal-sharers and role-reversers were characterized by women’s central work identity and men’s low centrality of work identity. In these couples, a `half and half` parenting ideology underlined the construction of mothering and fathering as equivalent interchangeable identities, each forming only one half of a child’s parenting. Intertwining their maternal identity with an equivalent construction of their partners’ identity allowed women to reconcile a good mother ideal with central work identities, by redefining mothering as a responsibility for only half of the caregiving.
      PubDate: 2024-06-10
       
  • Flourishing in a Binary World: The Creation of Transgender Alternative
           Narratives

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      Abstract: Abstract The master narrative of gender within contemporary U.S. culture is that there are two mutually exclusive categories of men and women. This leaves transgender individuals with the precarious position of creating alternative narratives in response to that master narrative. The current qualitative research study was undertaken to better understand the varieties of alternative narratives transgender individuals create for themselves. Thematic life story interviews were conducted with 19 American transgender emerging adults, asking them to reflect on their experiences with gender throughout their lives. A discursive thematic analysis resulted in three themes: persistence of the binary, rejection of the binary, and pressures of transnormativity. Binary expectations persisted through gender binary policing, binary requirements of passing, and a lack of options within the binary. Participants rejected the binary by discovering transgender concepts and role models and subverting other people’s binary expectations. Participants also felt pressure to follow a particular alternative narrative, transnormativity, from gatekeepers both within and outside the trans community. However, despite the cultural power of these master and alternative narratives persisting, our participants demonstrated a wealth of creativity and strength by searching for information that fit their gender experiences, creating supportive communities with caring others, and disrupting this cultural power by flourishing as their full gendered selves.
      PubDate: 2024-06-04
       
  • Same Place, Different Worlds: An Emergent Fit Analysis of the Experiences
           of Iranian Trans Women and Trans Men

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      Abstract: Abstract Iran's cultural, social, and historical characteristics contribute to different experiences for Iranian trans women and trans men compared with their peers in other countries where gender diversity and trans rights are acknowledged. We conducted an emergent fit analysis based on past grounded theory studies of Iranian trans women's and men's identity development to explore and compare the diverse gender developmental milestones of these groups and the underlying causes and mechanisms associated with any observed differences. In this study, emergent fit analysis revealed that trans women's and trans men's experiences are comparable across several general categories, but markedly diverge in many specific emergent details, including different child-parent relationships, school years experiences, peer and romantic relationships, social policy implications, gender taboos during different developmental stages, their experiences after transition/surgery, and legal and social status. Policymakers, academics, clinical associates, and medical professionals not specifically trained in working with gender-diverse populations and those who may not be familiar with Iran’s cultural context can use these findings to enhance their professional knowledge and, as a result, implement policies and practices that acknowledge and support the diverse gendered experiences of trans people.
      PubDate: 2024-05-30
       
  • Gendering Narcissism: Different Roots and Different Routes to
           Intimate Partner Violence

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      Abstract: Abstract Research has only recently begun to explore narcissism in women using gender-inclusive assessments that move beyond traditional male-centric frameworks associated with grandiosity. Such work indicates gender differences in the onset and expression of narcissism, and risk factors of partner violence perpetration. The pathways to offending in narcissism may therefore be gendered but have yet to be tested. In this study, we investigated the mediating role of grandiose and vulnerable narcissism in the association between childhood exposure to maltreatment and later partner violence perpetration in adulthood, and the moderating role of gender in these associations. Participants (N = 328) completed scales of grandiose and vulnerable narcissism, perceived parenting styles, and physical/sexual and psychological abuse perpetration. Results indicated gender differences in grandiose (men higher) and vulnerable (women higher) narcissism. Retrospective reports of having mothers who were caring was negatively related to grandiose narcissism for men and vulnerable narcissism for women. Father overprotectiveness was positively related to grandiose narcissism in men. Self-reported vulnerable narcissism was related to greater perpetration of physical/sexual and psychological IPV in women, whereas grandiose narcissism was associated with greater perpetration of psychological IPV in men. For women, but not men, mother care was associated with reduced psychological IPV via lower vulnerable narcissism levels. These findings inform gendered risk markers of narcissism and perpetration of violence for intervention efforts.
      PubDate: 2024-05-29
       
  • Sex Wars and TERF Wars: The Divisiveness of Who is Included in Feminism

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      Abstract: Abstract An increasing number of people identify as feminists, but there is disagreement about whom and what feminism should be fighting for. Using a multi-method approach, across three studies (total N = 3,387), we examine (1) disagreements in today’s feminist movement and how these disagreements come together to form different ideological groups as well as (2) psychological variables associated with different feminist beliefs and ideologies. In doing so we establish a nuanced picture of contemporary feminism in the UK and the US. Study 1 used open-response data to identify topics on which today’s feminists disagree. Study 2 used exploratory factor analyses to examine how views on these topics hang together, resulting in eight feminist beliefs scales. Finally, Study 3 used cluster analysis to determine what ideological groups of feminists exist in quasi-representative samples from the US and the UK and explored the associations of these beliefs with relevant psychological constructs. Transgender issues, sex work, and the importance of marginalized perspectives were the most polarizing issues across studies, highlighting that feminists are more divided on the issue of who feminism should fight for, than what feminism should fight for. These studies show the heterogeneity of feminist ideologies and the continued barriers to a truly inclusive and intersectional feminist movement.
      PubDate: 2024-05-27
       
  • Relating Profiles of Ethnocultural Gender Roles to Mental Health and
           Help-Seeking Attitudes among Latina Women

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      Abstract: Abstract Latina women report higher levels of psychological distress relative to Latino men (Fortuna et al. in J Clin Psychiatry 68(4):572–581, 2007; Wassertheil-Smoller et al. in Ann Epidemiol 24(11):822–830, 2014). Despite the prevalence and chronicity of mental health concerns among Latina women, rates of help-seeking are relatively low (Division of Diversity & Health Equity in Mental health disparities: Hispanics and Latinos [Fact sheet]. American Psychiatric Association, 2017). In the current study, we drew from the cultural influences on mental health model (Hwang et al. in Clin Psychol Rev 28(2):211–227, 2008) to explore the extent to which Latina women’s perceptions of their ethnocultural gender role relates to their mental health and help-seeking attitudes. To achieve this objective, we first conducted a latent profile analysis to examine the potential for an empirically supported taxonomy of Latina women’s ethnocultural gender role based upon their reported endorsement of traditional ethnic values and mainstream gender role attitudes. Then, we explored how profiles of Latina women’s ethnocultural gender role, as revealed by the taxonomy, may be associated with women’s mental health and help-seeking attitudes. Results revealed four profiles of Latina women’s ethnocultural gender role (i.e., Integrationist, Separationist, Assimilationist, and Marginalist) that were associated with women’s help-seeking attitudes, but not their mental health. Women in the Integrationist and Assimilationist profiles reported more positive help-seeking attitudes compared to women in the other two profiles. The implications of this study include advancing our understanding of Latina women’s cultural identity, mental health, and help-seeking attitudes.
      PubDate: 2024-05-22
       
  • Men’s Perception of Women’s Passive Sexual Responses Impacts Their
           Decision-Making During Simulated Hookups

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      Abstract: Abstract A woman’s passive response to a sexual advance can be misconstrued by men as signaling consent when it does not. Characterological factors and situational variances may further shape how men perceive a woman’s passive response and impact their sexual decisions during hookups, leading to unwanted sexual experiences for the partner. A sample of men (n = 357) completed first-person factorial vignettes depicting a sexual hookup in which a woman reacts to their partner’s sexual advance passively, either with or without signs of tension. Men were asked to rate their perceptions of consent and their hypothetical likelihood of engaging in different sexual behaviors, and completed assessments that were used to extract hostile masculinity and impersonal sexual orientation factors. Consent perceptions had strong effects on men’s sexual decision-making and mediated situational influences (e.g., passive response type), impersonal sexual orientation, and, to some extent, hostile masculinity; and hostile masculinity had strong direct effects on sexual decision-making irrespective of consent perceptions. Men can discriminate between passive responses and appear to calibrate their decision-making according to their perceptions of consent. Some men, however, are prone to perceive consent in passive responding irrespective of the situation, with others inclined to continue or advance intimacy without considering the woman’s level of consent.
      PubDate: 2024-05-09
       
 
JournalTOCs
School of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
Heriot-Watt University
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  Subjects -> SOCIAL SCIENCES (Total: 1648 journals)
    - BIRTH CONTROL (22 journals)
    - CHILDREN AND YOUTH (262 journals)
    - FOLKLORE (30 journals)
    - MATRIMONY (16 journals)
    - MEN'S INTERESTS (16 journals)
    - MEN'S STUDIES (90 journals)
    - SEXUALITY (56 journals)
    - SOCIAL SCIENCES (937 journals)
    - WOMEN'S INTERESTS (44 journals)
    - WOMEN'S STUDIES (175 journals)

SEXUALITY (56 journals)

Showing 1 - 46 of 46 Journals sorted alphabetically
AIDS and Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
AIDS Research and Therapy     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
Archives of Sexual Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
BMJ Sexual & Reproductive Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Cadernos de Gênero e Diversidade     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Cadernos Pagu     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Culture, Health & Sexuality: An International Journal for Research, Intervention and Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Genre, sexualité & société     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
HIV/AIDS - Research and Palliative Care     Open Access   (Followers: 18)
Human Reproduction Update     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
International Journal of Transgender Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Bisexuality     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Black Sexuality and Relationships     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Gay & Lesbian Issues in Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Gay & Lesbian Psychotherapy     Partially Free   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Gay & Lesbian Social Services     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of GLBT Family Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Homosexuality     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Lesbian Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of LGBT Health Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of LGBT Issues in Counseling     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of LGBT Youth     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Psychosexual Health     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Sex & Marital Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Sex Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Sexual & Reproductive Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Psychology & Sexuality     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
QED : A Journal in GLBTQ Worldmaking     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Queer Cats Journal of LGBTQ Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Raheema     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Religion and Gender     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
Screen Bodies : An Interdisciplinary Journal of Experience, Perception, and Display     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Sex Roles     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Sexes     Open Access  
Sextant : Revue de recherche interdisciplinaire sur le genre et la sexualité     Open Access  
Sexual Addiction & Compulsivity: The Journal of Treatment & Prevention     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Sexual and Relationship Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Sexualities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Sexuality & Culture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Sexuality and Disability     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Sexuality Research and Social Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Sexualization, Media, & Society     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Simone de Beauvoir Studies     Full-text available via subscription  
Theology & Sexuality     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Transgender Health     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Whatever : A Transdisciplinary Journal of Queer Theories and Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
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School of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
Heriot-Watt University
Edinburgh, EH14 4AS, UK
Email: journaltocs@hw.ac.uk
Tel: +00 44 (0)131 4513762
 


Your IP address: 44.200.194.255
 
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