Subjects -> ADVERTISING AND PUBLIC RELATIONS (Total: 23 journals)
Showing 1 - 8 of 8 Journals sorted alphabetically
Advertising & Society Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Book History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 203)
Design and Culture : The Journal of the Design Studies Forum     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
Foundations and Trends® in Marketing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
International Journal of Advertising     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 33)
International Journal of Complexity in Leadership and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31)
International Journal of Market Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Journal of Advertising     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
Journal of Advertising Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 27)
Journal of Consumer Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 45)
Journal of Current Issues & Research in Advertising     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Interactive Advertising     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
Journal of International Marketing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 30)
Journal of Marketing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 60)
Journal of Marketing Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 75)
Journal of Public Policy & Marketing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
Journal of Public Relations Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Opinião Pública     Open Access  
Place Branding and Public Diplomacy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Public Relations Inquiry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Public Relations Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
RAE-eletrônica     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Revista Internacional de Relaciones Públicas     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Young Consumers: Insight and Ideas for Responsible Marketers     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Similar Journals
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Journal of Public Policy & Marketing
Journal Prestige (SJR): 1.328
Citation Impact (citeScore): 2
Number of Followers: 19  
 
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
ISSN (Print) 0743-9156 - ISSN (Online) 1547-7207
Published by American Marketing Association Homepage  [4 journals]
  • The Future of Marketing Analytics and Public Policy

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      Authors: Brennan Davis, Dhruv Grewal, Steve Hamilton
      Pages: 447 - 452
      Abstract: Journal of Public Policy & Marketing, Volume 40, Issue 4, Page 447-452, October 2021.

      Citation: Journal of Public Policy & Marketing
      PubDate: 2021-10-01T08:55:21Z
      DOI: 10.1177/07439156211042372
      Issue No: Vol. 40, No. 4 (2021)
       
  • Treatment Effect Heterogeneity in Randomized Field Experiments: A
           Methodological Comparison and Public Policy Implications

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      Authors: Yixing Chen, Shrihari Sridhar, Vikas Mittal
      Pages: 457 - 462
      Abstract: Journal of Public Policy & Marketing, Volume 40, Issue 4, Page 457-462, October 2021.

      Citation: Journal of Public Policy & Marketing
      PubDate: 2021-10-01T08:55:40Z
      DOI: 10.1177/07439156211032751
      Issue No: Vol. 40, No. 4 (2021)
       
  • Sustainable by Design: Choice Architecture and the Carbon Footprint of
           Grocery Shopping

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      Authors: Luca A. Panzone, Alistair Ulph, Denis Hilton, Ilse Gortemaker, Ibrahim Adebisi Tajudeen
      Pages: 463 - 486
      Abstract: Journal of Public Policy & Marketing, Volume 40, Issue 4, Page 463-486, October 2021.
      The increase in global temperatures requires substantial reductions in the greenhouse emissions from consumer choices. The authors use an experimental incentive-compatible online supermarket to analyze the effect of a carbon-based choice architecture, which presents commodities to customers in high, medium, and low carbon footprint groups, in reducing the carbon footprints of grocery baskets. The authors relate this choice architecture to two other policy interventions: (1) a bonus-malus carbon tax on all grocery products and (2) moral goal priming using an online banner noting the moral importance of reducing one’s carbon footprint. Participants shopped from their home in an online store containing 612 existing food products and 39 existing nonfood products for which the authors had carbon footprint data over three successive weeks, with the interventions occurring in the second and third weeks. Choice architecture reduced participants’ carbon footprint significantly in the third week by reducing the proportion of choices made in the high-carbon aisle. The carbon tax reduced carbon footprint in both weeks, primarily by reducing overall spend. The goal-priming banner led to a small reduction in carbon footprint in the second week only. Thus, the design of the marketplace plays an important role in achieving the policy objective of reducing greenhouse gas emissions.
      Citation: Journal of Public Policy & Marketing
      PubDate: 2021-10-01T08:53:42Z
      DOI: 10.1177/07439156211008898
      Issue No: Vol. 40, No. 4 (2021)
       
  • Do Consumers Order More Calories in a Meal with a Diet or Regular Soft
           Drink' An Empirical Investigation Using Large-Scale Field Data

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      Authors: Sina Ghotbi, Tirtha Dhar, Charles B. Weinberg
      Pages: 521 - 537
      Abstract: Journal of Public Policy & Marketing, Volume 40, Issue 4, Page 521-537, October 2021.
      Diet carbonated soft drinks (CSDs) were introduced to help consumers lower caloric intake. However, critics suggest that these drinks can provide an excuse to consume more calories, a so-called “Big Mac and Diet Coke” mentality that is consistent with behavioral theories such as moral licensing (e.g., combining a healthy eating choice with an indulgent, less healthy one). Using individual-level food and drink consumer panel data from a major fast-food restaurant chain, the authors empirically examine meals with a regular CSD versus a diet CSD. Results after controlling for drink size and demographics show that consumers generally do not order higher total calories from a meal with a diet CSD; rather, the authors find significant reductions in calorie count, suggesting that within a single meal, diet CSDs can help consumers unwilling to stop drinking CSDs to reduce calories. So, despite popular beliefs to the contrary, policy makers can consider diet CSD availability as a “calorie-reduction” strategy to lower calorie consumption within a meal.
      Citation: Journal of Public Policy & Marketing
      PubDate: 2021-10-01T08:56:04Z
      DOI: 10.1177/07439156211014900
      Issue No: Vol. 40, No. 4 (2021)
       
  • How Communications That Portray Unhealthy Food Consumption Reduce Food
           Intake Among Dieters

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      Authors: Mia M. Birau, Diogo Hildebrand, Carolina O.C. Werle
      Abstract: Journal of Public Policy & Marketing, Ahead of Print.
      Both regulatory agencies and nonprofit organizations seek to understand how various tactics and appeals contained in food and public health advertisements might influence the food intake of an increasingly dieting-conscious population. This article addresses this important issue by examining how consumers who are concerned with their diets react to rich images of unhealthy food consumption. Results of two experiments show that exposure to food advertisements containing unhealthy food consumption imagery reduces food intake among consumers chronically concerned with dieting, whereas a third experiment shows a similar decrease in intended consumption when a public health advertisement portrays the consumption of unhealthy food. These findings in turn offer guidelines for maximizing the effectiveness of messages that attempt to promote healthy eating habits. In addition, this research provides theoretical contributions to the self-control and mental imagery research domains, which have public policy implications for regulatory agencies and nonprofit organizations.
      Citation: Journal of Public Policy & Marketing
      PubDate: 2021-10-09T04:17:56Z
      DOI: 10.1177/07439156211019035
       
  • Framings of Food Waste: How Food System Stakeholders Are Responsibilized
           in Public Policy Debate

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      Authors: Nina Mesiranta, Elina Närvänen, Malla Mattila
      Abstract: Journal of Public Policy & Marketing, Ahead of Print.
      Food waste is a global sustainability issue that demands that multiple stakeholders participate in solving it. This article examines how different food system stakeholders are held responsible in the policy debate related to food waste reduction. The study adopts a framing approach, paying attention to the construction and negotiation of what is going on in the food waste–related public policy debate. The data consist of documents generated as a result of food policy development processes in Finland. The authors identify four framings—eco-efficiency, solidarity, safety, and appreciation—within which the issue of food waste is presented differently and different stakeholders responsibilized. The framings reveal the nature of food waste as a boundary object, a flexible and open-ended object that has different context-dependent meanings. The study extends marketing literature on responsibilization by investigating several stakeholders beyond consumers. Additionally, considering food waste a boundary object sheds light on how stakeholders, even those with conflicting interests, can debate policy measures collaboratively. Finally, the authors outline policy implications related to each framing.
      Citation: Journal of Public Policy & Marketing
      PubDate: 2021-09-21T06:02:57Z
      DOI: 10.1177/07439156211005722
       
  • Missing the Mark: The Long-Term Impacts of the Federal Trade
           Commission’s Red Flag Initiative to Reduce Deceptive Weight Loss Product
           Advertising

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      Authors: Mara Schein, Rosemary J. Avery, Matthew D. Eisenberg
      Abstract: Journal of Public Policy & Marketing, Ahead of Print.
      This study examines the long-term efficacy of the Federal Trade Commission’s (FTC’s) 2003 Red Flag Initiative, which aimed to curb the prevalence of deceptive claims in over-the-counter weight loss product advertising. The principal component of this effort was the FTC’s promotion of voluntary guidelines which encouraged media outlets to screen advertisements for the seven deceptive (“Red Flag”) claims prior to publication. By analyzing the content of English-language advertisement airings appearing in nationally circulated print magazines and on television programs between 2010 and 2011, this study evaluates the success of the Red Flag Initiative as a long-term regulatory solution to deceptive advertising in this market. This study finds that the FTC’s voluntary initiative failed to halt the dissemination of deceptive claims during the time period analyzed. In response to the FTC’s actions, manufacturers appear to have engaged in offsetting behaviors and employed other creative content to convey similar deceptive information in their advertising, allowing them to avoid scrutiny while continuing to mislead consumers.
      Citation: Journal of Public Policy & Marketing
      PubDate: 2021-05-05T09:24:54Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0743915620984116
       
  • Fooled by Success: How, Why, and When Disclosures Fail or Work in Mutual
           Fund Ads

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      Authors: Joseph M. Johnson, Gerard J. Tellis, Noah VanBergen
      Abstract: Journal of Public Policy & Marketing, Ahead of Print.
      Mutual fund advertisers often highlight their funds’ past returns, albeit with a disclosure mandated by the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC). To ascertain whether the SEC disclosure is effective and how it could be improved, the authors conduct seven experiments regarding individuals’ choice of mutual funds with ads touting past success plus disclosures. These experiments lead to several findings: First, current SEC disclosures do not work because investors fall prey to the “hot hand” bias and believe that past performance trends will continue. Second, although investors comprehend the content of the SEC disclosure, they misapply it. Third, an alternate stronger, less ambiguous disclosure effectively attenuates investors’ preferences for funds with longer (vs. shorter) performance runs. Fourth, only a disclosure that directly relates to the beliefs that give rise to the hot hand bias overcomes peoples’ tendency to chase returns. Fifth, these findings generalize to the real estate context. This is the only research that shows that when the SEC disclosure found in mutual fund ads is pitted against the hot hand bias, the hot hand wins out. However, a strongly worded disclosure has some success at debiasing individuals. The authors also discuss implications for policy makers, practitioners, and consumers.
      Citation: Journal of Public Policy & Marketing
      PubDate: 2021-01-25T10:00:32Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0743915620970905
       
  • Big Data, Marketing Analytics, and Public Policy: Implications for Health
           Care

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      Authors: Praveen K. Kopalle, Donald R. Lehmann
      First page: 453
      Abstract: Journal of Public Policy & Marketing, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Public Policy & Marketing
      PubDate: 2021-07-02T09:32:04Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0743915621999031
       
  • “Get a £10 Free Bet Every Week!”—Gambling Advertising on Twitter:
           Volume, Content, Followers, Engagement and Regulatory Compliance

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      Authors: Raffaello Rossi, Agnes Nairn, Josh Smith, Christopher Inskip
      First page: 487
      Abstract: Journal of Public Policy & Marketing, Ahead of Print.
      The internet raises substantial challenges for policy makers in regulating gambling harm. The proliferation of gambling advertising on Twitter is one such challenge. However, the sheer scale renders it extremely difficult to investigate using conventional techniques. In this article, the authors present three U.K. Twitter gambling advertising studies using both big data analytics and manual content analysis to explore the volume and content of gambling ads, the age and engagement of followers, and compliance with U.K. advertising regulations. They analyze 890,000 organic ads from 417 accounts along with data on 620,000 followers and 457,000 engagements (replies and retweets). They find that approximately 41,000 U.K. children follow Twitter gambling accounts, and that two-thirds of gambling advertising tweets fail to fully comply with regulations. Ads for e-sports gambling are markedly different from those for traditional gambling (such as on soccer, casinos, and lotteries) and appear to have strong appeal for children, with 28% of engagements with e-sports gambling ads coming from users under 16 years old. The authors make six policy recommendations: spotlight e-sports gambling advertising, create new social media–specific regulations, revise regulation on content appealing to children, use technology to block users under 18 years from seeing gambling ads, require ad labeling of organic gambling tweets, and deploy better enforcement.
      Citation: Journal of Public Policy & Marketing
      PubDate: 2021-07-02T09:33:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0743915621999674
       
  • Power and the Tweet: How Viral Messaging Conveys Political Advantage

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      Authors: Kellie Crow, Ashish S. Galande, Mathew Chylinski, Frank Mathmann
      First page: 505
      Abstract: Journal of Public Policy & Marketing, Ahead of Print.
      Researchers are increasingly confronting the need to examine the impacts of social media on democratic discourse. Analyzing 55,560 tweets from the official Twitter accounts of the Democratic and Republican Parties in the United States, the authors examine approaches used by political parties to encourage sharing of their content within the contemporary political divide. They show that tweets sent by the Republican Party are more likely to be predominant in the language of assessment and that tweets predominant in the language of assessment lead to more retweets. Further, this effect is reduced as political parties gain control of successive branches of government because successive increases in political power create fewer impediments to the implementation of a party’s political agenda. As impediments to action are reduced, so is regulatory fit for assessment-oriented language. Goal pursuit language shared on Twitter therefore reveals distinct approaches to obtaining and wielding power across the U.S. political system and constitutes an important tool for public policy makers to use in successfully conducting policy debates.
      Citation: Journal of Public Policy & Marketing
      PubDate: 2021-07-14T09:24:42Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0743915621999036
       
  • Using Analytics to Gain Insights on U.S. Prescription Drug Prices: An
           Inductive Analysis

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      Authors: Kathleen Iacocca, Beth Vallen
      First page: 538
      Abstract: Journal of Public Policy & Marketing, Ahead of Print.
      Using data scraping techniques to gather data from a variety of previously disjointed sources—some proprietary and some publicly available—this research applies the analytical techniques of data visualization and machine learning to (1) gain exploratory insights into the drivers of prescription drug list prices and (2) test how well these variables impact prices directly and interact to predict pricing. Specifically, this inductive analysis considers characteristics related to the brand (i.e., manufacturer, brand/generic classification), product attributes (i.e., dosing levels, amount of active ingredient), the condition for which the drug is recommended (i.e., therapeutic class, subclass, and pricing tier), and market factors (i.e., number of drugs in class and approval year). Through these analytic analyses, the authors seek to cut through some of the opacity of pharmaceutical drug list prices to consider the drivers of drug prices, evaluate how these insights might drive marketplace and policy solutions, and spark future research inquiries in this area.
      Citation: Journal of Public Policy & Marketing
      PubDate: 2021-05-18T03:03:08Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0743915621993173
       
  • The Role of Patient Satisfaction in Hospitals’ Medicare
           Reimbursements

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      Authors: Lu Liu, Dinesh K. Gauri, Rupinder P. Jindal
      First page: 558
      Abstract: Journal of Public Policy & Marketing, Ahead of Print.
      Medicare uses a pay-for-performance program to reimburse hospitals. One of the key input measures in the performance formula is patient satisfaction with their hospital care. Physicians and hospitals, however, have raised concerns regarding questions related to patient satisfaction with pain management during hospitalization. They report feeling pressured to prescribe opioids to alleviate pain and boost satisfaction survey scores for higher reimbursements. This overprescription of opioids has been cited as a cause of current opioid crisis in the United States. Due to these concerns, Medicare stopped using pain management questions as inputs in its payment formula. The authors collected multiyear data from six diverse data sources, employed propensity score matching to obtain comparable groups, and estimated difference-in-difference models to show that, in fact, pain management was the only measure to improve in response to the pay-for-performance system. No other input measure showed significant improvement. Thus, removing pain management from the formula may weaken the effectiveness of the Hospital Value-Based Purchasing Program at improving patient satisfaction, which is one of the key goals of the program. The authors suggest two divergent paths for Medicare to make the program more effective.
      Citation: Journal of Public Policy & Marketing
      PubDate: 2021-04-20T07:39:17Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0743915620984723
       
  • Linking Marketing to Nonprofit Performance

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      Authors: Denish Shah, Morris George
      First page: 571
      Abstract: Journal of Public Policy & Marketing, Ahead of Print.
      The critical role of marketing in driving nonprofit performance has been recognized for decades. However, in practice, there has been a disturbingly weak acknowledgment and/or implementation of marketing practices across nonprofits to date. Marketing is often perceived as an avoidable and costly overhead. The issue is complicated by the fact that nonprofit performance is relatively difficult to measure and may often comprise multiple tangible and intangible outcomes with different (linear and nonlinear) functional forms. Furthermore, nonprofit performance outcomes often depend on behavioral and attitudinal changes of the target segment. The authors address these challenges by presenting a methodology to link marketing efforts to nonprofits’ mission-based performance outcome(s). The authors apply their approach with data from a large nonprofit and find empirical support for the notion that marketing can play a pivotal and significant role in improving nonprofits’ mission-based performance outcomes. The findings help present a strong case for nonprofit leaders and policy makers to fund and treat marketing as a critical investment to drive nonprofit entities’ performance.
      Citation: Journal of Public Policy & Marketing
      PubDate: 2021-03-04T03:52:33Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0743915620978538
       
 
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