Subjects -> ADVERTISING AND PUBLIC RELATIONS (Total: 23 journals)
Showing 1 - 8 of 8 Journals sorted alphabetically
Advertising & Society Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Book History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 203)
Design and Culture : The Journal of the Design Studies Forum     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
Foundations and Trends® in Marketing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
International Journal of Advertising     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 33)
International Journal of Complexity in Leadership and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31)
International Journal of Market Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Journal of Advertising     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
Journal of Advertising Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 27)
Journal of Consumer Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 45)
Journal of Current Issues & Research in Advertising     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Interactive Advertising     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
Journal of International Marketing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 30)
Journal of Marketing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 60)
Journal of Marketing Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 75)
Journal of Public Policy & Marketing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
Journal of Public Relations Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Opinião Pública     Open Access  
Place Branding and Public Diplomacy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Public Relations Inquiry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Public Relations Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
RAE-eletrônica     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Revista Internacional de Relaciones Públicas     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Young Consumers: Insight and Ideas for Responsible Marketers     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Similar Journals
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Public Relations Inquiry
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.392
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 10  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 2046-147X - ISSN (Online) 2046-1488
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1166 journals]
  • Book Review: Simon Moore, Public Relations and Individuality: Fate,
           Influence and Autonomy

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      Authors: Chris Galloway
      Pages: 399 - 400
      Abstract: Public Relations Inquiry, Volume 10, Issue 3, Page 399-400, September 2021.

      Citation: Public Relations Inquiry
      PubDate: 2021-10-11T05:55:15Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2046147X211038786
      Issue No: Vol. 10, No. 3 (2021)
       
  • Dealing with disappointment: How can a ‘coexisting imperatives’ view
           help us understand the unfulfilled dialogical promise of digital media

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      Authors: Andrés Shoai
      Abstract: Public Relations Inquiry, Ahead of Print.
      The association between the concept of dialogue and the expansion of digital media in public relations started as a theoretical ‘promise’ and was later followed by a feeling of disappointment. This article argues that the dialogic promise of new media was in great measure a consequence of a well-established belief according to which the field was rapidly moving from a ‘functional’ to a ‘cocreational’ approach, whereas in fact both cocreational and functional imperatives persist and coexist in complex manners that need to be disentangled. This idea is explored through a critical analysis of highly cited literature about dialogue and digital technology in public relations. Implications for future theory-building, research and practice are discussed.
      Citation: Public Relations Inquiry
      PubDate: 2021-09-22T01:46:20Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2046147X211045630
       
  • Deep canvassing: Persuasion, ethics, democracy and activist public
           relations

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      Authors: Kristin Demetrious
      Abstract: Public Relations Inquiry, Ahead of Print.
      In the run up to the 2020 US presidential elections, some activist groups promoted the practice of ‘deep canvassing political persuasion’ as an inclusive, values-based communication strategy, to turn Trump voters favourably towards left leaning or progressive agendas. Deep canvassing emphasises non-judgemental listening to voters’ stories and emotions, in order to avoid any threat that voters may feel from ‘forms of persuasion employed by traditional political campaigns’. In current conditions, some see it as an antidote to the increased persuasive power of misinformation campaigns. This paper provides a critical description of deep canvassing and investigates its growing appeal as a persuasive activist communication practice in the US, focussing on its justification and ethical orientation. In doing so, it situates the practice as ‘activist public relations’ and discusses its context in relation to democratic models. The paper will field the proposition that deep canvassing should be situated within a broader and more robust discussion of democracy, discourse and power to fully understand its ethical and social implications. This study of contemporary communication in the US contexts will shed light on democratic political cultures and interrelationships of power and language between civil society, business and government that support their distribution and interpretation.
      Citation: Public Relations Inquiry
      PubDate: 2021-07-20T08:58:25Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2046147X211033838
       
  • Strategic problematization of sustainability reframing dissent in
           strategic communication for transformation

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      Authors: Franzisca Weder
      Abstract: Public Relations Inquiry, Ahead of Print.
      Involving stakeholders in organizational decisions is essential in the present sustainability movement, associated with the social license to operate and specific forms of communication in, from and about organizations with an impact orientation. This paper introduces a concept of strategic problematization of sustainability for transformation as innovative approach to Public Relations (PR), acknowledging the plurality of agonistic voices in stakeholder engagement processes in social, cultural and environmental transformations and challenging the normative concept of dialogue and solution- and consensus-oriented approaches to date. The article discusses the transformative potential of PR by reframing dissent and introducing problematization as ability to agonize and, therefore, as key process of constructive strategic communication for sustainable development. Three conversational procedures in water (scarcity) management on a local, national and international level were chosen to explore the potential of strategic problematization in relation to sustainability as normative framework of today’s society. The implications of the case studies and the conceptual framework expand existing engagement theories with a critical perspective and manifest the transformative potential of PR for a sustainable future.
      Citation: Public Relations Inquiry
      PubDate: 2021-06-23T11:59:26Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2046147X211026857
       
  • “Recovery warriors”: The National Eating Disorders Association’s
           online community and rhetorical vision

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      Authors: Sarah A. Aghazadeh
      Abstract: Public Relations Inquiry, Ahead of Print.
      Mental health advocacy organizations play an important role in mitigating stigma and questioning the social norms that can create negative health outcomes. This essay explores how a U.S. advocacy organization attempted to facilitate shared meaning about a stigmatized health issue with its online community via rhetorical vision, or narrative that connects people in shared reality. Through the lens of symbolic convergence theory (SCT), a fantasy theme analysis of the National Eating Disorders Association’s (NEDA) social media messages and comments uncovered a recovery warrior metaphor that framed eating disorder recovery as a heroic journey. The analysis describes potential reasons why NEDA would attempt to foster a rhetorical vision informed by a warrior narrative, how it used warriors as a cue to facilitate vision, and the tensions within the community that expose the evolution and limitations of recovery warriors to constitute a rhetorical vision and community. Theoretical implications are offered at the intersections of public relations and SCT. These implications provide a roadmap for advocacy organizations attempting to build symbolic community and shared narratives online in the context of stigmatized health conditions while also interrogating organizational power to shape rhetorical visions.
      Citation: Public Relations Inquiry
      PubDate: 2021-05-12T11:33:43Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2046147X211014083
       
  • Silencing the virus' Government communication and MMR vaccination
           campaigns – the Australian case

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      Authors: Roumen Dimitrov
      Abstract: Public Relations Inquiry, Ahead of Print.
      In this paper I analyse a series of Australian MMR (measles-mumpsrubella) vaccination campaigns and policies from the last decade. Using the Bruno Latour’s Actor Network Theory (ATN), I locate human and non-human mediators – including the virus and vaccine – in the complex pro-vaccination alliance led by government campaigners. I identify the vaccine hesitant parents – a large group that ‘sits on the fence’ between the ‘vaccine confident’ and ‘vaccine refusing’ parents – as the main target of pro-vaccination campaigns. PR literature on pro-vaccination campaigns has applied ATN to the independence of the media as network agents. This paper contributes with the problematisation of several more actors such as the health workers, medical experts and the vaccine hesitant parents themselves. Even when they are keen members of a pro-vaccination network, they cannot be taken for granted. This is where understanding of stigma, silence and voice helps. To align their group interests and discourses, government should know how to communicate strategically – including how to communicate indirectly, avoiding stigma and keeping certain internal affinities and communicative distances intact. In conclusion, I make suggestions about strategic communication in pro-vaccination campaigns. Communication of statistical risks and side effects should be central. It is a winning strategy because it establishes a more credible balance between individual rights and collective obligations in achieving herd immunity. And mandating vaccination cannot replace communication. Research shows that legislating compulsory vaccination may have short-term and relatively small effects. They are almost negligible in the long run. Mandate may trigger compliance, but it also causes anger and mistrust. Mandating vaccine has negative side effects. It punishes with economic and cultural sanctions the socially disadvantaged, who are not active refusers. It also has the opposite effect on vaccine hesitant parents. It does not weaken but rather strengthens their resistance to the vaccine and pushes them to the lager of antivaxxers.
      Citation: Public Relations Inquiry
      PubDate: 2021-05-12T11:33:37Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2046147X211014078
       
  • When public relations can heal: An embodied theory of silence for public
           communication

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      Authors: Cristina Archetti
      Abstract: Public Relations Inquiry, Ahead of Print.
      This article extends the conceptualization of silence in public relations beyond strategic communication. It develops a new theoretical framework to explain the mechanisms through which suffering and pain felt inside the body translate into silence, exclusion from public debate, and communication gaps in health communication. This happens through intermediate steps that involve, among others, the role of the media in the narrative construction of the body and the self. This framework advances an understanding of public relations oriented towards civil society and is based on the empirical case study of involuntary childlessness (i.e. not having children not by choice): even in the age of ubiquitous communication, despite affecting about 25% of the adult population of virtually all developed countries, this issue is shrouded in taboo and seldom heard of. The analysis makes the case for a more material, indeed embodied, approach to conceptualizing silence in public relations.
      Citation: Public Relations Inquiry
      PubDate: 2021-05-06T06:10:19Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2046147X211014095
       
  • Èèwọ̀: Cultural issues mediating the coverage of maternal and child
           healthcare experiences in the Nigerian press

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      Authors: Raheemat Adeniran, Ganiyat Tijani-Adenle, Lai Oso
      Abstract: Public Relations Inquiry, Ahead of Print.
      Although the Nigerian government appears committed to improving maternal and child healthcare (MCH), studies consistently show high maternal and child mortality in the country. Studies have also shown that a lack of awareness about symptoms and their severity prevents women from seeking medical attention until complications arise. The media can help address these issues by enlightening and empowering the public with relevant information. Unfortunately, even when published, critical information (about MCH) are usually buried in statistics and within ‘authority interviews’ which may not attract the attention of the target audience or provide them with the relevant information they need to protect the lives of women and children during pregnancy and childbirth. This study presents results from a content analysis of MCH-related contents in four national newspapers for a 12-month period and also interviews with ten health editors about the coverage of MCH-related issues in the Nigerian press. Major findings are that health journalists use statistics and stakeholder interviews mainly in producing health contents in the press because cultural ideologies around secrecy/silence about MCH experiences, the fatalistic acceptance of unfavourable outcomes as destiny, as well as patriarchy, have consistently discouraged women (and men) from sharing their MCH experiences in the media. The study recommends that the media should avoid the sensationalisation of MCH experiences to encourage more people to share their stories. This is because including the positive and challenging experiences of individuals in MCH-related contents in the media provides the human-interest angle that can increase readership of health contents, thus empowering citizens with the information they need to get adequate care and also seek redress when such care is denied.
      Citation: Public Relations Inquiry
      PubDate: 2021-05-06T06:08:21Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2046147X211014072
       
  • ‘Unmentionable’ condoms vs. ‘glamorous’ pills: How the London
           Rubber Company tackled an image problem in 1960s Britain

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      Authors: Jessica Borge
      Abstract: Public Relations Inquiry, Ahead of Print.
      This article responds to a special call for papers on the subject of ‘Taboos in Health Communication: Stigma, Silence and Voice’ and presents the historic case study of the London Rubber Company, manufacturers of Durex condoms, who used PR techniques to undermine confidence in the oral contraceptive pill over 1961–1965. It is argued that continuities between the public discussion of birth control products between the 1960s and today can help practitioners to better understand the nature and uses of ‘fake news’, secrecy and transparency and the productive possibilities of rumour. It is written from the perspective of an empirical research historian with an interest in historical cases of PR relating to contraception, using a qualitative, chronological approach based on original archival research.
      Citation: Public Relations Inquiry
      PubDate: 2021-05-05T07:00:28Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2046147X211014085
       
  • Discordant storytelling, ‘honest fakery’, identity peddling: How
           uncanny CGI characters are jamming public relations and influencer
           practices

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      Authors: Elena Block, Rob Lovegrove
      First page: 265
      Abstract: Public Relations Inquiry, Ahead of Print.
      This article critically explores whether and how computer-generated imagery (CGI) characters are jamming public relations and influencer practices. We use Miquela, a virtual character with 3 million Instagram followers as a case study. We examine Miquela’s (and her creators’) communication strategies to identify what makes her so appealing to postmillennial audiences, luxury and indie brands, and civil rights activists alike. Valued at USD125 million, Miquela is algorithmically moulded as a fashionista, singer and civil rights warrior to maximise visibility, influence and emotional release. ‘Her’ discordant, uncanny human/nonhuman ethos simultaneously attracts, intrigues and defies. To study Miquela’s case we built a four-tiered theoretical framework (parasocial relations, identity influence, culture jamming, and algorithmic branding) using the Freudian concept of ‘the uncanny’ as connecting thread; and a mixed method that includes digital ethnography, textual and sentiment analysis. We aim to make a contribution to studies on the use of digital media in PR.
      Citation: Public Relations Inquiry
      PubDate: 2021-06-25T11:28:47Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2046147X211026936
       
  • Discursive stickiness: Affective institutional texts and activist
           resistance

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      Authors: Erica Ciszek, Richard Mocarski, Sarah Price, Elaine Almeida
      First page: 295
      Abstract: Public Relations Inquiry, Ahead of Print.
      Pushing the bounds of public relations theory and research, we explore how institutional texts have produced and reified stigmas around gender transgression and how these texts are bound up in moments of activism and resistance. We considered how different discursive and material functions get “stuck” together by way of texts and how this sticking depends on a history of association and institutionalization. Activism presents opportunities to challenge institutional and structural stickiness, and we argue that public relations can challenge the affective assemblages that comprise and perpetuate these systems, unsettling the historical discourses that have governed institutions by establishing new communicative possibilities.
      Citation: Public Relations Inquiry
      PubDate: 2021-04-03T09:56:20Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2046147X211008388
       
  • Rethinking crisis dynamics from the perspective of online publics: A case
           study of Dolce & Gabbana’s China crisis

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      Authors: Zhuo Ban, Alessandro Lovari
      First page: 311
      Abstract: Public Relations Inquiry, Ahead of Print.
      On November 18, 2018, the Italian fashion house Dolce & Gabbana (D&G) released a controversial video on all their social media channels. The video triggered an instant outcry from the general Chinese public, who called the video a racist caricature of Chinese culture. D&G responded to the crisis with several image repair strategies. This study examines D&G’s crisis communication efforts in the wake of this incident. Departing from corporate-oriented perspectives prevalent in the field of public relations, this study employs a dynamic, public-oriented view of crisis communication, which focuses on the dynamic, interactive process of crisis development from the standpoint of the publics. By analyzing communicative behavior on Twitter (an increasingly influential alternative public sphere in China) and in particular, comments and responses toward the crisis communication strategies employed by D&G, we have identified four prominent themes, or ways that publics framed their key messages against the corporation: “Apology not enough”; “Apology done badly”; “Call to unite against D&G”; and “Sarcasm, mockery, and abuse.” And they can be interpreted as a number of crisis communication strategies of the global, online publics. Based on our analysis of the D&G case, we discuss the theoretical implications of a dynamic, public-oriented perspective (DPOP) on crisis communication, highlighting its key areas of difference from the corporate-oriented perspective (COP).
      Citation: Public Relations Inquiry
      PubDate: 2021-06-23T11:58:26Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2046147X211026854
       
  • Does your corporation “care”' Exploring an ethical standard for
           communicating CSR relationships online

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      Authors: Virginia S Harrison
      First page: 333
      Abstract: Public Relations Inquiry, Ahead of Print.
      A qualitative content analysis of corporate social responsibility (CSR) webpages of top-ranked corporations was conducted to determine the ethical nature of online communications surrounding nonprofit partnerships. Are corporations giving nonprofits their fair share of online publicity' All CSR-related webpages from the top 30 Fortune’s 500 Most Admired Corporations for 2017 were examined. Ethical principles from public relations communications regarding open, honest, and transparent information sharing guided textual analysis. Evidence shows that CSR website communications often engage in self-promotion rather than genuine and mutually beneficial support for nonprofit partners. Through corporate branding of CSR activities, advertising through philanthropy stories, and exploiting employee volunteerism and donations, the balance of CSR relationships tilts heavily in the corporation’s favor. Yet, public relations practitioners have a special calling to be the “ethical conscience” of their organizations. Understanding how corporations can provide ethical communications about their nonprofit partners helps guide ethical voice of the practice. This study is unique for looking specifically at the ethics of corporate CSR communications themselves and for addressing the nonprofit perspective of CSR, which is often overlooked. While nonprofits may benefit from CSR relationships, this article shows that opportunities for mutually beneficial communications about these relationships may be lacking.
      Citation: Public Relations Inquiry
      PubDate: 2021-07-21T06:23:22Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2046147X211032913
       
  • Media coverage of the unfolding crisis of domestic terrorism in the United
           States, 1990–2020

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      Authors: Diana Zulli, Kevin Coe, Zachary Isaacs, Ian Summers
      First page: 357
      Abstract: Public Relations Inquiry, Ahead of Print.
      Public relations research has paid considerable attention to foreign terrorist crises but relatively little attention to domestic ones—despite the growing salience of domestic terrorism in the United States. This study content analyzes 30 years of network television news coverage of domestic terrorism to gain insight into four theoretical issues of enduring interest within the literature on news framing and crisis management: sourcing, contextualization, ideological labeling, and definitional uncertainty. Results indicate that the sources called upon to contextualize domestic terrorism have shifted over time, that ideological labels are more often applied on the right than the left, and that definitional uncertainty has increased markedly in recent years. Implications for the theory and practice of public relations and crisis management are discussed.
      Citation: Public Relations Inquiry
      PubDate: 2021-02-23T11:57:08Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2046147X21996015
       
  • Expanding the discussion on internal management of risk communication: A
           critique of the current risk communication literature

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      Authors: Laura L. Lemon, Matthew S. VanDyke
      First page: 377
      Abstract: Public Relations Inquiry, Ahead of Print.
      The purpose of this paper is to build from the infrastructural approach to risk communication, rethink the internal management of risk communication, and critique the current literature’s discussion of how risks emerge, the role of the risk communication manager, and the decentralization of the risk communication function. Some of the risk communication literature is too general in terms of recognizing the nuance of the locus of risk, and the role(s) of stakeholders and communicators, which limit understanding that could extend and enrich current risk communication literature. In doing so, the conceptualization of where risk may occur broadens and research-based recommendations are developed from varied contexts to offer specific guidelines for future research to better understand the role of “internal” in risk communication and its practice. All of these points are not to diminish previous risk communication scholarship, but rather to refine and complement the current understanding so the management and communication of risk continues to enhance society as a whole.
      Citation: Public Relations Inquiry
      PubDate: 2021-05-05T07:02:26Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2046147X211014086
       
  • Book review: Post-Truth Public Relations: Communication in an Era of
           Digital Disinformation and Beyond Post-Communication: Challenging
           Disinformation, Deception and Manipulation

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      Authors: Kristin Demetrious
      First page: 395
      Abstract: Public Relations Inquiry, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Public Relations Inquiry
      PubDate: 2021-05-11T05:59:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2046147X211014969
       
 
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