Subjects -> ADVERTISING AND PUBLIC RELATIONS (Total: 23 journals)
Showing 1 - 8 of 8 Journals sorted alphabetically
Advertising & Society Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Book History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 112)
Design and Culture : The Journal of the Design Studies Forum     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Foundations and Trends® in Marketing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
International Journal of Advertising     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22)
International Journal of Complexity in Leadership and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
International Journal of Market Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Advertising     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Journal of Advertising Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Consumer Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44)
Journal of Current Issues & Research in Advertising     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Interactive Advertising     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Journal of International Marketing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 24)
Journal of Marketing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 51)
Journal of Marketing Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 70)
Journal of Public Policy & Marketing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Public Relations Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Place Branding and Public Diplomacy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Public Relations Inquiry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Public Relations Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Revista Internacional de Relaciones Públicas     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Young Consumers: Insight and Ideas for Responsible Marketers     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Book History
Number of Followers: 112  
 
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
ISSN (Print) 1098-7371 - ISSN (Online) 1529-1499
Published by Johns Hopkins University Press Homepage  [22 journals]
  • Virginia Woolf, Penguin Paperbacks, and Mass Publishing in Mid-Century
           Britain

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      Abstract: “I am anxious to obtain the author’s signature to enclose with my copies of ORLANDO and A ROOM OF ONE’S OWN. Could you possibly help me in my quest'”1 In July 1946, Allen Lane, director of Penguin Books, approached Leonard Woolf with an unusual, some might say inappropriate, request. Four years earlier, Penguin Books had published a cheap paperback edition of Virginia Woolf’s Orlando (1928) and Lane’s company had also been given permission to republish A Room of One’s Own (1929) as a paperback in 1945. Since setting up his business in 1935, Lane had developed the habit of asking authors to sign one copy of a first Penguin edition of their books for him to keep. In Woolf’s case such autograph hunting was more ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-04-29T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • The Consequences of Competition: Book Awards and Twenty-first Century
           Black Poetry

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      Abstract: Just in case potential readers needed confirmation that Claudia Rankine’s Citizen (2014) was an exceptional award-winning book, her publisher, Graywolf Press adorned printings of the publication with a list of its accolades. The back cover reads:Perhaps no book by a poet has received such a variety of honors. Prior to 2014, Rankine was rarely if ever presented as a prominent author. After the publication of Citizen though, she quickly became the subject of newspaper and magazine profiles, interviews, and commentary. Rankine’s book vaulted her to new, lofty heights in contemporary literary culture.2 While the high quantity of accolades placed on Citizen was unusual, an unprecedented number of works by Black poets ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-04-29T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Galen’s De Indolentia and The Fire of 192 CE: Through the Eyes of
           Book History

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      Abstract: Sometime in the spring of the year 192 CE,2 a fire–all too frequent in the jerry-built Rome of the time–raged through the Temple of Peace in the Forum, the centre of official Rome. Like several other monumental buildings on the nearby Palatine Hill, the temple possessed a library, where intellectuals often met for discussion.3 A cluster of other buildings on the nearby Via Sacra included two high-status warehouses for rare spices and valuable merchandise, the Horrea Piperateria and the Horrea Vespasiani. They also stored the valuables of wealthy Romans and others who were temporarily absent from the city. Pier Luigi Tucci imagines the situation as a north wind blew flames from the burning roofs of houses in the ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-04-29T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Paratextuality Between Materiality, Interpretation and Translation: The
           Case of Psalm Incipits in Jewish Late Antiquity

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      Abstract: The field of Book History binds together the destiny of books and their readers. As a principle, it posits that the material reality of a text will have an impact upon the way in which readers engage with it; and that, in turn, the way readers engage with a text will shape its material representations. This interpretive schema has produced volumes of thought-provoking and persuasive academic literature.1 This article joins this tradition of discourse by exploring the complicated relationship between the opening words of compositions within the Hebrew Psalter and the late ancient Jews who read them. In particular, it examines the various interpretive frameworks that Hebrew- and Aramaic-literate Jews who lived ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-04-29T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Unmasking Publius: Authorial Attribution and the Making of The Federalist

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      Abstract: On 5 February 1788, as the states were debating the ratification of the American Constitution, George Washington wrote to his friend and ally in the pro-Constitution fight, Henry Knox, demanding, “who is the author or authors of Publius'”1 From the moment that the essays now known as The Federalist or The Federalist Papers began to appear in New York newspapers in October 1787 as the pseudonymous work of Publius, readers have been interested in their authorship. While the essays’ earliest readers were not even sure if Publius was one writer or many, by the early nineteenth century, new readers, armed with the knowledge that the essays were the collective work of Alexander Hamilton, James Madison, and John Jay ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-04-29T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • The Bentley Schema: Inside a Newly Industrialized Firm

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      Abstract: The history of the firm of Richard Bentley and Son appears be marked by cultural tradition and patriarchal continuity. After dissolving a short-lived partnership with Henry Colburn in 1832, Richard Bentley Sr. became the sole owner of the firm, renaming Colburn and Bentley as Richard Bentley and Son. From this point onwards, the firm functioned as a family business. Richard Sr.’s son George became active in the firm in the 1850s, followed by George’s son Richard Jr. towards the end of the century.1 Profiles of the firm that appeared in the periodical press show that Bentley and Son’s public legacy was that of a literary dynasty. In Sketch, for example, the firm is referred to as an “aristocratic house” whose ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-04-29T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Literary Translation and the Expansion of the Ottoman Armenian Reading
           Public, 1853–1884

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      Abstract: In 1902, an Ottoman Armenian writer stood before a reception in Paris organized in honor of the centennial of Victor Hugo’s birth. This young man, Arshag Chobanian, had come as part of a delegation to pay tribute to the French writer and to describe the particular resonance of his work for Armenian readers in the Ottoman Empire. “All Armenians know the name Victor Hugo thanks to Les Misérables,” he said, “a delectable book that every last one of our peasants and the humblest of our village schoolteachers have read and reread and that has become like a second gospel for our people.”1 In hearing such a speech about impassioned Armenian readers and their love of French literature, the audience had little reason to ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-04-29T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Reorienting “Lost” Time: Reading Godey’s Lady’s Book in the
           American Civil War

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      Abstract: Since Frank Luther Mott disparaged Godey’s Lady’s Book, the most influential women’s magazine of the American antebellum period, for being “absolutely untouched by the great conflict” that was the American Civil War, scholars have often claimed that the publication was apolitical during the sectional crisis.1 Susan Belasco, for one, argues that Sarah Hale, Godey’s editor from 1837 to 1877, “made no reference to the Civil War throughout the years of the conflict.”2 Scholars who have acknowledged the political impulse of Godey’s during the sectional tensions nonetheless suggest that the magazine only responded indirectly to them, never actually addressing partisan politics. Joseph Michael Sommers claims that in the ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-04-29T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Henry Mayhew and the Participatory Reading Culture of Victorian
           Investigative Journalism

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      Abstract: In the winter of 1849–50, the Metropolitan Correspondent for the Morning Chronicle visited the Asylum for the Houseless Poor at Playhouse-Yard, London. One of the hundreds of destitute people finding refuge at the Asylum was a young woman who worked at velvet embossing. In Henry Mayhew’s account of the visit for the “Labour and the Poor” series on the Metropolitan Districts, he describes the woman as “comely, and modestly spoken . . . She was scrupulously clean and neat in her dress; indeed it was evident, even from her appearance, that she belonged to a better class than the ordinary inmates of the Asylum.”1 As she spoke with the journalist, she sighed heavily, and stared at the ground, speaking in a “very ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-04-29T00:00:00-05:00
       
 
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