Subjects -> ADVERTISING AND PUBLIC RELATIONS (Total: 23 journals)
Showing 1 - 8 of 8 Journals sorted alphabetically
Advertising & Society Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Book History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 203)
Design and Culture : The Journal of the Design Studies Forum     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
Foundations and Trends® in Marketing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
International Journal of Advertising     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 33)
International Journal of Complexity in Leadership and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31)
International Journal of Market Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Journal of Advertising     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
Journal of Advertising Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 27)
Journal of Consumer Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 45)
Journal of Current Issues & Research in Advertising     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Interactive Advertising     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
Journal of International Marketing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 30)
Journal of Marketing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 60)
Journal of Marketing Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 75)
Journal of Public Policy & Marketing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
Journal of Public Relations Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Opinião Pública     Open Access  
Place Branding and Public Diplomacy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Public Relations Inquiry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Public Relations Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
RAE-eletrônica     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Revista Internacional de Relaciones Públicas     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Young Consumers: Insight and Ideas for Responsible Marketers     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Journal of Marketing Research
Journal Prestige (SJR): 7.819
Citation Impact (citeScore): 6
Number of Followers: 75  
 
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
ISSN (Print) 0022-2437 - ISSN (Online) 1547-7193
Published by American Marketing Association Homepage  [4 journals]
  • The Economic and Social Impacts of Migration on Brand Expenditure:
           Evidence from Rural India

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      Authors: Vishal Narayan, Shreya Kankanhalli
      Pages: 63 - 82
      Abstract: Journal of Marketing, Volume 85, Issue 6, Page 63-82, November 2021.
      Households that send members to work away from home often receive information about the lifestyles and consumption behaviors in those migration destinations (i.e., social remittances) along with money or goods (i.e., economic remittances). The authors investigate the effect of having a migrant household member on household brand expenditures in rural India, a market characterized by substantial consumption of unbranded products. They collect and analyze household-level survey data from 434 households across 30 villages using an instrumental variable strategy. Economic remittances result in greater brand expenditure, and this level is higher for poorer households. After controlling for economic remittances, the authors find that the effect of migration on brand expenditures is more positive for households in more populous villages, with greater access to mobile phones, lower viewership of television media, and less recently departed migrants. They demonstrate how marketing resource allocation across villages can be improved by incorporating migration data and provide insights for household targeting in the context of door-to-door selling in villages. The results are robust to alternative, public policy–based instruments and can be generalized to expenditure on private schools. Using additional survey data from 300 households in 62 new villages, the authors replicate the results by comparing within-households brand expenditures before and after the migration event.
      Citation: Journal of Marketing
      PubDate: 2021-10-12T05:57:18Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00222429211021992
      Issue No: Vol. 85, No. 6 (2021)
       
  • Values Created from Far and Near: Influence of Spatial Distance on Brand
           Evaluation

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      Authors: Xing-Yu (Marcos) Chu, Chun-Tuan Chang, Angela Y. Lee
      Pages: 162 - 175
      Abstract: Journal of Marketing, Volume 85, Issue 6, Page 162-175, November 2021.
      This research shows that spatial distance between visual representations of a product and consumers may enhance or devalue consumers’ perceptions of the brand depending on the brand image (prestigious vs. popular). The authors suggest that spatial distance signals prestige when status and luxury are relevant to the brand image, and decreased distance signals social closeness when popularity and broad appeal are relevant to the brand image. The authors show that for prestigious brands whose brand image is associated with status and luxury, consumers’ attitude toward the product becomes more favorable and their willingness to pay a premium for the product grows as the distance between the visual representations of the product and the consumer increases. In contrast, for popular brands whose brand image is associated with broad appeal and social connectedness, the closer the distance, the more favorable is consumers’ attitude and the higher their willingness to pay a premium. The findings provide useful guidelines to marketers on the use of visual cues in advertising and product displays.
      Citation: Journal of Marketing
      PubDate: 2021-10-12T05:58:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00222429211000706
      Issue No: Vol. 85, No. 6 (2021)
       
  • Shedding Light on the Dark Side of Firm Lobbying: A Customer Perspective

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      Authors: Gautham G. Vadakkepatt, Sandeep Arora, Kelly D. Martin, Neeru Paharia
      Abstract: Journal of Marketing, Ahead of Print.
      Firms spend a substantial amount on lobbying—devoting financial resources on teams of lobbyists to further their interests among regulatory stakeholders. Previous research acknowledges that lobbying positively influences firm value, but no studies have examined the parallel effects for customers. Building on the attention-based view (ABV) of the firm, the authors examine these customer effects. Findings reveal that lobbying negatively affects customer satisfaction such that the positive relationship between lobbying and firm value is mediated by losses to customer satisfaction. These findings suggest a dark side of lobbying and challenge current thinking. However, several customer-focused moderators attenuate the negative effect of lobbying on customer satisfaction, predicted by ABV theory, including the chief executive officer’s background (marketing vs. other functional area) and the firm’s strategic use of resources (advertising spending, R&D spending, or lobbying for product market issues). These moderators ensure consistency between lobbying and customer priorities or direct firm attention toward customers even while firms continue to lobby. Finally, the authors verify that lobbying reduces the firm’s customer focus by measuring this focus directly using text analysis of firm communications with shareholders. Collectively, the research provides managerial implications for navigating both lobbying activities and customer priorities, and public policy implications for lobbying disclosure requirements.
      Citation: Journal of Marketing
      PubDate: 2021-10-22T04:46:21Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00222429211023040
       
  • Regulating Product Recall Compliance in the Digital Age: Evidence from the
           “Safe Cars Save Lives” Campaign

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      Authors: Sotires Pagiavlas, Kartik Kalaignanam, Manpreet Gill, Paul D. Bliese
      Abstract: Journal of Marketing, Ahead of Print.
      The unprecedented number of product recalls in recent years and subsequent low consumer recall compliance raise questions about the role of regulatory agencies in ensuring safety. In this study, the authors develop a conceptual framework to test the impact of a regulator-initiated digital marketing campaign (DMC) on consumer recall compliance. The empirical context is the launch of a nationwide DMC by the U.S. automobile industry’s regulator. The analysis utilizes recall completion data from 296 product recalls active both before and after the DMC’s launch. The results show that the DMC improves consumer recall compliance. In the first four quarters after it was introduced, the DMC increased the number of vehicles fixed, on average, by 20,712 per recall campaign over what would be expected without the DMC. Regarding boundary conditions, the study finds that the DMC is more effective for recall campaigns with greater media coverage and for those with older recalled products. However, the DMC’s effect weakens as the time needed to repair a defective component increases. The findings should help regulators make compelling cases for greater resource allocation toward digital initiatives to improve recall compliance.
      Citation: Journal of Marketing
      PubDate: 2021-10-19T02:53:35Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00222429211023016
       
  • Identifying Market Structure: A Deep Network Representation Learning of
           Social Engagement

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      Authors: Yi Yang, Kunpeng Zhang, P.K. Kannan
      Abstract: Journal of Marketing, Ahead of Print.
      With rapid technological developments, product-market boundaries have become more dynamic. Consequently, competition for products and services is emerging outside the product-market boundaries traditionally defined based on Standard Industrial Classification and North American Industry Classification System codes. Identifying these fluid product-market boundaries is critical for firms not only to compete effectively within a market but also to identify lurking threats and latent opportunities outside market boundaries. Newly available big data on social media engagement presents such an opportunity. The authors propose a deep network representation learning framework to capture latent relationships among thousands of brands and across many categories, using millions of social media users’ brand engagement data. They build a brand–user network and then compress the network into a lower-dimensional space using a deep autoencoder technique. The authors evaluate this approach quantitatively and qualitatively and visually display the market structure using the learned representations of brands. They validate the learned brand relationships using multiple external data sources. They also illustrate how this method can capture the dynamic changes of product-market boundaries using two well-known events—the acquisition of Whole Foods by Amazon and the introduction of the Model 3 by Tesla—and how managers can use the insights that emerge from this analysis.
      Citation: Journal of Marketing
      PubDate: 2021-10-16T12:37:08Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00222429211033585
       
  • Communication in the Gig Economy: Buying and Selling in Online Freelance
           Marketplaces

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      Authors: Stephan Ludwig, Dennis Herhausen, Dhruv Grewal, Liliana Bove, Sabine Benoit, Ko de Ruyter, Peter Urwin
      Abstract: Journal of Marketing, Ahead of Print.
      The proliferating gig economy relies on online freelance marketplaces, which support relatively anonymous interactions through text-based messages. Informational asymmetries thus arise that can lead to exchange uncertainties between buyers and freelancers. Conventional marketing thought recommends reducing such uncertainty. However, uncertainty reduction and uncertainty management theories indicate that buyers and freelancers might benefit more from balancing—rather than reducing—uncertainty, such as by strategically adhering to or deviating from common communication principles. With dyadic analyses of calls for bids and bids from a leading online freelance marketplace, this study reveals that buyers attract more bids from freelancers when they provide moderate degrees of task information and concreteness, avoid sharing personal information, and limit the affective intensity of their communication. Freelancers’ bid success and price premiums increase when they mimic the degree of task information and affective intensity exhibited by buyers. However, mimicking a lack of personal information and concreteness reduces freelancers’ success, so freelancers should always be more concrete and offer more personal information than buyers. These contingent perspectives offer insights into buyer–seller communication in two-sided online marketplaces. They clarify that despite, or sometimes due to, communication uncertainty, both sides can achieve success in the online gig economy.
      Citation: Journal of Marketing
      PubDate: 2021-10-16T11:04:26Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00222429211030841
       
  • Leveraging Creativity in Charity Marketing: The Impact of Engaging in
           Creative Activities on Subsequent Donation Behavior

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      Authors: Lidan Xu, Ravi Mehta, Darren W. Dahl
      Abstract: Journal of Marketing, Ahead of Print.
      Charities are constantly looking for new and more effective ways to engage potential donors in order to secure the resources needed to deliver services. The current work demonstrates that creative activities are one way for marketers to meet this challenge. Field and lab studies find that engaging potential donors in creative activities positively influences their donation behaviors (i.e., the likelihood of donation and the monetary amount donated). Importantly, the observed effects are shown to be context independent: they hold even when potential donors engage in creative activities unrelated to the focal cause of the charity (or the charitable organization itself). The findings suggest that engaging in a creative activity enhances the felt autonomy of the participant, thus inducing a positive affective state, which in turn leads to higher donation behaviors. Positive affect is demonstrated to enhance donation behaviors due to perceptions of donation impact and a desire for mood maintenance. However, the identified effects emerge only when one engages in a creative activity—not when the activity is noncreative, or when only the concept of creativity itself is made salient.
      Citation: Journal of Marketing
      PubDate: 2021-10-16T07:28:16Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00222429211037587
       
  • Do Backer Affiliations Help or Hurt Crowdfunding Success'

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      Authors: Kelly B. Herd, Girish Mallapragada, Vishal Narayan
      Abstract: Journal of Marketing, Ahead of Print.
      Crowdfunding has emerged as a mechanism to raise funds for entrepreneurial ideas. On crowdfunding platforms, backers (i.e., individuals who fund ideas) jointly fund the same idea, leading to affiliations, or overlaps, within the community. The authors find that while an increase in the total number of backers may positively affect funding behavior, the resulting affiliations affect funding negatively. They reason that when affiliated others fund a new idea, individuals may feel less of a need to fund, a process known as “vicarious moral licensing.” Drawing on data collected from 2,021 ideas on a prominent crowdfunding platform, the authors show that prior affiliation among backers negatively affects an idea’s funding amount and eventual funding success. Creator engagement (i.e., idea description and updates) and backer engagement (i.e., Facebook shares) moderate this negative effect. The effect of affiliation is robust across several instrumental variables, model specifications, measures of affiliation, and multiple crowdfunding outcomes. Results from three experiments, a survey, and interviews with backers support the negative effect of affiliation and show that it can be explained by vicarious moral licensing. The authors develop actionable insights for creators to mitigate the negative effects of affiliation with the language used in idea descriptions and updates.
      Citation: Journal of Marketing
      PubDate: 2021-10-14T12:50:33Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00222429211031814
       
  • How Consumer Orchestration Work Creates Value in the Sharing Economy

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      Authors: Daiane Scaraboto, Bernardo Figueiredo
      Abstract: Journal of Marketing, Ahead of Print.
      Sharing economy platforms have become increasingly popular, but many platforms do not create all the value that is possible because consumers face challenges while cocreating their experiences. The authors situate the origin of these challenges in the sharing economy’s hybrid cocreation logics, which combine competing communal and transactional logics. Using a qualitative study of Couchsurfing, a platform for sharing free accommodation, the authors find that consumers engage in orchestration work to overcome cocreation roadblocks and extract greater benefits from sharing economy platforms. This orchestration work consists of many actions reflected in four overarching mechanisms: consumer-to-consumer alignment, rewiring relations, trust investment, and network experimentation. The authors connect these mechanisms to known sources of value for firms (i.e., complementarities, efficiency, lock-in, and novelty) to make recommendations for how platform firms can foster consumer orchestration work and unlock the full value of consumer cocreation in the sharing economy.
      Citation: Journal of Marketing
      PubDate: 2021-10-14T12:50:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00222429211027777
       
  • Halo or Cannibalization' How New Software Entrants Impact Sales of
           Incumbent Software in Platform Markets

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      Authors: B.J. Allen, Richard T. Gretz, Mark B. Houston, Suman Basuroy
      Abstract: Journal of Marketing, Ahead of Print.
      Platform markets involve indirect network effects as two or more sides of a market interact through an intermediary platform. Many platform markets consist of both a platform device and corresponding software. In such markets, new software introductions influence incumbent software sales, and new entrants may directly cannibalize incumbents. However, entrants may also create an indirect halo impact by attracting new platform adopters, who then purchase incumbent software. To measure performance holistically, this article introduces a method to quantify both indirect and direct paths and determine which effect dominates and when. The authors identify relevant moderators from the sensations–familiarity framework and conduct empirical tests with data from the video game industry (1995–2019). Results show that the direct impact often results in cannibalization, which generally increases when the entrant is a superstar or part of a franchise. For the indirect halo impact, superstar entrants significantly increase platform adoption, which can help all incumbents. Combining the direct and indirect impacts, the authors find that only new software that is both a superstar and part of a franchise increases platform adoption sufficiently to overcome direct cannibalization and achieve a net positive effect on incumbent software; all other types of entrants have a neutral or negative overall effect.
      Citation: Journal of Marketing
      PubDate: 2021-10-12T03:09:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00222429211017827
       
  • The Influence of Social Norms on Consumer Behavior: A Meta-Analysis

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      Authors: Vladimir Melnyk, François A. Carrillat, Valentyna Melnyk
      Abstract: Journal of Marketing, Ahead of Print.
      Social norms shape consumer behavior. However, it is not clear under what circumstances social norms are more versus less effective in doing so. This gap is addressed through an interdisciplinary meta-analysis examining the impact of social norms on consumer behavior across a wide array of contexts involving the purchase, consumption, use, and disposal of products and services, including socially approved (e.g., fruit consumption, donations) and disapproved (e.g., smoking, gambling) behaviors. Drawing from reactance theory and based on a cross-disciplinary data set of 250 effect sizes from research spanning 1978–2019 representing 112,478 respondents from 22 countries, the authors examine the effects of five categories of moderators of the effectiveness of social norms on consumer behavior: (1) target behavior characteristics, (2) communication factors, (3) consumer costs, (4) environmental factors, and (5) methodological characteristics. The findings suggest that while the effect of social norms on approved behavior is stable across time and cultures, their effect on disapproved behavior has grown over time and is stronger in survival and traditional cultures. Communications identifying specific organizations or close group members enhance compliance with social norms, as does the presence of monetary costs. The authors leverage their findings to offer managerial implications and a future research agenda for the field.
      Citation: Journal of Marketing
      PubDate: 2021-10-08T03:48:33Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00222429211029199
       
  • The Roar of the Crowd: How Interaction Ritual Chains Create Social
           Atmospheres

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      Authors: Tim Hill, Robin Canniford, Giana M. Eckhardt
      Abstract: Journal of Marketing, Ahead of Print.
      Atmospheres are experiences of place involving transformations of consumers’ behaviors and emotions. Existing marketing research reveals how atmospheric stimuli, service performances, and ritual place-making enhance place experiences and create value for firms. Yet it remains unclear how shared experiences of atmosphere emerge and intensify among groups of people during collective live events. Accordingly, this article uses sociological interaction ritual theory to conceptualize “social atmospheres”: rapidly changing qualities of place created when a shared focus aligns consumers’ emotions and behavior, resulting in lively expressions of collective effervescence. With data from an ethnography of an English Premier League football stadium, the authors identify a four-stage process of creating atmospheres in interaction ritual chains. This framework goes beyond conventional retail and servicescape design by demonstrating that social atmospheres are mobile and cocreated between firms and consumers before, during, and after a main event. The study also reveals how interaction rituals can be disrupted and offers insight as to how firms can balance key tensions in creating social atmospheres as a means to enhance customer experiences, customer loyalty, and communal place attachments.
      Citation: Journal of Marketing
      PubDate: 2021-10-08T03:47:22Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00222429211023355
       
  • Machine Learning for Creativity: Using Similarity Networks to Design
           Better Crowdfunding Projects

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      Authors: Yanhao “Max” Wei, Jihoon Hong, Gerard J. Tellis
      Abstract: Journal of Marketing, Ahead of Print.
      A fundamental tension exists in creativity between novelty and similarity. This research exploits this tension to help creators craft successful projects in crowdfunding. To do so, the authors apply the concept of combinatorial creativity, analyzing each new project in connection to prior similar projects. By using machine learning techniques (Word2vec and Word Mover’s Distance), they measure the degrees of similarity between crowdfunding projects on Kickstarter. They analyze how this similarity pattern relates to a project’s funding performance and find that (1) the prior level of success of similar projects strongly predicts a new project’s funding performance, (2) the funding performance increases with a balance between being novel and imitative, (3) the optimal funding goal is close to the funds raised by prior similar projects, and (4) the funding performance increases with a balance between atypical and conventional imitation. The authors use these findings to generate actionable recommendations for project creators and crowdfunding platforms.
      Citation: Journal of Marketing
      PubDate: 2021-10-08T03:46:42Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00222429211005481
       
  • Despite Efficiencies, Mergers and Acquisitions Reduce Firm Value by
           Hurting Customer Satisfaction

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      Authors: Nita Umashankar, S. Cem Bahadir, Sundar Bharadwaj
      Abstract: Journal of Marketing, Ahead of Print.
      Most researchers focus on the effect of mergers and acquisitions (M&As) on investor returns and overlook customer reactions, despite the fact that customers are directly impacted by these corporate transformations. Others suggest that in M&A contexts, a dual emphasis of customer satisfaction and firm efficiency is both likely and beneficial. In contrast, the authors demonstrate that M&As not only do not yield a dual emphasis but also cause a decline in customer satisfaction to the extent that they eclipse any gain in firm value from an increase in firm efficiency. A quasiexperimental difference-in-differences analysis and an instrumental variable panel regression provide robust evidence for the dark side of M&As for customers. The authors use the attention-based view of the firm to demonstrate that post-M&A customer dissatisfaction occurs because of a shift in executive attention away from customers and toward financial issues. In line with the related upper echelons theory, they find that marketing representation on a firm’s board of directors helps maintain executive attention on customers, which mitigates the dysfunctional effect of M&As on customer satisfaction. This research identifies a negative M&A–customer satisfaction relationship and highlights executive attention to customer issues and marketing leadership as factors that mitigate this negative relationship.
      Citation: Journal of Marketing
      PubDate: 2021-10-05T03:24:56Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00222429211024255
       
  • How Industries Use Direct-to-Public Persuasion in Policy Conflicts:
           Asymmetries in Public Voting Responses

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      Authors: Kathleen Seiders, Andrea Godfrey Flynn, Gergana Y. Nenkov
      Abstract: Journal of Marketing, Ahead of Print.
      Industries use persuasion strategies to gain public support when challenged by activist groups on consumer-relevant issues. This marketing practice, termed “direct-to-public persuasion,” has received limited attention in the field, and thus we have little understanding of when such campaigns fail or succeed. This research introduces a theoretically derived and empirically supported framework that draws from multiple areas, including marketing persuasion, political campaign strategy, sociopolitical legitimacy, and perceptual fit, to identify important differences in the effectiveness of these persuasion strategies on attitudes and voting behavior. The multimethod approach includes a field study of ballot measure voting during a national U.S. election and three experimental studies. The findings contribute new knowledge of asymmetries in public response to industry and activist arguments. Stronger arguments from both sides lead to more favorable outcomes, but activist groups benefit most. Suspicion of activist arguments weakens the impact on attitudes and voting; industry argument suspicion has limited impact, though it does increase the likelihood of voter switching. A financial argumentation strategy works best for the industry side, while societal argumentation is more effective for the activist side. The insights offer guidance for industries and activist groups as argument strategy success is contingent on the side that uses it.
      Citation: Journal of Marketing
      PubDate: 2021-10-01T02:46:09Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00222429211007517
       
  • A New Livestream Retail Analytics Framework to Assess the Sales Impact of
           Emotional Displays

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      Authors: Neeraj Bharadwaj, Michel Ballings, Prasad A. Naik, Miller Moore, Mustafa Murat Arat
      Abstract: Journal of Marketing, Ahead of Print.
      At the intersection of technology and marketing, this study develops a framework to unobtrusively detect salespeople’s faces and simultaneously extract six emotions: happiness, sadness, surprise, anger, fear, and disgust. The authors analyze 99,451 sales pitches on a livestream retailing platform and match them with actual sales transactions. Results reveal that each emotional display, including happiness, uniformly exhibits a negative U-shaped effect on sales over time. The maximum sales resistance appears in the middle rather than at the beginning or end of sales pitches. Taken together, the results show that in one-to-many screen-mediated communications, salespeople should sell with a straight face. In addition, the authors derive closed-form formulae for the optimal allocation of the presence of a face and emotional displays over the presentation span. In contrast to the U-shaped effects, the optimal face presence wanes at the start, gradually builds to a crescendo, and eventually ebbs. Finally, the study shows how to objectively rank salespeople and circumvent biases in performance appraisals, thereby making novel contributions to people analytics. This research integrates new types of data and methods, key theoretical insights, and important managerial implications to inform the expanding opportunity that livestream e-commerce presents to marketers to create, communicate, deliver, and capture value.
      Citation: Journal of Marketing
      PubDate: 2021-09-30T01:42:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00222429211013042
       
  • When to Use Markets, Lines, and Lotteries: How Beliefs About Preferences
           Shape Beliefs About Allocation

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      Authors: Franklin Shaddy, Anuj K. Shah
      Abstract: Journal of Marketing, Ahead of Print.
      When allocating scarce goods and services, firms often either prioritize those willing to spend the most resources (e.g., money, in the case of markets; time, in the case of lines) or simply ignore such differences and allocate randomly (e.g., through lotteries). When do these resource-based allocation rules seem most appropriate, and why' Here, the authors propose that people are more likely to endorse markets and lines when these systems increase the likelihood that scarce goods and services go to those who have the strongest preferences—that is, when they help sort preferences. This is most feasible when preferences are dissimilar (i.e., some consumers want something much more than others). Consequently, people are naturally attuned to preference variance: when preferences for something are similar, markets and lines seem less appropriate, because it is unlikely that the highest bidders or those who have waited the longest actually have the strongest preferences. However, when preferences are dissimilar, markets and lines seem more appropriate, because they can more easily sort preferences. Consumers thus react negatively when firms use resource-based allocation rules in situations where preferences cannot be easily sorted (e.g., when preferences are similar).
      Citation: Journal of Marketing
      PubDate: 2021-09-30T01:40:58Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00222429211012107
       
  • How Physical Stores Enhance Customer Value: The Importance of Product
           Inspection Depth

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      Authors: Jonathan Z. Zhang, Chun-Wei Chang, Scott A. Neslin
      Abstract: Journal of Marketing, Ahead of Print.
      The authors investigate the role of the physical store in today’s multichannel environment. They posit that one benefit of the store to the retailer is to enhance customer value by providing the physical engagement needed to purchase deep products—products that require ample inspection for customers to make an informed decision. Using a multimethod approach involving a hidden Markov model of transaction data and two experiments, the authors find that buying deep products in the physical store transitions customers to the high-value state more than other product/channel combinations. Findings confirm the hypotheses derived from experiential learning theory. A moderated serial mediation test supports the experiential learning theory–based mechanism for translating physical engagement into customer value: Customers purchase a deep product from the physical store. They reflect on this physical engagement experience, and because it is tangible, concrete, and multisensory, it enables them to develop strong learning about the retailer. This experiential knowledge precipitates repatronage and generalizes to future online purchases in the same category and in adjacent categories, thus contributing to higher customer value. This research suggests that multichannel retailers use a combination of right-channel and right-product strategies for customer development and provides implications for experiential retail designs.
      Citation: Journal of Marketing
      PubDate: 2021-09-30T01:38:32Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00222429211012106
       
  • Can Encroachment Benefit Hotel Franchisees'

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      Authors: TI Tongil Kim, Sandy D. Jap
      Abstract: Journal of Marketing, Ahead of Print.
      Franchise encroachment, or the addition of an outlet in the vicinity of existing franchisees, is largely viewed as resulting in revenue cannibalization of incumbent locations. Against this backdrop, the authors consider the possibility that the addition of same brand outlets can, in fact, also create positive effects via customer utility and ultimately benefit franchisees, due to a range of mechanisms such as quality signaling, learning, or brand awareness, resulting in a positive pathway on franchisee performance. The authors unpack this possibility using an experiment and detailed proprietary and publicly available data sets from the hotel industry over a five-year period. Their results show evidence of positive effects on customer utility for same-brand outlets and stronger effects for newer brands, cross brands, and online travel agency channel bookings. Counterfactual simulations indicate that although encroachment hurts franchisees on average, it can modestly benefit same-brand franchisees in low-brand-density markets. Together, the findings illustrate the potential “sunny side” of encroachment, underscoring the need to update our view of encroachment as context-dependent. The novel emphasis on customers versus the dominant firm view suggests customer and incumbent responses to encroachment should be accounted for in the development of franchise strategy and public policy decisions.
      Citation: Journal of Marketing
      PubDate: 2021-09-30T01:36:27Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00222429211008136
       
  • Platform Exploitation: When Service Agents Defect with Customers from
           Online Service Platforms

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      Authors: Qiang (Kris) Zhou, B.J. Allen, Richard T. Gretz, Mark B. Houston
      Abstract: Journal of Marketing, Ahead of Print.
      Online, pure-labor service platforms (e.g., Zeel, Amazon Home Services, Freelancer.com) represent a multibillion-dollar market. An increasing managerial concern in such markets is the opportunistic behavior of service agents who defect with customers off platform for future transactions. Using multiple methods across studies, the authors explain this platform exploitation phenomenon. In Study 1, they utilize a theories-in-use approach to clarify why and when platform exploitation occurs and derive some hypotheses. Study 2 empirically tests these hypotheses using data from a health care platform that connects nurses and patients. The results indicate that high-quality, long-tenured service agents may enhance platform usage, but customers also are more likely to defect with such agents. Platform exploitation also increases with greater customer–agent interaction frequency (i.e., building stronger relationships). This phenomenon decreases agents’ platform usage due to capacity constraints caused by serving more customers off platform. These effects are stronger as service price increases (because higher prices equate to more fee savings), as service repetitiveness increases, and as the agent’s on-platform customer pool comprises more repeat and more proximal customers. Finally, the authors use two scenario-based experiments to establish some managerial strategies to combat platform exploitation.
      Citation: Journal of Marketing
      PubDate: 2021-09-22T03:10:33Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00222429211001311
       
  • Virtual Reality in New Product Development: Insights from Pre-launch Sales
           Forecasting for Durables

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      Authors: Nathalie Harz, Sebastian Hohenberg, Christian Homburg
      Abstract: Journal of Marketing, Ahead of Print.
      This investigation examines how consumer durable goods producers can leverage virtual reality for new product development. First, the authors develop a prelaunch sales forecasting approach with two key features: virtual reality and an extended macro-flow model. To assess its effectiveness, the authors collect data from 631 potential buyers of two real-world innovations. The results reveal that the new approach yields highly accurate prelaunch forecasts across the two field studies: compared with the actual sales data tracked after the product launches, the prediction errors for the aggregated first-year sales are only 1.9% (Study 1a, original prelaunch sales forecast), .0% (Study 1b, forecast with actual advertisement spending), and 20.0% (Study 1b, original prelaunch forecast). Moreover, the average mean absolute percentage error for the monthly sales is only 23% across both studies. Second, to understand the mechanisms of virtual reality, the authors conduct a controlled laboratory experiment. The findings reveal that virtual reality fosters behavioral consistency between participants’ information search, preferences, and buying behavior. Moreover, virtual reality enhances participants’ perceptions related to presence and vividness, but not their perceptions related to alternative theoretical perspectives. Finally, the authors provide recommendations for when and how managers can use virtual reality in new product development.
      Citation: Journal of Marketing
      PubDate: 2021-07-22T09:41:36Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00222429211014902
       
  • Augmented Reality in Retail and Its Impact on Sales

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      Authors: Yong-Chin Tan, Sandeep R. Chandukala, Srinivas K. Reddy
      Abstract: Journal of Marketing, Ahead of Print.
      The rise of augmented reality (AR) technology presents marketers with promising opportunities to engage customers and transform their brand experience. Although firms are keen to invest in AR, research documenting its tangible impact in real-world contexts is sparse. In this article, the authors outline four broad uses of the technology in retail settings. They then focus specifically on the use of AR to facilitate product evaluation prior to purchase and empirically investigate its impact on sales in online retail. Using data obtained from an international cosmetics retailer, they find that AR usage on the retailer’s mobile app is associated with higher sales for brands that are less popular, products with narrower appeal, and products that are more expensive. In addition, the effect of AR is stronger for customers who are new to the online channel or product category, suggesting that the sales increase is coming from online channel adoption and category expansion. These findings provide converging evidence that AR is most effective when product-related uncertainty is high, demonstrating the technology’s potential to increase sales by reducing uncertainty and instilling purchase confidence. To encourage more impactful research in this area, the authors conclude with a research agenda for AR in marketing.
      Citation: Journal of Marketing
      PubDate: 2021-06-16T10:26:16Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0022242921995449
       
  • An Emerging Theory of Avatar Marketing

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      Authors: Fred Miao, Irina V. Kozlenkova, Haizhong Wang, Tao Xie, Robert W. Palmatier
      Abstract: Journal of Marketing, Ahead of Print.
      Avatars are becoming increasingly popular in contemporary marketing strategies, but their effectiveness for achieving performance outcomes (e.g., purchase likelihood) varies widely in practice. Related academic literature is fragmented, lacking both definitional consistency and conceptual clarity. This article makes three main contributions to avatar theory and managerial practice. First, to address ambiguity with respect to its definition, this study identifies and critically evaluates key conceptual elements of the term “avatar,” offers a definition derived from this analysis, and provides a typology of avatars’ design elements. Second, the proposed 2 × 2 avatar taxonomy suggests that the alignment of an avatar’s form realism and behavioral realism, across different contingencies, provides a parsimonious explanation for avatar effectiveness. Third, the authors develop an emerging theory of avatar marketing by triangulating insights from fundamental elements of avatars, a synthesis of extant research, and business practices. This framework integrates key theoretical insights, research propositions, and important managerial implications for this expanding area of marketing strategy. Lastly, the authors outline a research program to test the propositions and insights as well as advance future research.
      Citation: Journal of Marketing
      PubDate: 2021-05-25T04:17:52Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0022242921996646
       
  • Genetic Data: Potential Uses and Misuses in Marketing

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      Authors: Remi Daviet, Gideon Nave, Jerry Wind
      Abstract: Journal of Marketing, Ahead of Print.
      Advances in molecular genetics have led to the exponential growth of the direct-to-consumer genetic testing industry, resulting in the assembly of massive privately owned genetic databases. This article explores the potential impact of this new data type on the field of marketing. Drawing on findings from behavioral genetic research, the authors propose a framework that incorporates genetic influences into existing consumer behavior theory and use it to survey potential marketing uses of genetic data. Applications include business strategies that rely on genetic variants as bases for segmentation and targeting, creative uses that develop consumers’ sense of community and personalization, use of genetically informed study designs to test causal relations, and refinement of consumer theory by uncovering biological mechanisms underlying behavior. The authors further evaluate ethical challenges related to autonomy, privacy, misinformation, and discrimination that are unique to the use of genetic data and are not sufficiently addressed by current regulations. They conclude by proposing an agenda for future research.
      Citation: Journal of Marketing
      PubDate: 2021-02-10T04:22:15Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0022242920980767
       
  • Complaint Publicization in Social Media

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      Authors: Alireza Golmohammadi, Taha Havakhor, Dinesh K. Gauri, Joseph Comprix
      First page: 1
      Abstract: Journal of Marketing, Ahead of Print.
      Firms are increasingly turning to social media platforms for complaint handling. Previous research and practitioners’ reports highlight the benefits of complaint handling on social media, urging firms to provide prompt and detailed responses to complaints. However, little research has explored the possible drawbacks of such practices, especially when responses inadvertently further publicize complaints. Utilizing two unique data sets in a series of observational and quasiexperimental analyses, this research provides the first evidence of “complaint publicization” in social media, a phenomenon in which firm responses to complaints on popular social media platforms increase the potential public exposure of complaints. This negative effect can outweigh any positive customer care–signaling impact from firm responses. The authors show that a response strategy that engenders a high level of complaint publicization (e.g., providing detailed responses through multiple communication exchanges with a complainant) could negatively impact perceived quality and firm value, diminish the positive impact of a firm’s own posts, and increase the volume of future complaints. Additional analyses reveal that these adverse impacts are stronger for firms that are targeted by retail investors. The authors also uncover specific response strategies and styles that could mitigate these effects.
      Citation: Journal of Marketing
      PubDate: 2021-07-07T09:35:30Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00222429211002183
       
  • Wage Inequality: Its Impact on Customer Satisfaction and Firm Performance

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      Authors: Boas Bamberger, Christian Homburg, Dominik M. Wielgos
      First page: 24
      Abstract: Journal of Marketing, Ahead of Print.
      This article adopts a marketing perspective to examine how wage inequality between top managers and their employees may have customer-related consequences (i.e., customer-directed effort, customer-directed opportunism, and customer-oriented culture) that affect customer satisfaction and firm performance. Surprisingly, marketing scholars and practitioners have largely neglected this pressing societal issue. The authors collect a cross-industry, multisource data set, including responses by top-level managers and objective data on wage inequality and firm performance from 106 business-to-business-focused firms (Study 1). In addition, they analyze multisource longitudinal panel data covering 521 firm-year observations for business-to-consumer-focused firms (Study 2). The results consistently reveal that wage inequality harms customer satisfaction. This relationship is mediated by customer-directed opportunism and customer-oriented culture but not customer-directed effort. Moreover, while wage inequality has a positive direct effect on short-term firm profitability, this effect is dampened by the negative indirect effect through customer-related consequences and customer satisfaction. Importantly, the positive direct effect of wage inequality on short-term profitability vanishes in the long run, whereas the adverse effect through customer satisfaction persists, leading to a nonsignificant total effect on long-term profitability. These findings may guide researchers, managers, shareholders, and policy makers in addressing the challenge of rising wage inequality.
      Citation: Journal of Marketing
      PubDate: 2021-07-07T09:36:52Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00222429211026655
       
  • Managing the Versioning Decision over an App’s Lifetime

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      Authors: Seoungwoo Lee, Jie Zhang, Michel Wedel
      First page: 44
      Abstract: Journal of Marketing, Ahead of Print.
      The authors investigate app publishers’ decisions to offer free, paid, or both versions of an app over an app’s lifetime by taking into account the interplays between the demand for the free and paid versions and publishers’ consideration of future profit streams. Their empirical analyses are based on a comprehensive model of publishers’ versioning decisions calibrated on a data set of 584 top-downloaded apps on Google Play. They find contemporaneous cannibalization but positive intertemporal cross-effects on new users’ demand between the two versions. In addition, the free version’s active user base and in-app purchase and advertising revenues are reduced by the presence of a paid version, but not vice versa. Among the three options, offering the paid version first is the most common optimal launch strategy and applies to 40% of apps in the data. The evolutionary patterns of optimal versioning decisions vary by app category and are related to apps’ abilities to monetize different revenue sources. This study provides insights on how to strategically manage the versioning decision over an app’s lifetime and shows how publishers can make their free version apps more profitable via the deployment or elimination of the paid version.
      Citation: Journal of Marketing
      PubDate: 2021-07-14T09:25:36Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00222429211000068
       
  • Is Nestlé a Lady' The Feminine Brand Name Advantage

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      Authors: Ruth Pogacar, Justin Angle, Tina M. Lowrey, L. J. Shrum, Frank R. Kardes
      First page: 101
      Abstract: Journal of Marketing, Ahead of Print.
      A brand name’s linguistic characteristics convey brand qualities independent of the name’s denotative meaning. For instance, name length, sounds, and stress can signal masculine or feminine associations. This research examines the effects of such gender associations on three important brand outcomes: attitudes, choice, and performance. Across six studies, using both observational analyses of real brands and experimental manipulations of invented brands, the authors show that linguistically feminine names increase perceived warmth, which improves brand outcomes. Feminine brand names enhance attitudes and choice share—both hypothetically and consequentially—and are associated with better brand performance. The authors establish boundary conditions, showing that the feminine brand name advantage is attenuated when the typical user is male and when products are utilitarian.
      Citation: Journal of Marketing
      PubDate: 2021-05-05T09:26:32Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0022242921993060
       
  • Tarred with the Same Brush' Advertising Share of Voice and Stock Price
           Synchronicity

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      Authors: Chee S. Cheong, Arvid O.I. Hoffmann, Ralf Zurbruegg
      First page: 118
      Abstract: Journal of Marketing, Ahead of Print.
      Using the informative view of advertising as their theoretical lens, the authors propose that advertising provides information to investors in financial markets, analogous to its role for customers in product markets. The authors extend previous marketing–finance research, which has focused on how advertising affects firms’ risk and returns, and investigate a novel outcome variable, stock price synchronicity. Consistent with their proposed theory, the authors find that firms that advertise more relative to competitors have lower stock price synchronicity, implying that these firms’ stock price movements are driven more by information that is specific to the firm rather than general industry- and market-wide trends. The effect of advertising investments on stock price synchronicity is moderated by the information demand versus supply about firms in financial markets given firms’ product characteristics and ownership structure, and the likelihood of spillover effects between product and financial markets given firms’ marketing strategies. The authors illustrate the relevance of their findings for marketing managers through an event study in which they demonstrate that firms with high stock price synchronicity are “tarred with the same brush” and experience negative abnormal returns when competitors have a product recall, whereas firms with low stock price synchronicity are not affected.
      Citation: Journal of Marketing
      PubDate: 2021-06-08T04:13:22Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00222429211001052
       
  • Emotional Calibration and Salesperson Performance

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      Authors: Blair Kidwell, Jonathan Hasford, Broderick Turner, David M. Hardesty, Alex Ricardo Zablah
      First page: 141
      Abstract: Journal of Marketing, Ahead of Print.
      The authors propose that the emotional intelligence–sales performance link can be better understood by considering a salesperson’s confidence in how they use emotions, known as emotional self-efficacy (ESE). Four multisource studies across diverse sales industries offer evidence of the interactive effect of a salesperson’s emotional intelligence and ESE—which the authors term “emotional calibration”—on salesperson performance. They find that sales performance suffers when salespeople are either overconfident or underconfident in their emotional skills and that salespeople perform best when they are calibrated. Further, the authors demonstrate that the performance gains associated with emotional calibration (1) are attenuated when salespeople are under stress and (2) occur because emotional calibration encourages positive avoidance emotions (calmness and relaxation) among salespeople that result in improved customer rapport, but only among salespeople with relatively longer job tenures. Overall, the research highlights the critical role of ESE as an essential but neglected aspect of a salesperson’s emotional competence.
      Citation: Journal of Marketing
      PubDate: 2021-07-01T08:56:29Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0022242921999603
       
 
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