Subjects -> ADVERTISING AND PUBLIC RELATIONS (Total: 23 journals)
Showing 1 - 8 of 8 Journals sorted by number of followers
Book History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 114)
Journal of Marketing Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 70)
Journal of Marketing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 51)
Journal of Consumer Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44)
International Journal of Complexity in Leadership and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Design and Culture : The Journal of the Design Studies Forum     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Journal of International Marketing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 24)
International Journal of Advertising     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22)
Journal of Advertising     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Public Relations Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
International Journal of Market Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Advertising Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Public Policy & Marketing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Public Relations Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Foundations and Trends® in Marketing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Advertising & Society Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Interactive Advertising     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Public Relations Inquiry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Current Issues & Research in Advertising     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Young Consumers: Insight and Ideas for Responsible Marketers     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Place Branding and Public Diplomacy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Revista Internacional de Relaciones Públicas     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Journal of Marketing Research
Journal Prestige (SJR): 7.819
Citation Impact (citeScore): 6
Number of Followers: 70  
 
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
ISSN (Print) 0022-2437 - ISSN (Online) 1547-7193
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1174 journals]
  • Conducting Research in Marketing with Quasi-Experiments

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Avi Goldfarb, Catherine Tucker, Yanwen Wang
      Pages: 1 - 20
      Abstract: Journal of Marketing, Volume 86, Issue 3, Page 1-20, May 2022.
      This article aims to broaden the understanding of quasi-experimental methods among marketing scholars and those who read their work by describing the underlying logic and set of actions that make their work convincing. The purpose of quasi-experimental methods is, in the absence of experimental variation, to determine the presence of a causal relationship. First, the authors explore how to identify settings and data where it is interesting to understand whether an action causally affects a marketing outcome. Second, they outline how to structure an empirical strategy to identify a causal empirical relationship. The article details the application of various methods to identify how an action affects an outcome in marketing, including difference-in-differences, regression discontinuity, instrumental variables, propensity score matching, synthetic control, and selection bias correction. The authors emphasize the importance of clearly communicating the identifying assumptions underlying the assertion of causality. Last, they explain how exploring the behavioral mechanism—whether individual, organizational, or market level—can actually reinforce arguments of causality.
      Citation: Journal of Marketing
      PubDate: 2022-04-01T03:33:15Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00222429221082977
      Issue No: Vol. 86, No. 3 (2022)
       
  • Leveraging Cofollowership Patterns on Social Media to Identify Brand
           Alliance Opportunities

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Pankhuri Malhotra, Siddhartha Bhattacharyya
      Abstract: Journal of Marketing, Ahead of Print.
      The use of cobranding and brand extension strategies to access new markets has been a topic of significant interest. However, surprisingly few studies have examined cross-category connections of brands using publicly available digital footprints. In this study, the authors introduce a new, scalable automated approach for identifying potential cobranding and brand extension opportunities using brand networks derived from publicly available Twitter followership data. The digital user–brand relationship, established through followership activity, is regarded as an expression of interest toward the brand. Common followership patterns between brands are then extracted to capture cointerest between those brands’ audience. By utilizing the cointerest patterns, the approach aims to derive cross-category brand–brand and brand–category connections, which can serve as important measures for assessing cobranding and extensions opportunities. This article introduces a new construct, transcendence, which measures the extent to which a brand’s followers overlap with those of other brands in a new category. The analysis is conducted at different points in time to help managers track shifts in brand transcendence.
      Citation: Journal of Marketing
      PubDate: 2022-04-25T05:53:04Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00222429221083668
       
  • The Context (In)Dependence of Low-Fit Brand Extensions

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Pragya Mathur, Malika Malika, Nidhi Agrawal, Durairaj Maheswaran
      Abstract: Journal of Marketing, Ahead of Print.
      Low-fit brand extensions, while often presenting profitable opportunities for existing brands, are known to meet with varying levels of consumer acceptance. This research identifies conditions in which low-fit extensions can succeed. Specifically, the authors show that the extent to which consumers consider the context in forming judgments (i.e., they are context dependent) determines their acceptance of low-fit extensions. Across four studies, the authors examine the combined effects of context (in)dependence and type of information. Context-dependent consumers form their evaluations on the basis of the type of brand extension information provided, such that providing benefit-based information enhances the evaluations of low-fit extensions, whereas providing attribute-based information leads to a reliance on extension fit and subsequent unfavorable evaluations of low fit extensions. In contrast, context-independent consumers are more likely to base their judgments on extension fit regardless of whether they receive attribute- or benefit-based information. Acceptance of high-fit extensions is unaffected by context (in)dependence and type of information. These findings provide a two-step strategy (i.e., sensitize consumers to context and providing benefit-based extension information) to managers for launching low-fit extensions and leveraging existing parent brand equity.
      Citation: Journal of Marketing
      PubDate: 2022-04-25T05:52:38Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00222429221076840
       
  • The Impact of Advertising Creative Strategy on Advertising Elasticity

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Filippo Dall’Olio, Demetrios Vakratsas
      Abstract: Journal of Marketing, Ahead of Print.
      This study provides a comprehensive assessment of the impact of advertising creative strategy (ACS) on advertising elasticity, founded on an integrative framework that distinguishes between the function (content) and form (execution) of an advertising creative. The authors evaluate function using a three-dimensional representation of content (experience, affect, cognition), whereas the representation of form accounts for both executional elements and the use of creative templates. The distinction between function and form allows for the investigation of potential synergies between content and execution, previously unaccounted for in the literature. The ACS framework also facilitates the calculation of composite metrics that capture holistic aspects of the creative strategy, such as focus (i.e., the extent of the emphasis on a specific content dimension) and variation (i.e., changes in content and execution over time). The empirical application focuses on a dynamic linear model analysis of 2,251 television advertising creatives from 91 brands in 16 consumer packaged goods categories. The findings show that for function, experiential content has the greatest effect on elasticity, followed by cognitive and affective content. Function and form produce synergies that advertisers can leverage to increase returns. Finally, focus, variation, and the use of templates increase advertising elasticity.
      Citation: Journal of Marketing
      PubDate: 2022-04-25T05:52:16Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00222429221074960
       
  • The Upside of Negative: Social Distance in Online Reviews of
           Identity-Relevant Brands

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Nailya Ordabayeva, Lisa A. Cavanaugh, Darren W. Dahl
      Abstract: Journal of Marketing, Ahead of Print.
      Conventional wisdom in marketing emphasizes the detrimental effects of negative online reviews for brands. An important question is whether some firms could more effectively manage negative reviews to increase brand preference and improve outcomes. To address the question, this research examines how customers respond to online reviews of identity-relevant brands in particular, which have been overlooked in the online reviews literature. Eight studies (field data and experiments featuring consequential and hypothetical behaviors) show that negative online reviews may not be so detrimental for identity-relevant brands, especially when those reviews originate from socially distant (vs. socially close) reviewers. This occurs because a negative review of an identity-relevant brand can pose a threat to a customer's identity, prompting the customer to strengthen their relationship with the identity-relevant brand. To document the underlying process, the authors show that this effect does not emerge when the review is positive or the brand is identity-irrelevant. Importantly, the authors identify circumstances when negative reviews can actually produce positive outcomes (higher preference) for identity-relevant brands over no reviews or even positive reviews. By demonstrating the upside of negative reviews for identity-relevant brands, the findings have important implications for marketing theory and practice.
      Citation: Journal of Marketing
      PubDate: 2022-03-21T08:32:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00222429221074704
       
  • The Pet Exposure Effect: Exploring the Differential Impact of Dogs Versus
           Cats on Consumer Mindsets

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Lei Jia, Xiaojing Yang, Yuwei Jiang
      Abstract: Journal of Marketing, Ahead of Print.
      Despite the ubiquity of pets in consumers’ lives, scant research has examined how exposure to them (e.g., recalling past interactions with dogs and cats, viewing ads featuring a dog or a cat) influences consumer behavior. The authors demonstrate that exposure to dogs (cats) reminds consumers of the stereotypical temperaments and behaviors of the pet species, which activates a promotion- (prevention-) focused motivational mindset among consumers. Using secondary data, Study 1 shows that people in states with a higher percentage of dog (cat) owners Google more promotion- (prevention-) focused words and report a higher COVID-19 transmission rate. Using multiple products, Studies 2 and 3 demonstrate that these regulatory mindsets, when activated by pet exposure, carry over to influence downstream consumer judgments, purchase intentions, and behaviors, even in pet-unrelated consumption contexts. Study 4 shows that pet stereotypicality moderates the proposed effect such that the relationship between pet exposure and regulatory orientations persists to the extent consumers are reminded of the stereotypical temperaments and behaviors of the pet species. Studies 5–7 examine the role of regulatory fit and evince that exposure to dogs (cats) leads to more favorable responses toward advertising messages featuring promotion- (prevention-) focused appeals.
      Citation: Journal of Marketing
      PubDate: 2022-03-18T11:59:07Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00222429221078036
       
  • Onboarding Salespeople: Socialization Approaches

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Phillip Wiseman, Michael Ahearne, Zachary Hall, Seshadri Tirunillai
      Abstract: Journal of Marketing, Ahead of Print.
      The effective training of salespeople is crucial to a firm's success; there is arguably no more critical type of training than a salesperson's onboarding. In this study, the authors leverage a natural field experiment in which a firm's newly hired salespeople can undergo onboarding through either a decentralized program or a centralized program to examine the relative impact of each program. Drawing on organizational socialization theory, the authors consider whether an onboarding program that incorporates both individualized and institutionalized socialization tactics (the decentralized program) can develop salespeople into higher performers by encouraging them to take a more innovative and adaptive approach to different facets of the sales role. The findings reveal that salespeople who underwent the decentralized program achieved approximately 23.5% higher sales performance than those who underwent the centralized program. The performance benefits of the decentralized program were amplified for salespeople whose managers had a narrower span of control. In addition, these performance benefits were appreciable for those salespeople transitioning from another job but negligible for those transitioning from school. A scenario-based experiment enriches the field experiment's findings by showing evidence of the theorized mechanism underlying the sales performance benefits observed: the fostering of an innovative role orientation.
      Citation: Journal of Marketing
      PubDate: 2022-03-08T11:09:14Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00222429221076437
       
  • Bad News' Send an AI. Good News' Send a Human

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Aaron M. Garvey, TaeWoo Kim, Adam Duhachek
      Abstract: Journal of Marketing, Ahead of Print.
      The present research demonstrates how consumer responses to negative and positive offers are influenced by whether the administering marketing agent is an artificial intelligence (AI) or a human. In the case of a product or service offer that is worse than expected, consumers respond better when dealing with an AI agent in the form of increased purchase likelihood and satisfaction. In contrast, for an offer that is better than expected, consumers respond more positively to a human agent. The authors demonstrate that AI agents, compared with human agents, are perceived to have weaker intentions when administering offers, which accounts for this effect. That is, consumers infer that AI agents lack selfish intentions in the case of an offer that favors the agent and lack benevolent intentions in the case of an offer that favors the customer, thereby dampening the extremity of consumer responses. Moreover, the authors demonstrate a moderating effect, such that marketers may anthropomorphize AI agents to strengthen perceived intentions, providing an avenue to receive due credit from consumers when the agent provides a better offer and mitigate blame when it provides a worse offer. Potential ethical concerns with the use of AI to bypass consumer resistance to negative offers are discussed.
      Citation: Journal of Marketing
      PubDate: 2022-02-18T04:28:07Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00222429211066972
       
  • When the Honeymoon Is Over: A Theory of Relationship Liabilities and
           Evolutionary Processes

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Danielle A. Chmielewski-Raimondo, Ali Shamsollahi, Simon J. Bell, Jan B. Heide
      Abstract: Journal of Marketing, Ahead of Print.
      The authors draw on the sociological theories of the “liability of newness” and the “liability of adolescence” to generate new insights into relationship evolution. First, they show how a new relationship in its “honeymoon” phase exhibits a unique constellation of two conditions, namely information asymmetry and forbearance. Next, they explain how a relationship evolves along two processes that involve passive learning and decay, respectively. In themselves, these processes will move a relationship toward a long-term “transactional” state and possibly termination, but the processes can also be actively shaped using various governance mechanisms. Doing so, however, requires a nuanced account of types of governance mechanisms and the particular conditions they are intended to induce. The authors consider how the general mechanisms of (1) incentives and (2) information sharing can be deployed in standardized or customized fashions, respectively. Next, they suggest how different manifestation of governance mechanisms impact a relationship's underlying evolutionary processes and evolved relationship states. In general, their framework represents a new perspective on relationship evolution—one that involves the purposeful management of initial conditions and their related evolutionary processes.
      Citation: Journal of Marketing
      PubDate: 2022-02-15T05:43:23Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00222429211062247
       
  • Getting a Handle on Sales: Shopping Carts Affect Purchasing by Activating
           Arm Muscles

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Zachary Estes, Mathias C. Streicher
      Abstract: Journal of Marketing, Ahead of Print.
      This research demonstrates that the physical properties of shopping carts influence purchasing and spending. Prior research on ergonomics indicates that standard shopping carts, which are pushed via a horizontal handlebar, are likely to activate arm extensor muscles. Prior research on arm muscle activation, in turn, suggests that arm extensor activation may elicit less purchasing than arm flexor activation. The authors thus deduce that standard shopping carts may be suboptimal for stimulating purchases. The authors predicted that shopping carts with parallel handles (such as on a wheelbarrow or “walker”) would instead activate the flexor muscles and thus increase purchasing. An electromyography study revealed that both horizontal and vertical handles more strongly activate the extensor muscles of the upper arm (triceps), whereas parallel handles more strongly activate the flexor muscles (biceps). In a field experiment, parallel-handle shopping carts significantly and substantially increased sales across a broad range of categories, including both vice and virtue products. Finally, in a simulated shopping experiment, parallel handles increased purchasing and spending beyond both horizontal and vertical handles. These results were not attributable to the novelty of the shopping cart itself, participants’ mood, or purely ergonomic factors.
      Citation: Journal of Marketing
      PubDate: 2022-02-15T04:57:06Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00222429211061367
       
  • How Political Identity Shapes Customer Satisfaction

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Daniel Fernandes, Nailya Ordabayeva, Kyuhong Han, Jihye Jung, Vikas Mittal
      Abstract: Journal of Marketing, Ahead of Print.
      This article examines the effect of political identity on customers’ satisfaction with the products and services they consume. Recent work suggests that conservatives are less likely to complain than liberals. Building on that work, the present research examines how political identity shapes customer satisfaction, which has broad implications for customers and firms. Nine studies combine different methodologies, primary and secondary data, real and hypothetical behavior, different product categories, and diverse participant populations to show that conservatives (vs. liberals) are more satisfied with the products and services they consume. This happens because conservatives (vs. liberals) are more likely to believe in free will (i.e., that people have agency over their decisions) and, therefore, to trust their own decisions. The authors document the broad and tangible downstream consequences of this effect for customers’ repurchase and recommendation intentions and firms’ sales. The association of political identity and customer satisfaction is attenuated when belief in free will is externally weakened, choice is limited, or the consumption experience is overwhelmingly positive.
      Citation: Journal of Marketing
      PubDate: 2022-02-01T12:39:35Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00222429211057508
       
  • Households Under Economic Change: How Micro- and Macroeconomic Conditions
           Shape Grocery Shopping Behavior

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Thomas P. Scholdra, Julian R.K. Wichmann, Maik Eisenbeiss, Werner J. Reinartz
      Abstract: Journal of Marketing, Ahead of Print.
      Economic conditions may significantly affect households’ shopping behavior and, by extension, retailers’ and manufacturers’ firm performance. By explicitly distinguishing between two basic types of economic conditions—micro conditions, in terms of households’ personal income, and macro conditions, in terms of the business cycle—this study analyzes how households adjust their grocery shopping behavior. The authors observe more than 5,000 households over eight years and analyze shopping outcomes in terms of what, where, and how much they shop and spend. Results show that micro and macro conditions substantially influence shopping outcomes, but in very different ways. Microeconomic changes lead households to adjust primarily their overall purchase volume—that is, after losing income, households buy fewer products and spend less in total. In contrast, macroeconomic changes cause pronounced structural shifts in households’ shopping basket allocation and spending behavior. Specifically, during contractions, households shift purchases toward private labels while also buying and consequently spending more than during expansions. During expansions, however, households increasingly purchase national brands but keep their total spending constant. The authors discuss psychological and sociological mechanisms that can explain the differential effects of micro and macro conditions on shopping behavior and develop important diagnostic and normative implications for retailers and manufacturers.
      Citation: Journal of Marketing
      PubDate: 2022-01-07T02:18:32Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00222429211036882
       
  • Befriending the Enemy: The Effects of Observing Brand-to-Brand Praise on
           Consumer Evaluations and Choices

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Lingrui Zhou, Katherine M. Du, Keisha M. Cutright
      Abstract: Journal of Marketing, Ahead of Print.
      Consumers have grown increasingly skeptical of brands, leaving managers in a dire search for novel ways to connect. The authors suggest that focusing on one's relationships with competitors is a valuable, albeit unexpected, way for brands to do so. More specifically, the present research demonstrates that praising one's competitor—via “brand-to-brand praise”— often heightens preference for the praiser more so than other common forms of communication, such as self-promotion or benevolent information. This is because brand-to-brand praise increases perceptions of brand warmth, which leads to enhanced brand evaluations and choice. The authors support this theory with seven studies conducted in the lab, online, and in the field that feature multiple managerially relevant outcomes, including brand attitudes, social media and advertising engagement, brand choice, and purchase behavior, in a variety of product and service contexts. The authors also identify key boundary conditions and rule out alternative explanations, further elucidating the underlying mechanism and important implementation insights. This work contributes to the understanding of brand perception and warmth, providing a novel way for brands to connect to consumers by connecting with each other.
      Citation: Journal of Marketing
      PubDate: 2022-01-04T06:33:07Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00222429211053002
       
  • GMO Labeling Policy and Consumer Choice

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Youngju Kim, SunAh Kim, Neeraj Arora
      First page: 21
      Abstract: Journal of Marketing, Ahead of Print.
      Most scientists claim that genetically modified organisms (GMOs) in foods are safe for human consumption and offer societal benefits such as better nutritional content. However, many consumers remain skeptical about their safety. Against this backdrop of diverging views, the authors investigate the impact of different GMO labeling policy regimes on the products consumers choose. Guided by the literature on negativity bias, structural alignment theory, and message presentation, and based on findings from four experiments, the authors show that consumer demand for GM foods depends on the labeling regime policy makers adopt. Both absence-focused (“non-GMO”) and presence-focused (“contains GMO”) labeling regimes reduce the market share of GM foods, with the reduction being greater in the latter case. GMO labels reduce the importance consumers place on price and enhance their willingness to pay for non-GM products. Results indicate that specific label design choices policy makers implement (in the form of color and style) also affect consumer responses to GM labeling. Consumer attitudes toward GMOs moderate this effect—consumers with neutral attitudes toward GMOs are influenced most significantly by the label design.
      Citation: Journal of Marketing
      PubDate: 2022-02-23T05:19:35Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00222429211064901
       
  • Sales and Self: The Noneconomic Value of Selling the Fruits of One's Labor
           

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Benedikt Schnurr, Christoph Fuchs, Elisa Maira, Stefano Puntoni, Martin Schreier, Stijn M.J. van Osselaer
      First page: 40
      Abstract: Journal of Marketing, Ahead of Print.
      A core assumption across many disciplines is that producers enter market exchange relationships for economic reasons. This research examines an overlooked factor; namely, the socioemotional benefits of selling the fruits of one's labor. Specifically, the authors find that individuals selling their products interpret sales as a signal from the market that serves as a source of self-validation, thus increasing their happiness above and beyond any monetary rewards from those sales. This effect highlights an information asymmetry that is opposite to what is found in traditional signaling theory. That is, the authors find that customers have information about product quality that they signal to the producer, validating the producer's skill level. Furthermore, the sales-as-signal effect is moderated by characteristics of the purchase transaction that determine the signal strength of sales: The effect is attenuated when product choice does not reflect a deliberate decision and is amplified when buyers incur higher monetary costs. In addition, sales have a stronger effect on happiness than alternative, nonmonetary forms of market signals such as likes. Finally, the sales-as-signal effect is more pronounced when individuals sell their self-made (vs. other-made) products and affects individuals’ happiness beyond the happiness gained from producing.
      Citation: Journal of Marketing
      PubDate: 2022-03-10T10:29:12Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00222429211064263
       
  • Measuring the Real-Time Stock Market Impact of Firm-Generated Content

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Ewelina Lacka, D. Eric Boyd, Gbenga Ibikunle, P.K. Kannan
      Abstract: Journal of Marketing, Ahead of Print.
      Firms increasingly follow an “always on” philosophy, publishing multiple pieces of firm-generated content (FGC) every day. Current methodologies used in marketing are unfit to unbiasedly capture the impact of FGC disseminated intermittently throughout the day on stock markets characterized by ultra-high-frequency trading. They also neither distinguish between the permanent (i.e., long-term) and temporary (i.e., short-term) price impacts nor identify FGC attributes capable of generating these price impacts. In this study, the authors define price impact as the impact on the variance of stock price. Employing a market microstructure approach to exploit the variance of high-frequency changes in stock price, the authors estimate the permanent and temporary price impacts of the firm-generated Twitter content of S&P 500 information technology firms. The authors find that firm-generated tweets induce both permanent and temporary price impacts, which are linked to tweet attributes of valence and subject matter. Tweets reflecting only valence or subject matter concerning consumer or competitor orientation result in temporary price impacts, whereas those embodying both attributes generate permanent price impacts. Negative-valence tweets about competitors generate the largest permanent price impacts. Building on these findings, the authors offer suggestions to marketing managers regarding the design of intraday FGC.
      Citation: Journal of Marketing
      PubDate: 2021-11-26T11:41:35Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00222429211042848
       
  • Attribute Embedding: Learning Hierarchical Representations of Product
           Attributes from Consumer Reviews

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Xin (Shane) Wang, Jiaxiu He, David J. Curry, Jun Hyun (Joseph) Ryoo
      Abstract: Journal of Marketing, Ahead of Print.
      Sales, product design, and engineering teams benefit immensely from better understanding customer perspectives. How do customers combine a product's technical specifications (i.e., engineered attributes) to form abstract product benefits (i.e., meta-attributes)' To address this question, the authors use machine learning and natural language processing to develop a methodological framework that extracts a hierarchy of product attributes based on contextual information of how attributes are expressed in consumer reviews. The attribute hierarchy reveals linkages between engineered attributes and meta-attributes within a product category, enabling flexible sentiment analysis that can identify how consumers receive meta-attributes, and which engineered attributes are main drivers. The framework can guide managers to monitor only portions of review content that are relevant to specific attributes of interest. Moreover, managers can compare products within and between brands, where different names and attribute combinations are often associated with similar benefits. The authors apply the framework to the tablet computer category to generate dashboards and perceptual maps and provide validations of the attribute hierarchy using both primary and secondary data. Resultant insights allow the exploration of substantive questions, such as how Apple improved successive generations of iPads and why Hewlett-Packard and Toshiba discontinued their tablet product lines.
      Citation: Journal of Marketing
      PubDate: 2021-11-17T02:57:21Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00222429211047822
       
  • Why Is It Wrong to Sell Your Body' Understanding Liberals’ Versus
           Conservatives’ Moral Objections to Bodily Markets

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Shreyans Goenka, Stijn M.J. van Osselaer
      Abstract: Journal of Marketing, Ahead of Print.
      People hold strong moral objections to commercial bodily markets—the buying and selling of the human body and its components (e.g., prostitution; commercial surrogacy; trade of kidneys, blood plasma, sperm, ovum, and hair). This research takes a descriptive approach to understand why people object to the marketing of the human body and how their moral objections differ across the political spectrum. The authors propose that liberals and conservatives find bodily markets to be morally wrong; however, the two groups object to bodily markets for different reasons. Liberals are more sensitive to exploitation concerns, but conservatives are more sensitive to violation of sanctity concerns in these markets. Real-world observational data and controlled experiments test these predictions. The findings show how sociopolitical leaders utilize the different moral objections to persuade their respective audiences, such as how conservative versus more liberal pastors sermonize differently on prostitution. Second, results show how targeted marketing campaigns encourage liberals and conservatives to participate in consumer advocacy and donate to political causes. Third, findings outline how liberals and conservatives support different regulatory laws that penalize buyers versus sellers. Finally, results show how the different moral objections manifest for live bodily products but not for dead bodily products.
      Citation: Journal of Marketing
      PubDate: 2021-11-17T02:56:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00222429211046936
       
  • Connecting to Place, People, and Past: How Products Make Us Feel Grounded

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Isabel Eichinger, Martin Schreier, Stijn M.J. van Osselaer
      Abstract: Journal of Marketing, Ahead of Print.
      Consumption can provide a feeling of groundedness or being emotionally rooted. This can occur when products connect consumers to their physical (place), social (people), and historic (past) environment. The authors introduce the concept of groundedness to the literature and show that it increases consumer choice; happiness; and feelings of safety, strength, and stability. Following these consequential outcomes, the authors demonstrate how marketers can provide consumers with a feeling of groundedness through product designs, distribution channels, and marketing communications. They also show how marketers might segment the market using observable proxies for consumers’ need for groundedness, such as high computer use, high socioeconomic status, or life changes brought on by the COVID-19 pandemic. Taken together, the findings show that groundedness is a powerful concept providing a comprehensive explanation for a variety of consumer trends, including the popularity of local, artisanal, and nostalgic products. It seems that in times of digitization, urbanization, and global challenges, the need to feel grounded has become particularly acute.
      Citation: Journal of Marketing
      PubDate: 2021-11-03T03:14:57Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00222429211027469
       
  • Why Salespeople Avoid Big-Whale Sales Opportunities

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Juan Xu, Michel van der Borgh, Edwin J. Nijssen, Son K. Lam
      Abstract: Journal of Marketing, Ahead of Print.
      Contrary to the intuition that salespeople gravitate toward big-whale sales opportunities, in reality they often avoid them. To study this phenomenon, the authors integrate contingent decision-making and conservation-of-resources theories to develop and test a framework of salespeople's decision making when prospecting. Study 1 reveals that the performance impact of salesperson initial judgment of opportunity magnitude follows an inverted U-shape, indicating that salespeople's avoidance of large opportunities results from rational benefit–cost analyses due to their conservation of resources. Interestingly, salespeople use a calibration decision-making strategy (i.e., calculating expected benefits by accounting for conversion uncertainty) at the portfolio rather than prospect level, in solution- but not product-selling contexts. Ignoring this calibration effect can lead to under- or overestimation of conversion rates of up to 100%. Study 2 shows that salespeople's past performance success and experience bias this calibration. Simulations reveal that when high performers or inexperienced salespeople believe their portfolio magnitude is large and conversion uncertainty low, they are less concerned about resource conservation and improve their quota attainment by 50%. Study 3 confirms the theoretical mechanism. These findings shed new light on salespeople's decision making and suggest ways for sales professionals to improve effectiveness when prospecting.
      Citation: Journal of Marketing
      PubDate: 2021-10-27T12:21:45Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00222429211037336
       
  • Is Distance Really Dead in the Online World' The Moderating Role of
           Geographical Distance on the Effectiveness of Electronic Word of Mouth

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Vilma Todri, Panagiotis (Panos) Adamopoulos, Michelle Andrews
      Abstract: Journal of Marketing, Ahead of Print.
      The authors investigate how the geographical distance between online users is associated with electronic word-of-mouth (eWOM) effectiveness. Their research leverages variation in the visibility of eWOM messages on the social media platform of Twitter to address the issue of correlated user behaviors and preferences. The study shows that the likelihood that followers who are exposed to users’ WOM subsequently make purchases increases with followers’ geographic proximity to the users. The authors propose social identification as a potential mechanism for why geographical distance still matters online in eWOM: because consumers may form a sense of social identity based on their physical location, information regarding the spatial proximity of users could trigger online social identification with others. The findings are robust to alternative methods and specifications, such as further controlling for latent user homophily by incorporating user characteristics and embeddings based on advanced machine-learning and deep-learning models and a corpus of 140 million messages. The authors also rule out several alternative explanations. The findings have important implications for platform design, content curation, and seeding and targeting strategies.
      Citation: Journal of Marketing
      PubDate: 2021-10-27T03:05:34Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00222429211034414
       
  • Examining Why and When Market Share Drives Firm Profit

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Abhi Bhattacharya, Neil A. Morgan, Lopo L. Rego
      Abstract: Journal of Marketing, Ahead of Print.
      Many firms use market share to set marketing goals and monitor performance. Recent meta-analytic research reveals the average economic impact of market share performance and identifies some factors affecting its value. However, empirical understanding of why any market share–profit relationship exists and varies is limited. The authors simultaneously examine the three primary theoretical mechanisms linking firm market share with profit. On average, they find that most of the variance in market share’s positive effect on firm profit is explained by market power and quality signaling, with little support for operating efficiency as a mechanism. They find a similar explanatory role of the three mechanisms in conditions where market share negatively predicts profit (for niche firms and those “buying” market share). Using these mechanism insights, the authors show that the value of market share differs in predictable ways between firms and across industries, providing new understanding of when managers may usefully set market share goals. The authors also provide new insights into how market share should be measured for goal setting and performance monitoring. They show that revenue market share is a predictor of firm profit while unit market share is not, and that relative measures of revenue market share can provide greater predictive power.
      Citation: Journal of Marketing
      PubDate: 2021-10-27T03:04:46Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00222429211031922
       
  • Regulating Product Recall Compliance in the Digital Age: Evidence from the
           “Safe Cars Save Lives” Campaign

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Sotires Pagiavlas, Kartik Kalaignanam, Manpreet Gill, Paul D. Bliese
      Abstract: Journal of Marketing, Ahead of Print.
      The unprecedented number of product recalls in recent years and subsequent low consumer recall compliance raise questions about the role of regulatory agencies in ensuring safety. In this study, the authors develop a conceptual framework to test the impact of a regulator-initiated digital marketing campaign (DMC) on consumer recall compliance. The empirical context is the launch of a nationwide DMC by the U.S. automobile industry’s regulator. The analysis utilizes recall completion data from 296 product recalls active both before and after the DMC’s launch. The results show that the DMC improves consumer recall compliance. In the first four quarters after it was introduced, the DMC increased the number of vehicles fixed, on average, by 20,712 per recall campaign over what would be expected without the DMC. Regarding boundary conditions, the study finds that the DMC is more effective for recall campaigns with greater media coverage and for those with older recalled products. However, the DMC’s effect weakens as the time needed to repair a defective component increases. The findings should help regulators make compelling cases for greater resource allocation toward digital initiatives to improve recall compliance.
      Citation: Journal of Marketing
      PubDate: 2021-10-19T02:53:35Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00222429211023016
       
  • Identifying Market Structure: A Deep Network Representation Learning of
           Social Engagement

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Yi Yang, Kunpeng Zhang, P.K. Kannan
      Abstract: Journal of Marketing, Ahead of Print.
      With rapid technological developments, product-market boundaries have become more dynamic. Consequently, competition for products and services is emerging outside the product-market boundaries traditionally defined based on Standard Industrial Classification and North American Industry Classification System codes. Identifying these fluid product-market boundaries is critical for firms not only to compete effectively within a market but also to identify lurking threats and latent opportunities outside market boundaries. Newly available big data on social media engagement presents such an opportunity. The authors propose a deep network representation learning framework to capture latent relationships among thousands of brands and across many categories, using millions of social media users’ brand engagement data. They build a brand–user network and then compress the network into a lower-dimensional space using a deep autoencoder technique. The authors evaluate this approach quantitatively and qualitatively and visually display the market structure using the learned representations of brands. They validate the learned brand relationships using multiple external data sources. They also illustrate how this method can capture the dynamic changes of product-market boundaries using two well-known events—the acquisition of Whole Foods by Amazon and the introduction of the Model 3 by Tesla—and how managers can use the insights that emerge from this analysis.
      Citation: Journal of Marketing
      PubDate: 2021-10-16T12:37:08Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00222429211033585
       
  • Communication in the Gig Economy: Buying and Selling in Online Freelance
           Marketplaces

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Stephan Ludwig, Dennis Herhausen, Dhruv Grewal, Liliana Bove, Sabine Benoit, Ko de Ruyter, Peter Urwin
      Abstract: Journal of Marketing, Ahead of Print.
      The proliferating gig economy relies on online freelance marketplaces, which support relatively anonymous interactions through text-based messages. Informational asymmetries thus arise that can lead to exchange uncertainties between buyers and freelancers. Conventional marketing thought recommends reducing such uncertainty. However, uncertainty reduction and uncertainty management theories indicate that buyers and freelancers might benefit more from balancing—rather than reducing—uncertainty, such as by strategically adhering to or deviating from common communication principles. With dyadic analyses of calls for bids and bids from a leading online freelance marketplace, this study reveals that buyers attract more bids from freelancers when they provide moderate degrees of task information and concreteness, avoid sharing personal information, and limit the affective intensity of their communication. Freelancers’ bid success and price premiums increase when they mimic the degree of task information and affective intensity exhibited by buyers. However, mimicking a lack of personal information and concreteness reduces freelancers’ success, so freelancers should always be more concrete and offer more personal information than buyers. These contingent perspectives offer insights into buyer–seller communication in two-sided online marketplaces. They clarify that despite, or sometimes due to, communication uncertainty, both sides can achieve success in the online gig economy.
      Citation: Journal of Marketing
      PubDate: 2021-10-16T11:04:26Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00222429211030841
       
  • Leveraging Creativity in Charity Marketing: The Impact of Engaging in
           Creative Activities on Subsequent Donation Behavior

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Lidan Xu, Ravi Mehta, Darren W. Dahl
      Abstract: Journal of Marketing, Ahead of Print.
      Charities are constantly looking for new and more effective ways to engage potential donors in order to secure the resources needed to deliver services. The current work demonstrates that creative activities are one way for marketers to meet this challenge. Field and lab studies find that engaging potential donors in creative activities positively influences their donation behaviors (i.e., the likelihood of donation and the monetary amount donated). Importantly, the observed effects are shown to be context independent: they hold even when potential donors engage in creative activities unrelated to the focal cause of the charity (or the charitable organization itself). The findings suggest that engaging in a creative activity enhances the felt autonomy of the participant, thus inducing a positive affective state, which in turn leads to higher donation behaviors. Positive affect is demonstrated to enhance donation behaviors due to perceptions of donation impact and a desire for mood maintenance. However, the identified effects emerge only when one engages in a creative activity—not when the activity is noncreative, or when only the concept of creativity itself is made salient.
      Citation: Journal of Marketing
      PubDate: 2021-10-16T07:28:16Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00222429211037587
       
  • Do Backer Affiliations Help or Hurt Crowdfunding Success'

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Kelly B. Herd, Girish Mallapragada, Vishal Narayan
      Abstract: Journal of Marketing, Ahead of Print.
      Crowdfunding has emerged as a mechanism to raise funds for entrepreneurial ideas. On crowdfunding platforms, backers (i.e., individuals who fund ideas) jointly fund the same idea, leading to affiliations, or overlaps, within the community. The authors find that while an increase in the total number of backers may positively affect funding behavior, the resulting affiliations affect funding negatively. They reason that when affiliated others fund a new idea, individuals may feel less of a need to fund, a process known as “vicarious moral licensing.” Drawing on data collected from 2,021 ideas on a prominent crowdfunding platform, the authors show that prior affiliation among backers negatively affects an idea’s funding amount and eventual funding success. Creator engagement (i.e., idea description and updates) and backer engagement (i.e., Facebook shares) moderate this negative effect. The effect of affiliation is robust across several instrumental variables, model specifications, measures of affiliation, and multiple crowdfunding outcomes. Results from three experiments, a survey, and interviews with backers support the negative effect of affiliation and show that it can be explained by vicarious moral licensing. The authors develop actionable insights for creators to mitigate the negative effects of affiliation with the language used in idea descriptions and updates.
      Citation: Journal of Marketing
      PubDate: 2021-10-14T12:50:33Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00222429211031814
       
  • Halo or Cannibalization' How New Software Entrants Impact Sales of
           Incumbent Software in Platform Markets

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: B.J. Allen, Richard T. Gretz, Mark B. Houston, Suman Basuroy
      First page: 59
      Abstract: Journal of Marketing, Ahead of Print.
      Platform markets involve indirect network effects as two or more sides of a market interact through an intermediary platform. Many platform markets consist of both a platform device and corresponding software. In such markets, new software introductions influence incumbent software sales, and new entrants may directly cannibalize incumbents. However, entrants may also create an indirect halo impact by attracting new platform adopters, who then purchase incumbent software. To measure performance holistically, this article introduces a method to quantify both indirect and direct paths and determine which effect dominates and when. The authors identify relevant moderators from the sensations–familiarity framework and conduct empirical tests with data from the video game industry (1995–2019). Results show that the direct impact often results in cannibalization, which generally increases when the entrant is a superstar or part of a franchise. For the indirect halo impact, superstar entrants significantly increase platform adoption, which can help all incumbents. Combining the direct and indirect impacts, the authors find that only new software that is both a superstar and part of a franchise increases platform adoption sufficiently to overcome direct cannibalization and achieve a net positive effect on incumbent software; all other types of entrants have a neutral or negative overall effect.
      Citation: Journal of Marketing
      PubDate: 2021-10-12T03:09:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00222429211017827
       
  • Shedding Light on the Dark Side of Firm Lobbying: A Customer Perspective

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Gautham G. Vadakkepatt, Sandeep Arora, Kelly D. Martin, Neeru Paharia
      First page: 79
      Abstract: Journal of Marketing, Ahead of Print.
      Firms spend a substantial amount on lobbying—devoting financial resources on teams of lobbyists to further their interests among regulatory stakeholders. Previous research acknowledges that lobbying positively influences firm value, but no studies have examined the parallel effects for customers. Building on the attention-based view (ABV) of the firm, the authors examine these customer effects. Findings reveal that lobbying negatively affects customer satisfaction such that the positive relationship between lobbying and firm value is mediated by losses to customer satisfaction. These findings suggest a dark side of lobbying and challenge current thinking. However, several customer-focused moderators attenuate the negative effect of lobbying on customer satisfaction, predicted by ABV theory, including the chief executive officer’s background (marketing vs. other functional area) and the firm’s strategic use of resources (advertising spending, R&D spending, or lobbying for product market issues). These moderators ensure consistency between lobbying and customer priorities or direct firm attention toward customers even while firms continue to lobby. Finally, the authors verify that lobbying reduces the firm’s customer focus by measuring this focus directly using text analysis of firm communications with shareholders. Collectively, the research provides managerial implications for navigating both lobbying activities and customer priorities, and public policy implications for lobbying disclosure requirements.
      Citation: Journal of Marketing
      PubDate: 2021-10-22T04:46:21Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00222429211023040
       
  • The Influence of Social Norms on Consumer Behavior: A Meta-Analysis

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Vladimir Melnyk, François A. Carrillat, Valentyna Melnyk
      First page: 98
      Abstract: Journal of Marketing, Ahead of Print.
      Social norms shape consumer behavior. However, it is not clear under what circumstances social norms are more versus less effective in doing so. This gap is addressed through an interdisciplinary meta-analysis examining the impact of social norms on consumer behavior across a wide array of contexts involving the purchase, consumption, use, and disposal of products and services, including socially approved (e.g., fruit consumption, donations) and disapproved (e.g., smoking, gambling) behaviors. Drawing from reactance theory and based on a cross-disciplinary data set of 250 effect sizes from research spanning 1978–2019 representing 112,478 respondents from 22 countries, the authors examine the effects of five categories of moderators of the effectiveness of social norms on consumer behavior: (1) target behavior characteristics, (2) communication factors, (3) consumer costs, (4) environmental factors, and (5) methodological characteristics. The findings suggest that while the effect of social norms on approved behavior is stable across time and cultures, their effect on disapproved behavior has grown over time and is stronger in survival and traditional cultures. Communications identifying specific organizations or close group members enhance compliance with social norms, as does the presence of monetary costs. The authors leverage their findings to offer managerial implications and a future research agenda for the field.
      Citation: Journal of Marketing
      PubDate: 2021-10-08T03:48:33Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00222429211029199
       
  • The Roar of the Crowd: How Interaction Ritual Chains Create Social
           Atmospheres

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Tim Hill, Robin Canniford, Giana M. Eckhardt
      First page: 121
      Abstract: Journal of Marketing, Ahead of Print.
      Atmospheres are experiences of place involving transformations of consumers’ behaviors and emotions. Existing marketing research reveals how atmospheric stimuli, service performances, and ritual place-making enhance place experiences and create value for firms. Yet it remains unclear how shared experiences of atmosphere emerge and intensify among groups of people during collective live events. Accordingly, this article uses sociological interaction ritual theory to conceptualize “social atmospheres”: rapidly changing qualities of place created when a shared focus aligns consumers’ emotions and behavior, resulting in lively expressions of collective effervescence. With data from an ethnography of an English Premier League football stadium, the authors identify a four-stage process of creating atmospheres in interaction ritual chains. This framework goes beyond conventional retail and servicescape design by demonstrating that social atmospheres are mobile and cocreated between firms and consumers before, during, and after a main event. The study also reveals how interaction rituals can be disrupted and offers insight as to how firms can balance key tensions in creating social atmospheres as a means to enhance customer experiences, customer loyalty, and communal place attachments.
      Citation: Journal of Marketing
      PubDate: 2021-10-08T03:47:22Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00222429211023355
       
  • When to Use Markets, Lines, and Lotteries: How Beliefs About Preferences
           Shape Beliefs About Allocation

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Franklin Shaddy, Anuj K. Shah
      First page: 140
      Abstract: Journal of Marketing, Ahead of Print.
      When allocating scarce goods and services, firms often either prioritize those willing to spend the most resources (e.g., money, in the case of markets; time, in the case of lines) or simply ignore such differences and allocate randomly (e.g., through lotteries). When do these resource-based allocation rules seem most appropriate, and why' Here, the authors propose that people are more likely to endorse markets and lines when these systems increase the likelihood that scarce goods and services go to those who have the strongest preferences—that is, when they help sort preferences. This is most feasible when preferences are dissimilar (i.e., some consumers want something much more than others). Consequently, people are naturally attuned to preference variance: when preferences for something are similar, markets and lines seem less appropriate, because it is unlikely that the highest bidders or those who have waited the longest actually have the strongest preferences. However, when preferences are dissimilar, markets and lines seem more appropriate, because they can more easily sort preferences. Consumers thus react negatively when firms use resource-based allocation rules in situations where preferences cannot be easily sorted (e.g., when preferences are similar).
      Citation: Journal of Marketing
      PubDate: 2021-09-30T01:40:58Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00222429211012107
       
  • Virtual Reality in New Product Development: Insights from Pre-launch Sales
           Forecasting for Durables

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Nathalie Harz, Sebastian Hohenberg, Christian Homburg
      First page: 157
      Abstract: Journal of Marketing, Ahead of Print.
      This investigation examines how consumer durable goods producers can leverage virtual reality for new product development. First, the authors develop a prelaunch sales forecasting approach with two key features: virtual reality and an extended macro-flow model. To assess its effectiveness, the authors collect data from 631 potential buyers of two real-world innovations. The results reveal that the new approach yields highly accurate prelaunch forecasts across the two field studies: compared with the actual sales data tracked after the product launches, the prediction errors for the aggregated first-year sales are only 1.9% (Study 1a, original prelaunch sales forecast), .0% (Study 1b, forecast with actual advertisement spending), and 20.0% (Study 1b, original prelaunch forecast). Moreover, the average mean absolute percentage error for the monthly sales is only 23% across both studies. Second, to understand the mechanisms of virtual reality, the authors conduct a controlled laboratory experiment. The findings reveal that virtual reality fosters behavioral consistency between participants’ information search, preferences, and buying behavior. Moreover, virtual reality enhances participants’ perceptions related to presence and vividness, but not their perceptions related to alternative theoretical perspectives. Finally, the authors provide recommendations for when and how managers can use virtual reality in new product development.
      Citation: Journal of Marketing
      PubDate: 2021-07-22T09:41:36Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00222429211014902
       
 
JournalTOCs
School of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
Heriot-Watt University
Edinburgh, EH14 4AS, UK
Email: journaltocs@hw.ac.uk
Tel: +00 44 (0)131 4513762
 


Your IP address: 3.239.129.91
 
Home (Search)
API
About JournalTOCs
News (blog, publications)
JournalTOCs on Twitter   JournalTOCs on Facebook

JournalTOCs © 2009-