Subjects -> ADVERTISING AND PUBLIC RELATIONS (Total: 23 journals)
Showing 1 - 8 of 8 Journals sorted alphabetically
Advertising & Society Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Book History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 119)
Design and Culture : The Journal of the Design Studies Forum     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Foundations and Trends┬« in Marketing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
International Journal of Advertising     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22)
International Journal of Complexity in Leadership and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
International Journal of Market Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Advertising     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Journal of Advertising Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Consumer Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44)
Journal of Current Issues & Research in Advertising     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Interactive Advertising     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Journal of International Marketing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 24)
Journal of Marketing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 50)
Journal of Marketing Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 71)
Journal of Public Policy & Marketing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Public Relations Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Place Branding and Public Diplomacy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Public Relations Inquiry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Public Relations Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Revista Internacional de Relaciones P├║blicas     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Young Consumers: Insight and Ideas for Responsible Marketers     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
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Journal of Marketing Research
Journal Prestige (SJR): 7.819
Citation Impact (citeScore): 6
Number of Followers: 71  
 
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
ISSN (Print) 0022-2437 - ISSN (Online) 1547-7193
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1174 journals]
  • Order Matters: Rating Service Professionals First Reduces Tipping Amount

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      Authors: Jinjie Chen, Alison Jing Xu, Maria A. Rodas, Xuefeng Liu
      Abstract: Journal of Marketing, Ahead of Print.
      As customer ratings have become ubiquitous and digital platforms can directly request ratings and tips from customers, it is important to understand how a customer rating influences tipping. The authors investigate whether, how, why, and when the order of rating and tipping affects both consumer behaviors in seven studies, including one quasi-field experiment, one archival data analysis, one randomized field experiment, and four randomized lab experiments. They show that asking customers to rate a service professional before tipping negatively impacts the tip amount but that tipping first does not affect subsequent rating scores. The authors propose that the negative effect of rating on tipping occurs because, when rating a service professional first, customers categorize their feedback as a reward for the service professional, which partially alleviates the felt obligation to tip, resulting in a smaller tip. This negative effect is more evident when customers (1) tip from their own pocket, (2) have higher categorization flexibility, or (3) perceive that the service professional benefits from the rating. Moreover, highlighting the consistency motivation after rating but before tipping can attenuate this effect. These boundary conditions not only support the proposed mechanism and evaluate alternative processes but also have significant practical implications.
      Citation: Journal of Marketing
      PubDate: 2022-06-13T06:31:50Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00222429221098698
       
  • Analyzing the Cultural Contradictions of Authenticity: Theoretical and
           Managerial Insights from the Market Logic of Conscious Capitalism

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      Authors: Craig J. Thompson, Ankita Kumar
      Abstract: Journal of Marketing, Ahead of Print.
      This research analyzes the cultural contradictions of authenticity as they pertain to the actions of consumers and marketers. The authors’ conceptualization diverges from the conventional assumption that the ambiguity manifest in the concept of authenticity can be resolved by identifying an essential set of defining attributes or by conceptualizing it as a continuum. Using a semiotic approach, the authors identify a general system of structural relationships and ambiguous classifications that organize the meanings through which authenticity is understood and contested in a given market context. They demonstrate the contextually adaptable nature of this framework by analyzing the authenticity contradictions generated by the cultural tensions between “conscious capitalism”—a market logic that encompasses both global brands and small independent businesses, such as a farm-to-table restaurant or an organic food co-op—and the elitist critique. The Slow Food movement provides a case study for analyzing how consumers, producers, and entrepreneurs who identify with conscious capitalist ideals understand these disauthenticating, elitist associations and the strategies they use to counter them. The authors conclude by discussing implications of the analysis for theories of authenticity and for managing the authenticity challenges facing conscious capitalist brands.
      Citation: Journal of Marketing
      PubDate: 2022-06-01T05:43:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00222429221087987
       
  • A Practice Perspective on Market Evolution: How Craft and Commercial
           Coffee Firms Expand Practices and Develop Markets

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      Authors: Pierre-Yann Dolbec, Zeynep Arsel, Aya Aboelenien
      Abstract: Journal of Marketing, Ahead of Print.
      How markets evolve is a perennial and important question in business. Building on a large qualitative data set on the coffee market comprising primary and secondary interviews, archival data, and fieldwork, the authors introduce a novel theoretical mechanism—practice expansion—to explain how ongoing institutional complexity fosters market evolution. To theorize practice expansion, the authors combine institutional logics with resource partitioning and introduce a two-by-two typology of firms evolving in markets: craft versus commercial and generalist versus specialist. The authors’ analysis, grounded in this typology, identifies three mechanisms that explain practice expansion (elaboration, translation, and transformation). The authors then show how practice expansion contributes to market evolution by increasing product diversity, broadening skills and knowledge, and enriching the market meaning system. The novel theory introduced in this article contributes to extant work by theorizing market evolution as resulting from practice expansion and by broadening our understanding of the types of firms and their interactions important to that evolution. The novel theory also points to important strategy implications for how different types of firms can contribute to and benefit from the identified evolutionary patterns and ongoing institutional complexity.
      Citation: Journal of Marketing
      PubDate: 2022-05-26T04:09:37Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00222429221093624
       
  • Who We Are and How We Govern: The Effect of Identity Orientation on
           Governance Choice

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      Authors: Jan B. Heide, Simon J. Bell, Paul Tracey
      Abstract: Journal of Marketing, Ahead of Print.
      The authors draw on emerging research in organization theory to suggest how different firm-level identity orientations (individualistic, relational, or collectivistic) impact governance choice. They develop a conceptual framework that focuses on the relationship between a focal firm’s own identity orientation and that of a value chain partner. The framework identifies a series of match and mismatch scenarios, where the latter represent unique governance problems that are not accounted for by existing theory. Some of the mismatch scenarios involve pseudo-matches that resemble convergent orientations between parties but actually represent governance problems. Theoretically, this framework advances the governance literature by providing a comprehensive and nuanced account of (1) the orientations that parties bring to bear on a relationship, and (2) how their effects vary depending on the interdependence structure between the parties. The authors also advance the general literature on identity orientation by connecting it to concrete governance practices, by showing how multiple internal identity orientations create unique internal governance challenges, and by delineating two possible solutions to these challenges. They rely on the framework to develop managerial guidelines for governance choice.
      Citation: Journal of Marketing
      PubDate: 2022-05-23T05:54:38Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00222429221094027
       
  • The Impact of Organic Specialist Store Entry on Category Performance at
           Incumbent Stores

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      Authors: Stijn Maesen, Lien Lamey
      Abstract: Journal of Marketing, Ahead of Print.
      Premium organic retailers are specialist retailers that exclusively offer organic products. Prior literature has not studied their entry, focusing instead on the impact of generalist store entry. This study examines the impact of premium organic specialist store entry on category performance at incumbent generalist stores for 47 packaged food and beverage categories. The results indicate that incumbent stores lose sales after a local organic store entry and that the impact of price on sales at generalist stores becomes stronger. The authors postulate that incumbent stores can reduce sales losses by reducing the relative distinctiveness of the entrant along three dimensions: variety, price–quality, and authenticity. Empirical results show that more variety in organic products, as well as more organic feature and display advertising, protect generalist stores from premium organic specialist store entry. Assortments composed of premium organic products are harmed less, whereas assortments in which organic products are subject to more frequent and deeper price promotions are harmed more. Furthermore, including products from an organic specialist brand in generalists’ organic assortments offers additional protection.
      Citation: Journal of Marketing
      PubDate: 2022-05-23T05:54:13Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00222429221090983
       
  • The Context (In)Dependence of Low-Fit Brand Extensions

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      Authors: Pragya Mathur, Malika Malika, Nidhi Agrawal, Durairaj Maheswaran
      Abstract: Journal of Marketing, Ahead of Print.
      Low-fit brand extensions, while often presenting profitable opportunities for existing brands, are known to meet with varying levels of consumer acceptance. This research identifies conditions in which low-fit extensions can succeed. Specifically, the authors show that the extent to which consumers consider the context in forming judgments (i.e., they are context dependent) determines their acceptance of low-fit extensions. Across four studies, the authors examine the combined effects of context (in)dependence and type of information. Context-dependent consumers form their evaluations on the basis of the type of brand extension information provided, such that providing benefit-based information enhances the evaluations of low-fit extensions, whereas providing attribute-based information leads to a reliance on extension fit and subsequent unfavorable evaluations of low fit extensions. In contrast, context-independent consumers are more likely to base their judgments on extension fit regardless of whether they receive attribute- or benefit-based information. Acceptance of high-fit extensions is unaffected by context (in)dependence and type of information. These findings provide a two-step strategy (i.e., sensitize consumers to context and providing benefit-based extension information) to managers for launching low-fit extensions and leveraging existing parent brand equity.
      Citation: Journal of Marketing
      PubDate: 2022-04-25T05:52:38Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00222429221076840
       
  • The Impact of Advertising Creative Strategy on Advertising Elasticity

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      Authors: Filippo Dall’Olio, Demetrios Vakratsas
      Abstract: Journal of Marketing, Ahead of Print.
      This study provides a comprehensive assessment of the impact of advertising creative strategy (ACS) on advertising elasticity, founded on an integrative framework that distinguishes between the function (content) and form (execution) of an advertising creative. The authors evaluate function using a three-dimensional representation of content (experience, affect, cognition), whereas the representation of form accounts for both executional elements and the use of creative templates. The distinction between function and form allows for the investigation of potential synergies between content and execution, previously unaccounted for in the literature. The ACS framework also facilitates the calculation of composite metrics that capture holistic aspects of the creative strategy, such as focus (i.e., the extent of the emphasis on a specific content dimension) and variation (i.e., changes in content and execution over time). The empirical application focuses on a dynamic linear model analysis of 2,251 television advertising creatives from 91 brands in 16 consumer packaged goods categories. The findings show that for function, experiential content has the greatest effect on elasticity, followed by cognitive and affective content. Function and form produce synergies that advertisers can leverage to increase returns. Finally, focus, variation, and the use of templates increase advertising elasticity.
      Citation: Journal of Marketing
      PubDate: 2022-04-25T05:52:16Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00222429221074960
       
  • The Upside of Negative: Social Distance in Online Reviews of
           Identity-Relevant Brands

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      Authors: Nailya Ordabayeva, Lisa A. Cavanaugh, Darren W. Dahl
      Abstract: Journal of Marketing, Ahead of Print.
      Conventional wisdom in marketing emphasizes the detrimental effects of negative online reviews for brands. An important question is whether some firms could more effectively manage negative reviews to increase brand preference and improve outcomes. To address the question, this research examines how customers respond to online reviews of identity-relevant brands in particular, which have been overlooked in the online reviews literature. Eight studies (field data and experiments featuring consequential and hypothetical behaviors) show that negative online reviews may not be so detrimental for identity-relevant brands, especially when those reviews originate from socially distant (vs. socially close) reviewers. This occurs because a negative review of an identity-relevant brand can pose a threat to a customer's identity, prompting the customer to strengthen their relationship with the identity-relevant brand. To document the underlying process, the authors show that this effect does not emerge when the review is positive or the brand is identity-irrelevant. Importantly, the authors identify circumstances when negative reviews can actually produce positive outcomes (higher preference) for identity-relevant brands over no reviews or even positive reviews. By demonstrating the upside of negative reviews for identity-relevant brands, the findings have important implications for marketing theory and practice.
      Citation: Journal of Marketing
      PubDate: 2022-03-21T08:32:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00222429221074704
       
  • The Pet Exposure Effect: Exploring the Differential Impact of Dogs Versus
           Cats on Consumer Mindsets

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      Authors: Lei Jia, Xiaojing Yang, Yuwei Jiang
      Abstract: Journal of Marketing, Ahead of Print.
      Despite the ubiquity of pets in consumers’ lives, scant research has examined how exposure to them (e.g., recalling past interactions with dogs and cats, viewing ads featuring a dog or a cat) influences consumer behavior. The authors demonstrate that exposure to dogs (cats) reminds consumers of the stereotypical temperaments and behaviors of the pet species, which activates a promotion- (prevention-) focused motivational mindset among consumers. Using secondary data, Study 1 shows that people in states with a higher percentage of dog (cat) owners Google more promotion- (prevention-) focused words and report a higher COVID-19 transmission rate. Using multiple products, Studies 2 and 3 demonstrate that these regulatory mindsets, when activated by pet exposure, carry over to influence downstream consumer judgments, purchase intentions, and behaviors, even in pet-unrelated consumption contexts. Study 4 shows that pet stereotypicality moderates the proposed effect such that the relationship between pet exposure and regulatory orientations persists to the extent consumers are reminded of the stereotypical temperaments and behaviors of the pet species. Studies 5–7 examine the role of regulatory fit and evince that exposure to dogs (cats) leads to more favorable responses toward advertising messages featuring promotion- (prevention-) focused appeals.
      Citation: Journal of Marketing
      PubDate: 2022-03-18T11:59:07Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00222429221078036
       
  • Onboarding Salespeople: Socialization Approaches

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      Authors: Phillip Wiseman, Michael Ahearne, Zachary Hall, Seshadri Tirunillai
      Abstract: Journal of Marketing, Ahead of Print.
      The effective training of salespeople is crucial to a firm's success; there is arguably no more critical type of training than a salesperson's onboarding. In this study, the authors leverage a natural field experiment in which a firm's newly hired salespeople can undergo onboarding through either a decentralized program or a centralized program to examine the relative impact of each program. Drawing on organizational socialization theory, the authors consider whether an onboarding program that incorporates both individualized and institutionalized socialization tactics (the decentralized program) can develop salespeople into higher performers by encouraging them to take a more innovative and adaptive approach to different facets of the sales role. The findings reveal that salespeople who underwent the decentralized program achieved approximately 23.5% higher sales performance than those who underwent the centralized program. The performance benefits of the decentralized program were amplified for salespeople whose managers had a narrower span of control. In addition, these performance benefits were appreciable for those salespeople transitioning from another job but negligible for those transitioning from school. A scenario-based experiment enriches the field experiment's findings by showing evidence of the theorized mechanism underlying the sales performance benefits observed: the fostering of an innovative role orientation.
      Citation: Journal of Marketing
      PubDate: 2022-03-08T11:09:14Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00222429221076437
       
  • Bad News' Send an AI. Good News' Send a Human

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      Authors: Aaron M. Garvey, TaeWoo Kim, Adam Duhachek
      Abstract: Journal of Marketing, Ahead of Print.
      The present research demonstrates how consumer responses to negative and positive offers are influenced by whether the administering marketing agent is an artificial intelligence (AI) or a human. In the case of a product or service offer that is worse than expected, consumers respond better when dealing with an AI agent in the form of increased purchase likelihood and satisfaction. In contrast, for an offer that is better than expected, consumers respond more positively to a human agent. The authors demonstrate that AI agents, compared with human agents, are perceived to have weaker intentions when administering offers, which accounts for this effect. That is, consumers infer that AI agents lack selfish intentions in the case of an offer that favors the agent and lack benevolent intentions in the case of an offer that favors the customer, thereby dampening the extremity of consumer responses. Moreover, the authors demonstrate a moderating effect, such that marketers may anthropomorphize AI agents to strengthen perceived intentions, providing an avenue to receive due credit from consumers when the agent provides a better offer and mitigate blame when it provides a worse offer. Potential ethical concerns with the use of AI to bypass consumer resistance to negative offers are discussed.
      Citation: Journal of Marketing
      PubDate: 2022-02-18T04:28:07Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00222429211066972
       
  • When the Honeymoon Is Over: A Theory of Relationship Liabilities and
           Evolutionary Processes

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      Authors: Danielle A. Chmielewski-Raimondo, Ali Shamsollahi, Simon J. Bell, Jan B. Heide
      Abstract: Journal of Marketing, Ahead of Print.
      The authors draw on the sociological theories of the “liability of newness” and the “liability of adolescence” to generate new insights into relationship evolution. First, they show how a new relationship in its “honeymoon” phase exhibits a unique constellation of two conditions, namely information asymmetry and forbearance. Next, they explain how a relationship evolves along two processes that involve passive learning and decay, respectively. In themselves, these processes will move a relationship toward a long-term “transactional” state and possibly termination, but the processes can also be actively shaped using various governance mechanisms. Doing so, however, requires a nuanced account of types of governance mechanisms and the particular conditions they are intended to induce. The authors consider how the general mechanisms of (1) incentives and (2) information sharing can be deployed in standardized or customized fashions, respectively. Next, they suggest how different manifestation of governance mechanisms impact a relationship's underlying evolutionary processes and evolved relationship states. In general, their framework represents a new perspective on relationship evolution—one that involves the purposeful management of initial conditions and their related evolutionary processes.
      Citation: Journal of Marketing
      PubDate: 2022-02-15T05:43:23Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00222429211062247
       
  • Getting a Handle on Sales: Shopping Carts Affect Purchasing by Activating
           Arm Muscles

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      Authors: Zachary Estes, Mathias C. Streicher
      Abstract: Journal of Marketing, Ahead of Print.
      This research demonstrates that the physical properties of shopping carts influence purchasing and spending. Prior research on ergonomics indicates that standard shopping carts, which are pushed via a horizontal handlebar, are likely to activate arm extensor muscles. Prior research on arm muscle activation, in turn, suggests that arm extensor activation may elicit less purchasing than arm flexor activation. The authors thus deduce that standard shopping carts may be suboptimal for stimulating purchases. The authors predicted that shopping carts with parallel handles (such as on a wheelbarrow or “walker”) would instead activate the flexor muscles and thus increase purchasing. An electromyography study revealed that both horizontal and vertical handles more strongly activate the extensor muscles of the upper arm (triceps), whereas parallel handles more strongly activate the flexor muscles (biceps). In a field experiment, parallel-handle shopping carts significantly and substantially increased sales across a broad range of categories, including both vice and virtue products. Finally, in a simulated shopping experiment, parallel handles increased purchasing and spending beyond both horizontal and vertical handles. These results were not attributable to the novelty of the shopping cart itself, participants’ mood, or purely ergonomic factors.
      Citation: Journal of Marketing
      PubDate: 2022-02-15T04:57:06Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00222429211061367
       
  • How Political Identity Shapes Customer Satisfaction

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      Authors: Daniel Fernandes, Nailya Ordabayeva, Kyuhong Han, Jihye Jung, Vikas Mittal
      Abstract: Journal of Marketing, Ahead of Print.
      This article examines the effect of political identity on customers’ satisfaction with the products and services they consume. Recent work suggests that conservatives are less likely to complain than liberals. Building on that work, the present research examines how political identity shapes customer satisfaction, which has broad implications for customers and firms. Nine studies combine different methodologies, primary and secondary data, real and hypothetical behavior, different product categories, and diverse participant populations to show that conservatives (vs. liberals) are more satisfied with the products and services they consume. This happens because conservatives (vs. liberals) are more likely to believe in free will (i.e., that people have agency over their decisions) and, therefore, to trust their own decisions. The authors document the broad and tangible downstream consequences of this effect for customers’ repurchase and recommendation intentions and firms’ sales. The association of political identity and customer satisfaction is attenuated when belief in free will is externally weakened, choice is limited, or the consumption experience is overwhelmingly positive.
      Citation: Journal of Marketing
      PubDate: 2022-02-01T12:39:35Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00222429211057508
       
  • Leveraging Cofollowership Patterns on Social Media to Identify Brand
           Alliance Opportunities

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      Authors: Pankhuri Malhotra, Siddhartha Bhattacharyya
      First page: 17
      Abstract: Journal of Marketing, Ahead of Print.
      The use of cobranding and brand extension strategies to access new markets has been a topic of significant interest. However, surprisingly few studies have examined cross-category connections of brands using publicly available digital footprints. In this study, the authors introduce a new, scalable automated approach for identifying potential cobranding and brand extension opportunities using brand networks derived from publicly available Twitter followership data. The digital user–brand relationship, established through followership activity, is regarded as an expression of interest toward the brand. Common followership patterns between brands are then extracted to capture cointerest between those brands’ audience. By utilizing the cointerest patterns, the approach aims to derive cross-category brand–brand and brand–category connections, which can serve as important measures for assessing cobranding and extensions opportunities. This article introduces a new construct, transcendence, which measures the extent to which a brand’s followers overlap with those of other brands in a new category. The analysis is conducted at different points in time to help managers track shifts in brand transcendence.
      Citation: Journal of Marketing
      PubDate: 2022-04-25T05:53:04Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00222429221083668
       
  • Befriending the Enemy: The Effects of Observing Brand-to-Brand Praise on
           Consumer Evaluations and Choices

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      Authors: Lingrui Zhou, Katherine M. Du, Keisha M. Cutright
      First page: 57
      Abstract: Journal of Marketing, Ahead of Print.
      Consumers have grown increasingly skeptical of brands, leaving managers in a dire search for novel ways to connect. The authors suggest that focusing on one's relationships with competitors is a valuable, albeit unexpected, way for brands to do so. More specifically, the present research demonstrates that praising one's competitor—via “brand-to-brand praise”— often heightens preference for the praiser more so than other common forms of communication, such as self-promotion or benevolent information. This is because brand-to-brand praise increases perceptions of brand warmth, which leads to enhanced brand evaluations and choice. The authors support this theory with seven studies conducted in the lab, online, and in the field that feature multiple managerially relevant outcomes, including brand attitudes, social media and advertising engagement, brand choice, and purchase behavior, in a variety of product and service contexts. The authors also identify key boundary conditions and rule out alternative explanations, further elucidating the underlying mechanism and important implementation insights. This work contributes to the understanding of brand perception and warmth, providing a novel way for brands to connect to consumers by connecting with each other.
      Citation: Journal of Marketing
      PubDate: 2022-01-04T06:33:07Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00222429211053002
       
  • Households Under Economic Change: How Micro- and Macroeconomic Conditions
           Shape Grocery Shopping Behavior

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      Authors: Thomas P. Scholdra, Julian R.K. Wichmann, Maik Eisenbeiss, Werner J. Reinartz
      First page: 95
      Abstract: Journal of Marketing, Ahead of Print.
      Economic conditions may significantly affect households’ shopping behavior and, by extension, retailers’ and manufacturers’ firm performance. By explicitly distinguishing between two basic types of economic conditions—micro conditions, in terms of households’ personal income, and macro conditions, in terms of the business cycle—this study analyzes how households adjust their grocery shopping behavior. The authors observe more than 5,000 households over eight years and analyze shopping outcomes in terms of what, where, and how much they shop and spend. Results show that micro and macro conditions substantially influence shopping outcomes, but in very different ways. Microeconomic changes lead households to adjust primarily their overall purchase volume—that is, after losing income, households buy fewer products and spend less in total. In contrast, macroeconomic changes cause pronounced structural shifts in households’ shopping basket allocation and spending behavior. Specifically, during contractions, households shift purchases toward private labels while also buying and consequently spending more than during expansions. During expansions, however, households increasingly purchase national brands but keep their total spending constant. The authors discuss psychological and sociological mechanisms that can explain the differential effects of micro and macro conditions on shopping behavior and develop important diagnostic and normative implications for retailers and manufacturers.
      Citation: Journal of Marketing
      PubDate: 2022-01-07T02:18:32Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00222429211036882
       
 
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