Subjects -> ADVERTISING AND PUBLIC RELATIONS (Total: 23 journals)
Showing 1 - 8 of 8 Journals sorted by number of followers
Book History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 175)
Journal of Marketing Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 76)
Journal of Marketing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 56)
Journal of Consumer Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 49)
International Journal of Complexity in Leadership and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Journal of International Marketing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 27)
Design and Culture : The Journal of the Design Studies Forum     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Journal of Advertising     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
International Journal of Advertising     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 23)
Journal of Public Policy & Marketing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
International Journal of Market Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Journal of Advertising Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Public Relations Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Journal of Public Relations Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Foundations and Trends® in Marketing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Advertising & Society Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Interactive Advertising     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Current Issues & Research in Advertising     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Young Consumers: Insight and Ideas for Responsible Marketers     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Public Relations Inquiry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Place Branding and Public Diplomacy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Revista Internacional de Relaciones Públicas     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Similar Journals
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Journal of Marketing
Journal Prestige (SJR): 8.616
Citation Impact (citeScore): 8
Number of Followers: 56  
 
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
ISSN (Print) 0022-2429 - ISSN (Online) 1547-7185
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1176 journals]
  • Targeting Nearby Influencers: The Acceleration of Natural Triadic Closure
           by Leveraging Interconnectors

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      Authors: Jacob Goldenberg, Andreas Lanz, Daniel Shapira, Florian Stahl
      Abstract: Journal of Marketing, Ahead of Print.
      On user-generated content platforms, individuals and firms alike seek to build and expand their follower base to eventually increase the reach of the content they upload. The bulk of the seeding literature in marketing suggests targeting users with a large follower base, that is, high-status influencers. In contrast, some recent studies find targeting lower-status influencers to be a more effective seeding policy. This multimethod article shifts the focus from the follower base of the seeding target to the focal content creator. The authors propose accelerating natural triadic closure by leveraging first-degree followers as interconnectors to target second-degree followers, that is, the nearby (low-status) influencers (who are interconnected with the focal content creator). Empirical studies document that this seeding target is much more effective for building and expanding the follower base, compared with targeting influencers who are not interconnected with the focal content creator—that is, the remote (both high- and low-status) influencers—by 2,300% and 46%, respectively. These studies on the acceleration of natural triadic closure are augmented by a preregistered field experiment to obtain convergent validity of the findings.
      Citation: Journal of Marketing
      PubDate: 2024-02-27T07:47:23Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00222429231223420
       
  • Collaborating to Innovate: Balancing Strategy Dividend and Transactional
           Efficiencies

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      Authors: Nehal Elhelaly, Sourav Ray
      Abstract: Journal of Marketing, Ahead of Print.
      When a firm collaborates with its suppliers, it expands its access to external know-how and thus can enhance its innovation performance. Such collaborations are common and argued to have significant impact on the firm's market outcomes. However, such collaborations also expose the firm to various transactional hazards, including knowledge spillovers and opportunism. This trade-off looms over the firm's commitment to a market positioning strategy and the functional capabilities it draws on to generate its strategy dividend. Recent accounts suggest that the verdict on supplier collaborations is noisy and that partner perceptions of these collaborations do not align on key issues of governance, strategy, and value generation. To investigate this, the authors study 202 formal codevelopment contracts of high-tech original equipment manufacturers that collaborated with suppliers from 1985 to 2016. Drawing on the governance value analysis framework, the authors show how misalignment between the firm's codevelopment contracts, capabilities, and market positioning strategy significantly erodes its innovation performance. Thus, blanket prescriptions for one type of contract or the other are misdirected, their effectiveness being a contingent outcome dependent on the firm's market positioning strategy and functional capabilities. This research presents one of the most complete tests of the governance value analysis framework to date.
      Citation: Journal of Marketing
      PubDate: 2024-02-20T07:17:43Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00222429231222269
       
  • p-Values as QWERTY: Curating Evidence in the Computational Era

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      Authors: Fred Feinberg
      Abstract: Journal of Marketing, Ahead of Print.
      McShane et al.'s (2024) wide-ranging critique of null hypothesis significance testing provides a number of specific suggestions for improved practice in empirical research. This commentary amplifies several of these from the perspective of computational statistics—particularly nonparametrics, resampling/bootstrapping, and Bayesian methods—applied to common research problems. Throughout, the author emphasizes estimation (as opposed to testing) and uncertainty quantification through a comprehensive process of “curating” a variety of graphical and tabular evidence. Specifically, researchers should be encouraged to estimate the quantities that matter, with as few assumptions as possible, in multiple ways, then try to visualize it all, documenting their pathway from data to results for others to follow.
      Citation: Journal of Marketing
      PubDate: 2024-02-19T10:53:28Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00222429231221698
       
  • Behavioral Labeling: Prompting Consumer Behavior Through Activity Tags

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      Authors: Martin P. Fritze, Franziska Völckner, Valentyna Melnyk
      Abstract: Journal of Marketing, Ahead of Print.
      This research introduces behavioral labeling as the use of names or tags that reflect an associated activity, and it proposes that this can induce corresponding behavior. Contrary to the common intuition that descriptions of behaviors emerge as markings for popular actions (i.e., the label is a consequence of the behavior), the authors propose that a description itself might also induce the corresponding action (i.e., the label is an antecedent of the behavior). Building on linguistic relativity theory and based on five studies conducted in the lab and field, the authors show that merely attaching a fictitious name to a behavior can induce that very behavior. The authors also explore a potential explanation for this finding by showing that a behavioral label can evoke mental imagery regarding the associated behavior, which enhances the implementation of the behavior. The results contribute to marketing theory by introducing behavioral labeling and highlighting how language can shape behaviors. Marketers can use behavioral labels to promote their offerings based on the associated behaviors, while public policy makers can use behavioral labels to encourage prosocial and proenvironmental behaviors.
      Citation: Journal of Marketing
      PubDate: 2024-02-15T08:09:38Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00222429231213011
       
  • Revenue Generation Through Influencer Marketing

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      Authors: Maximilian Beichert, Andreas Bayerl, Jacob Goldenberg, Andreas Lanz
      Abstract: Journal of Marketing, Ahead of Print.
      Direct-to-consumer firms increasingly believe that influencer marketing is an effective option for seeding. However, the current managerially relevant question for direct-to-consumer firms of whether to target low- or high-followership influencers to generate immediate revenue is still unresolved. In this article, the authors’ goal is to answer this question by considering for the first time the whole influencer-marketing funnel, that is, from followers on user-generated content networks (e.g., on Instagram), to reached followers, to engagement, to actual revenue, while accounting for the cost of paid endorsements. The authors find that low-followership targeting outperforms high-followership targeting by order of magnitude across three performance (return on investment) metrics. A mediation analysis reveals that engagement can explain the negative relationship between the influencer followership levels and return on investment. This is in line with the rationale based on social capital theory that with higher followership levels of an influencer, the engagement between an influencer and their followers decreases. These two findings are derived from secondary sales data of 1,881,533 purchases and results of three full-fledged field studies with hundreds of paid influencer endorsements, establishing the robustness of the findings.
      Citation: Journal of Marketing
      PubDate: 2024-02-09T10:47:10Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00222429231217471
       
  • Adoption of New Technology Vaccines

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      Authors: Laura Zimmermann, Jeeva Somasundaram, Barsha Saha
      Abstract: Journal of Marketing, Ahead of Print.
      Extensive research has examined the diffusion of innovations for products that can be trialed, and where the most adverse outcome, if a product fails, is a financial loss. However, less research has explored consumer responses to innovations in highly uncertain contexts characterized by health losses, lack of trialability, and the opportunity to free ride on other's adoption. This research focuses on vaccine decision making as a unique case within such contexts and extends the findings to other domains. Four studies (Ntotal = 1,796; five supplementary studies, Ntotal = 643) test the propositions of a formal model that incorporates uncertainty and others' choices into the adoption decision. The results show that consumers are surprisingly averse to products that are described as employing a new technology (e.g., mRNA technology) and require an “efficacy premium” to compensate for higher perceived uncertainty. However, considerable heterogeneity exists due to individual differences in technology readiness, trust in government, and risk attitudes. Notably, despite the prominent threat of free riding, a social proof nudge (communicating increasing population adoption) effectively reduces aversion to new technology. In this context, social proof information does not merely drive conformity or social learning, but instead increases adoption of new technology by alleviating perceived uncertainty.
      Citation: Journal of Marketing
      PubDate: 2024-02-09T08:17:41Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00222429231220295
       
  • “Statistical Significance” and Statistical Reporting: Moving
           Beyond Binary

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      Authors: Blakeley B. McShane, Eric T. Bradlow, John G. Lynch, Robert J. Meyer
      Abstract: Journal of Marketing, Ahead of Print.
      Null hypothesis significance testing (NHST) is the default approach to statistical analysis and reporting in marketing and the biomedical and social sciences more broadly. Despite its default role, NHST has long been criticized by both statisticians and applied researchers, including those within marketing. Therefore, the authors propose a major transition in statistical analysis and reporting. Specifically, they propose moving beyond binary: abandoning NHST as the default approach to statistical analysis and reporting. To facilitate this, they briefly review some of the principal problems associated with NHST. They next discuss some principles that they believe should underlie statistical analysis and reporting. They then use these principles to motivate some guidelines for statistical analysis and reporting. They next provide some examples that illustrate statistical analysis and reporting that adheres to their principles and guidelines. They conclude with a brief discussion.
      Citation: Journal of Marketing
      PubDate: 2024-02-08T07:47:56Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00222429231216910
       
  • How High-Arousal Language Shapes Micro- Versus Macro-Influencers’
           Impact

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      Authors: Giovanni Luca Cascio Rizzo, Francisco Villarroel Ordenes, Rumen Pozharliev, Matteo De Angelis, Michele Costabile
      Abstract: Journal of Marketing, Ahead of Print.
      Influencer marketing is a popular strategy to connect with consumers. However, influencers’ use of overly high-arousal language in promoting products (e.g., “it's totally AMAZING!”) has raised questions about their true motivations. This article investigates how high-arousal language in micro- versus macro-influencers’ sponsored posts might shape engagement. A multimethod approach, combining automated text, image, video, and audio analyses of thousands of Instagram and TikTok posts with controlled experiments, demonstrates that high-arousal language increases engagement with micro-influencers, but it decreases engagement with macro-influencers, seemingly because it makes micro- (macro-) influencers appear more (less) trustworthy. Yet the negative effect of arousal for macro-influencers can be mitigated if their posts provide counterbalanced valence (both positive and negative assessments) or if they indicate an informative, rather than commercial, goal. These findings deepen understanding of how language arousal shapes consumer responses, reveal a psychological mechanism through which language arousal affects perceptions, and provide actionable insights for crafting more effective social media content.
      Citation: Journal of Marketing
      PubDate: 2024-01-09T06:52:39Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00222429231207636
       
  • Influencer Mix Strategies in Livestream Commerce: Impact on Product Sales

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      Authors: Xian Gu, Xiaoxi Zhang, P.K. Kannan
      Abstract: Journal of Marketing, Ahead of Print.
      A new trend in influencer marketing is livestream commerce, which combines influencers’ live video streaming with e-commerce. Little is known, though, about how firms should develop their influencer strategies to maximize product sales. Given a budget constraint, marketers may choose to employ a single, “big” influencer with a large number of followers or several small influencers. They may also employ a combination of both big and small influencers when their budget is adequate. Analyzing data from 1.3 million livestreams on TikTok, the authors find a negative interaction effect between big and small influencers when employed together due to decreased trust in big influencers and substitution effects. Further analysis reveals that livestream sales generated by a big influencer are adversely affected by small influencers who promoted the same product previously, but not the other way around. In addition, big influencers can reach a much larger audience, whereas small influencers are more effective at increasing the audience's conversion rates. Big and small influencers are also different in terms of how product and campaign characteristics moderate their sales effectiveness. Finally, the scenario analysis explores how the profitability of influencer strategies hinges on the influencer mix and their costs. This research is one of the first to investigate the sales effectiveness of influencer marketing and to provide general guidelines for developing influencer mix strategies.
      Citation: Journal of Marketing
      PubDate: 2024-01-04T08:11:54Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00222429231213581
       
  • Typography Talks: Influencing Vintage Anemoia and Product Safety
           Perceptions with Vintage Typography

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      Authors: Alicia Kulczynski, Margurite Hook
      Abstract: Journal of Marketing, Ahead of Print.
      Drawing from the concept of anemoia, the authors propose a new typology of nostalgia called vintage anemoia. Vintage anemoia encompasses consumers’ positive and nostalgic response to vintage cues, regardless of specific historical periods or individual lived experiences. Through a series of seven studies, the authors demonstrate that vintage typography, by evoking feelings of vintage anemoia, can enhance consumer perceptions of product safety. This effect has positive downstream consequences on key marketing outcomes, including brand attitude, purchase intention, and willingness to pay. Furthermore, the effect of vintage anemoia on product safety perceptions remains unaffected by whether product safety information indicates that a product is safe or unsafe. However, the effect diminishes when an explicit indexical cue (year of establishment) is utilized or when promoting futuristic products. The findings contribute to the existing body of knowledge in marketing and provide insights for marketers on leveraging vintage typography as a strategic tool for creating emotional connections with consumers and enhancing perceptions of product safety.
      Citation: Journal of Marketing
      PubDate: 2024-01-04T07:39:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00222429231215357
       
  • Making Sense' The Sensory-Specific Nature of Virtual Influencer
           Effectiveness

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      Authors: Xinyue Zhou, Xiao Yan, Yuwei Jiang
      Abstract: Journal of Marketing, Ahead of Print.
      The current research examines consumers’ responses to sensory endorsements from virtual influencers. The authors reveal that consumers perceive virtual and human influencers to have similar distal sensory (i.e., visual and auditory) capacities. Consumers, however, perceive virtual influencers as having lower proximal sensory (i.e., haptic, olfactory, and gustatory) capacities. Consequently, when endorsements focus on proximal sensory experiences, consumers have lower purchase intention toward products and services endorsed by a virtual (vs. human) influencer. The findings further reveal that imagery difficulty and perceived sensory capacity serially mediate this effect. Importantly, this effect is mitigated when endorsements focus on distal sensory experiences, when sensory information is not explicitly mentioned, and when consumers are informed of new technology that enables virtual influencers to have proximal sensory experiences. These findings offer actionable insights for marketers to effectively utilize virtual influencers in sensory-driven campaigns, providing practical strategies to improve consumer responses to sensory endorsements and enhance marketing effectiveness.
      Citation: Journal of Marketing
      PubDate: 2023-12-14T07:08:27Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00222429231203699
       
  • Conceptual Contributions in Marketing Scholarship: Patterns, Mechanisms,
           and Rebalancing Options

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      Authors: Bastian Kindermann, Daniel Wentzel, David Antons, Torsten-Oliver Salge
      Abstract: Journal of Marketing, Ahead of Print.
      This article analyzes the nature and temporal change of conceptual contributions in marketing scholarship with two complementary studies. First, based on a computer-aided text analysis of 5,922 articles published in the four major marketing journals between 1990 and 2021, the authors analyze how conceptual contributions have changed over time using the MacInnis (2011) framework. Results indicate that over the past three decades, theorizing efforts have strongly favored “envisioning” and “explicating” at the expense of “relating” and “debating,” with this imbalance increasing over time. Second, the authors draw on 48 in-depth interviews with editors, department heads, and authors to validate these patterns and uncover the underlying mechanisms. The findings indicate that a prevalent thought style has developed in the field—defined by the research ideals of novelty, clarity, and quantification—that shapes the collective view of how marketing scholars, in their roles as authors, reviewers, and mentors, can make a valuable contribution to marketing scholarship. This thought style favors envisioning and explicating contributions and disfavors relating and debating contributions. Jointly, the two studies point to several rebalancing options that can reinvigorate relating and debating contributions while preserving the current strengths of the marketing field.
      Citation: Journal of Marketing
      PubDate: 2023-11-20T07:59:42Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00222429231196122
       
  • Dual Branding by National Brand Manufacturers: Drivers and Outcomes

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      Authors: Yu Ma, Kusum L. Ailawadi, Mercedes Martos-Partal, Óscar González-Benito
      Abstract: Journal of Marketing, Ahead of Print.
      This article is the first generalizable empirical analysis of dual branding, that is, the supply of private labels (PLs) by national brand (NB) manufacturers. The authors compile a unique data set combining the identity of PL suppliers in over 260 packaged goods categories with multiple years of scanner data in the Spanish grocery market to offer several contributions. First, they provide new descriptive insights on the prevalence of dual branding in categories where the manufacturer does and does not have NBs, the longevity of PL supply arrangements, and the differences in PL sourcing across retailers. Second, they integrate the literature on motivators and dissuaders of dual branding and test the impact of relevant manufacturer, retailer, and dyad characteristics on PL supply in NB and non-NB categories. The results reveal a more nuanced empirical reality than is evident from prior research regarding the role of multicategory scope, fighter brands, NB differentiation, and size and positioning of the retailer's PL. Third, they examine the outcomes of PL supply for the NBs of dual branders and find that starting (terminating) PL supply to a retailer significantly benefits (hurts) the relative distribution depth but not the relative share of the dual brander's NBs at that retailer.
      Citation: Journal of Marketing
      PubDate: 2023-11-15T08:21:59Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00222429231196575
       
  • Affording Disposal Control: The Effect of Circular Take-Back Programs on
           Psychological Ownership and Valuation

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      Authors: Anna Tari, Remi Trudel
      Abstract: Journal of Marketing, Ahead of Print.
      A circular economy is a “closed-loop” system designed so that products flow back into the production cycle after use. With many companies implementing take-back programs as part of their sustainability strategy, a fundamental shift in consumption has occurred, with consumers considering disposal during and even before purchase decision making. Eight experiments reveal that consumers indicate a greater willingness to pay for circular program products. An increase in psychological ownership underlies the difference in product valuation. Specifically, the additional disposal control uniquely afforded by circular products increases the capacity of circular take-back program products to evoke psychological ownership. The process explanation is directly tested through mediation. Experimentally manipulating antecedents of psychological ownership (i.e., disposal control and psychological ownership) provides further support for the conceptual framework.
      Citation: Journal of Marketing
      PubDate: 2023-11-08T07:43:04Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00222429231196576
       
  • Measuring Willingness to Pay: A Comparative Method of Valuation

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      Authors: Sharlene He, Eric T. Anderson, Derek D. Rucker
      Abstract: Journal of Marketing, Ahead of Print.
      Willingness to pay (WTP) is a metric that is widely valued and utilized among both practitioners and academics. However, the conceptualization of WTP is ambiguous, and this ambiguity is reflected across existing methods of measuring WTP. The authors first present a formal mathematical framework that clarifies WTP as a distributional concept—rather than a single number—constructed as a function of customers, comparisons, and situations. The framework further reveals the operation of two comparative mechanisms, direct and indirect, by which situational factors affect WTP. They then introduce a new method to measure WTP—the comparative method of valuation (CMV)—that, unlike existing methods, is designed to account for the inherently comparative and situational nature of WTP. Across nine studies reported in the article and four additional studies in the Web Appendix, the authors (1) examine differences in results between CMV and choice-based conjoint as well as between CMV and the classic Becker–DeGroot–Marschak methodology, (2) demonstrate that CMV is a valid and reliable measure of WTP, and (3) illustrate applications of CMV to managerial problems. This article offers both conceptual clarity and methodological advances to understanding the construction and measurement of WTP for practitioners and academics alike.
      Citation: Journal of Marketing
      PubDate: 2023-11-03T08:37:44Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00222429231195564
       
  • Buyer–Supplier Relationship Dynamics in Buyers’ Bankruptcy
           Survival

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      Authors: Sudha Mani, Vivek Astvansh, Kersi D. Antia
      Abstract: Journal of Marketing, Ahead of Print.
      A bankrupt buyer firm's interactions with its suppliers during bankruptcy have critical implications for both parties and for the broader economy, yet these interactions remain poorly understood. The authors build on research on buyer–supplier relationship dynamics to demonstrate that accommodative and exploitative velocities—the rate and direction of change in the corresponding acts—serve as signals affecting bankruptcy survival. They show how signal characteristics (i.e., the variability in accommodative and exploitative acts) and signaler characteristics (i.e., whether the party undertaking the acts is the buyer or its suppliers) moderate the impact of accommodative and exploitative velocities on bankruptcy survival. Study 1 examines the bankruptcy survival outcome of 310 U.S. bankruptcies over 14 years and finds that a 1% increase in accommodative (exploitative) velocity increases (decreases) the buyer's survival by 39% (33%). Further, variability in accommodative acts weakens their effect, and suppliers' (vs. the buyer's) accommodative and exploitative velocities are less deterministic of the buyer's bankruptcy survival. Study 2 uses a scenario-based experiment to shed light on the mechanism underlying the impact of the two velocities on bankruptcy survival. The findings from both studies demonstrate the key role played by buyer–supplier interactions in a buyer's bankruptcy survival.
      Citation: Journal of Marketing
      PubDate: 2023-11-01T07:37:15Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00222429231193994
       
  • The Competitive Effects of Online Reviews on Hotel Demand

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      Authors: Sanghoon Cho, Pelin Pekgün, Ramkumar Janakiraman, Jian Wang
      Abstract: Journal of Marketing, Ahead of Print.
      The authors examine the effects of a firm’s and its competitors’ online reviews on its demand within the hotel industry. The authors leverage a unique data set of actual bookings from properties of a major hotel chain in six different markets in the United States, supplemented with online reviews garnered from a popular social media platform. The findings indicate that not only a hotel’s own reviews but also its competitors’ reviews have a significant impact on the hotel’s booking performance. The impact of review sentiment is amplified if the focal hotel also charges higher prices or when the volume of reviews is high. The authors establish heterogeneous effects across consumer segments (business vs. leisure travelers) and by the type of review content (objective vs. subjective attributes to assess quality). Specifically, both a hotel’s own reviews and its competitors’ reviews have a larger impact on bookings for business travelers compared with leisure travelers, and for reviews that mainly discuss subjective attributes, for which consumers need to rely on the experiences of others to assess the quality of a hotel prior to their stay. The study provides a set of comprehensive insights on the impact of both own and competitors’ online reviews on a focal hotel’s bookings.
      Citation: Journal of Marketing
      PubDate: 2023-10-31T06:59:28Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00222429231191449
       
  • Assessing the Multichannel Impact of Brand Store Entry by a Digital-Native
           Grocery Brand

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      Authors: Michiel Van Crombrugge, Els Breugelmans, Florian Breiner, Christian W. Scheiner
      Abstract: Journal of Marketing, Ahead of Print.
      For digital-native fast-moving consumer goods (FMCG) manufacturers that sell through their own online channel and have made headway into supermarkets, brand stores can represent the next step in a multichannel distribution strategy. In this research, the authors investigate the impact of introducing a brand store on a digital-native FMCG brand's sales in its existing company-owned online channel and in independent supermarkets, as well as on the brand's supermarket distribution. By incorporating brand store sales and operational costs, this research also specifies the entry effects on the brand's top-line total brand sales and bottom-line operating profit. Based on before-and-after-with-control-group analyses of the entry of ten brand stores by a digital-native FMCG brand, the authors show that brand store entry boosts supermarket sales, partially driven by a brand store's positive effect on the number of supermarkets listing the brand. Although they cannibalize company-owned online sales, brand store entries generate an influx of own brand store sales that offset online channel losses. Still, accounting for brand stores’ operational costs reveals that top-line growth is not always enough to preserve the bottom line.
      Citation: Journal of Marketing
      PubDate: 2023-10-26T06:43:42Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00222429231193371
       
  • University Knowledge Inside: How and When University–Industry
           Collaborations Make New Products More Attractive to Consumers

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      Authors: Lukas Maier, Martin Schreier, Christian V. Baccarella, Kai-Ingo Voigt
      Abstract: Journal of Marketing, Ahead of Print.
      In this research, the authors examine how consumers perceive the fruits of university–industry collaborations (i.e., new products codeveloped with universities). Eight studies document a positive university effect and highlight its practical significance and boundary conditions. An Instagram A/B test utilizing a video that refers (vs. does not refer) to the underlying university–industry collaboration results in higher click-through rates and ad engagement levels. Another field study demonstrates that university-codeveloped products are more attractive to consumers, even after an actual product trial. Further, several consequential studies reveal that consumers are willing to pay up to 65% more for products marketed as codeveloped with a university. The authors argue and show that collaborating with a university infuses the underlying firm with a stronger sense of scientific legitimacy, thereby making the resulting product more attractive to consumers. Congruously, the authors find that the effect is more pronounced when the scientific legitimacy engendered by universities is more important to the focal product (i.e., high tech vs. low tech), underlying company (i.e., new vs. established), or target customer (i.e., high vs. low belief in science).
      Citation: Journal of Marketing
      PubDate: 2023-10-19T07:54:26Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00222429231185313
       
  • Symbolically Simple: How Simple Packaging Design Influences Willingness to
           Pay for Consumable Products

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      Authors: Lan Anh N. Ton, Rosanna K. Smith, Julio Sevilla
      Abstract: Journal of Marketing, Ahead of Print.
      Although consumers often value minimalist aesthetics, little work has examined why and when simple packaging designs of consumable products enhance consumer outcomes. The authors theorize that simple packaging evokes a symbolic association whereby minimizing design complexity signals that the product contains few ingredients, which increases perceived product purity and willingness to pay (WTP). A field study examining a supermarket chain's product packages (N = 1,353) provided preliminary support for this increase in WTP and two boundary conditions. Six preregistered studies replicated these effects and tested the underlying process. Studies 1a and 1b showed that the increase in WTP for simple packaging is driven by few-ingredients inferences increasing perceived product purity. Study 2 demonstrated the increase in WTP using an incentive-compatible design. Study 3 reinforced the proposed process via moderated mediation. Lastly, Studies 4 and 5 tested the boundary conditions in the field study, showing that WTP for simple packaging decreases when the product is from a store (vs. nonstore) brand and when consumers have an indulgence (vs. health) goal. These findings offer theoretical and managerial insight into minimalist aesthetics.
      Citation: Journal of Marketing
      PubDate: 2023-10-11T07:19:52Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00222429231192049
       
  • When Do Marketing Ideation Crowdsourcing Contests Create Shareholder
           Value' The Effect of Contest Design and Marketing Resource Factors

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      Authors: Zixia Cao, Hui Feng, Michael A. Wiles
      Abstract: Journal of Marketing, Ahead of Print.
      Firms often use crowdsourcing contests to develop marketing ideas and solutions. Despite the prevalence—and unique aspects—of marketing ideation crowdsourcing contests (MICCs), there has been little examination of these contests’ shareholder wealth implications. Adopting a signaling perspective, the authors conduct an event study of 508 MICC announcements and find that they are associated with higher returns, but also higher idiosyncratic risk, indicating that investors hold a mixed view of such contests. Further, the authors consider how contest design factors and firm marketing resources may signal the cultivation of intellectual and relational market-based assets to shape their stock market impact, providing firms guidance to better design their MICCs. Specifically, they find that returns are enhanced when firms use professional (vs. general public) contests, specifically scoped contests, and contests using crowd judging (vs. expert panels), and for firms with stronger marketing capabilities. However, brand factors have mixed effects on returns, with a brand's relevant stature having a positive effect and its energized differentiation having a negative effect on returns. Product MICCs and generally scoped contests heighten the negative effects on risk, whereas marketing resources have no impact. Results offer implications for practitioners, including the finding that many MICC design choices commonly used in practice (i.e., general public contests and expert panels) are viewed less favorably by investors.
      Citation: Journal of Marketing
      PubDate: 2023-10-05T05:28:11Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00222429231191446
       
  • Understanding Consumer Self-Design Abandonment: A Dynamic Perspective

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      Authors: Franziska Krause, Nikolaus Franke
      Abstract: Journal of Marketing, Ahead of Print.
      Many studies have found that allowing customers to self-design products using customization configurators generates high value for customers. However, in practice, high abandonment rates cast doubt on these findings. In the present article, this contradiction is resolved by analyzing consumers’ experiences during the creative process. Six studies provide converging evidence that consumers abandon customization because their valence during the process is U-shaped: initial high expectations prompt consumers to start self-designing in the first place, but they quickly find, to their frustration, that their (interim) design solutions are less attractive and the self-designing process is less enjoyable than they originally anticipated. Unaware that their enjoyment of the process would ultimately increase if they persisted through this phase, they abandon the self-design process altogether. It is only if the consumer overcomes the minimum of the U of valence that they harness the potential value from self-designing. This problematic pattern can be managed by providing social feedback during the self-design process. These findings contribute not only to the customization literature but also more generally to the understanding of consumers’ goal pursuit by enhancing its scope to creative tasks.
      Citation: Journal of Marketing
      PubDate: 2023-09-25T08:02:55Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00222429231183977
       
  • Tales of Two Channels: Digital Advertising Performance Between AI
           Recommendation and User Subscription Channels

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      Authors: Beibei Dong, Mengzhou Zhuang, Eric (Er) Fang, Minxue Huang
      Abstract: Journal of Marketing, Ahead of Print.
      Although in-feed advertising is popular on mainstream platforms, academic research on it is limited. Platforms typically deliver organic content through two methods: subscription by users or recommendation by artificial intelligence. However, little is known about the ad performance between these two channels. This research examines how the performance of in-feed ads, in terms of click-through rates and conversion rates, differs between subscription and recommendation channels and whether these effects are mediated by ad intrusiveness and moderated by ad attributes. Two ad attributes are investigated: ad appeal (informational vs. emotional) and ad link (direct vs. indirect). Study 1 finds that the recommendation channel generates higher click-through rates but lower conversion rates than the subscription channel, and these effects are amplified by informational ad appeal and direct ad links. Study 2 explores channel differences, revealing that the recommendation channel yields less source credibility and content control, reducing consumer engagement with organic content. Studies 3 and 4 validate the mediating role of ad intrusiveness and rule out ad recognition as an alternative explanation. Study 5 uses eye-tracking technology to show that the recommendation channel has lower content engagement, lower ad intrusiveness, and greater ad interest.
      Citation: Journal of Marketing
      PubDate: 2023-09-12T07:07:57Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00222429231190021
       
  • From Mentally Doing to Actually Doing: A Meta-Analysis of Induced Positive
           Consumption Simulations

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      Authors: Gizem Ceylan, Kristin Diehl, Wendy Wood
      Abstract: Journal of Marketing, Ahead of Print.
      Mental simulation is an important tool for managers who want consumers to imagine what life would be like if they engaged in positive consumption behaviors. However, research has found mixed effects of mental simulation on behavior. To understand this inconsistency, the authors conduct a meta-analysis to quantify the effect of different mental simulation prompts. This multivariate three-level meta-analysis of 237 effect sizes spanning four decades (1980–2020) and representing 40,705 respondents yields a positive but small effect of mental simulation on behavioral responses. Managers and researchers can amplify this effect by using dynamic visual inductions (e.g., augmented reality), inductions involving both visuals and verbal instructions, and repeated inductions spaced over time (e.g., weekly, akin to real-world marketing campaigns). Inducing simulations repeatedly but massed (e.g., using the same message at the same time across different platforms or retargeting ads) actually reduces subsequent behavioral performance. The authors explain the implications of these findings for theory and practice and identify novel avenues for research.
      Citation: Journal of Marketing
      PubDate: 2023-09-07T07:36:34Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00222429231181071
       
  • For Shame! Socially Unacceptable Brand Mentions on Social Media Motivate
           Consumer Disengagement

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      Authors: Daniel Villanova, Ted Matherly
      Abstract: Journal of Marketing, Ahead of Print.
      Brands invest tremendous resources into building engagement with their customers on social media. But considerably less focus is placed on addressing disengagement, when users actively choose to distance themselves from the brand through reduced posting or even unfollowing. The authors find that the same self–brand connections that lead individuals to defensively protect the brand can also lead them to experience shame vicariously when others mention the brand in socially unacceptable ways. Experiencing vicarious shame motivates them to distance themselves from the brand, driving disengagement. Three mixed-method studies show that a socially unacceptable behavior—using profanity while mentioning the brand—leads highly connected consumers to experience vicarious shame, prompting disengagement motivations and ultimately leading to real-world unfollowing behaviors on social media. The authors also show that proactive moderation behaviors by the brand can attenuate these responses. These results provide insight into the process by which self–brand connection interacts with socially unacceptable brand mentions and suggest a limitation to the insulating effects of strong self–brand connections.
      Citation: Journal of Marketing
      PubDate: 2023-08-01T07:42:44Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00222429231179942
       
 
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  Subjects -> ADVERTISING AND PUBLIC RELATIONS (Total: 23 journals)
Showing 1 - 8 of 8 Journals sorted by number of followers
Book History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 175)
Journal of Marketing Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 76)
Journal of Marketing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 56)
Journal of Consumer Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 49)
International Journal of Complexity in Leadership and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Journal of International Marketing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 27)
Design and Culture : The Journal of the Design Studies Forum     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Journal of Advertising     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
International Journal of Advertising     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 23)
Journal of Public Policy & Marketing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
International Journal of Market Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Journal of Advertising Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Public Relations Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Journal of Public Relations Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Foundations and Trends® in Marketing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Advertising & Society Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Interactive Advertising     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Current Issues & Research in Advertising     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Young Consumers: Insight and Ideas for Responsible Marketers     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Public Relations Inquiry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Place Branding and Public Diplomacy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Revista Internacional de Relaciones Públicas     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
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School of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
Heriot-Watt University
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