Publisher: Sage Publications   (Total: 1166 journals)

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Showing 1 - 200 of 1166 Journals sorted alphabetically
AADE in Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Abstracts in Anthropology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 29)
Academic Pathology     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Accounting History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18, SJR: 0.527, CiteScore: 1)
Acta Radiologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.754, CiteScore: 2)
Acta Radiologica Open     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Acta Sociologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39, SJR: 0.939, CiteScore: 2)
Action Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 53, SJR: 0.308, CiteScore: 1)
Active Learning in Higher Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 396, SJR: 1.397, CiteScore: 2)
Adaptive Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.288, CiteScore: 1)
Administration & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18, SJR: 0.675, CiteScore: 1)
Adoption & Fostering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25, SJR: 0.313, CiteScore: 0)
Adsorption Science & Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.258, CiteScore: 1)
Adult Education Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 260, SJR: 0.566, CiteScore: 2)
Adult Learning     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 51)
Advances in Dental Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 1.791, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Developing Human Resources     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35, SJR: 0.614, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Mechanical Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 156, SJR: 0.272, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Methods and Practices in Psychological Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20)
Advances in Structural Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 51, SJR: 0.599, CiteScore: 1)
AERA Open     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
Affilia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.496, CiteScore: 1)
Africa Spectrum     Open Access   (Followers: 17)
Agrarian South : J. of Political Economy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Air, Soil & Water Research     Open Access   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.214, CiteScore: 1)
Alexandria : The J. of National and Intl. Library and Information Issues     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 68)
Allergy & Rhinology     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
AlterNative : An Intl. J. of Indigenous Peoples     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 39, SJR: 0.194, CiteScore: 0)
Alternative Law J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.176, CiteScore: 0)
Alternatives : Global, Local, Political     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.351, CiteScore: 1)
Alternatives to Laboratory Animals     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.297, CiteScore: 1)
American Behavioral Scientist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26, SJR: 0.982, CiteScore: 2)
American Economist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
American Educational Research J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 260, SJR: 2.913, CiteScore: 3)
American J. of Alzheimer's Disease and Other Dementias     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23, SJR: 0.67, CiteScore: 2)
American J. of Cosmetic Surgery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
American J. of Evaluation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18, SJR: 0.646, CiteScore: 2)
American J. of Health Promotion     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35, SJR: 0.807, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Hospice and Palliative Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 47, SJR: 0.65, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Law & Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.204, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Lifestyle Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.431, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Medical Quality     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.777, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Men's Health     Open Access   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.595, CiteScore: 2)
American J. of Rhinology and Allergy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.972, CiteScore: 2)
American J. of Sports Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 248, SJR: 3.949, CiteScore: 6)
American Politics Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 36, SJR: 1.313, CiteScore: 1)
American Review of Public Administration     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28, SJR: 2.062, CiteScore: 2)
American Sociological Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 357, SJR: 6.333, CiteScore: 6)
American String Teacher     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Analytical Chemistry Insights     Open Access   (Followers: 26, SJR: 0.224, CiteScore: 1)
Angiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.849, CiteScore: 2)
Animation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.197, CiteScore: 0)
Annals of Clinical Biochemistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.634, CiteScore: 1)
Annals of Otology, Rhinology & Laryngology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20, SJR: 0.807, CiteScore: 1)
Annals of Pharmacotherapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 59, SJR: 1.096, CiteScore: 2)
Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 51, SJR: 1.225, CiteScore: 3)
Annals of the ICRP     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.548, CiteScore: 1)
Anthropocene Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 3.341, CiteScore: 7)
Anthropological Theory     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 48, SJR: 0.739, CiteScore: 1)
Antitrust Bulletin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Antiviral Chemistry and Chemotherapy     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.635, CiteScore: 2)
Antyajaa : Indian J. of Women and Social Change     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Applied Biosafety     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.131, CiteScore: 0)
Applied Psychological Measurement     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21, SJR: 1.17, CiteScore: 1)
Applied Spectroscopy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 27, SJR: 0.489, CiteScore: 2)
Armed Forces & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25, SJR: 0.29, CiteScore: 1)
Arthaniti : J. of Economic Theory and Practice     Full-text available via subscription  
Arts and Humanities in Higher Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 49, SJR: 0.305, CiteScore: 1)
Asia Pacific Media Educator     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.23, CiteScore: 0)
Asia-Pacific J. of Management Research and Innovation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Asia-Pacific J. of Public Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.558, CiteScore: 1)
Asia-Pacific J. of Rural Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Asian and Pacific Migration J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.324, CiteScore: 1)
Asian Cardiovascular and Thoracic Annals     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.305, CiteScore: 0)
Asian J. of Comparative Politics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Asian J. of Legal Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Asian J. of Management Cases     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.101, CiteScore: 0)
ASN Neuro     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 1.534, CiteScore: 3)
Assessment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19, SJR: 1.519, CiteScore: 3)
Assessment for Effective Intervention     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.578, CiteScore: 1)
Australasian J. of Early Childhood     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.535, CiteScore: 1)
Australasian Psychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18, SJR: 0.433, CiteScore: 1)
Australian & New Zealand J. of Psychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30, SJR: 1.801, CiteScore: 2)
Australian and New Zealand J. of Criminology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 545, SJR: 0.612, CiteScore: 1)
Australian J. of Career Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Australian J. of Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 51, SJR: 0.403, CiteScore: 1)
Australian J. of Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.497, CiteScore: 1)
Autism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 356, SJR: 1.739, CiteScore: 4)
Autism & Developmental Language Impairments     Open Access   (Followers: 17)
Avian Biology Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.401, CiteScore: 1)
Behavior Modification     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.877, CiteScore: 2)
Behavioral and Cognitive Neuroscience Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Behavioral Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Beyond Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Bible Translator     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Biblical Theology Bulletin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24, SJR: 0.184, CiteScore: 0)
Big Data & Society     Open Access   (Followers: 55)
Biochemistry Insights     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Bioinformatics and Biology Insights     Open Access   (Followers: 12, SJR: 1.141, CiteScore: 2)
Biological Research for Nursing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.685, CiteScore: 2)
Biomarker Insights     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.81, CiteScore: 2)
Biomarkers in Cancer     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Biomedical Engineering and Computational Biology     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
Biomedical Informatics Insights     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Bioscope: South Asian Screen Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.235, CiteScore: 0)
BMS: Bulletin of Sociological Methodology/Bulletin de Méthodologie Sociologique     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.226, CiteScore: 0)
Body & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29, SJR: 1.531, CiteScore: 3)
Bone and Tissue Regeneration Insights     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Brain and Neuroscience Advances     Open Access  
Brain Science Advances     Open Access  
Breast Cancer : Basic and Clinical Research     Open Access   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.823, CiteScore: 2)
British J. of Music Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
British J. of Occupational Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 253, SJR: 0.323, CiteScore: 1)
British J. of Pain     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31, SJR: 0.579, CiteScore: 2)
British J. of Politics and Intl. Relations     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39, SJR: 0.91, CiteScore: 2)
British J. of Visual Impairment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.337, CiteScore: 1)
British J.ism Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
BRQ Business Review Quarterly     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Building Acoustics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.215, CiteScore: 1)
Building Services Engineering Research & Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.583, CiteScore: 1)
Bulletin of Science, Technology & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Business & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Business and Professional Communication Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.348, CiteScore: 1)
Business Information Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17, SJR: 0.279, CiteScore: 0)
Business Perspectives and Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Cahiers Élisabéthains     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.111, CiteScore: 0)
Calcutta Statistical Association Bulletin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
California Management Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 37, SJR: 2.209, CiteScore: 4)
Canadian Association of Radiologists J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.463, CiteScore: 1)
Canadian J. of Kidney Health and Disease     Open Access   (Followers: 8, SJR: 1.007, CiteScore: 2)
Canadian J. of Nursing Research (CJNR)     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Canadian J. of Occupational Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 167, SJR: 0.626, CiteScore: 1)
Canadian J. of Psychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28, SJR: 1.769, CiteScore: 3)
Canadian J. of School Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.266, CiteScore: 1)
Canadian Pharmacists J. / Revue des Pharmaciens du Canada     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.536, CiteScore: 1)
Cancer Control     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Cancer Growth and Metastasis     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Cancer Informatics     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.64, CiteScore: 1)
Capital and Class     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.282, CiteScore: 1)
Cardiac Cath Lab Director     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Cardiovascular and Thoracic Open     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Career Development and Transition for Exceptional Individuals     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.44, CiteScore: 1)
Cartilage     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.889, CiteScore: 3)
Cell Transplantation     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 1.023, CiteScore: 3)
Cephalalgia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 1.581, CiteScore: 3)
Cephalalgia Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Child Language Teaching and Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34, SJR: 0.501, CiteScore: 1)
Child Maltreatment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 1.22, CiteScore: 3)
Child Neurology Open     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Childhood     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19, SJR: 0.894, CiteScore: 2)
Childhood Obesity and Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
China Information     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.767, CiteScore: 2)
China Report     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.221, CiteScore: 0)
Chinese J. of Sociology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Christian Education J. : Research on Educational Ministry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Chronic Illness     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.672, CiteScore: 2)
Chronic Respiratory Disease     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.808, CiteScore: 2)
Chronic Stress     Open Access  
Citizenship, Social and Economics Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.145, CiteScore: 0)
Cleft Palate-Craniofacial J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.757, CiteScore: 1)
Clin-Alert     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Clinical and Applied Thrombosis/Hemostasis     Open Access   (Followers: 32, SJR: 0.49, CiteScore: 1)
Clinical and Translational Neuroscience     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Clinical Case Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.364, CiteScore: 1)
Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 45, SJR: 0.73, CiteScore: 2)
Clinical EEG and Neuroscience     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.552, CiteScore: 2)
Clinical Ethics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.296, CiteScore: 1)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Arthritis and Musculoskeletal Disorders     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.537, CiteScore: 2)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Blood Disorders     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.314, CiteScore: 2)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Cardiology     Open Access   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.686, CiteScore: 2)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Case Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.283, CiteScore: 1)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Circulatory, Respiratory and Pulmonary Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.425, CiteScore: 2)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Ear, Nose and Throat     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Endocrinology and Diabetes     Open Access   (Followers: 33, SJR: 0.63, CiteScore: 2)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Oncology     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 1.129, CiteScore: 3)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Pediatrics     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Psychiatry     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Reproductive Health     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.776, CiteScore: 0)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Therapeutics     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.172, CiteScore: 0)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Trauma and Intensive Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Women's Health     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Clinical Nursing Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34, SJR: 0.471, CiteScore: 1)
Clinical Pathology     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Clinical Pediatrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25, SJR: 0.487, CiteScore: 1)
Clinical Psychological Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16, SJR: 3.281, CiteScore: 5)
Clinical Rehabilitation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 78, SJR: 1.322, CiteScore: 3)
Clinical Risk     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.133, CiteScore: 0)
Clinical Trials     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22, SJR: 2.399, CiteScore: 2)
Clothing and Textiles Research J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28, SJR: 0.36, CiteScore: 1)
Collections : A J. for Museum and Archives Professionals     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Common Law World Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Communication & Sport     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.385, CiteScore: 1)
Communication and the Public     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Communication Disorders Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.458, CiteScore: 1)
Communication Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24, SJR: 2.171, CiteScore: 3)
Community College Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 1.451, CiteScore: 1)
Comparative Political Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 292, SJR: 3.772, CiteScore: 3)
Compensation & Benefits Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Competition & Change     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.843, CiteScore: 2)

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Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Annals of the ICRP
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.548
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 4  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0146-6453 - ISSN (Online) 1872-969X
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1166 journals]
  • Occupational Radiological Protection in Brachytherapy

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Firas Mourtada, Christopher H. Clement, L.T. Dauer, C. Baureus Koch, J.M. Cosset, M. Doruff, A. Damato, F. Guedea, P. Scalliet, B. Thomadsen, L. Pinillos-Ashton, W. Small
      Pages: 5 - 75
      Abstract: Annals of the ICRP, Volume 50, Issue 3, Page 5-75, July 2021.

      Citation: Annals of the ICRP
      PubDate: 2021-09-10T02:04:26Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01466453211013514
      Issue No: Vol. 50, No. 3 (2021)
       
  • Reputational Damage in Radiation Disasters 10 years after the Accident at
           TEPCO's Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant.

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Naoya Sekiya
      Abstract: Annals of the ICRP, Ahead of Print.
      This paper does not necessarily reflect the views of the International Commission on Radiological Protection.Ten years have passed since the accident at Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant, and radioactive substances contained in agricultural products and marine products are now below detectable levels. Amidst this, the testing stance is changing from one that guarantees safety to one that guarantees relief, and testing is being reduced for financial reasons. Moreover, the sense of resistance and concern towards food products produced in Fukushima Prefecture is reducing. Anxiety has been reducing along with the development of the inspection system, the inspection results, and the passage of time. However, although there have been fewer requests, demands, and claims to avoid products from Fukushima Prefecture since immediately after the accident, there is a tendency for consumer trends to be forcefully ‘surmised'. As a result, the problem of reputational damage, such as the fact that the market ranking of rice and beef has not recovered, remains an issue.
      Citation: Annals of the ICRP
      PubDate: 2021-10-13T05:46:12Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01466453211020846
       
  • Dialogue as therapy: the role of the expert in the ICRP Dialogues

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: M. Takahashi
      Abstract: Annals of the ICRP, Ahead of Print.
      Science communication is commonly framed as a battle with ignorance and the field of radiological protection is not exempt from this tendency. By correcting deficits in the public’s understanding of science, the expert is often imagined to be able to convince the public of its objective safety (‘anzen’), thereby inspiring a sense of calm (‘anshin’). In the wake of the 2011 Fukushima Daiichi disaster, however, the International Commission on Radiological Protection has sought to break with this tradition by organising a series of participatory seminars in which experts engage those affected by the disaster as equals. Drawing on ethnographic fieldwork, this article suggests that the Dialogue seminars can be best understood using the metaphor of therapy; using it to describe the premise, form, and objectives of the Dialogues with a view to identifying good practice for future radiological protection scenarios.
      Citation: Annals of the ICRP
      PubDate: 2021-08-13T07:03:05Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01466453211033758
       
  • Radiation doses of workers engaged in decontamination of the environment

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: T. Ogawa, T. Ueno, T. Asano, A. Suzuki, A. Ito
      Abstract: Annals of the ICRP, Ahead of Print.
      After the accident at Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant on 11 March 2011, radioactive materials were released into the atmosphere resulting in environmental contamination. Following the implementation of environmental decontamination efforts, the Radiation Dose Registration Centre of the Radiation Effects Association established the radiation dose registration system for decontamination and related workers to consolidate and prevent the loss of radiation records. This article presents statistics on the radiation doses of decontamination and related workers using official records. Since approximately 10 years have passed since the accident in Fukushima, the types of work conducted in the affected restricted areas have changed over time. Therefore, changes in radiation dose for each type of work and comparisons with nuclear workers are presented.
      Citation: Annals of the ICRP
      PubDate: 2021-08-06T08:19:39Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01466453211015395
       
  • CORRIGENDA

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Annals of the ICRP, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Annals of the ICRP
      PubDate: 2021-07-30T05:13:16Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01466453211032745
       
  • Communicating radiation risks to the residents of the Chernobyl-affected
           areas in Russia: key lessons learned

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: I. Abalkina, E. Melikhova, M. Savkin
      Abstract: Annals of the ICRP, Ahead of Print.
      This paper does not necessarily reflect the views of the International Commission on Radiological Protection.This article analyses the communication experiences of radiation protection experts at federal/regional and local level. Efforts to justify protective measures were more successful at federal level, while the task of adjusting risk perception among local residents remains unresolved. At the recovery stage (15 years after the accident at Chernobyl nuclear power plant), the main difficulties were associated with the fact that expert knowledge was in conflict with public perception of the risk of low doses and legislative approaches. In these situations, communication success depends directly on an expert’s personality. When large areas are affected, the efforts of a few dedicated experts are clearly not sufficient. More systematic approaches (training of doctors, teachers, etc.) require governmental support and experienced personnel. Federal authorities had changed their attitudes by the 15th anniversary of the accident. However, at regional level, this process stretched out for another 15 years. Public perception of large-scale health consequences still persists. Examples and survey results are presented in this article.
      Citation: Annals of the ICRP
      PubDate: 2021-07-28T04:00:05Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01466453211010917
       
  • How to overcome the difficulty of talking about the experience of a
           nuclear disaster

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Ryoko Ando
      Abstract: Annals of the ICRP, Ahead of Print.
      At the ICRP International Conference on Recovery After Nuclear Accidents Session 3.4 Forum on the Transmission of Experience held in December 2020, a panel discussion took place on the topic, ‘How to overcome the difficulty to talk about the experience of nuclear accidents'’. The facilitator was Ryoko Ando (NPO Fukushima Dialogue) and the following six people participated as panelists: Atsushi Chiba (teacher at Fukushima Prefectural Asaka High School), Yoshiko Aoki (NPO Group of Storytellers About 311 in Tomioka), Miku Endo (Great East Japan Earthquake and Nuclear Disaster Memorial Museum), Kenji Shiga (former Director of Hiroshima Peace Memorial Museum), Thierry Schneider (Centre d’étude sur l’Evaluation de la Protection dans le domaine Nucléaire), and Noboru Takamura (Director of Great East Japan Earthquake and Nuclear Disaster Memorial Museum, Nagasaki University).
      Citation: Annals of the ICRP
      PubDate: 2021-07-27T07:21:49Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01466453211015397
       
  • R&D of JAEA for the decommissioning of TEPCO’s Fukushima Daiichi
           nuclear power station

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Koichi Noda
      Abstract: Annals of the ICRP, Ahead of Print.
      This paper does not necessarily reflect the views of the International Commission on Radiological Protection.Since the accident at Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power station in March 2011, Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) has been contributing actively to the environmental recovery of Fukushima and the decommissioning of Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power station from a technical aspect, through a wide range of research and development (R&D) activities including fundamental research and applicational technology development. JAEA has been conducting R&D such as the characterisation of fuel debris, and treatment and disposal of radioactive wastes based on the ‘Mid-and-Long-Term Roadmap’ authorised by the Japanese Government. This R&D is mainly promoted by Collaborative Laboratories for Advanced Decommissioning Science (CLADS) in Tomioka Town, and CLADS has also been promoting cooperation with domestic and foreign research institutes, related companies, universities, etc. In addition, Naraha Centre for Remote Control Technology Development in Naraha Town commenced full operation in April 2016 for the development and demonstration of remote control technologies planned for use in the decommissioning of Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power station and disaster response. Okuma Analysis and Research Centre in Okuma Town is under construction for the analysis and characterisation of fuel debris and various radioactive wastes. Ten years have passed since the Great East Japan Earthquake and the accident at Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power station, and environmental conditions in Fukushima have been improving. The evacuation zone has been lifted, and preparation of specific recovery areas in the difficult-to-return zone has progressed. However, the reconstruction of Fukushima and the decommissioning of Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power station are still in progress, and JAEA will continue its R&D for the decommissioning of Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power station with domestic and international expertise in order to further contribute to the reconstruction of Fukushima.
      Citation: Annals of the ICRP
      PubDate: 2021-07-27T03:17:24Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01466453211010892
       
  • Chornobyl exclusion zone: current status and challenges

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      Authors: Olena Pareniuk, Nakahiro Yasuda
      Abstract: Annals of the ICRP, Ahead of Print.
      Comparisons of the large nuclear accidents that occurred at the nuclear power plants in Chornobyl and Fukushima usually focus on the emission of radionuclides, the contamination area, doses to the public and liquidation workers, etc. However, little attention has been paid to various factors that affect decisions regarding the future development of these territories, such as the sociopolitical and economic situation in the countries during the accident and at the present time, the density and structure of the population, climate change, media coverage, and accessibility of information to the public. This article attempts to discuss the above factors, speculates about the paths for future development of both exclusion zones, and suggests the most promising areas for joint research in the future.
      Citation: Annals of the ICRP
      PubDate: 2021-07-20T01:41:36Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01466453211028032
       
  • The institutional structure for decommissioning Fukushima Daiichi nuclear
           power plant

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      Authors: Hajimu Yamana
      Abstract: Annals of the ICRP, Ahead of Print.
      This paper does not necessarily reflect the views of the International Commission on Radiological Protection.This article describes the institutional structure established for decommissioning Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant. To deal with the aftermath of the unprecedented nuclear accident in Fukushima, several responsible institutions such as Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry (METI), Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology (MEXT) have worked together at the initiative of the Government of Japan. In this structure, Tokyo Electric Power Company Holdings (TEPCO) implements the decommissioning due to its legal responsibility, while the essential direction and milestones are set by the Nuclear Emergency Response Headquarters of the Government of Japan. Nuclear Damage Compensation and Decommissioning Facilitation Corporation, a government-affiliated organisation, oversees and facilitates the decommissioning by TEPCO, and the Nuclear Regulatory Authority regulates safety from an independent standpoint. The main basic elements essential for the success of this long-term project have been developed, such as the technical strategy, financial system, and organisational capability. Decommissioning is making progress.
      Citation: Annals of the ICRP
      PubDate: 2021-07-15T03:43:09Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01466453211015396
       
  • Activities to support individual dosimetry of children in Kawamata Town

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      Authors: Hirokuni Yamanishi, Tetsuo Ito, Makoto Hosono
      Abstract: Annals of the ICRP, Ahead of Print.
      This paper does not necessarily reflect the views of the International Commission on Radiological Protection.Kawamata Town in Date District, Fukushima Prefecture is located more than 30 km north-west of Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant, but on 22 April 2011, part of the Yamakiya District of Kawamata Town was designated as a planned evacuation area. The exposure of children was a concern in Kawamata Town. Based on the proposal of Kindai University, Kawamata Town Board of Education took the initiative to measure individual radiation doses with an integrated dosimeter (glass badge) for all kindergarten children, nursery school children, elementary school students, and junior high school students in the town. These measurements were continued for nearly 3 years from June 2011 until the end of March 2014. The total number of measurements was approximately 16,800 across 11-cycle measurement, with 3 months’ accumulation taken as one-cycle measurement. Kindai University provided financial support for the glass badge measurement service, and cooperated in the analysis of measured values and the development of advice based on the results. The main body implementing the measurements was Kawamata Town Board of Education, and the data obtained belong to Kawamata Town. When measurements were starting to be taken, schools got involved in the collection and distribution of dosimeters after explanations were provided to principals and school nurses who were in charge of risk communication. Thanks to the efforts of the schools, the recovery rate exceeded 90%, increasing the reliability of the measurements. It was clear who needed the information – the children and their parents. Kawamata Town Board of Education summarised the cumulative dose results for each measurement and notified parents via personal reports. These were sent to parents with advice on measurement results prepared by Kindai University, and care was taken to ensure that people could understand the measured results. Further briefing sessions were held as appropriate. At the briefing sessions, at the request of Kawamata Town Board of Education, the faculty members of Kindai University explained the measurement results from a professional point of view, and a professor from the Faculty of Medicine provided individual health consultations. Kawamata Town took the lead in using specialists to gain peace of mind, and this was key to the project’s success. The situation was managed by taking measurements by dosimetry, and asking experts to interpret the data and provide advice to help reassure the residents.
      Citation: Annals of the ICRP
      PubDate: 2021-07-15T03:41:47Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01466453211010918
       
  • Regulatory approach to management of radioactive waste generated during
           remediation activities in the Chernobyl contaminated areas

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      Authors: L.F. Rozdyalouskaya
      Abstract: Annals of the ICRP, Ahead of Print.
      This paper does not necessarily reflect the views of the International Commission on Radiological Protection.It is known that remediation activities in areas affected by radiological accidents may result in generation of huge volumes of very low-level radioactive waste that can overwhelm national capabilities, and be outside of the existing national regulation requirements for radioactive waste management. This may pose a challenge for adoption of an adequate strategy for remediation waste management and application of regulatory requirements that are commensurate with the waste hazard. The Republic of Belarus faced this problem after the Chernobyl accident when performing remediation activities in the contaminated areas. This article presents the experience of the Republic of Belarus in overcoming the challenges and conflicts that arose in the process of developing a rational strategy for safety management of remediation waste, and its justification and optimisation, bearing in mind the need to adopt advanced regulatory instruments of relevance to the management of this waste.
      Citation: Annals of the ICRP
      PubDate: 2021-07-15T03:16:57Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01466453211010855
       
  • Feedback assessment from the audience as part of health literacy training
           for health professionals: a case from Fukushima after the nuclear accident
           

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      Authors: A. Goto, Y. Yumiya, K. Ueda
      Abstract: Annals of the ICRP, Ahead of Print.
      Following the accident at Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant in 2011, a series of health literacy training workshops for local health workers was developed and implemented. This study aimed to analyse who among the intended audience gained the greatest benefit from the training. Nine health workers attended a workshop consisting of classroom training and a follow-up feedback assessment of materials they created in the workshop. The materials were assessed by a total of 131 intended readers. Using Sakai’s tool, those items asking readers to rate the accessibility of written information were used to compare the materials before and after revision. The total score for Sakai’s measure showed a significant improvement, and the elderly and those without regular doctor visits were more likely to notice improvements after revision. Such health literacy training could serve as a model programme to prevent inequity in access to health information in the face of a regional health crisis.
      Citation: Annals of the ICRP
      PubDate: 2021-07-14T06:15:46Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01466453211010919
       
  • From a policy perspective: what is at stake'

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      Authors: N. Ban
      Abstract: Annals of the ICRP, Ahead of Print.
      This paper does not necessarily reflect the views of the International Commission on Radiological Protection.What is at stake' It was one of the most frequently asked questions in a series of fora with concerned parties on the rehabilitation of living conditions in the aftermath of the accident at Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant. It was obvious that radioactive contamination was the source of the problem, and people were at a loss over how to cope with the situation. Various measures were taken under such circumstances, including detailed radiation monitoring, a decontamination programme to reduce the level of radiation in the living environment, and activities related to communication about radiation risk. Nevertheless, this question was asked repeatedly. Measures against radiation exposure were certainly necessary, but it is a reality that they were not enough to solve the difficulties experienced by people in the affected areas. This article presents the author's personal view of the underlying reasons for this, and discusses the way to facilitate recovery after a nuclear accident.
      Citation: Annals of the ICRP
      PubDate: 2021-07-14T06:14:46Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01466453211006817
       
  • Health management and care following the Fukushima nuclear power plant
           accident: overview of Fukushima Health Management Survey

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      Authors: Kenji Kamiya
      Abstract: Annals of the ICRP, Ahead of Print.
      Following the accident at Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant, Fukushima Prefecture is conducting the Fukushima Health Management Survey, which has been contracted out to Fukushima Medical University. The purpose of this survey is to investigate the exposure doses and health conditions of the residents of Fukushima Prefecture in order to prevent, diagnose, and treat diseases at an early stage, and to maintain and improve the health of residents in the future.This survey consists of a basic survey to estimate external exposure doses and detailed surveys to investigate health conditions. The detailed surveys comprise: (i) thyroid ultrasound examination; (ii) comprehensive health check; (iii) mental health and lifestyle survey; and (iv) pregnancy and birth survey.In the basic survey, the external exposure dose was estimated for>466,000 people during the first 4 months after the accident; it was estimated to be
      Citation: Annals of the ICRP
      PubDate: 2021-07-05T08:29:04Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01466453211015402
       
  • Presentations and presenters

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      Abstract: Annals of the ICRP, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Annals of the ICRP
      PubDate: 2021-06-28T07:15:28Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01466453211027672
       
  • Status of research and development conducted by the International Research
           Institute for Nuclear Decommissioning

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      Authors: Toyoaki Yamauchi
      Abstract: Annals of the ICRP, Ahead of Print.
      Since the International Research Institute for Nuclear Decommissioning (IRID) was established as a technology research association in August 2013, it has been engaged in research and development (R&D) for decommissioning the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant, which is currently an urgent issue, to strengthen the platform for decommissioning technology for the future. The work of IRID R&D is classified into three main pillars: removal of spent nuclear fuel from the pool; retrieval of fuel debris; and technological development for treatment and disposal of solid radioactive waste. This article describes an overview of R&D as of the first half of the fiscal year 2020, mainly focusing on investigation inside primary containment vessels and retrieval of fuel debris.
      Citation: Annals of the ICRP
      PubDate: 2021-06-23T02:51:26Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01466453211006811
       
  • RECOVERY AFTER NUCLEAR ACCIDENTS

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      Authors: Christopher H. Clement
      Abstract: Annals of the ICRP, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Annals of the ICRP
      PubDate: 2021-06-18T05:59:11Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01466453211020845
       
  • Fukushima Daiichi decontamination and decommissioning: current status and
           challenges

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      Authors: Akira Ono
      Abstract: Annals of the ICRP, Ahead of Print.
      It has been nearly 10 years since the accident at Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant. With the cooperation of those involved, the site, which was once in a crisis situation, has improved to the point where it is possible to look ahead and proceed with work on schedule. In the off-site area, conditions for returning home have been progressed, and evacuation orders for some areas have been lifted by the Japanese Government. This article describes, in respect of the various efforts being made on site at the moment, the current status of fuel removal from the spent fuel pools, preparations for fuel debris retrieval, improvement of the working environment, and future plans. Removal of fuel from the spent fuel pool for Unit 4 was completed in December 2014, and work is continuing with Unit 3 in order to complete by March 2021. The decision was made to install a large cover in advance for Unit 1 in consideration of the risk of dust scattering, and to conduct fuel removal for Unit 2 from the south side without dismantling the existing upper section of the building. The target is for fuel removal from the pools, including Units 5 and 6, to be complete by 2031. Regarding fuel debris retrieval, progress in various investigations has made it possible to grasp the distribution of debris in the reactor containment vessels of Units 1–3 to a certain extent, and it was decided that the first retrieval will start with the most-investigated unit (Unit 2). A robot arm will be used for retrieval; initially, a trial retrieval will be started, and once the retrieval method has been verified and confirmed, the scale of retrieval will be expanded in stages using a device with the same mechanism. The working environment of Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant has also improved. By reducing the stirring up of radioactive materials due to facing (paving), etc., it became possible to reduce the degree of protective clothing needed, and the area in which people can work with simple clothing such as general work clothes now represents 96% of the entire site. Due to various reduction measures, the effective dose of workers is currently approximately 0.2–0.4 mSv month−1 on average per person. The work environment will continue to be improved steadily in the future. Finally, I would like to briefly mention the direction of future decommissioning efforts. The decommissioning of Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant and contaminated water management are being implemented based on the national Mid-and-Long-Term Roadmap. The latest edition (5th revision) sets out the milestones until 2031, and we are on target to achieve the goals set forth here and the goals set forth in the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's risk map. To that end, the Mid-and-Long-Term Decommissioning Action Plan 2020, which shows the main work processes of the decommissioning, was announced. This will enable us to proceed with decommissioning work more systematically in the future while looking ahead. Local people who sometime are concerned about risk arising from Fukushima Daiichi may grasp the future work plan concretely in relief, and can consider taking part in the decommissioning work. The key lies in how we can contribute to the reconstruction of Fukushima through the decommissioning of Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant, and we will continue to take responsibility for decommissioning of the power plant and contaminated water management under the principle of ‘striking a balance of reconstruction and decommissioning’.
      Citation: Annals of the ICRP
      PubDate: 2021-06-18T05:58:32Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01466453211010865
       
  • The role of experts in the development of recovery handbooks: UK and
           European experience

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      Authors: A.F. Nisbet
      Abstract: Annals of the ICRP, Ahead of Print.
      The importance of involving experts in the development of strategies for managing areas contaminated as a result of a nuclear accident is now well recognised. Following the Chernobyl accident in 1986, the initial focus, quite understandably, was on the technical aspects of reducing doses to the affected population. Subsequently, work carried out in the UK and elsewhere in Europe looked at the broader impacts of protective actions on agriculture, the environment, and society. From 1997, a group of experts from academia, government, and non-government organisations met regularly in the UK to debate these issues. One of the outputs included the first version of the UK Recovery Handbook for Radiation Incidents in 2005. Based on the success of the UK group, a European network of experts was established, leading to the development of European handbooks in 2009. The UK handbooks are living documents that are updated regularly with substantive input from experts.
      Citation: Annals of the ICRP
      PubDate: 2021-06-16T08:14:56Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01466453211010920
       
  • Radiocaesium in the environment of Fukushima

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      Authors: H. Tsukada
      Abstract: Annals of the ICRP, Ahead of Print.
      It has been 10 years since the accident at Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant in 2011. Large quantities of 131I, 134Cs, and 137Cs were released into the environment, and 80% of 137Cs still remains. In addition to the decrease by attenuation, the transfer of 137Cs to plants, animals, and humans is decreasing due to movement and changing fractions with elapsed time. The activity concentration of 137Cs in the atmosphere has decreased drastically, and the internal radiation dose due to inhalation is negligible. The activity concentration of 137Cs in agricultural plants is decreasing due to decontamination of soil, application of potassium, and lower levels in irrigation water. The activity concentration of 137Cs in wild animals is decreasing, and shows seasonal variation in wild boars. The activity concentration of 137Cs in offshore seawater has decreased to 0.01 Bq l−1. Therefore, the radiation dose is
      Citation: Annals of the ICRP
      PubDate: 2021-06-14T08:57:42Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01466453211006808
       
  • Supporting societal and economic dynamics of recovery: lessons from
           Chernobyl and Fukushima

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      Authors: Thierry Schneider, Jacques Lochard
      Abstract: Annals of the ICRP, Ahead of Print.
      This paper does not necessarily reflect the views of the International Commission on Radiological Protection.Beyond the consideration of radiological aspects, the rehabilitation of living and working conditions after a large nuclear accident is a complex process in which all dimensions of individual and community life are involved and interconnected. Responsibles of socio-economic entities are facing various difficulties/challenges, including the implementation of protective actions for ensuring the protection of employees, the continuity of production of good-quality products in affected areas, and restoring the confidence of consumers. For affected local communities, the deployment of a socio-economic programme is essential to enable a sustainable future while recognising that a return to the pre-accident situation is generally not achievable. In this context, supporting the societal and economic dynamics of the recovery process requires the adoption of specific governance mechanisms respecting a series of ethical and social values, as highlighted by lessons from the post-accident management of the Chernobyl and Fukshima accidents at Chernobyl and Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plants.
      Citation: Annals of the ICRP
      PubDate: 2021-06-11T05:25:59Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01466453211006812
       
  • On the role of experts: experiences from 35 years of Chernobyl
           consequences in Norway

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      Authors: L. Skuterud
      Abstract: Annals of the ICRP, Ahead of Print.
      The fallout from the 1986 Chernobyl accident caused dramatic and long-lasting consequences for parts of food production in Norway, and the indigenous Sámi reindeer-herding lifestyle and culture in central Norway was particularly threatened. Banning food production – or condemning food – was considered unacceptable in a long-term perspective, and huge efforts were made to develop mitigating options. Some of these are still in place, 35 years after the accident. This article describes some of the long-term efforts made by Norwegian authorities to attempt to alleviate the consequences for the reindeer herders. Every accident and crisis is unique, and this is true for the experiences in Norway. However, some of the experiences in Norway are likely to have universal value.
      Citation: Annals of the ICRP
      PubDate: 2021-06-10T11:26:16Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01466453211010921
       
  • Development of an application tool to support returnees in Fukushima

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      Authors: T. Ohba, A. Goto, H. Nakano, K.E. Nollet, M. Murakami, Y. Koyama, K. Honda, K. Yoshida, Y. Yumiya, Y. Kuroda, A. Kumagai, T. Ohira, K. Tanigawa
      Abstract: Annals of the ICRP, Ahead of Print.
      To promote radiation protection and health promotion among returning residents (returnees) in coastal areas of Fukushima, eHealth principles were used to develop a new application tool (app) that can record radiation exposure and health status while providing comprehensive support to returnees. Intended users are returnees and health and welfare workers. After assessing their needs, a flowchart and prototype for operational logic were created using commercially available software tools. Professional developers will focus on improving the user interface and ensuring data security. The finished app will be compatible with mobile telephones and tablets. Utility and ease of use are paramount to serve returnees of all ages effectively.
      Citation: Annals of the ICRP
      PubDate: 2021-06-10T11:25:36Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01466453211006815
       
  • Comparison of thyroid doses to the public from radioiodine following the
           Chernobyl and Fukushima accidents

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      Authors: Sergey M. Shinkarev
      Abstract: Annals of the ICRP, Ahead of Print.
      Estimates of thyroid doses to the public from radioiodine intake following the accidents at Chernobyl and Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plants are compared. The basis for thyroid dose estimates after the Chernobyl accident was a large set of measurements of 131I thyroidal content for approximately 400,000 residents in Belarus, Ukraine, and Russia. Due to a lack of direct thyroid measurements after the Fukushima accident (just over 1000 residents were measured), thyroid doses were estimated based on ecological models and are therefore associated with much higher uncertainty than those based on direct thyroid measurements. Thyroid dose estimates for evacuees were up to 50,000 mGy for Chernobyl and up to approximately 100 mGy for Fukushima. This large difference in thyroid dose to the public is mainly due to the different dominant pathways of radioiodine intake: ingestion of fresh, locally produced cows’ milk (Chernobyl) and inhalation of contaminated air (Fukushima).
      Citation: Annals of the ICRP
      PubDate: 2021-06-10T11:25:36Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01466453211006816
       
  • Synthesis of the JHPS International Symposium on Tritiated Water

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      Authors: H. Yoshida
      Abstract: Annals of the ICRP, Ahead of Print.
      As the decommissioning of Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant (NPP) progresses, the issue of how to deal with tritiated water has been attracting attention, both domestically and internationally. This article summarises the live discussion at the International Symposium on Tritiated Water, which was held by the Japan Health Physics Society (JHPS) in June 2020. Two issues – the scientific safety of tritiated water and social consensus building – were covered in the live discussion. The importance of further disclosure and dissemination of information based on steady monitoring was highlighted. It was also pointed out that scientific knowledge and scientific research data are merely the bottom line to achieve social consensus. Through the discussions, it was recognised that the role of JHPS is not only to look at the technical issues of safety, but also to look at social issues from the point of view of radiation protection, and to support the solution of these issues.
      Citation: Annals of the ICRP
      PubDate: 2021-06-10T11:25:14Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01466453211006813
       
  • As a resident and a counsellor

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      Authors: Maiko Momma, Ryoko Ando
      Abstract: Annals of the ICRP, Ahead of Print.
      At the time of the accident at Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant in 2011, I was living in Iwaki City with my two children and my husband. With our home damaged by the tsunami and the deteriorating status following the situation at the nuclear power plant, we spent 2 years as evacuees before returning to Iwaki City. Subsequently, I decided to work as a radiation counsellor in the Suetsugi district of Iwaki City. I would like to describe my experience of taking measurements and helping to communicate with the residents while respecting the lives of local people.
      Citation: Annals of the ICRP
      PubDate: 2021-06-10T11:23:24Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01466453211015399
       
  • Lessons from the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant accident
           –from a research perspective

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      Authors: Satoshi Tashiro
      Abstract: Annals of the ICRP, Ahead of Print.
      Since the accident at Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant, there has been a focus on the impact of low-dose radiation exposure due to nuclear disasters and radiology on human bodies. In order to study very low levels of impact on the human body from low-dose radiation exposure, a system with high detection sensitivity is needed. Until now, the most well-established biological radiation effect detection system in the field of emergency radiation medicine has been chromosomal analysis. However, chromosomal analysis requires advanced skills, and it is necessary to perform chromosomal analysis of a large number of cells in order to detect slight effects on the human body due to low-dose radiation exposure. Therefore, in order to study the effects of low-dose radiation exposure on the human body, it is necessary to develop high-throughput chromosome analysis technology. We have established the PNA-FISH method, which is a fluorescence in-situ hybridisation method using a PNA probe, as a high-throughput chromosome analysis technique. Using this method, the detection of dicentrics and ring chromosomes has become very efficient. Using this technology, chromosomal analysis was performed on peripheral blood before and after computed tomography (CT) examination of patients at Hiroshima University Hospital, and it was possible to detect chromosomal abnormalities due to low-dose radiation exposure in the CT examination. Furthermore, it was shown that there may be individual differences in the increase in chromosomal abnormalities due to low-dose radiation exposure, suggesting the need to build a next-generation medical radiation exposure management system based on individual differences in radiation sensitivity. If techniques such as chromosomal analysis, which have been used for biological dose evaluation in emergency radiation medicine, can be used for general radiology, such as radiodiagnosis and treatment, that will be a contribution to radiology from an unprecedented angle. This article will discuss the clinical application of new biological dose evaluation methods that have been developed in the field of emergency radiation medicine.
      Citation: Annals of the ICRP
      PubDate: 2021-06-10T11:23:16Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01466453211015394
       
  • Corrigenda

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      Abstract: Annals of the ICRP, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Annals of the ICRP
      PubDate: 2021-06-09T05:15:20Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01466453211016658
       
  • Corrigenda

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      Abstract: Annals of the ICRP, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Annals of the ICRP
      PubDate: 2021-06-09T05:15:12Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01466453211013964
       
  • ICRP recommendations for recovery

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      Authors: M. Kai
      Abstract: Annals of the ICRP, Ahead of Print.
      In 2020, the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) issued Publication 146 which provides a framework of the radiological protection of people and the environment in the case of a large nuclear accident. Mitigation of radiological consequences is achieved using the fundamental principles of justification of decisions and optimisation of protection. These recommendations emphasise the importance of the optimisation of protection for the rehabilitation of living and working conditions in the affected areas during the intermediate and long-term phases. They underline the role of co-operation between the authorities, experts, and the affected population in the co-expertise process to facilitate informed decisions about their own protection. ICRP defines reference levels to be selected within generic bands of exposure considering the induced risk of radiation, as well as the feasibility of controlling the situation.
      Citation: Annals of the ICRP
      PubDate: 2021-06-07T03:55:25Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01466453211006809
       
  • Support activities in Namie Town, Fukushima undertaken by Hirosaki
           University

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      Authors: Shinji Tokonami, Tomisato Miura, Naofumi Akata, Hirofumi Tazoe, Masahiro Hosoda, Kranrod Chutima, Hiromi Kudo, Koya Ogura, Yohei Fujishima, Yuki Tamakuma, Mayumi Shimizu, Kazutaka Kikuchi, Ikuo Kashiwakura
      Abstract: Annals of the ICRP, Ahead of Print.
      This paper does not necessarily reflect the views of the International Commission on Radiological Protection.Several radiation monitoring research projects are underway on dose assessment, biological analysis, and risk communication under an agreement with Namie Town. Indoor radon and thoron progeny concentrations have been measured using passive-type monitors to estimate internal doses due to inhalation. In addition, airborne radiocaesium concentrations at five points in Namie Town have been analysed using a high-purity germanium detector to estimate internal doses for comparison with radon. External radiation doses from natural and artificial radionuclides have also been estimated using an in-situ gamma-ray spectrometer. Other support activities are mentioned briefly in this article,
      Citation: Annals of the ICRP
      PubDate: 2021-06-07T03:54:45Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01466453211006806
       
  • Involvement of stakeholders during the preparedness phase of post-accident
           situation management

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      Authors: J.M. Bertho, F. Gabillaud-Poillion, C. Reuter, O. Rivière, J.L. Lachaume
      Abstract: Annals of the ICRP, Ahead of Print.
      The Steering Committee for Post-accident Management Preparedness (CODIRPA) was commissioned by the French Government in 2005 with the aim of establishing the main principles to be set up for population protection and recovery in the long term. From the beginning, one of the main principles was the pluralistic nature of the working groups (WGs), including scientific and technical experts, representatives from state departments, nuclear operators, and representatives of civil society (i.e. stakeholders). Stakeholders were mainly associated with the various WGs of CODIRPA. In order to foster the involvement of stakeholders from civil society in the works of CODIRPA, a new organisation was implemented with two WGs: one mainly composed of technical experts for tackling technical issues, and one for evaluating the proposals made by the experts from the stakeholders’ point of view. This article presents the results of this new strategy.
      Citation: Annals of the ICRP
      PubDate: 2021-06-07T03:54:26Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01466453211006805
       
  • Development of computer simulator ‘Kawauchi Legends’ as disaster
           response medical training software: overcoming the COVID-19 pandemic

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      Authors: Arifumi Hasegawa, Mikiko Shiga, Keita Iyama
      Abstract: Annals of the ICRP, Ahead of Print.
      Medical disaster response training is provided for international students in Kawauchi Village to share the lessons learnt from the accident at Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant. At present, this is difficult due to the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. The purpose of this article is to report the development of hands-on medical training software on a topic that does not require in-person attendance. The ‘Kawauchi Legends’ disaster simulator was developed as a useful tool to teach the medical response to various disasters, and this was applied in a 3-day webinar in October 2020. Fourteen students participated in the webinar and successfully learnt medical management, manipulating their avatars in the virtual environment. This software can be an effective substitute for in-person disaster training without physical involvement. Such innovative teaching methods mean that lessons from the Fukushima accident can continue to be shared, even in the COVID-19 pandemic situation.
      Citation: Annals of the ICRP
      PubDate: 2021-06-04T05:00:50Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01466453211006804
       
  • Health issues today in affected areas near Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power
           plant

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      Authors: K. Tanigawa
      Abstract: Annals of the ICRP, Ahead of Print.
      Due to vigorous efforts to decontaminate the environment following the accident at Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant, the size of the difficult-to-return zone has reduced significantly and people have started returning to their homes. As the population has increased, medical needs have ensued. A marked increase in traffic as well as decontamination and reconstruction projects has led to an increase in the number of road traffic and occupational accidents. Acceleration of population aging has resulted in an increased number of elderly residents with multiple medical problems. Uncontrolled/untreated medical problems among middle-aged to older workers have made them susceptible to deterioration of health conditions. Insufficient social support for elderly people living alone has resulted in delayed access to medical care. Early intervention and the prevention of health deterioration are instrumental. When responding to medical needs, proactive approaches, including home visits for elderly patients and health promotion, have been implemented. Human resource development is crucial to ensure the sustainability of these activities.
      Citation: Annals of the ICRP
      PubDate: 2021-06-03T07:21:21Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01466453211006807
       
  • CORRIGENDUM

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      Abstract: Annals of the ICRP, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Annals of the ICRP
      PubDate: 2021-03-25T04:09:31Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01466453211000254
       
  • CORRIGENDUM

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      Abstract: Annals of the ICRP, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Annals of the ICRP
      PubDate: 2021-03-23T11:46:51Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01466453211000206
       
 
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