Publisher: Sage Publications   (Total: 1166 journals)

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Showing 1 - 200 of 1166 Journals sorted alphabetically
AADE in Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Abstracts in Anthropology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 29)
Academic Pathology     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Accounting History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18, SJR: 0.527, CiteScore: 1)
Acta Radiologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.754, CiteScore: 2)
Acta Radiologica Open     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Acta Sociologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39, SJR: 0.939, CiteScore: 2)
Action Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 53, SJR: 0.308, CiteScore: 1)
Active Learning in Higher Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 396, SJR: 1.397, CiteScore: 2)
Adaptive Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.288, CiteScore: 1)
Administration & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18, SJR: 0.675, CiteScore: 1)
Adoption & Fostering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25, SJR: 0.313, CiteScore: 0)
Adsorption Science & Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.258, CiteScore: 1)
Adult Education Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 258, SJR: 0.566, CiteScore: 2)
Adult Learning     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 51)
Advances in Dental Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 1.791, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Developing Human Resources     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35, SJR: 0.614, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Mechanical Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 156, SJR: 0.272, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Methods and Practices in Psychological Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20)
Advances in Structural Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 51, SJR: 0.599, CiteScore: 1)
AERA Open     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
Affilia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.496, CiteScore: 1)
Africa Spectrum     Open Access   (Followers: 17)
Agrarian South : J. of Political Economy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Air, Soil & Water Research     Open Access   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.214, CiteScore: 1)
Alexandria : The J. of National and Intl. Library and Information Issues     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 68)
Allergy & Rhinology     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
AlterNative : An Intl. J. of Indigenous Peoples     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 39, SJR: 0.194, CiteScore: 0)
Alternative Law J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.176, CiteScore: 0)
Alternatives : Global, Local, Political     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.351, CiteScore: 1)
Alternatives to Laboratory Animals     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.297, CiteScore: 1)
American Behavioral Scientist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26, SJR: 0.982, CiteScore: 2)
American Economist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
American Educational Research J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 259, SJR: 2.913, CiteScore: 3)
American J. of Alzheimer's Disease and Other Dementias     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23, SJR: 0.67, CiteScore: 2)
American J. of Cosmetic Surgery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
American J. of Evaluation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18, SJR: 0.646, CiteScore: 2)
American J. of Health Promotion     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35, SJR: 0.807, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Hospice and Palliative Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 47, SJR: 0.65, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Law & Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.204, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Lifestyle Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.431, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Medical Quality     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.777, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Men's Health     Open Access   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.595, CiteScore: 2)
American J. of Rhinology and Allergy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.972, CiteScore: 2)
American J. of Sports Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 249, SJR: 3.949, CiteScore: 6)
American Politics Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 36, SJR: 1.313, CiteScore: 1)
American Review of Public Administration     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28, SJR: 2.062, CiteScore: 2)
American Sociological Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 356, SJR: 6.333, CiteScore: 6)
American String Teacher     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Analytical Chemistry Insights     Open Access   (Followers: 26, SJR: 0.224, CiteScore: 1)
Angiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.849, CiteScore: 2)
Animation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.197, CiteScore: 0)
Annals of Clinical Biochemistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.634, CiteScore: 1)
Annals of Otology, Rhinology & Laryngology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20, SJR: 0.807, CiteScore: 1)
Annals of Pharmacotherapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 59, SJR: 1.096, CiteScore: 2)
Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 51, SJR: 1.225, CiteScore: 3)
Annals of the ICRP     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.548, CiteScore: 1)
Anthropocene Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 3.341, CiteScore: 7)
Anthropological Theory     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 48, SJR: 0.739, CiteScore: 1)
Antitrust Bulletin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Antiviral Chemistry and Chemotherapy     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.635, CiteScore: 2)
Antyajaa : Indian J. of Women and Social Change     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Applied Biosafety     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.131, CiteScore: 0)
Applied Psychological Measurement     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21, SJR: 1.17, CiteScore: 1)
Applied Spectroscopy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 27, SJR: 0.489, CiteScore: 2)
Armed Forces & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25, SJR: 0.29, CiteScore: 1)
Arthaniti : J. of Economic Theory and Practice     Full-text available via subscription  
Arts and Humanities in Higher Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 49, SJR: 0.305, CiteScore: 1)
Asia Pacific Media Educator     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.23, CiteScore: 0)
Asia-Pacific J. of Management Research and Innovation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Asia-Pacific J. of Public Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.558, CiteScore: 1)
Asia-Pacific J. of Rural Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Asian and Pacific Migration J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.324, CiteScore: 1)
Asian Cardiovascular and Thoracic Annals     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.305, CiteScore: 0)
Asian J. of Comparative Politics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Asian J. of Legal Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Asian J. of Management Cases     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.101, CiteScore: 0)
ASN Neuro     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 1.534, CiteScore: 3)
Assessment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19, SJR: 1.519, CiteScore: 3)
Assessment for Effective Intervention     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.578, CiteScore: 1)
Australasian J. of Early Childhood     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.535, CiteScore: 1)
Australasian Psychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18, SJR: 0.433, CiteScore: 1)
Australian & New Zealand J. of Psychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30, SJR: 1.801, CiteScore: 2)
Australian and New Zealand J. of Criminology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 546, SJR: 0.612, CiteScore: 1)
Australian J. of Career Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Australian J. of Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 51, SJR: 0.403, CiteScore: 1)
Australian J. of Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.497, CiteScore: 1)
Autism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 355, SJR: 1.739, CiteScore: 4)
Autism & Developmental Language Impairments     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
Avian Biology Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.401, CiteScore: 1)
Behavior Modification     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.877, CiteScore: 2)
Behavioral and Cognitive Neuroscience Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Behavioral Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Beyond Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Bible Translator     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Biblical Theology Bulletin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24, SJR: 0.184, CiteScore: 0)
Big Data & Society     Open Access   (Followers: 55)
Biochemistry Insights     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Bioinformatics and Biology Insights     Open Access   (Followers: 12, SJR: 1.141, CiteScore: 2)
Biological Research for Nursing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.685, CiteScore: 2)
Biomarker Insights     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.81, CiteScore: 2)
Biomarkers in Cancer     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Biomedical Engineering and Computational Biology     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Biomedical Informatics Insights     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Bioscope: South Asian Screen Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.235, CiteScore: 0)
BMS: Bulletin of Sociological Methodology/Bulletin de Méthodologie Sociologique     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.226, CiteScore: 0)
Body & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29, SJR: 1.531, CiteScore: 3)
Bone and Tissue Regeneration Insights     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Brain and Neuroscience Advances     Open Access  
Brain Science Advances     Open Access  
Breast Cancer : Basic and Clinical Research     Open Access   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.823, CiteScore: 2)
British J. of Music Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
British J. of Occupational Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 252, SJR: 0.323, CiteScore: 1)
British J. of Pain     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31, SJR: 0.579, CiteScore: 2)
British J. of Politics and Intl. Relations     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39, SJR: 0.91, CiteScore: 2)
British J. of Visual Impairment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.337, CiteScore: 1)
British J.ism Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
BRQ Business Review Quarterly     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Building Acoustics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.215, CiteScore: 1)
Building Services Engineering Research & Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.583, CiteScore: 1)
Bulletin of Science, Technology & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Business & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Business and Professional Communication Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.348, CiteScore: 1)
Business Information Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17, SJR: 0.279, CiteScore: 0)
Business Perspectives and Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Cahiers Élisabéthains     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.111, CiteScore: 0)
Calcutta Statistical Association Bulletin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
California Management Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 37, SJR: 2.209, CiteScore: 4)
Canadian Association of Radiologists J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.463, CiteScore: 1)
Canadian J. of Kidney Health and Disease     Open Access   (Followers: 8, SJR: 1.007, CiteScore: 2)
Canadian J. of Nursing Research (CJNR)     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Canadian J. of Occupational Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 166, SJR: 0.626, CiteScore: 1)
Canadian J. of Psychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28, SJR: 1.769, CiteScore: 3)
Canadian J. of School Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.266, CiteScore: 1)
Canadian Pharmacists J. / Revue des Pharmaciens du Canada     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.536, CiteScore: 1)
Cancer Control     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Cancer Growth and Metastasis     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Cancer Informatics     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.64, CiteScore: 1)
Capital and Class     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.282, CiteScore: 1)
Cardiac Cath Lab Director     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Cardiovascular and Thoracic Open     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Career Development and Transition for Exceptional Individuals     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.44, CiteScore: 1)
Cartilage     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.889, CiteScore: 3)
Cell Transplantation     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 1.023, CiteScore: 3)
Cephalalgia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 1.581, CiteScore: 3)
Cephalalgia Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Child Language Teaching and Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34, SJR: 0.501, CiteScore: 1)
Child Maltreatment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 1.22, CiteScore: 3)
Child Neurology Open     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Childhood     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19, SJR: 0.894, CiteScore: 2)
Childhood Obesity and Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
China Information     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.767, CiteScore: 2)
China Report     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.221, CiteScore: 0)
Chinese J. of Sociology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Christian Education J. : Research on Educational Ministry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Chronic Illness     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.672, CiteScore: 2)
Chronic Respiratory Disease     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.808, CiteScore: 2)
Chronic Stress     Open Access  
Citizenship, Social and Economics Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.145, CiteScore: 0)
Cleft Palate-Craniofacial J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.757, CiteScore: 1)
Clin-Alert     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Clinical and Applied Thrombosis/Hemostasis     Open Access   (Followers: 32, SJR: 0.49, CiteScore: 1)
Clinical and Translational Neuroscience     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Clinical Case Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.364, CiteScore: 1)
Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 45, SJR: 0.73, CiteScore: 2)
Clinical EEG and Neuroscience     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.552, CiteScore: 2)
Clinical Ethics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.296, CiteScore: 1)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Arthritis and Musculoskeletal Disorders     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.537, CiteScore: 2)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Blood Disorders     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.314, CiteScore: 2)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Cardiology     Open Access   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.686, CiteScore: 2)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Case Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.283, CiteScore: 1)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Circulatory, Respiratory and Pulmonary Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.425, CiteScore: 2)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Ear, Nose and Throat     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Endocrinology and Diabetes     Open Access   (Followers: 33, SJR: 0.63, CiteScore: 2)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Oncology     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 1.129, CiteScore: 3)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Pediatrics     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Psychiatry     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Reproductive Health     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.776, CiteScore: 0)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Therapeutics     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.172, CiteScore: 0)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Trauma and Intensive Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Women's Health     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Clinical Nursing Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34, SJR: 0.471, CiteScore: 1)
Clinical Pathology     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Clinical Pediatrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25, SJR: 0.487, CiteScore: 1)
Clinical Psychological Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16, SJR: 3.281, CiteScore: 5)
Clinical Rehabilitation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 78, SJR: 1.322, CiteScore: 3)
Clinical Risk     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.133, CiteScore: 0)
Clinical Trials     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22, SJR: 2.399, CiteScore: 2)
Clothing and Textiles Research J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28, SJR: 0.36, CiteScore: 1)
Collections : A J. for Museum and Archives Professionals     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Common Law World Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Communication & Sport     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.385, CiteScore: 1)
Communication and the Public     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Communication Disorders Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.458, CiteScore: 1)
Communication Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24, SJR: 2.171, CiteScore: 3)
Community College Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 1.451, CiteScore: 1)
Comparative Political Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 291, SJR: 3.772, CiteScore: 3)
Compensation & Benefits Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Competition & Change     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.843, CiteScore: 2)

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Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Behavioral Disorders
Number of Followers: 1  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0198-7429 - ISSN (Online) 2163-5307
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1166 journals]
  • Introduction to the Special Series on Behavioral Disorders and Juvenile
           Justice: Facilitating Effective Reentry Into School and Community

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Heather Griller Clark, Sarup R. Mathur
      Pages: 135 - 137
      Abstract: Behavioral Disorders, Volume 46, Issue 3, Page 135-137, May 2021.
      This introduction to the special series on facilitating effective reentry into school and community for youth from the juvenile justice (JJ) system highlights several important issues for educators and others serving youth with emotional and behavioral disorders (EBD). The articles within this special series focus on key factors in programming and professional development that promote reentry success. Central to this discussion are protective factors, like self-determination and engagement, facility programming and climate, provision of person-centered supports, prioritization of youth development and mental health, increased communication and capacity building among stakeholders, and shifting to the use of positive youth outcomes in addition to recidivism as measure of reentry success. Findings and discussion provide a critical reference point for professionals and scholars interested in promoting reentry success and may improve interventions and services for JJ-involved youth, especially those with EBD.
      Citation: Behavioral Disorders
      PubDate: 2021-04-10T10:15:34Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01987429211002133
      Issue No: Vol. 46, No. 3 (2021)
       
  • Teacher Praise and Reprimand: Examining the Generalizability and
           Dependability of Observational Estimates

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Margaret T. Floress, Amy M. Briesch, Lyndsay N. Jenkins, Kaylee A. Hampton
      Abstract: Behavioral Disorders, Ahead of Print.
      This study examined the generalizability and dependability of observational estimates of middle and high school teachers’ use of praise and reprimand. Frequency of behavior-specific praise, general praise, and total reprimand were collected across 67, 20-min observations that took place during class-wide instruction in general education classrooms. Generalizability theory was used to determine the number of observations needed to obtain dependable estimates of teacher behavior. Behavior-specific praise rates were consistently low. General praise rates were slightly higher and reprimand rates were notably higher and slightly more variable. Total reprimands had the strongest generalizability results and general praise had the weakest. Behavior-specific praise reached an acceptable level of dependability after 15 min, whereas general praise required a 35-min observation, and reprimand only required 5 min. Implications and future directions are discussed.
      Citation: Behavioral Disorders
      PubDate: 2021-05-13T05:30:43Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01987429211012020
       
  • Factor Structure of the Scales for Assessing Emotional Disturbance : 3
           Rating Scale for Students Identified With Emotional Disturbance

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Matthew C. Lambert, Douglas Cullinan, Michael H. Epstein, Jodie Martin
      Abstract: Behavioral Disorders, Ahead of Print.
      This study examined the internal structure of the Scales for Assessing Emotional Disturbance-3 Rating Scale (RS), a teacher-completed RS developed to measure emotional disturbance (ED). As defined in U.S. law and regulations, ED involves five characteristics or patterns of behavioral and emotional maladaptation. RS data obtained on a sample of students with ED were used to examine validity evidence based on the internal structure of the assessment. Of particular interest was the extent to which multivariate factors derived from the RS data conform to the five characteristics of ED stated in the definition. Results indicate that the RS data fit a 5-factor model reasonably well. A subsequent bifactor analysis identified a considerable proportion of common variance across factors, suggesting the presence of a strong general ED factor, two distinct group factors (Inability to Learn and Inappropriate Behavior), and three weak group factors. The findings provided evidence of the validity of the SAED-3 RS based on internal structure and pointed to support for use of the RS in contributing to the process of determining whether a student qualifies for the ED education disability. Implications for improved research on the nature of ED and how students with ED can be better served are discussed.
      Citation: Behavioral Disorders
      PubDate: 2021-05-08T10:39:25Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01987429211012328
       
  • A Preliminary Study of BEST in CLASS–Elementary on Teacher
           Self-Efficacy, Burnout, and Attributions

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      Authors: Shannon Nemer McCullough, Kristen L. Granger, Kevin S. Sutherland, Maureen A. Conroy, Toshna Pandey
      Abstract: Behavioral Disorders, Ahead of Print.
      Student problem behaviors in early elementary school have been associated with increased teacher burnout, negative emotions, and stress, along with negative student outcomes, including increased risk of emotional and behavioral disorders (EBDs). This study examined the impact of BEST in CLASS–Elementary (BEST in CLASS-E), a teacher-delivered Tier 2 intervention, on teacher self-efficacy, burnout, and attributions for student behavior. Participants in the study were 45 kindergarten to Grade 3 students, identified as at risk of EBD, and their 26 teachers from three elementary schools located in an urban school district. Although changes in teacher self-efficacy and burnout were nonsignificant, results suggest that teachers in the BEST in CLASS-E condition reported less emotional exhaustion than teachers in the control condition and that BEST in CLASS-E had a slight but nonsignificant effect (p = .06) on teachers’ causal attributions of problem behavior. This study highlights the promise of BEST in CLASS-E as a Tier-2 intervention delivered by teachers in impacting elementary teacher outcomes. Implications and limitations of the study are discussed.
      Citation: Behavioral Disorders
      PubDate: 2021-04-30T07:26:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01987429211010672
       
  • Evaluating School-Level Student Outcomes of a Systematic Tier 2 Framework

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      Authors: Sara C. McDaniel, Daniel Cohen, Allison L. Bruhn
      Abstract: Behavioral Disorders, Ahead of Print.
      Targeted Tier 2 interventions are critical to supporting students with challenging behavior and decreasing the resources associated with highly individualized and intense interventions. This study extends findings from recent single-case design studies and case example applications of the Tier 2 Identification and Intervention framework with the first large-scale evaluation of school-level outcomes following district implementation. We employed a pretest–posttest design within one large urban school district (N = 23,042 students) to evaluate school-level discipline outcomes for elementary schools who received training and coaching on the Tier 2 framework. Fidelity (i.e., Tiered Fidelity Inventory) and school-level demographics (e.g., poverty status, race) were entered as covariates into the generalized linear models. Results indicated statistically significant decreases in office discipline referrals and in-school suspensions for schools with adequate Tier 2 fidelity. Implications, limitations, and future directions are discussed.
      Citation: Behavioral Disorders
      PubDate: 2021-04-28T05:21:10Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01987429211009156
       
  • Are Breaks Better' A Comparison of Breaks Are Better to Check-In
           Check-Out

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      Authors: Caitlyn E. Majeika, Joseph H. Wehby, Eleanor M. Hancock
      Abstract: Behavioral Disorders, Ahead of Print.
      Identification and validation of effective Tier 2 interventions that address a wide range of student-level factors is critical to the sustainability of positive behavior interventions and supports (PBIS). Within the context of check-in check-out (CICO), function of behavior affects outcomes for many students, especially for those who engage in problem behavior to escape from tasks. Therefore, more research is needed to understand if and how we can support students with escape-maintained behavior. Breaks are Better (BrB) is a modified version of CICO that includes a system for taking breaks. The current research on BrB is limited but promising. The purpose of this study was to compare the effectiveness of CICO to BrB. Using a multitreatment design, we compared the effects of each intervention by measuring problem behavior and academic engagement across five elementary students who engaged in problem behavior to escape from tasks. Overall results were mixed and ranged from strong effects of BrB to no differential effects. However, despite the results, teachers and students consistently rated BrB as being a more preferable intervention. We conclude with limitations and implications for practice.
      Citation: Behavioral Disorders
      PubDate: 2021-03-30T11:38:22Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01987429211001816
       
  • Brief Report: Ordinate Scaling and Axis Proportions of Single-Case Graphs
           in Two Prominent EBD Journals From 2010 to 2019

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Corey Peltier, John W. McKenna, Tracy E. Sinclair, Justin Garwood, Kimberly J. Vannest
      Abstract: Behavioral Disorders, Ahead of Print.
      Single-case experimental designs (SCEDs) are frequently used to evaluate whether a functional relation exists between interventions and student outcomes. A critical factor in decision making is the evaluation of graphical data, typically displayed in time-series graphs. Distortion in the graphical display of data can lead to invalid decisions on whether a functional relation exists, as well as overestimating the magnitude of an effect. Previous research has identified two potentially analysis-altering elements that when manipulated alter visual analysts’ decision regarding the presence of a functional relation and magnitude of effect. The purpose of this review was to evaluate the graphical display of data from SCEDs in the field of emotional and behavioral disorders (EBD). The review included 40 SCEDs, including 258 graphs, published in Behavioral Disorders and Journal of Emotional and Behavioral Disorders over the last 10 years (2010–2019). We identified large variation in the axis proportions of reviewed graphs, as measured using standardized x:y and the data points per x- to y-axis ratio (DPPXYR). A majority of graphs included an ordinate scaling procedure that aligns with findings from preliminary research on this analysis-altering element. We provide recommendations to the field on designing graphs to enhance the validity of visual analysis.
      Citation: Behavioral Disorders
      PubDate: 2021-01-21T05:04:50Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0198742920982587
       
  • Corrigendum to Predictive Role of Classroom Management in Literacy
           Development in Preschool Children at-risk for EBD

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      Abstract: Behavioral Disorders, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Behavioral Disorders
      PubDate: 2021-01-07T05:12:15Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0198742920986006
       
  • Predictors of Self-Determination and Mental Health Symptoms Among Youth in
           Juvenile Justice Facilities

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      Authors: David E. Houchins, Eliseo Jimenez, Nickolas Langley, Katelyn Plescow, Christopher C. Henrich
      Pages: 138 - 148
      Abstract: Behavioral Disorders, Volume 46, Issue 3, Page 138-148, May 2021.
      The purpose of this article was to examine the relationships between (a) youth and facility characteristics and (b) youth risk and resilience factors (i.e., mental health, self-determination [SD]) in juvenile justice facilities. Extant self-report data from 205 nationally representative correctional facilities and 7,073 youth, collected as part of the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Survey of Residential Placement, were analyzed. Youth charateristics included sex, race, disability classification, mental health status, traumatic events/abuse encountered, offense committed, and SD. Facility factors included facility climate and counseling services. Results indicated that both prior abuse and victimization in the facility were positively correlated with mental health symptoms and SD. Positive perceptions of facility climate were associated with lower mental health symptoms. Youth who were female, younger, with a learning disability, and had committed a violent offense, reported more mental health symptoms. Positive perceptions of facility climate and receipt of counseling in the facility were associated with higher SD. Contrary to expectations, prior abuse and victimization in the facility were associated with higher SD. Recommendations include creating positive facility climates, developing targeted SD instruction, and providing tailored counseling services to facilitate successful transitions out of juvenile justice.
      Citation: Behavioral Disorders
      PubDate: 2020-03-13T12:51:42Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0198742920911182
      Issue No: Vol. 46, No. 3 (2020)
       
  • A National Survey on Mental Health Professional Development in Juvenile
           Justice Facilities: Implications for Youth Reentry

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      Authors: Joseph Calvin Gagnon, Jacqueline M. Swank
      Pages: 149 - 162
      Abstract: Behavioral Disorders, Volume 46, Issue 3, Page 149-162, May 2021.
      A national study of clinical directors examined professional development (PD) focused on mental health provided to professionals in juvenile justice facilities for adjudicated youth. A total of 85 clinical directors responded to a mail survey (45% return rate). The survey questions related to (a) topics of staff training and the basis for choosing topics, (b) which professionals participated in each PD topic, (c) training format and frequency of PD, (d) recommended attributes of PD, (e) methods of evaluating PD, and (f) adequacy of PD and how can it be improved. For each topic, PD was typically provided once per year and face to face, rather than online. PD participation rates were commonly in the 30% and 40% ranges for professionals other than clinical directors and counselors, with teachers, correctional officers, administrators, and teaching assistants receiving PD the least. Rarely did PD include recommended attributes of PD, and it was commonly viewed as ineffective. Implications for research and practice related to PD and its relationship to youth reentry from juvenile justice facilities are discussed.
      Citation: Behavioral Disorders
      PubDate: 2020-03-10T09:58:43Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0198742920911183
      Issue No: Vol. 46, No. 3 (2020)
       
  • Juvenile Justice Administrator Perspectives: Reframing Reentry Around
           Positive Youth Outcomes

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      Authors: Michael P. Dempsey, Wendi M. Davis, Peter Forbes, Cathleen Barclay Penkoff, Simon Gonsoulin, Phil W. Harris
      Pages: 187 - 196
      Abstract: Behavioral Disorders, Volume 46, Issue 3, Page 187-196, May 2021.
      This article draws on research, policy, legislation, and practice to provide strategies for addressing the reentry needs of youth in the juvenile justice system and reframing the way successful reentry outcomes are conceptualized. Achieving a systemic paradigm shift of this nature requires that researchers, policymakers, and juvenile justice administrators work together to facilitate change. The Council of Juvenile Justice Administrators is leading the combined effort to facilitate reform in this area. This article briefly discusses the state of the juvenile justice system, progress in the field, and remaining challenges facing administrators of juvenile justice facilities, within the context of a changing framework that focuses on a developmental approach to issues of delinquency and emphasizes positive youth outcomes as a more effective measure of reentry.
      Citation: Behavioral Disorders
      PubDate: 2020-10-28T10:22:51Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0198742920965134
      Issue No: Vol. 46, No. 3 (2020)
       
  • Moving Toward Implementation of Universal Mental Health Screening by
           Examining Attitudes Toward School-Based Practices

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      Authors: Stephanie A. Moore, Erin Dowdy, Tameisha Hinton, Christine DiStefano, Fred W. Greer
      Abstract: Behavioral Disorders, Ahead of Print.
      Universal mental health screening is a proactive approach to identify students who may benefit from prevention or early intervention services. Despite known benefits, few schools are engaging in screening efforts and it is critical to examine factors that may impede or enhance implementation. Following implementation of a universal screening program across five preschools and elementary schools, this study investigated the attitudes of teachers (N = 40) and parents (N = 330) and found strong agreement among stakeholders about the acceptability and appropriateness of universal mental health screening. Teachers and parents expressed less willingness to regularly complete screening forms, yet teachers reported that the Behavior Assessment System for Children–Third Edition: Behavioral Emotional Screening System was a usable screening tool. Implications and future directions to enhance implementation efforts are discussed.
      Citation: Behavioral Disorders
      PubDate: 2020-12-30T03:03:57Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0198742920982591
       
  • Predictive Role of Classroom Management in Literacy Development in
           Preschool Children at Risk of EBD

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      Authors: Jason C. Chow, Kristen L. Granger, Michael D. Broda, Nicole Peterson
      Abstract: Behavioral Disorders, Ahead of Print.
      The purpose of this study was to better understand the association between teachers’ incoming classroom management skills and end-of-year literacy skills of preschool children with or at risk of emotional and behavioral disorders. Furthermore, we explored the contribution of student’s incoming engagement and communication skills to end-of-year literacy skills. A series of multilevel models revealed that teacher classroom management predicted end-of-year letter sound fluency, but not letter naming fluency, after controlling for other factors. We conclude with a discussion of these preliminary findings and provide suggestions for future research and practice in early intervention settings.
      Citation: Behavioral Disorders
      PubDate: 2020-11-21T05:16:54Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0198742920972322
       
  • A Study of One State’s School District Physical Restraint and
           Seclusion Policies

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      Authors: Eryn Y. Van Acker, Elisabeth J. Kane, Nicole C. Bricko, Reece L. Peterson
      Abstract: Behavioral Disorders, Ahead of Print.
      This descriptive analysis of policy content examined local school district policies on physical restraint and seclusion in one Midwestern state that did not have state legislation on these topics to determine whether districts had policies and, if so, whether their content included recommended principles from the U.S. Department of Education. No previous research has addressed district policies. A maximum variation sample of 90 districts was examined to determine whether policies were in place, whether recommended principles were included, and whether policies varied based on student enrollment. Although almost all districts had policies, many of the federally recommended principles were not addressed across the sample and less than 10% of the district policies indicated that these procedures should only be used in the case of imminent danger of serious injury to self or others. District enrollment size did not affect policy, but the substance of the policy was determined by the districts’ policy source from advising attorneys.
      Citation: Behavioral Disorders
      PubDate: 2020-11-21T05:16:53Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0198742920973213
       
  • Effects of Check-In Check-Out on Engagement of Students Demonstrating
           Internalizing Behaviors in an Elementary School Setting

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      Authors: Kristin Kladis, Leanne S. Hawken, Robert E. O’Neill, Aaron J. Fischer, Kristen Stokes Fuoco, Breda V. O’Keeffe, Sharlene A. Kiuhara
      Abstract: Behavioral Disorders, Ahead of Print.
      Check-In Check-Out (CICO) is an evidence-based Tier 2 intervention that has most often been used to support students who exhibit externalizing problem behaviors; however, emerging research suggests that CICO may be effective when extended to students who are engaging in internalizing problem behaviors (CICO-IB). The purpose of this study was to replicate previous research using CICO to support students with internalizing behaviors as well as to extend the research using a standardized Daily Progress Report (DPR) for all students. A multiple baseline design across students was used to examine the effects of CICO-IB on social and academic engagement with four elementary students from an urban elementary school who were exhibiting internalizing behavior problems (e.g., shyness, social withdrawal). Results indicated that CICO-IB was effective in improving active academic and social engagement for all four students included in the study as measured by both teacher rating on a DPR and direct observation. Overall, the majority of teachers, parents, and students found the intervention socially acceptable. Implications for future research and practice with students who are at-risk or exhibiting emotional/behavioral disorders along with limitations are discussed.
      Citation: Behavioral Disorders
      PubDate: 2020-11-20T11:10:36Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0198742920972107
       
  • The Scales for Assessing Emotional Disturbance—Third Edition: Internal
           Reliability, Interrater Reliability, and Test–Retest Reliability

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      Authors: Jacqueline Huscroft-D’Angelo, Jessica Wery, Jodie Diane Martin, Corey Pierce, Lindy Crawford
      Abstract: Behavioral Disorders, Ahead of Print.
      The Scales for Assessing Emotional Disturbance—Third Edition Rating Scale (SAED-3 RS; Epstein et al.) is a standardized, norm-referenced measure designed to aid in the identification process by providing useful data to professionals determining eligibility of students with an emotional disturbance (ED). Three studies are reported to address the reliability of the SAED-3 RS. Study 1 investigated the internal reliability of the SAED-3 RS using data from a nationally representative sample of 1,430 students and 441 with ED. Study 2 examined interrater reliability between 123 pairs of educators who had worked with the student for at least 2 months. Study 3 assessed the test–retest reliability over a 2-week period to determine stability of the SAED-3 RS. Across all studies, scores collected from the SAED-3 RS were determined to be a reliable, stable for measuring the emotional and behavioral functioning of students. Specifically, the averaged coefficient alpha for internal consistency ranged from .79 to .92 for each subscale and .96 for the composite score; interrater reliability coefficients ranged from .77 to .89 for each subscale and .89 for the composite score, and test–retest reliability coefficients ranged from .79 to .92 for each subscale and .96 for the composite score. Limitations, future research and implications for use of the SAED-3 RS are discussed.
      Citation: Behavioral Disorders
      PubDate: 2020-11-13T10:22:39Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0198742920969152
       
  • A Quantitative Synthesis of Intervention Research Published in Flagship
           EBD Journals: 2010 to 2019

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      Authors: Justin D. Garwood, Corey Peltier, Tracy Sinclair, Heather Eisel, John W. McKenna, Kimberly J. Vannest
      Abstract: Behavioral Disorders, Ahead of Print.
      Students with emotional and behavioral disorders (EBDs) could be considered some of the most challenging students to serve in schools. The need for effective interventions for these students is ever-present. To design and implement empirical studies to better inform the field of EBDs, researchers must have a firm understanding of the most up-to-date intervention literature. The purpose of this targeted quantitative synthesis is to create such a knowledge base for the field of EBDs. Results from 55 studies indicate a declining focus on intervention research for students with EBDs in the last 10 years (2010–2019). Of the intervention research available, the quality (40% did not meet What Works Clearinghouse standards) and effectiveness on student outcomes across academic, behavioral, and social skills domains was variable (between-case standardized mean difference [BC-SMD] = 0.13–8.26, Hedges’ g = −0.30 to 1.29). Future directions for the field of EBDs are included.
      Citation: Behavioral Disorders
      PubDate: 2020-10-27T07:23:37Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0198742920961341
       
  • Exploring Disproportionate Discipline for Latinx Students With and Without
           Disabilities: A National Analysis

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      Authors: Nicholas A. Gage, Antonis Katsiyannis, Kelly M. Carrero, Rhonda Miller, Danielle Pico
      Abstract: Behavioral Disorders, Ahead of Print.
      The Latinx population is the largest group of racially and ethnically diverse students in the United States. Although disproportionality in school discipline has been documented for Latinx students, findings related to such disparities have been inconsistent. We examined disciplinary exclusion practices involving students with and without disabilities who are Latinx across the United States using risk ratios (RR) and weighted mixed-effect models. We leveraged data from the Civil Rights Data Collection (CRDC) data set for the 2015 to 2016 academic school year, which included data from more than 94,000 schools. The CRDC is collected by the U.S. Department of Education’s Office of Civil Rights every 2 years. All U.S. public schools are required to submit data to the CRDC. Results suggest that Latinx students with and without disabilities were statistically significantly more likely to receive exclusionary discipline than White students, but less likely than Black students. Implications for research and practice are provided.
      Citation: Behavioral Disorders
      PubDate: 2020-10-26T07:28:19Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0198742920961356
       
  • Sense of Futility as Subject of Disciplinary Action: Do Students With
           Negative Attitudes Toward the Educational System Get Disciplined More
           Often'

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      Authors: Emma Degroote, Mieke Van Houtte
      Abstract: Behavioral Disorders, Ahead of Print.
      School discipline research has demonstrated that the labeling of student behaviors as requiring disciplinary action is a selective process in which school staff take into account other factors than the characteristics of the behaviors. We argue that school staff react in a disciplinary way to students with negative attitudes toward the educational system. Concretely, we examined if feelings of futility caused students to suffer disciplinary consequences more often. Multilevel analysis was carried out on data of 2,358 students in 28 Ghentian (Belgium) schools that participated in the International Study of City Youth (ISCY). Results indicate that school staff do not react to students’ sense of futility directly by means of disciplinary actions, however, they impose disciplinary actions following disruptive behaviors on students displaying higher feelings of futility more often.
      Citation: Behavioral Disorders
      PubDate: 2020-10-26T07:27:59Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0198742920961354
       
  • The Impact of the Contextual Fit Enhancement Protocol on Behavior Support
           Plan Fidelity and Student Behavior

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      Authors: Manuel Monzalve, Robert H. Horner
      Abstract: Behavioral Disorders, Ahead of Print.
      The contextual fit of a behavior support plan refers to the extent that the procedures of the plan are consistent with the knowledge, values, skills, resources, and administrative support of those who are expected to implement the plan. This study used a concurrent multiple baseline design across four participants to assess the presence of a functional relation between introduction of the Contextual Fit Enhancement Protocol, an intervention designed to improve contextual fit and (a) increase in fidelity of support plan implementation and (b) improve student behavior. Results indicate that following implementation of the Contextual Fit Enhancement Protocol, support plan implementation fidelity increased and student problem behavior decreased. In addition, teachers participating in the study rated the contextual fit intervention process as effective and efficient. Limitations and implications for future research, practice, and training are discussed.
      Citation: Behavioral Disorders
      PubDate: 2020-09-10T09:49:04Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0198742920953497
       
  • A Mixed-Methods Approach for Embedding Cost Analysis Within Fidelity
           Assessment in School-Based Programs

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      Authors: Catherine P. Bradshaw, Katrina J. Debnam, Daniel Player, Brooks Bowden, Sarah Lindstrom Johnson
      Abstract: Behavioral Disorders, Ahead of Print.
      This mixed-methods study describes a framework for conducting cost analyses of school-based programs leveraging fidelity data and applying the ingredients method. We illustrate this approach by applying it to Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports (PBIS), drawing on multiple sources of data from a sample of 77 schools that were trained in PBIS. We concluded that the average per school cost of PBIS was US$53,216.00 (median = US$36,698), with an average per-pupil cost of US$90.00 (median = US$58.00), which is considerably less than other school-based prevention models. The cost did, however, differ by implementation level, such that high-fidelity implementation tended to cost more than low-fidelity implementation. We provide a case illustration to elucidate some of the cost drivers of PBIS implementation. Specifically, these data highlight the variability in the amount of training and coaching by the specific evidence-based program implemented within the tiered PBIS framework. Through this case illustration, we demonstrate the utility of tracking costs of school-based program within the context of fidelity data collection. The findings also suggest the potential cost savings of PBIS, both when compared with other evidence-based interventions as well as the known costs of negative school outcomes like dropout.
      Citation: Behavioral Disorders
      PubDate: 2020-08-11T09:32:27Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0198742920944850
       
  • Language Skills of Vulnerable Children With Social, Emotional, and
           Behavioral Difficulties: An Australian Primary School Sample

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      Authors: Patricia A. Eadie, Pamela C. Snow, Hannah L. Stark, Nancy Sidoti, Jacinta Berndt
      Abstract: Behavioral Disorders, Ahead of Print.
      The co-occurrence of social, emotional, and behavioral difficulties (SEBD), maltreatment, and language disorders (LD) is recognized in school-age children; however, the nature of the interaction between them remains poorly understood. The aim of this study was to explore associations between LD and SEBD in children with and without suspected histories of maltreatment. Forty-one primary school students enrolled at a specialist unit for children with SEBD are described with respect to language skills, maltreatment history, and comorbid neurodevelopmental disorders. Two thirds of students who met criteria for SEBD also met criteria for LD. Children with higher levels of internalizing problems were found to have stronger expressive language scores, but otherwise the severity of LD did not correlate with severity of SEBD. SEBD was similar in students with and without a history of maltreatment, and this did not increase the likelihood or severity of LD, except for pragmatic language skills. There is considerable overlap between SEBD, LD, and suspected maltreatment in this group. Students with SEBD and/or a suspected history of maltreatment need additional support to ensure that the interaction of their behavior and communication difficulties are understood so they make steady progress in social and academic skills and remain engaged in school.
      Citation: Behavioral Disorders
      PubDate: 2020-08-06T09:28:21Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0198742920945635
       
  • Interdependent Group Rewards: Rewarding On-Task Behavior Versus Academic
           Performance in an Eighth-Grade Classroom Serving Students With Emotional
           and Behavioral Disorders

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      Authors: Caroline M. Jaquett, Christopher H. Skinner, Tara Moore, Kyle Ryan, Merilee McCurdy, David Cihak
      Abstract: Behavioral Disorders, Ahead of Print.
      An alternating treatments design was used to evaluate and compare the effects of two interdependent group contingencies on the academic performance, on-task behavior, and disruptive behavior of eighth-grade students in a social studies class. All students were enrolled in a self-contained alternative school for students with behavior problems. Delivering rewards contingent upon participants’ average percent correct enhanced on-task behavior and percent correct on independent seatwork assignments; however, delivering rewards contingent upon participants’ on-task behavior yielded more consistent and larger increases in percent correct and on-task behavior. Neither group contingency resulted in consistent or meaningful changes in disruptive behavior. Theoretical and applied implications related to direct and indirect effects of interdependent group rewards are discussed along with directions for future research.
      Citation: Behavioral Disorders
      PubDate: 2020-06-26T02:31:37Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0198742920934006
       
  • A Bayesian Rate Ratio Effect Size to Quantify Intervention Effects for
           Count Data in Single Case Experimental Research

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      Authors: Prathiba Natesan Batley, Smita Shukla Mehta, John H. Hitchcock
      Abstract: Behavioral Disorders, Ahead of Print.
      Single case experimental design (SCED) is an indispensable methodology when evaluating intervention efficacy. Despite long-standing success with using visual analyses to evaluate SCED data, this method has limited utility for conducting meta-analyses. This is critical because meta-analyses should drive practice and policy in behavioral disorders, more than evidence derived from individual SCEDs. Even when analyzing data from individual studies, there is merit to using multiple analytic methods since statistical analyses in SCED can be challenging given small sample sizes and autocorrelated data. These complexities are exacerbated when using count data, which are common in SCEDs. Bayesian methods can be used to develop new statistical procedures that may address these challenges. The purpose of the present study was to formulate a within-subject Bayesian rate ratio effect size (BRR) for autocorrelated count data which obviates the need for small sample corrections. This effect size is the first step toward building a between-subject rate ratio that can be used for meta-analyses. We illustrate this within-subject effect size using real data for an ABAB design and provide codes for practitioners who may want to compute BRR.
      Citation: Behavioral Disorders
      PubDate: 2020-06-19T10:08:34Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0198742920930704
       
  • A Methodological Review of Research Syntheses Involving Reading
           Interventions for Students With Emotional and Behavioral Disorders

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      Authors: Argnue Chitiyo, Seth A. King, Margaret D. Krizon, Cephas N. Ablakwa, Andrew M. Markelz
      Abstract: Behavioral Disorders, Ahead of Print.
      Students with emotional and behavioral disorders (EBD) exhibit problem behaviors that potentially result in lower performance in reading and related content areas. Researchers and policy makers have increasingly emphasized the need for evidence-based practices (EBPs) in reading. However, conclusions made regarding the effectiveness of the interventions strongly depend on the rigor of systematic reviews and meta-analyses used to identify intervention research. This article applied a set of established quality indicators to literature reviews of reading instruction for children with EBD. Systematic reviews and meta-analyses published in refereed journals between 1996 and 2018 were eligible for inclusion. Identified reviews (n = 17) generally exhibited a range of methodological strengths; however, authors did not consistently describe coding procedures or assess the quality of primary studies. Implications for the identification of EBP follow a discussion of findings.
      Citation: Behavioral Disorders
      PubDate: 2020-05-21T08:54:17Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0198742920919095
       
  • A Systematic Review of Tier 1 PBIS Implementation in Alternative Education
           Settings

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      Authors: Nicolette M. Grasley-Boy, Brian Reichow, Wilhelmina van Dijk, Nicholas Gage
      Abstract: Behavioral Disorders, Ahead of Print.
      Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports (PBIS) is a multitiered system of support for behavior used in many schools across the world. Researchers have begun adapting and evaluating Tier 1 of PBIS for students placed in alternative education (AE) settings. The purpose of this review is to synthesize these evaluations. We systematically searched two electronic databases to find potential studies of Tier 1 PBIS in AE settings. We screened 47 full texts, 19 of which met all inclusion criteria. Most studies (16 of 19, 84%) evaluated student behavioral outcomes, while seven studies (37%) evaluated academic outcomes alone or in addition to behavioral measures. Overall, restraints and seclusions generally decreased following Tier 1 implementation, but behavioral incident changes were variable and academic outcomes only improved for students enrolled continuously throughout the studies. The findings of this review support the need for continued evaluations of Tier 1 in AE settings using more rigorous methodologies and metrics that account for rolling admissions. The observed reductions in restraints and seclusions are promising for students and practitioners given the poor outcomes associated with these consequences.
      Citation: Behavioral Disorders
      PubDate: 2020-05-05T05:22:18Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0198742920915648
       
 
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