Publisher: Sage Publications   (Total: 1166 journals)

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Showing 1 - 200 of 1166 Journals sorted alphabetically
AADE in Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Abstracts in Anthropology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 29)
Academic Pathology     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Accounting History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18, SJR: 0.527, CiteScore: 1)
Acta Radiologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.754, CiteScore: 2)
Acta Radiologica Open     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Acta Sociologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39, SJR: 0.939, CiteScore: 2)
Action Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 53, SJR: 0.308, CiteScore: 1)
Active Learning in Higher Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 396, SJR: 1.397, CiteScore: 2)
Adaptive Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.288, CiteScore: 1)
Administration & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18, SJR: 0.675, CiteScore: 1)
Adoption & Fostering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25, SJR: 0.313, CiteScore: 0)
Adsorption Science & Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.258, CiteScore: 1)
Adult Education Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 258, SJR: 0.566, CiteScore: 2)
Adult Learning     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 51)
Advances in Dental Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 1.791, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Developing Human Resources     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35, SJR: 0.614, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Mechanical Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 156, SJR: 0.272, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Methods and Practices in Psychological Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20)
Advances in Structural Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 51, SJR: 0.599, CiteScore: 1)
AERA Open     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
Affilia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.496, CiteScore: 1)
Africa Spectrum     Open Access   (Followers: 17)
Agrarian South : J. of Political Economy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Air, Soil & Water Research     Open Access   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.214, CiteScore: 1)
Alexandria : The J. of National and Intl. Library and Information Issues     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 68)
Allergy & Rhinology     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
AlterNative : An Intl. J. of Indigenous Peoples     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 39, SJR: 0.194, CiteScore: 0)
Alternative Law J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.176, CiteScore: 0)
Alternatives : Global, Local, Political     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.351, CiteScore: 1)
Alternatives to Laboratory Animals     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.297, CiteScore: 1)
American Behavioral Scientist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26, SJR: 0.982, CiteScore: 2)
American Economist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
American Educational Research J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 259, SJR: 2.913, CiteScore: 3)
American J. of Alzheimer's Disease and Other Dementias     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23, SJR: 0.67, CiteScore: 2)
American J. of Cosmetic Surgery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
American J. of Evaluation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18, SJR: 0.646, CiteScore: 2)
American J. of Health Promotion     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35, SJR: 0.807, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Hospice and Palliative Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 47, SJR: 0.65, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Law & Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.204, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Lifestyle Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.431, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Medical Quality     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.777, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Men's Health     Open Access   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.595, CiteScore: 2)
American J. of Rhinology and Allergy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.972, CiteScore: 2)
American J. of Sports Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 249, SJR: 3.949, CiteScore: 6)
American Politics Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 36, SJR: 1.313, CiteScore: 1)
American Review of Public Administration     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28, SJR: 2.062, CiteScore: 2)
American Sociological Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 356, SJR: 6.333, CiteScore: 6)
American String Teacher     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Analytical Chemistry Insights     Open Access   (Followers: 26, SJR: 0.224, CiteScore: 1)
Angiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.849, CiteScore: 2)
Animation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.197, CiteScore: 0)
Annals of Clinical Biochemistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.634, CiteScore: 1)
Annals of Otology, Rhinology & Laryngology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20, SJR: 0.807, CiteScore: 1)
Annals of Pharmacotherapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 59, SJR: 1.096, CiteScore: 2)
Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 51, SJR: 1.225, CiteScore: 3)
Annals of the ICRP     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.548, CiteScore: 1)
Anthropocene Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 3.341, CiteScore: 7)
Anthropological Theory     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 48, SJR: 0.739, CiteScore: 1)
Antitrust Bulletin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Antiviral Chemistry and Chemotherapy     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.635, CiteScore: 2)
Antyajaa : Indian J. of Women and Social Change     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Applied Biosafety     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.131, CiteScore: 0)
Applied Psychological Measurement     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21, SJR: 1.17, CiteScore: 1)
Applied Spectroscopy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 27, SJR: 0.489, CiteScore: 2)
Armed Forces & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25, SJR: 0.29, CiteScore: 1)
Arthaniti : J. of Economic Theory and Practice     Full-text available via subscription  
Arts and Humanities in Higher Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 49, SJR: 0.305, CiteScore: 1)
Asia Pacific Media Educator     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.23, CiteScore: 0)
Asia-Pacific J. of Management Research and Innovation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Asia-Pacific J. of Public Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.558, CiteScore: 1)
Asia-Pacific J. of Rural Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Asian and Pacific Migration J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.324, CiteScore: 1)
Asian Cardiovascular and Thoracic Annals     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.305, CiteScore: 0)
Asian J. of Comparative Politics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Asian J. of Legal Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Asian J. of Management Cases     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.101, CiteScore: 0)
ASN Neuro     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 1.534, CiteScore: 3)
Assessment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19, SJR: 1.519, CiteScore: 3)
Assessment for Effective Intervention     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.578, CiteScore: 1)
Australasian J. of Early Childhood     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.535, CiteScore: 1)
Australasian Psychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18, SJR: 0.433, CiteScore: 1)
Australian & New Zealand J. of Psychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30, SJR: 1.801, CiteScore: 2)
Australian and New Zealand J. of Criminology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 546, SJR: 0.612, CiteScore: 1)
Australian J. of Career Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Australian J. of Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 51, SJR: 0.403, CiteScore: 1)
Australian J. of Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.497, CiteScore: 1)
Autism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 355, SJR: 1.739, CiteScore: 4)
Autism & Developmental Language Impairments     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
Avian Biology Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.401, CiteScore: 1)
Behavior Modification     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.877, CiteScore: 2)
Behavioral and Cognitive Neuroscience Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Behavioral Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Beyond Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Bible Translator     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Biblical Theology Bulletin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24, SJR: 0.184, CiteScore: 0)
Big Data & Society     Open Access   (Followers: 55)
Biochemistry Insights     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Bioinformatics and Biology Insights     Open Access   (Followers: 12, SJR: 1.141, CiteScore: 2)
Biological Research for Nursing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.685, CiteScore: 2)
Biomarker Insights     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.81, CiteScore: 2)
Biomarkers in Cancer     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Biomedical Engineering and Computational Biology     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Biomedical Informatics Insights     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Bioscope: South Asian Screen Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.235, CiteScore: 0)
BMS: Bulletin of Sociological Methodology/Bulletin de Méthodologie Sociologique     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.226, CiteScore: 0)
Body & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29, SJR: 1.531, CiteScore: 3)
Bone and Tissue Regeneration Insights     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Brain and Neuroscience Advances     Open Access  
Brain Science Advances     Open Access  
Breast Cancer : Basic and Clinical Research     Open Access   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.823, CiteScore: 2)
British J. of Music Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
British J. of Occupational Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 252, SJR: 0.323, CiteScore: 1)
British J. of Pain     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31, SJR: 0.579, CiteScore: 2)
British J. of Politics and Intl. Relations     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39, SJR: 0.91, CiteScore: 2)
British J. of Visual Impairment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.337, CiteScore: 1)
British J.ism Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
BRQ Business Review Quarterly     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Building Acoustics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.215, CiteScore: 1)
Building Services Engineering Research & Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.583, CiteScore: 1)
Bulletin of Science, Technology & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Business & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Business and Professional Communication Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.348, CiteScore: 1)
Business Information Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17, SJR: 0.279, CiteScore: 0)
Business Perspectives and Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Cahiers Élisabéthains     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.111, CiteScore: 0)
Calcutta Statistical Association Bulletin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
California Management Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 37, SJR: 2.209, CiteScore: 4)
Canadian Association of Radiologists J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.463, CiteScore: 1)
Canadian J. of Kidney Health and Disease     Open Access   (Followers: 8, SJR: 1.007, CiteScore: 2)
Canadian J. of Nursing Research (CJNR)     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Canadian J. of Occupational Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 166, SJR: 0.626, CiteScore: 1)
Canadian J. of Psychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28, SJR: 1.769, CiteScore: 3)
Canadian J. of School Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.266, CiteScore: 1)
Canadian Pharmacists J. / Revue des Pharmaciens du Canada     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.536, CiteScore: 1)
Cancer Control     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Cancer Growth and Metastasis     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Cancer Informatics     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.64, CiteScore: 1)
Capital and Class     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.282, CiteScore: 1)
Cardiac Cath Lab Director     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Cardiovascular and Thoracic Open     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Career Development and Transition for Exceptional Individuals     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.44, CiteScore: 1)
Cartilage     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.889, CiteScore: 3)
Cell Transplantation     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 1.023, CiteScore: 3)
Cephalalgia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 1.581, CiteScore: 3)
Cephalalgia Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Child Language Teaching and Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34, SJR: 0.501, CiteScore: 1)
Child Maltreatment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 1.22, CiteScore: 3)
Child Neurology Open     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Childhood     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19, SJR: 0.894, CiteScore: 2)
Childhood Obesity and Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
China Information     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.767, CiteScore: 2)
China Report     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.221, CiteScore: 0)
Chinese J. of Sociology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Christian Education J. : Research on Educational Ministry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Chronic Illness     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.672, CiteScore: 2)
Chronic Respiratory Disease     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.808, CiteScore: 2)
Chronic Stress     Open Access  
Citizenship, Social and Economics Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.145, CiteScore: 0)
Cleft Palate-Craniofacial J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.757, CiteScore: 1)
Clin-Alert     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Clinical and Applied Thrombosis/Hemostasis     Open Access   (Followers: 32, SJR: 0.49, CiteScore: 1)
Clinical and Translational Neuroscience     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Clinical Case Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.364, CiteScore: 1)
Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 45, SJR: 0.73, CiteScore: 2)
Clinical EEG and Neuroscience     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.552, CiteScore: 2)
Clinical Ethics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.296, CiteScore: 1)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Arthritis and Musculoskeletal Disorders     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.537, CiteScore: 2)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Blood Disorders     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.314, CiteScore: 2)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Cardiology     Open Access   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.686, CiteScore: 2)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Case Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.283, CiteScore: 1)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Circulatory, Respiratory and Pulmonary Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.425, CiteScore: 2)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Ear, Nose and Throat     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Endocrinology and Diabetes     Open Access   (Followers: 33, SJR: 0.63, CiteScore: 2)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Oncology     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 1.129, CiteScore: 3)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Pediatrics     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Psychiatry     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Reproductive Health     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.776, CiteScore: 0)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Therapeutics     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.172, CiteScore: 0)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Trauma and Intensive Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Women's Health     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Clinical Nursing Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34, SJR: 0.471, CiteScore: 1)
Clinical Pathology     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Clinical Pediatrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25, SJR: 0.487, CiteScore: 1)
Clinical Psychological Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16, SJR: 3.281, CiteScore: 5)
Clinical Rehabilitation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 78, SJR: 1.322, CiteScore: 3)
Clinical Risk     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.133, CiteScore: 0)
Clinical Trials     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22, SJR: 2.399, CiteScore: 2)
Clothing and Textiles Research J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28, SJR: 0.36, CiteScore: 1)
Collections : A J. for Museum and Archives Professionals     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Common Law World Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Communication & Sport     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.385, CiteScore: 1)
Communication and the Public     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Communication Disorders Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.458, CiteScore: 1)
Communication Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24, SJR: 2.171, CiteScore: 3)
Community College Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 1.451, CiteScore: 1)
Comparative Political Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 291, SJR: 3.772, CiteScore: 3)
Compensation & Benefits Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Competition & Change     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.843, CiteScore: 2)

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Arthaniti : Journal of Economic Theory and Practice
Number of Followers: 0  
 
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
ISSN (Print) 0976-7479 - ISSN (Online) 2517-2654
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1166 journals]
  • Towards a Comprehensive Index of Labour Law Reform and Ranking of States

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      Authors: Bhaskar Dasgupta
      Abstract: Arthaniti: Journal of Economic Theory and Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Since the pioneering paper by Besley and Burgess (2004) claimed to have found a positive relationship between flexible and pro-employer labour regulations with manufacturing sector performance, there has been an increasing pitch among policymakers to rationalise India’s complicated labour laws. Several state governments have since undertaken significant reforms in their respective labour law regimes. During the recent pandemic-induced lockdown, some states have gone to the extent of temporarily suspending labour laws to kick-start the economy. The Government of India has also recently consolidated the fragmented labour laws by integrating them into four functionally arranged Codes. But the regulatory measure developed by Besley and Burgess, the very basis of their conclusions, has been criticised on the ground of narrow coverage, methodological inconsistency, misclassification of amendments, etc. This article, therefore, attempts to construct a comprehensive Index by mapping state level-amendments in five important labour legislations over the seven-decade period from 1949 to 2017 and coding those amendments. The article is organised as follows: After the context-setting introductory section, the second section summarises the existing evidence on the relationship between labour regulations and manufacturing sector performance in India. The third section discusses the limitations of Besley–Burgess Index. The fourth section briefly mentions the research direction post publication of Besley–Burgess paper. The fifth section develops a comprehensive Index, and it discusses how it improves the BB Index. The sixth section concludes the article.JEL: J3, K3
      Citation: Arthaniti: Journal of Economic Theory and Practice
      PubDate: 2021-02-16T09:52:31Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0976747921989149
       
  • Augmenting Employees’ Efforts in Innovation

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      Authors: Nikita Jain
      Abstract: Arthaniti: Journal of Economic Theory and Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Strong labour laws play a major role in motivating innovation among employees. It has been found in the literature that stringency of labour laws is positively linked with employees’ efforts in innovation, in particular, wrongful discharge laws (WDL). However, employees may also bring nuisance suits against employers. Usually, the result of these suits is that both parties settle with each other. Thus, even if employees are justly dismissed, they may be able to bring nuisance suits against employers and gain a settlement amount. This article investigates how the possibility of nuisance suits affects the impact of WDL on employees’ efforts in innovation. In this respect, a game-theoretic model is developed in the article to find the equilibrium level of employees’ efforts in the presence of nuisance suits, where there is a possibility of employees getting discharged from the firm. I find that if nuisance suits are a possibility, the stringency of WDL has no impact on employees’ efforts if defence cost of the firm is low; but for higher defence costs, WDL affects employees’ efforts. The efforts exerted by an employee are found to be weakly increasing in the defence costs of the firm.
      Citation: Arthaniti: Journal of Economic Theory and Practice
      PubDate: 2021-02-08T10:26:07Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0976747921989171
       
  • How Inclusive Are Indian States: Evidence from Inclusive Development Index

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      Authors: Suresh Chand Aggarwal
      Abstract: Arthaniti: Journal of Economic Theory and Practice, Ahead of Print.
      The current study aims to find an ‘Inclusive Development Index’ (IDI) for the selected Indian states for the year 2017–2018 and has tried to incorporate indicators encompassing different aspects of the economy and life of the people. The index has tried to be more comprehensive and contemporary and attempts to keep the interest alive in the all-important policy objective of an inclusive growth in India as well as in many other countries around the world. The study has followed the guidelines given by Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD, 2008, Handbook on constructing composite indicators: Methodology and user guide) to construct a composite index and has included two pillars of growth with a total of 14 dimensions (sub-pillars) represented by 62 indicators. Principal component analysis (PCA) has been applied at the indicators level and simple averaging at the dimension and pillar levels to obtain the composite IDI for 20 Indian states. The states are ranked based on their inclusiveness score on IDI and divided into the ‘front-runners’, the ‘achievers’ and the ‘aspirants’. IDI may help the states to identify their spheres of ‘low’ performance and learn from their ‘front-runner’ peers.
      Citation: Arthaniti: Journal of Economic Theory and Practice
      PubDate: 2021-01-23T06:18:24Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0976747920985455
       
  • Deepak K. Mishra (Ed.), Internal Migration in Contemporary India

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      Authors: Shweta M Chandrashekhar
      Abstract: Arthaniti: Journal of Economic Theory and Practice, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Arthaniti: Journal of Economic Theory and Practice
      PubDate: 2021-01-19T10:42:30Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0976747920961961
       
  • Value of Sample Separation Information in a Sequential Probit Model

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      Authors: Kajal Lahiri, Chuanming Gao, Bernard Wixon
      Pages: 151 - 176
      Abstract: Arthaniti: Journal of Economic Theory and Practice, Volume 19, Issue 2, Page 151-176, December 2020.
      We illustrate the estimation and identification of multi-step sequential probit models with and without stepwise sample separation information. The likelihood functions are explicitly derived to ease experimentation with such models. We used data on health, activity limitations, demographic traits and work from the Survey of Income and Program Participation (SIPP) and exactly matched them with Social Security administrative records to showcase our theoretical points. Using a Monte Carlo simulation technique, our results suggest that the correlations in errors across equations may arise due to unobserved individual heterogeneity. Using a novel marginal likelihood approach, we also estimated the above sequential probit model without the sample separation information for the purpose of direct comparison. In terms of both in-sample and jackknife-type out-of-sample predictive analysis, the value of modelling the underlying sequential structure of the determination process in generating correct membership probabilities of belonging to a particular group is confirmed.JEL: C31, C34, C 35, I12, I18
      Citation: Arthaniti: Journal of Economic Theory and Practice
      PubDate: 2020-03-05T10:52:14Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0976747919900040
      Issue No: Vol. 19, No. 2 (2020)
       
  • Risk Analysis in Renewable Energy System (RES) Investment for a Developing
           Country: A Case Study in Pakistan

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      Authors: Izzet Alp Gul, Gülgün Kayakutlu, M. Özgür Kayalica
      Pages: 204 - 223
      Abstract: Arthaniti: Journal of Economic Theory and Practice, Volume 19, Issue 2, Page 204-223, December 2020.
      Technological improvements allow changing a significant part of the electricity generation investments to renewable energies. Especially in emerging markets and energy import-dependent countries, shift to renewable energy generation became more important to break the links of dependency. Pakistan relies on imported fossil fuels; however, the country’s experience and ambition about the renewable energy transition gain prominence in recent years. Considering the long-term life cycle of energy infrastructure investments, possible risk factors and their dynamic nature must be analysed before the financial decisions are taken. This article aims to propose a system dynamics model for the risk analysis of investment life cycle. In this study, possible risk factors are detected and discussed in different categories. The casual loop diagram of possible risk factors and risk assessment model are designed, and the impacts are analysed. Case study of the proposed model in Pakistan highlighted the importance of commercial risks. The results achieved through this study will guide investors, sector participants and policymakers to develop stable strategies for promoting renewable energy in the country.JEL: Q42, P48, O13
      Citation: Arthaniti: Journal of Economic Theory and Practice
      PubDate: 2020-03-23T07:21:14Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0976747920910824
      Issue No: Vol. 19, No. 2 (2020)
       
  • Book Review

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      Authors: Asis Kumar Banerjee
      Abstract: Arthaniti: Journal of Economic Theory and Practice, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Arthaniti: Journal of Economic Theory and Practice
      PubDate: 2020-12-17T10:35:04Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0976747920980403
       
  • Cross-country Emission Tax Effect of Mergers

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      Authors: Mahelet G. Fikru, Luis Gautier
      Abstract: Arthaniti: Journal of Economic Theory and Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Recent studies show that mergers among polluting firms could affect the regulatory landscape of the industry and trigger a policy change. Using a two-country model, this study examines the effect of a merger size, as measured by the number of merging firms, on the optimal emission tax of another country. We show that, if pollution damages are not too large, a decline in the size of a merger reduces production and profits in that country, which affords a larger tax in the other country due to smaller profit-shifting concerns. On the other hand, if pollution damages are extremely large, a reduction in the size of a merger in one country reduces production in that country, but it also reduces production and emissions in the other country. Thus, the latter can induce a smaller emission tax. The change in the emission tax in both scenarios is consistent with cooperative outcomes.
      Citation: Arthaniti: Journal of Economic Theory and Practice
      PubDate: 2020-12-16T04:31:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0976747920958094
       
  • Analysis of Financial Performance of Public Sector Banks in India: CAMEL

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      Authors: Yudhvir Singh, Ram Milan
      Abstract: Arthaniti: Journal of Economic Theory and Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Public sector banks have been merged by the government in the last few years. This is the rationale behind conducting this study. The purpose of this article is to determine the factors affecting the performance of public sector banks in India and the interrelationship between bank-specific determinants and performance of public sector banks. In this article, we shall analyse the financial data of all the public sector commercial banks for a period spread across 11 years (2009–2019); Capital adequacy, Assets quality, Management efficiency, Earning, and Liquidity (CAMEL) has been used as a performance determinant; system generalised method of moments (GMM) analysis has been used to find the effect of determinants on the performance measurement of public sector banks; and CCA (canonical correlation analysis) has been used to find the interrelationship between the bank-specific determinants and the performance of public sector banks. The finding has important implications in terms of performance in the banking sector. Certain limitations of this study are: It is based on secondary data. The study only covers the financial aspects and not the non-financial aspects. It is found that the asset quality is negatively related with performance of public sector banks. Liquidity and inflation are inversely related to performance of public sector banks in India. Capital adequacy is positively related with banks’ performance, but inversely related with banks’ interest margin. GDP growth has a significant positive impact on banks’ performance, but inversely related with banks’ interest income. Inflation rate is inversely related with banks’ performance. Banking sector reforms are insignificantly related with banks’ performance.
      Citation: Arthaniti: Journal of Economic Theory and Practice
      PubDate: 2020-12-10T02:53:11Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0976747920966866
       
  • Is Expenditure by States for Development Compromised to Ensure Compliance
           of Fiscal Targets' A Study of Indian States

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      Authors: H. K. Dwivedi, Sudip Kumar Sinha
      Abstract: Arthaniti: Journal of Economic Theory and Practice, Ahead of Print.
      This article examines the interlinkage between fiscal consolidation targets and states’ developmental expenditure under capital account. While fiscal consolidation targets have enabled states to take corrective measures to reduce deficit under the revenue account, the effect of the same is studied on developmental expenditure under capital account. For analysis, the fiscal deficit and developmental expenditure under the capital account have been compared with the fiscal deficit targets and general category states’ average benchmarks for fiscal indicators for three phases (corresponding to the periods of three finance commissions). It is argued, that, while fiscal consolidation has helped to improve the state finances, the stringent fiscal targets have further reduced the developmental expenditure under capital account. In view of this, it is suggested that the states, which are historically stressed, should be allowed to borrow an additional amount of 0.25 per cent of GSDP each year over and above the existing limit, provided these states make efforts to reduce deficit under revenue account and spend the extra borrowings on developmental expenditure under capital account.
      Citation: Arthaniti: Journal of Economic Theory and Practice
      PubDate: 2020-11-19T11:53:50Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0976747920966871
       
  • Entrepreneurial Ability and Development of Micro Enterprise

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      Authors: Susmita Chatterjee, Debabrata Datta
      Abstract: Arthaniti: Journal of Economic Theory and Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Self-help groups (SHGs) are set up by the National Bank for Agriculture and Rural Development (NABARD) with the objective of supporting poor people of India to set up micro enterprises. However, it is not at all easy to become an entrepreneur. The empirical observation shows that while some members of SHGs succeed in becoming entrepreneurs, other continue to remain just members. This article tries to identify the factors that help this entrepreneurship. It first develops a theoretical model and then carries out an empirical exercise with the help of ground-level surveys of SHGs in several districts of West Bengal. This empirical exercise with the help of logistic regression finds out that state help, financial access and existence of marketing opportunity are necessary for entrepreneurial success. Contrary to the general belief, more years of education does not help entrepreneurship. More revealing is the finding that protective social support deters entrepreneurship.
      Citation: Arthaniti: Journal of Economic Theory and Practice
      PubDate: 2020-11-10T06:27:11Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0976747920946405
       
  • Health Status, Government Health Expenditure and Economic Growth Nexus in
           India: A Toda–Yamamoto Causality Approach

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      Authors: Avinash Kaur
      Abstract: Arthaniti: Journal of Economic Theory and Practice, Ahead of Print.
      This article attempts to examine the causal linkage among government health expenditure, health status and economic growth in India for the period from 1981–1982 to 2015–2016. The results of Johansen co-integration test indicate that government health expenditure, health status and economic growth have long-run relationship in India. The results of Toda–Yamamoto causality test showed that there existed unidirectional causal relationship running from government health expenditure to gross domestic product—GDP (economic growth); GDP (economic growth) to life expectancy; government health expenditure to infant mortality rate and infant mortality rate to life expectancy. On the other hand, there is no evidence showing causality in any direction between infant mortality rate to GDP (economic growth) and government health expenditure to life expectancy. The study strongly confirmed that the government health expenditure has an effect on GDP (economic growth) and infant mortality rate (which depicts health status) in India. The health outcomes, namely life expectancy and infant mortality rare, reveal unidirectional causality between them. Therefore, the study concludes that policymakers and the government should pay proper attention to the health sector in order to ultimately achieve economic growth in the country.
      Citation: Arthaniti: Journal of Economic Theory and Practice
      PubDate: 2020-11-10T06:25:11Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0976747920963401
       
  • Water Insufficiency, Health Hazards and Rainwater Harvesting in North 24
           Parganas, West Bengal, India: Results of a Socio-economic Survey

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      Authors: Satabdi Biswas, Anupam Debsarkar, Manoranjan Pal
      Abstract: Arthaniti: Journal of Economic Theory and Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Rural households suffer from various health hazards due to unsafe water. Rooftop rainwater harvesting (RRH) has been recommended by various experts as a safer alternative to contaminated ground and surface water. The rural households, however, for various reasons, may not be willing to adopt RRH. The present study was based on primary data collected from 923 rural households in 4 blocks of North 24 Parganas district, West Bengal, India to identify the socio-demographic factors influencing the occurrence of health hazards and willingness to adopt RRH (WRRH). The study was focused on how health hazards and WRRH were related to water insufficiency, water awareness, poverty level and other socio-demographic variables. RRH not only depends on its feasibility but also on the willingness of the household to install it. A set of indices, namely health hazard index (HHI), water insufficiency index (WII), water awareness action index (WAAI), willingness to adopt RRH index (WRRHI) and Poverty Level Index (PLI) were developed from the relevant indicators. A binary logistic regression of HHI and WRRH was carried out on these indices along with some other socio-demographic variables. Most of these indices were found to have a significant effect on HHI. WRRH, however, was not found to depend on these indices, rather on religious belief and awareness of the adverse effects of arsenic poisoning in the village. The study also highlights the significance of undertaking awareness programmes on the consequences of using unsafe water by the government and non-governmental organisations.
      Citation: Arthaniti: Journal of Economic Theory and Practice
      PubDate: 2020-11-03T12:00:34Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0976747920963399
       
  • Risk Evaluation Model of Wind Energy Investment Projects Using Modified
           Fuzzy Group Decision-making and Monte Carlo Simulation

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      Authors: Abdolmajid Erfani, Mehdi Tavakolan
      Abstract: Arthaniti: Journal of Economic Theory and Practice, Ahead of Print.
      The recent increasing trend of investments in wind energy projects to support sustainable development requires an appropriate risk evaluation model to ensure the success of these projects. Early studies focus on opinion and discussion from subject matter experts. However, the expertise level in the subject is varied, and evaluation without considering expert competency can cause biased results. On the other hand, most of the project cost estimation models do not consider uncertainty in all cash flow parameters. In response, this article proposes a model that evaluates risks in wind energy investment projects by considering the knowledge and background of experts. Then, an integrated model of risk evaluation and cost estimation is developed. The model consists of three main stages: risk identification based on a systematic literature review (SLR); risk analysis phase 1 based on a modified fuzzy group decision-making; and risk analysis phase 2 based on a Monte Carlo simulation method. The main advantages of the proposed model are: (a) providing a comprehensive risk identification in wind energy investment projects; (b) using a modified fuzzy model to improve the risk assessment process by considering the expert competency in wind energy projects; and (c) establishing an integrated model to evaluate the cash flow of the investment. A wind farm in the Middle East is selected as the case study to examine the usability and practicality of the proposed model. The results show that the most important risks are ‘change in regulation and policy’, ‘dependency on the international market for importing raw materials’ and ‘market competitiveness’. On the other hand, the financial assessment under uncertainty shows that the profitability of the investment can be varied, and it emphasises the importance of an appropriate risk management process to guarantee the success of the investment.
      Citation: Arthaniti: Journal of Economic Theory and Practice
      PubDate: 2020-11-03T11:59:14Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0976747920963222
       
  • A Critical Analysis of Capitalism, Capital Accumulation and Crisis Theory
           in David Harvey

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      Authors: Tanaya Majumder
      Abstract: Arthaniti: Journal of Economic Theory and Practice, Ahead of Print.
      This article is a critical review of David Harvey’s essentialist theorisation of a capitalist economy and its crisis from a class focused Marxist perspective. The first part examines Harvey’s immense contribution to the understanding of space and spatiality of capitalism within the Marxist tradition. Capital accumulation in his theorisation serves as the impresario of space and spatiality and the harbinger of capitalist crisis in general. Expanding on a class focused approach, the second part provides a critique of Harvey’s methodology and crisis theory in which the law of capital accumulation reigns supreme. Specifically, using an anti-essentialist methodology of overdetermination with class process of surplus labour as the theoretical entry point, as developed by Resnick and Wolff, I argue that no correspondence of the rate of capital accumulation with those of rate of profit and rate of class distribution can be drawn. This unpredictability renders capitalism inherently unstable, prone to business cycles whose cause cannot be reduced to any chosen causal factor such as the one reducible to capital accumulation.
      Citation: Arthaniti: Journal of Economic Theory and Practice
      PubDate: 2020-10-26T10:53:50Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0976747920953009
       
  • Interrogating Social and Solidarity Economies Following Marxian Class
           Focused Approach: Evidence from India

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      Authors: Manas Ranjan Bhowmik
      Abstract: Arthaniti: Journal of Economic Theory and Practice, Ahead of Print.
      We use a class-focused Marxian approach to examine non-capitalist firms within the Social and Solidarity Economy (SSE) sector in India and draw some theoretical conclusions from it. Cooperatives, labour supply contracts, farmer producer organisations, mutuals, peoples’ credit societies, local alternative currencies—all such initiatives are covered by the umbrella term SSE. This article focuses on generating some broad-based criteria for conceptualising and assessing the successes and failures of firms within the SSE sector; maintaining non-exploitative class processes for a considerable period of time is a good measure of the success of an enterprise within the SSE sector. To this end, three case studies—a Farmer Producer organisation (FPO), handloom weavers’ cooperatives and Timbaktu Collective—have been used to show the impact on the existing class processes and non-class processes. By methodologically following overdetermined interrelationships between SSEs, trade unions and political parties, both of the importance of actual and possible avenues of intervention by way of class and non-class struggles have been pointed out towards the end.
      Citation: Arthaniti: Journal of Economic Theory and Practice
      PubDate: 2020-10-21T10:55:08Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0976747920954965
       
  • Growth and Regional Disparities in Odisha: An Analysis in the Post-reform
           Period

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      Authors: Priyabrata Sahoo, Asis Kumar Senapati
      Abstract: Arthaniti: Journal of Economic Theory and Practice, Ahead of Print.
      The post-reform period has witnessed high economic growth in the net state domestic product (NSDP) of the state of Odisha. With a higher growth in income in the post-reform period, especially in the tertiary sector, the state witnessed high regional disparities among its districts in terms of per capita income (PCI). The regional disparities can be assessed by looking at the convergence/divergence in the PCI of the 30 districts of Odisha. The state has seen a sigma (σ) divergence in the income of districts during the post-reform period, which points to an increase in income disparities among the districts. To know the sectoral effects of the income divergence, the PCI growths of the 30 districts, over the period from 1993–1994 to 2011–2012, are regressed with the initial PCI of the three sectors—primary, secondary and tertiary—of the 30 districts. The beta (β) divergence shows a mixed result. The districts having a low PCI in the primary sector show a convergence, meaning these were growing at a faster rate and converged with the districts having a high PCI in the primary sector. On the other hand, the districts having a low tertiary sector PCI show a divergence, which means these were growing at a slower rate while districts having a high PCI in the tertiary sector were growing at a faster rate, causing a divergence altogether. The secondary sector PCI of the districts shows an insignificant result. Combining the growth in the sectors’ income and the disparities among the districts in terms of sectoral PCI shows that the growth in income, especially the tertiary sector income growth during the post-reform period in Odisha, caused income disparities among the districts.
      Citation: Arthaniti: Journal of Economic Theory and Practice
      PubDate: 2020-10-19T08:56:31Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0976747920961934
       
  • Depot-Wise Efficiency of Haryana Roadways: A Data Envelopment Analysis

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      Authors: Ranjan Aneja, Nitisha Sehrawat
      Abstract: Arthaniti: Journal of Economic Theory and Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Presently, there are 24 depots and 13 sub-depots operating in various districts of Haryana and these play a pivotal role in providing short as well as medium distance passenger portability. The depots of Haryana roadways have relatively few incentives to perform efficiently. This study makes an effort to measure the efficiency of 20 major depots of Haryana roadways for the year of 2017–2018 and also find out the overall and depot level efficiency of Haryana roadways. For the purpose, the data envelopment analysis (DEA) has been applied and fleet size of Haryana roadways, total number of staff in this department and fuel consumption by buses are taken as inputs and bus utilisation taken as output. On the basis of technical efficiencies of the depots, it was found that the performance of depots is not at par with the optimum level. The overall mean technical efficiency is 91 per cent indicating that they can produce the same level of output by reducing 9 per cent inputs.
      Citation: Arthaniti: Journal of Economic Theory and Practice
      PubDate: 2020-10-09T07:34:34Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0976747920954973
       
  • International Trade Cooperation and Exogenous Economic Shocks in
           Developing Countries

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      Authors: Sena Kimm Gnangnon
      Abstract: Arthaniti: Journal of Economic Theory and Practice, Ahead of Print.
      This article explores whether the World Trade Organization (WTO), through its role of promoting multilateral trade liberalisation and mobilising greater financial resources (i.e., Aid for Trade [AfT] flows) in favour of the trade sector in developing countries, contributes to reducing the size of external economic shocks experienced by these countries. An empirical analysis is carried out using a sample of 111 countries over the period 1996–2016 and relying on the two-step system generalised method of moments (GMM) approach. The findings indicate that taken separately, multilateral trade liberalisation and AfT flows reduce the size of shocks. While the two factors are substitutable in negatively influencing countries’ size of shocks, it also appears that multilateral trade liberalisation always results in smaller shocks, irrespective of the amount of AfT that accrues to countries.
      Citation: Arthaniti: Journal of Economic Theory and Practice
      PubDate: 2020-09-29T11:29:40Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0976747920945188
       
  • Female Entrepreneurs in the Hospitality Industry: A Panel Causality
           Analysis of EU Countries

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      Authors: Sudeshna Ghosh
      Abstract: Arthaniti: Journal of Economic Theory and Practice, Ahead of Print.
      This study investigates the determinants of female entrepreneurship (FE) in the tourism and hospitality industry in 30 European countries. Based on annual observations for the period 2006–2016 and using panel causality techniques, the study explores the impact of tourism receipts, GDP per capita, the Global Entrepreneurial Index (GEI), policies related to institutional and cultural issues, childcare and gender parity related to skills and entrepreneurship on FE. The results of robust second-generation panel methods indicate the existence of long-run cointegration among FE, GDP, tourism receipts and other variables of interest. The long-run elasticities of tourism receipts, GDP, GEI, childcare and the female–male ratio of access to human capital formation in terms of training obtained from the panel fully modified ordinary least squares (FMOLS), panel dynamic ordinary least squares (DOLS) and the pooled mean group estimator (PMG) estimation are significant in the context of FE. The study concludes that pivotal policy interventions are needed to ensure that family policies and procedures, social strategies and tax structures do not discriminate female entrepreneurs.
      Citation: Arthaniti: Journal of Economic Theory and Practice
      PubDate: 2020-09-21T11:56:40Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0976747920942486
       
  • Four Faces of Marginalisation: Variations in Institutional Frameworks of
           Welfare State Provisions and Social Trust in Europe

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      Authors: Larysa Tamilina, Natalya Tamilina
      Abstract: Arthaniti: Journal of Economic Theory and Practice, Ahead of Print.
      By assuming that marginalisation threatens social trust formation, this study introduces a new analytical framework to explain the relationship between a welfare state’s institutional design and trust levels in European societies. A good’s lifecycle view, consisting of production and consumption, is applied to the provision of social benefits to discern four forms of marginalisation in an individual’s experience with the welfare state: (a) marginalisation through attitude, (b) marginalisation through context, (c) marginalisation through poverty and (d) marginalisation through opportunity lack. We argue that universalism in benefit provisions minimises each of the four marginalisation forms whereas selectivity is characterised by higher odds of marginalisation. We further demonstrate that this especially holds true when universal social programmes are generous, and the State dedicates substantial resources to their funding. When the State’s resources are scarce, selectivity becomes a good alternative to universalism and may enhance social trust formation among individuals. We tested our hypotheses using data from the European Social Survey (2010).
      Citation: Arthaniti: Journal of Economic Theory and Practice
      PubDate: 2020-09-18T04:12:27Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0976747920939735
       
  • Issues in the Provision of Health Care in India: An Overview

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      Authors: Vani Kant Borooah
      Abstract: Arthaniti: Journal of Economic Theory and Practice, Ahead of Print.
      After reviewing health outcomes and policy in India, this paper concludes that there are at least six sets of issues to be addressed about improving the quantity and quality of health services, and ipso facto improving health outcomes, in India. First, the amount of resources earmarked for health needs to increase. Second, health resources need to be used in a fair and just manner and, in particular, complaints relating to egregious health outcomes need to be addressed. Predominant in this set of issues is oversight and regulation of private-sector health provision. The third set of issues relates to the allocation of health resources and, in particular, to the imbalance in the allocation of health resources between towns and villages. A fourth issue is the accessibility of rural areas since it is the most remote areas that have the lowest density of health workers. Another issue is the more efficient use of health workers in order to make them more productive. Finally, Indian health policy is stronger on rhetoric and aspiration than it is on action and implementation. The successful implementation of the policy requires the explicit recognition that objectives are often competing (primary versus tertiary care) and the acknowledgement that, with budgetary constraints, one cannot have more of one without having less of the other. The first role of policy is to then choose the optimal mix of objectives with respect to these trade-offs. Secondly, policies come up against vested interests which agitate (often with the support of opposition politicians) and litigate against proposed changes. Lastly, policies in India are made against a background of poor governance with the predatory presence of corruption looming over every policy initiative. In implementing, rather than simply articulating, a policy it is important to address these governance issues.
      Citation: Arthaniti: Journal of Economic Theory and Practice
      PubDate: 2020-09-04T06:27:19Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0976747920945186
       
  • Lifetime Employment and Stackelberg Mixed Duopoly Games with a Foreign
           Labour-Managed Competitor

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      Authors: Kazuhiro Ohnishi
      Abstract: Arthaniti: Journal of Economic Theory and Practice, Ahead of Print.
      This article considers two Stackelberg games in which a state-owned firm competes against a foreign labour-managed firm. The first game is as follows. In the first stage, the state-owned firm decides whether to offer lifetime employment as a strategic commitment device. In the second stage, the foreign labour-managed firm decides whether to offer lifetime employment as a strategic commitment device. In the third stage, both firms simultaneously and independently choose actual outputs. The structure of the second game is nearly identical and differs only in the order in which the firms decide on the offer of lifetime employment in the first two stages. This study presents the equilibrium outcomes of these two Stackelberg games.
      Citation: Arthaniti: Journal of Economic Theory and Practice
      PubDate: 2020-08-07T07:12:03Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0976747920941772
       
  • Performance of Odisha State Co-operative Bank: An ARDL Approach

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      Authors: Ranjan Kumar Nayak
      Abstract: Arthaniti: Journal of Economic Theory and Practice, Ahead of Print.
      This article tries to analyse the financial performance of Odisha State Co-operative Bank (OSCB) for the period of 1949–1950 to 2014–2015. The methodology employed for the empirical analysis on this study involves autoregressive distributed lag (ARDL), augmented Dickey–Fuller (ADF) test and Phillips–Perron (PP). Statistical significant of the coefficient of the lagged error-correction term shows about 44 per cent correction in short-run dynamics to the long-run equilibrium. Using the ARDL approach, the study finds that owned fund, borrowing, advance and working capital, share capital and reserve are statistically significant in the short run; and deposits, share capital and reserve are statistically significant in the long run. The empirical results suggest that deposits and advances impact the profits of OSCB positively while cost of management, capital and reserves lead to lower profits. Hence, the study proposes the OSCB to follow a proactive management of capital with higher deposit generation and larger advances strategy to become a strong bank and grow steadily.
      Citation: Arthaniti: Journal of Economic Theory and Practice
      PubDate: 2020-08-04T11:59:56Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0976747920941769
       
  • Determinants of Crop Diversification and Its Effects on Household Food
           Security in Northern Ghana

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      Authors: Abdul Razak Baba, Abdul-Malik Abdulai
      Abstract: Arthaniti: Journal of Economic Theory and Practice, Ahead of Print.
      This study analyses factors that determine smallholder farmers’ crop diversification decisions and their effects on household food security in Northern Ghana. A total of 1,284 households were sampled across the five northern regions of Ghana. Herfindahl Index for measuring crop diversification was used. The study found average crop diversity to be 0.55 and about 61 per cent of the sampled farmers had values above the average which indicated high crop diversification in the study area. The study also estimated the determinants of crop diversification and their effects on household dietary food security using the conditional mixed process model. Upon examining the determinants of crop diversification, occupation, technology adoption, labour, extension contact and farm size were identified as significant determinants. The study also computed the Household Food Consumption Score as a proxy for measuring food security. The result indicated that crop diversification contributes significantly to improving household food security status in Northern Ghana.
      Citation: Arthaniti: Journal of Economic Theory and Practice
      PubDate: 2020-07-25T07:34:44Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0976747920936818
       
  • Equivalence Gain of the Global Financial Crisis: A Note

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      Authors: Chui Ying Lee, Shinji Kaneko, Yuichiro Yoshida, Sun Hangcheng, Masaru Ichihashi, Katsufumi Fukuda
      Abstract: Arthaniti: Journal of Economic Theory and Practice, Ahead of Print.
      By using the methodologies of Grinols (1984, Journal of International Economics, 16[3–4], 271–293) and Grinols and Wong (1991, Canadian Journal of Economics, 24[2], 428–449), we estimate the magnitudes of the welfare changes of China during the global financial crisis from 2007 to 2010. The results show that China’s welfare decreased in 2007, and the bursting of the housing bubble in the USA negatively affected China through international trade. However, the collapse of Lehman Brothers did not negatively affect China from 2008 to 2010. This may be because of the fiscal and monetary stimulus policies in the USA and China.
      Citation: Arthaniti: Journal of Economic Theory and Practice
      PubDate: 2020-07-10T02:14:54Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0976747920934341
       
  • Assessing Growth Impact of Public Debt in Sri Lanka

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      Authors: Suvra Prokash Mondal, Biswajit Maitra
      Abstract: Arthaniti: Journal of Economic Theory and Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Whether public debt spurs economic growth is an unsettled issue in both theoretical and empirical grounds. The issue has attracted lots of attention to economists and policymakers in recent times. This article addresses the debt–growth issue in the case of a small emerging south Asian country—Sri Lanka. The impact of external, domestic debt, in association with a set of financial variables on income, is assessed for an extended period of 1965–2017, and also for the post-reform period of 1978–2017. The article finds some robust evidence that external debt is not beneficial; rather it depresses income. The impact of domestic debt and foreign aid on income is trivial. On the other hand, gross fixed capital formation and money supply spur income growth, whereas the impact of openness to trade is dismaying, and all these findings are invariant across the extended period and the post-reform periods. The results have policy implications for the long-term sustained economic growth of Sri Lanka.JEL: H63, F35, O40, C22
      Citation: Arthaniti: Journal of Economic Theory and Practice
      PubDate: 2020-05-22T12:57:36Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0976747920917478
       
  • Innovation and Economic Growth in Sub-Saharan Africa: Why Institutions
           Matter' An Empirical Study Aross 37 Countries

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      Authors: Dejene Mamo Bekana
      Abstract: Arthaniti: Journal of Economic Theory and Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Based on empirical panel data for a sample of 37 sub-Saharan African economies for 1996–2016, this inquiry examines the extent to which institutional quality explains the existing cross-country difference in economic performance in sub-Saharan Africa. While most of the existing studies focus only on the direct effect of institutional quality, this article investigates the direct and indirect effects of institutions. It also reflects on impact of the interaction between institutional quality and innovation on economic growth in developing countries. The evidence provides very strong support for the direct effect of institutional quality development on economic performance as well as for its indirect effect via its impact on innovation. However, the results do not support theories that argue in favour of interaction between institutional quality such as democracy, governance quality and innovation, thereby pointing to the need for better calibration of the numerous existing theoretical postulations and related empirical measures.JEL: D70, D72, O15, O30, O31, O55
      Citation: Arthaniti: Journal of Economic Theory and Practice
      PubDate: 2020-05-20T11:52:20Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0976747920915114
       
  • Bees Out of the Pandora’s Box: Economic Consequences of National
           Register in Assam

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      Authors: Atanu Sengupta, Sanjoy De
      Abstract: Arthaniti: Journal of Economic Theory and Practice, Ahead of Print.
      In India, at present, there is a lot of hue and cry for and against the National Register of Citizens (NRC) in Assam. All the arguments are however based on false perception of migration and its ill or well effects on the economy. The latest 2011 Census does not provide the migration tables in detail. Hence, we had no other option but to use the Census 2001 data to understand the nature and trend of migration in Assam. Our analysis suggests that the recent uproar over illegal migrants from neighboring country in Assam is more of a myth than reality and does not hold much economic justification. Firstly, official data suggests that the flow of internal migration in various districts of Assam is miniscule. Moreover, it is showing a declining trend over the last few decades. The historical international migration that took place in Assam was due to mainly ‘push’ factor and no such ‘push’ factors have been in sight in the last few decades. Secondly and more importantly, migration of any form (though waning in Assam) adds to the prosperity and well-being of the state.JEL: J61, J6, Q56
      Citation: Arthaniti: Journal of Economic Theory and Practice
      PubDate: 2020-05-08T12:34:40Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0976747920915061
       
  • Elasticities of Gold Demand—An Empirical Analysis Using Cointegration
           and Error Correction Model

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      Authors: S. Maria Immanuvel, D. Lazar
      Abstract: Arthaniti: Journal of Economic Theory and Practice, Ahead of Print.
      This article examines the long-run and the short-run elastic relationships between price, income and gold demand. Four major gold consuming countries in the world, such as India, the USA, Europe and Japan, are included in the analysis. The study period is from January 2000 to December 2017. Using the Cointegration and Error Correction model, we found a long-run relationship between gold demand, price and income of the consumers. Price elasticity is negative and income elasticity is positive in the long run. The speed of error correction is slightly higher for India. Indian gold market takes a shorter time to get back to its equilibrium than the other major gold consuming countries. India’s overall gold consumption is relatively lesser reactive to the fluctuations in the world gold price than the other countries. Consumers in India react expeditiously in the short run and their response to the price changes is stable in the long run. More than 70 per cent of India’s gold consumption is unaffected by the price fluctuations. This behaviour eventually increases the wealth in the country. Hence the study suggests that instead of curbing the demand, new financial products may be developed to monetise the gold lying idle in the households. Various gold monetisation schemes already launched by the government should reach especially the rural section, as most of them may not be aware of these schemes. This may tend to bring a considerable amount of gold into the system.JEL: G14, Q02, Q21
      Citation: Arthaniti: Journal of Economic Theory and Practice
      PubDate: 2020-03-27T06:54:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0976747920903118
       
  • Regional Economic Growth and Inequality in India: A Sector-wise
           Decomposition Analysis

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      Authors: Ranjan Aneja, Barkha, Umer Jeelanie Banday
      Abstract: Arthaniti: Journal of Economic Theory and Practice, Ahead of Print.
      This article attempts to examine the behaviour of various sectors, with emphasis on the role of income inequality. First, the article estimates the sectoral decomposition in terms of net state domestic product (NSDP) among different states from years 1991–1992 to 2016–2017. Second, we analyse the sector-wise decomposition of regional inequality in term of per capita income. Finally, we analyse the role of developmental expenditure in regional inequalities in term of per capita developmental expenditure across various states.Based on empirical results, India has witnessed a high growth in per capita income in the post-reform period. With high growth rate, the sectoral composition of income has also registered a major change. The tertiary sector is the major contributor to growth in the post-reform period. At the sectoral level, disparity decreased within the sectors in case of primary and tertiary sector and increased in secondary sector. However, overall, the tertiary and secondary sectors are more responsible for raising the income inequality among the states while primary sector is offsetting this gap.JEL: O15, I14, I32, O12
      Citation: Arthaniti: Journal of Economic Theory and Practice
      PubDate: 2020-03-24T06:10:08Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0976747920910825
       
  • Foreign Direct Investment, Exports and Long-term Economic Growth in
           Alabama: A Co-integration Analysis

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      Authors: Sergio Castello, Anindya Biswas
      Abstract: Arthaniti: Journal of Economic Theory and Practice, Ahead of Print.
      This article provides a state-specific co-integration study by linking exports and foreign direct investment (FDI) to economic growth in Alabama. The study aims to determine how much of Alabama’s economic growth is driven by exports. Mercedes-Benz and its announcement of a US$600 million investment in 1993 started a surge of FDI and exports never seen before in the state accelerating its long-run economic growth path. Twenty years later, Mercedes-Benz has invested over US$4.5 billion and can produce 300,000 vehicles per year. This study analyses the importance of exports and FDI in the Alabama economy and establishes significant evidence of the positive relationship between Total Gross Domestic Product for Alabama (ALNGSP) and its exports from 1999 to 2017, whereas it does not find a statistically significant impact of the FDI on Alabama’s growth. We conclude that Alabama needs to focus on three main policies to continue its economic success. First, it needs to continue to attract FDI in these sectors to build a vast supplier network. Second, Alabama must allocate new investments in infrastructure and finally, it needs to continue to be a friendly state to businesses, providing skilled labour, low corporate taxes and less bureaucracy.JEL: C82, L62, O51
      Citation: Arthaniti: Journal of Economic Theory and Practice
      PubDate: 2020-03-05T06:05:42Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0976747920906268
       
  • Consumer Confidence and Consumer Spending in Brazil: A Nonlinear
           Autoregressive Distributed Lag Model Analysis

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      Authors: Sudeshna Ghosh
      Abstract: Arthaniti: Journal of Economic Theory and Practice, Ahead of Print.
      The study explores the relationship between consumer confidence, household private consumer expenditure and other related macroeconomic financial variables for Brazil, a major, upper middle, income, Latin American country. It is widely discussed in the literature that the consumer confidence is an initial guide to the future behaviour of the economy based on the consumption path. Thus, a rise in the confidence of the consumer would lead to rising household consumption behaviour, which would percolate to accelerate economic growth. The study uses the nonlinear autoregressive distributed lag model (NARDL) to measure the effects of changes in consumer sentiment on private consumer spending, taking into consideration the significance of other financial variables, namely the rate of interest, stock market index, the exchange rate, inflation and unemployment trends. The study employs monthly data from the 4th month of 1995 to the 10th month of 2018. The bounds test of the NARDL suggests the presence of a cointegrating relationship among the variables. The model estimation affirms the presence of asymmetries in the behaviour of the major explanatory variables. In the short run, there are both positive and negative asymmetric impacts of consumer confidence index (CCI) on consumer expenditure, while the rate of interest has only negative asymmetries. In the long run, unemployment changes, stock market fluctuations, interest rate variation and alterations in the CCI shape the behaviour of consumer spending at the household level in Brazil. So, the consumers are able to perceive the signalling of the future behaviour of the market and contribute through consumption spending.JEL: C22; D12; E21; O54
      Citation: Arthaniti: Journal of Economic Theory and Practice
      PubDate: 2020-02-15T06:01:53Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0976747919898906
       
  • Technology Intensity and Employment in the Indian Economy

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      Authors: Shampa Paul, Kaushalesh Lal
      Abstract: Arthaniti: Journal of Economic Theory and Practice, Ahead of Print.
      The article investigates the impact of technology on employment in key sectors of the Indian economy. The analysis encompasses services and manufacturing sectors. The services sectors include firms engaged in financial and non-financial segments, while manufacturing sector consists of firms engaged in production of consumer goods. The findings suggest that indicators that have affected employment in manufacturing sector are size of operations, import of capital goods and better human resource (HR) practices, while in financial services sector, the factors affecting employment are better HR policies, profitability and expenditure on Information and Communications Technology (ICT). Whereas in non-financial sector firms, import of capital goods and expenditure on training and welfare of workforce significantly influenced employment. The distinguishing finding is that association between employment creation and age of firms is negative in financial services sector, while age of firm is immaterial in manufacturing and non-financial sectors. The study uses Prowess database for the period between 2011–2012 and 2015–2016.JEL: O14, O15, O33
      Citation: Arthaniti: Journal of Economic Theory and Practice
      PubDate: 2020-02-14T11:23:24Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0976747919895326
       
 
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