Publisher: Sage Publications   (Total: 1166 journals)

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Showing 1 - 200 of 1166 Journals sorted alphabetically
AADE in Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Abstracts in Anthropology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 29)
Academic Pathology     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Accounting History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18, SJR: 0.527, CiteScore: 1)
Acta Radiologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.754, CiteScore: 2)
Acta Radiologica Open     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Acta Sociologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39, SJR: 0.939, CiteScore: 2)
Action Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 53, SJR: 0.308, CiteScore: 1)
Active Learning in Higher Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 396, SJR: 1.397, CiteScore: 2)
Adaptive Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.288, CiteScore: 1)
Administration & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18, SJR: 0.675, CiteScore: 1)
Adoption & Fostering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25, SJR: 0.313, CiteScore: 0)
Adsorption Science & Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.258, CiteScore: 1)
Adult Education Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 260, SJR: 0.566, CiteScore: 2)
Adult Learning     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 51)
Advances in Dental Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 1.791, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Developing Human Resources     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35, SJR: 0.614, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Mechanical Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 156, SJR: 0.272, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Methods and Practices in Psychological Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20)
Advances in Structural Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 51, SJR: 0.599, CiteScore: 1)
AERA Open     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
Affilia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.496, CiteScore: 1)
Africa Spectrum     Open Access   (Followers: 17)
Agrarian South : J. of Political Economy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Air, Soil & Water Research     Open Access   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.214, CiteScore: 1)
Alexandria : The J. of National and Intl. Library and Information Issues     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 68)
Allergy & Rhinology     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
AlterNative : An Intl. J. of Indigenous Peoples     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 39, SJR: 0.194, CiteScore: 0)
Alternative Law J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.176, CiteScore: 0)
Alternatives : Global, Local, Political     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.351, CiteScore: 1)
Alternatives to Laboratory Animals     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.297, CiteScore: 1)
American Behavioral Scientist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26, SJR: 0.982, CiteScore: 2)
American Economist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
American Educational Research J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 260, SJR: 2.913, CiteScore: 3)
American J. of Alzheimer's Disease and Other Dementias     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23, SJR: 0.67, CiteScore: 2)
American J. of Cosmetic Surgery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
American J. of Evaluation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18, SJR: 0.646, CiteScore: 2)
American J. of Health Promotion     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35, SJR: 0.807, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Hospice and Palliative Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 47, SJR: 0.65, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Law & Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.204, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Lifestyle Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.431, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Medical Quality     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.777, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Men's Health     Open Access   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.595, CiteScore: 2)
American J. of Rhinology and Allergy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.972, CiteScore: 2)
American J. of Sports Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 248, SJR: 3.949, CiteScore: 6)
American Politics Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 36, SJR: 1.313, CiteScore: 1)
American Review of Public Administration     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28, SJR: 2.062, CiteScore: 2)
American Sociological Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 357, SJR: 6.333, CiteScore: 6)
American String Teacher     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Analytical Chemistry Insights     Open Access   (Followers: 26, SJR: 0.224, CiteScore: 1)
Angiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.849, CiteScore: 2)
Animation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.197, CiteScore: 0)
Annals of Clinical Biochemistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.634, CiteScore: 1)
Annals of Otology, Rhinology & Laryngology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20, SJR: 0.807, CiteScore: 1)
Annals of Pharmacotherapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 59, SJR: 1.096, CiteScore: 2)
Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 51, SJR: 1.225, CiteScore: 3)
Annals of the ICRP     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.548, CiteScore: 1)
Anthropocene Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 3.341, CiteScore: 7)
Anthropological Theory     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 48, SJR: 0.739, CiteScore: 1)
Antitrust Bulletin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Antiviral Chemistry and Chemotherapy     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.635, CiteScore: 2)
Antyajaa : Indian J. of Women and Social Change     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Applied Biosafety     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.131, CiteScore: 0)
Applied Psychological Measurement     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21, SJR: 1.17, CiteScore: 1)
Applied Spectroscopy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 27, SJR: 0.489, CiteScore: 2)
Armed Forces & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25, SJR: 0.29, CiteScore: 1)
Arthaniti : J. of Economic Theory and Practice     Full-text available via subscription  
Arts and Humanities in Higher Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 49, SJR: 0.305, CiteScore: 1)
Asia Pacific Media Educator     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.23, CiteScore: 0)
Asia-Pacific J. of Management Research and Innovation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Asia-Pacific J. of Public Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.558, CiteScore: 1)
Asia-Pacific J. of Rural Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Asian and Pacific Migration J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.324, CiteScore: 1)
Asian Cardiovascular and Thoracic Annals     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.305, CiteScore: 0)
Asian J. of Comparative Politics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Asian J. of Legal Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Asian J. of Management Cases     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.101, CiteScore: 0)
ASN Neuro     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 1.534, CiteScore: 3)
Assessment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19, SJR: 1.519, CiteScore: 3)
Assessment for Effective Intervention     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.578, CiteScore: 1)
Australasian J. of Early Childhood     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.535, CiteScore: 1)
Australasian Psychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18, SJR: 0.433, CiteScore: 1)
Australian & New Zealand J. of Psychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30, SJR: 1.801, CiteScore: 2)
Australian and New Zealand J. of Criminology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 545, SJR: 0.612, CiteScore: 1)
Australian J. of Career Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Australian J. of Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 51, SJR: 0.403, CiteScore: 1)
Australian J. of Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.497, CiteScore: 1)
Autism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 356, SJR: 1.739, CiteScore: 4)
Autism & Developmental Language Impairments     Open Access   (Followers: 17)
Avian Biology Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.401, CiteScore: 1)
Behavior Modification     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.877, CiteScore: 2)
Behavioral and Cognitive Neuroscience Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Behavioral Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Beyond Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Bible Translator     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Biblical Theology Bulletin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24, SJR: 0.184, CiteScore: 0)
Big Data & Society     Open Access   (Followers: 55)
Biochemistry Insights     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Bioinformatics and Biology Insights     Open Access   (Followers: 12, SJR: 1.141, CiteScore: 2)
Biological Research for Nursing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.685, CiteScore: 2)
Biomarker Insights     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.81, CiteScore: 2)
Biomarkers in Cancer     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Biomedical Engineering and Computational Biology     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
Biomedical Informatics Insights     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Bioscope: South Asian Screen Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.235, CiteScore: 0)
BMS: Bulletin of Sociological Methodology/Bulletin de Méthodologie Sociologique     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.226, CiteScore: 0)
Body & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29, SJR: 1.531, CiteScore: 3)
Bone and Tissue Regeneration Insights     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Brain and Neuroscience Advances     Open Access  
Brain Science Advances     Open Access  
Breast Cancer : Basic and Clinical Research     Open Access   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.823, CiteScore: 2)
British J. of Music Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
British J. of Occupational Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 253, SJR: 0.323, CiteScore: 1)
British J. of Pain     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31, SJR: 0.579, CiteScore: 2)
British J. of Politics and Intl. Relations     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39, SJR: 0.91, CiteScore: 2)
British J. of Visual Impairment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.337, CiteScore: 1)
British J.ism Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
BRQ Business Review Quarterly     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Building Acoustics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.215, CiteScore: 1)
Building Services Engineering Research & Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.583, CiteScore: 1)
Bulletin of Science, Technology & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Business & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Business and Professional Communication Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.348, CiteScore: 1)
Business Information Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17, SJR: 0.279, CiteScore: 0)
Business Perspectives and Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Cahiers Élisabéthains     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.111, CiteScore: 0)
Calcutta Statistical Association Bulletin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
California Management Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 37, SJR: 2.209, CiteScore: 4)
Canadian Association of Radiologists J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.463, CiteScore: 1)
Canadian J. of Kidney Health and Disease     Open Access   (Followers: 8, SJR: 1.007, CiteScore: 2)
Canadian J. of Nursing Research (CJNR)     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Canadian J. of Occupational Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 167, SJR: 0.626, CiteScore: 1)
Canadian J. of Psychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28, SJR: 1.769, CiteScore: 3)
Canadian J. of School Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.266, CiteScore: 1)
Canadian Pharmacists J. / Revue des Pharmaciens du Canada     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.536, CiteScore: 1)
Cancer Control     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Cancer Growth and Metastasis     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Cancer Informatics     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.64, CiteScore: 1)
Capital and Class     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.282, CiteScore: 1)
Cardiac Cath Lab Director     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Cardiovascular and Thoracic Open     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Career Development and Transition for Exceptional Individuals     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.44, CiteScore: 1)
Cartilage     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.889, CiteScore: 3)
Cell Transplantation     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 1.023, CiteScore: 3)
Cephalalgia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 1.581, CiteScore: 3)
Cephalalgia Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Child Language Teaching and Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34, SJR: 0.501, CiteScore: 1)
Child Maltreatment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 1.22, CiteScore: 3)
Child Neurology Open     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Childhood     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19, SJR: 0.894, CiteScore: 2)
Childhood Obesity and Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
China Information     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.767, CiteScore: 2)
China Report     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.221, CiteScore: 0)
Chinese J. of Sociology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Christian Education J. : Research on Educational Ministry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Chronic Illness     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.672, CiteScore: 2)
Chronic Respiratory Disease     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.808, CiteScore: 2)
Chronic Stress     Open Access  
Citizenship, Social and Economics Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.145, CiteScore: 0)
Cleft Palate-Craniofacial J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.757, CiteScore: 1)
Clin-Alert     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Clinical and Applied Thrombosis/Hemostasis     Open Access   (Followers: 32, SJR: 0.49, CiteScore: 1)
Clinical and Translational Neuroscience     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Clinical Case Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.364, CiteScore: 1)
Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 45, SJR: 0.73, CiteScore: 2)
Clinical EEG and Neuroscience     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.552, CiteScore: 2)
Clinical Ethics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.296, CiteScore: 1)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Arthritis and Musculoskeletal Disorders     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.537, CiteScore: 2)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Blood Disorders     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.314, CiteScore: 2)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Cardiology     Open Access   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.686, CiteScore: 2)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Case Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.283, CiteScore: 1)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Circulatory, Respiratory and Pulmonary Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.425, CiteScore: 2)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Ear, Nose and Throat     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Endocrinology and Diabetes     Open Access   (Followers: 33, SJR: 0.63, CiteScore: 2)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Oncology     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 1.129, CiteScore: 3)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Pediatrics     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Psychiatry     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Reproductive Health     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.776, CiteScore: 0)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Therapeutics     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.172, CiteScore: 0)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Trauma and Intensive Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Women's Health     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Clinical Nursing Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34, SJR: 0.471, CiteScore: 1)
Clinical Pathology     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Clinical Pediatrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25, SJR: 0.487, CiteScore: 1)
Clinical Psychological Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16, SJR: 3.281, CiteScore: 5)
Clinical Rehabilitation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 78, SJR: 1.322, CiteScore: 3)
Clinical Risk     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.133, CiteScore: 0)
Clinical Trials     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22, SJR: 2.399, CiteScore: 2)
Clothing and Textiles Research J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28, SJR: 0.36, CiteScore: 1)
Collections : A J. for Museum and Archives Professionals     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Common Law World Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Communication & Sport     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.385, CiteScore: 1)
Communication and the Public     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Communication Disorders Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.458, CiteScore: 1)
Communication Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24, SJR: 2.171, CiteScore: 3)
Community College Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 1.451, CiteScore: 1)
Comparative Political Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 292, SJR: 3.772, CiteScore: 3)
Compensation & Benefits Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Competition & Change     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.843, CiteScore: 2)

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Asian Journal of Comparative Politics
Number of Followers: 5  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 2057-8911 - ISSN (Online) 2057-892X
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1166 journals]
  • From friend to foe: Post-9/11 Pakistan–US relations; a realist
           perspective

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Syed Muhammad Saad Zaidi, Azhar Ahmad
      Abstract: Asian Journal of Comparative Politics, Ahead of Print.
      The relations between Pakistan and the United States, throughout the course of history, have witnessed many ups and downs. At times, when their interests were aligned, strong socio-economic and military cooperation was seen between the two states. Yet, on other occasions they were at odds with and distant from each other. However, post 9/11, Pakistan–US relations were at its zenith, when Pakistan became the frontline ally of the US in the war against terrorism in Afghanistan, and the US granted Pakistan the prestigious status of non-NATO ally. Soon after, though, the partnership between the two states was in troubled waters: when the US repeatedly violated Pakistan’s sovereignty through drone strikes and covert ops, it diplomatically painted Pakistan as the bad guy by claiming it to be part of the problem (terrorism), not the solution, and by promoting India within the region. Furthermore, when Pakistan became part of China’s New Silk Road initiative, commonly known as the Belt and Road Initiative, Pakistan–US relations saw its lowest point in history. This article critically analyzes post-9/11 Pakistan–US relations by application of two mainstream theories of international relations in tandem: Realism and (Neo)structural Realism. Realism explains the US foreign policy rationale, while Structural Realism explains Pakistan’s foreign policy choices in relation to the US.
      Citation: Asian Journal of Comparative Politics
      PubDate: 2021-04-13T06:54:12Z
      DOI: 10.1177/20578911211007936
       
  • Thick as thieves' Corruption, institutional trust, and investment
           locations

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Rogelio Alicor Labalan Panao
      Abstract: Asian Journal of Comparative Politics, Ahead of Print.
      What makes corrupt investment locations still attractive to investing economies' This article examines whether states’ tendency to ignore corruption in investment targets is due to their being accustomed to corruption at home, or is instead due to a perception that despite flaws institutions can be counted on to remain functional. We argue that economies where corruption is viewed permissively would still likely invest in states equally perceived as corrupt but not necessarily due to shared collective tolerance. Rather, a perception of institutional dependability motivates the selection of investment locations, regardless of how people in investing states view corruption. To test our conjecture, we analyzed bilateral foreign direct investment outflows for 96 countries between 2001 and 2012 using exponential random graph models alongside value-based typologies for corruption and institutional confidence. Our results suggest that, overall, it is trust in institutions and not necessarily trepidation about corruption that mediates the selection of investment locations.
      Citation: Asian Journal of Comparative Politics
      PubDate: 2021-04-07T08:00:17Z
      DOI: 10.1177/20578911211004766
       
  • The effect of exposure to digital appeals to participate in collective
           action posted by influentials on protest information sharing: Evidence
           from Japan and South Korea

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Matthew D Jenkins
      Abstract: Asian Journal of Comparative Politics, Ahead of Print.
      Contemporary collective action theories put large horizontal digitally connected networks at the center of mass political action. They posit that information sharing among ordinary social media users makes possible new forms of rapid mass political action. However, recent research has shown that influential individuals can play a number of key roles in facilitating networked political action in seemingly leaderless movements. Still, the role of influential individuals in stimulating protest information sharing on social media is an important aspect of networked collective action that remains understudied. This study seeks to address this. Specifically, it investigates the following question: does exposure to appeals to engage in protest increase individuals’ motivation to share protest information' Drawing on evidence from an original survey experiment, this study shows that digital appeals to engage in collective action posted by influential individuals do elicit an increase in motivation to share the appeal. However, this result obtains only for Korean respondents, whereas influential appeals appear to have no effect on Japanese respondents. I argue that this difference is in part a function of different citizenship norms in the two countries, and the corresponding effects on social network dynamics. Preliminary analysis supports this interpretation, but further investigation is warranted.
      Citation: Asian Journal of Comparative Politics
      PubDate: 2021-04-07T07:54:37Z
      DOI: 10.1177/20578911211000854
       
  • Challenges to state control of territory: Comparative analysis of Yemen,
           Afghanistan and Myanmar

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Sumedha Korishetti
      Abstract: Asian Journal of Comparative Politics, Ahead of Print.
      States around the world have lost control over their territory to armed non-state actors, including states like Yemen, Afghanistan and Myanmar in the Asian region. This article aims to understand why these states are unable to exercise control over all of their territory. The study identifies and examines four major challenges faced by states in maintaining control over their territory – lack of state legitimacy and effectiveness, strategic motives of armed non-state actors, socio-economic motives of armed non-state actors and external intervention. A comparative analysis of the cases of Yemen, Afghanistan and Myanmar illustrates the wide relevance of these challenges faced by the states with respect to territorial control.
      Citation: Asian Journal of Comparative Politics
      PubDate: 2021-04-01T09:46:25Z
      DOI: 10.1177/20578911211004775
       
  • Sino–Sri Lankan relations and their impact on India

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      Authors: Ishan Jain
      Abstract: Asian Journal of Comparative Politics, Ahead of Print.
      This article aims to understand the development of the Sino–Sri Lankan relationship from ancient to contemporary times and its overall impact on the Indo–Sri Lankan relationship and on India as a leader in the South Asian region. China has been investing heavily in Sri Lanka and several other South Asian countries in the name of economic development and upliftment. It has formed diplomatic ties with Sri Lanka and has provided immense economic, military and other forms of assistance and has reduced India’s involvement. The building of the Maritime Silk Route and the Belt and Road Initiative have been dream projects for China, and so the article analyses the assistance provided in terms of strategy that the Chinese may be planning. Based on the facts and evidence provided, the article will end on a scenario that could most likely take place based on the trajectory of the events and relationships.
      Citation: Asian Journal of Comparative Politics
      PubDate: 2021-03-18T09:35:52Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2057891121997566
       
  • Religious identity and politics: Exploring the causes of the political
           persecution of religious minorities in Kohat District, Pakistan

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      Authors: Jan Alam
      Abstract: Asian Journal of Comparative Politics, Ahead of Print.
      Religious minorities are victims of political isolation and persecution in societies, where they are subject to violence and discrimination. This study was undertaken in a terrorism-affected area to explore those elements that subjugate and suppress religious minorities’ political participation and representation. To conduct an in-depth analysis, a qualitative inquiry was used for data collection and analysis. The researcher interviewed 13 Christians, seven Hindus, and six Sikhs, using a purposive sampling technique and a semi-structured interview guide. The primary data were analyzed using the thematic analysis technique. The researcher found that some of the underlying factors behind the political persecution are leadership vacuum, political neglect, post-election negligence, vote dislocation, political ignorance, and political subordination. This study presented a framework for policymakers to solve minorities’ political problems, and for researchers to better understand the minorities’ political oppression on local and international levels.
      Citation: Asian Journal of Comparative Politics
      PubDate: 2021-03-03T10:44:22Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2057891121997577
       
  • Spillover democratisation: Reflections from MENA politics

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      Authors: Sujay Ghosh
      Abstract: Asian Journal of Comparative Politics, Ahead of Print.
      ‘Spillover democratisation’ is an ongoing process. It envisages that democratic values, institutions and practices continue to spread and evolve through various pathways – horizontal, geographical and vertical. Yet, possibilities also remain that anti-democracy forces may thwart the process. In Middle East and North Africa (MENA), social and economic rights were not accompanied by civil and political rights. The Arab Spring was a response to this gap: it raised the optimism of achieving democratisation in the MENA region, through geographical and horizontal pathways. However, the promise remains largely elusive at present; rather, we witness the cementing of existing anti-democratic forces. Yet, citizens’ innate support for democracy, sporadic pro-democracy activism and rising consumerism sustain the democratising potentials of the Arab Spring.
      Citation: Asian Journal of Comparative Politics
      PubDate: 2021-02-24T10:11:27Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2057891121995570
       
  • Oligarchy in the Jokowi government and its influence on the implementation
           of legislative function in Indonesia

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      Authors: Asrinaldi, Mohammad Agus Yusoff, dan Zamzami Abdul Karim
      Abstract: Asian Journal of Comparative Politics, Ahead of Print.
      The weak implementation of the House of Representatives’, or Dewan Perwakilan Rakyat’s (DPR), function indicates stagnation in Indonesia’s democracy. This fact is due to the party oligarchy’s stronghold in the Jokowi government, which ignores the nature of public representation that should be carried out. The oligarchy controls the government and DPR’s performance in establishing political compromises for every legislative policy with the government to facilitate the affairs of party oligarchs, who are also the members of the Jokowi government coalition. In addition, they engage in cartel politics to secure their respective power and material interests. This article examines the roles of party oligarchs in influencing the implementation of political functions in the DPR. Ironically, the coalition formed by the party oligarchy has helped the Jokowi government and the DPR to secure government policies and the economic and political interests of the oligarchic group.
      Citation: Asian Journal of Comparative Politics
      PubDate: 2021-02-23T09:31:13Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2057891121995564
       
  • Authoritarian values and institutional trust: Theoretical considerations
           and evidence from the Philippines

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      Authors: Ronald A Pernia
      Abstract: Asian Journal of Comparative Politics, Ahead of Print.
      Studies on authoritarian values, which have mostly focused on authoritarian regimes and on democracies with spells of authoritarianism, suggest trust in public institutions. However, limited empirical evidence has been carried out in the Philippines where cycles of regime change and authoritarian leadership have characterized its post-authoritarian landscape. Examining multiple public opinion data from the Asian Barometer Survey, this study found that regardless of the political leadership across different regimes, Filipino citizens expressed attitudinal dispositions, i.e. conforming, anti-political pluralism, and support for strong leaders, that constitute authoritarian political values. But instead of a destabilizing effect, estimates from ordinary least squares indicate that Filipino citizens’ authoritarian tendencies enhance institutional trust—seen as an indicator of support for the political system. The findings of this study empirically challenge the view of democratization in the Philippines by foregrounding its ‘populist-authoritarian’ dimension. In addition, they provide evidence of a growing scholarship in comparative political studies that claims that courting confidence for political institutions and regime support does not necessitate a ‘liberal-democratic’ model.
      Citation: Asian Journal of Comparative Politics
      PubDate: 2021-02-23T09:27:08Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2057891121992118
       
  • Is political engagement by constitutional monarchs compatible with
           democracy'

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      Authors: Kana Inata
      Abstract: Asian Journal of Comparative Politics, Ahead of Print.
      Constitutional monarchies have proved to be resilient, and some have made substantive political interventions even though their positions are mostly hereditary, without granted constitutional channels to do so. This article examines how constitutional monarchs can influence political affairs and what impact royal intervention can have on politics. I argue that constitutional monarchs affect politics indirectly by influencing the preferences of the public who have de jure power to influence political leaders. The analyses herein show that constitutional monarchs do not indiscriminately intervene in politics, but their decisions to intervene reflect the public’s preferences. First, constitutional monarchs with little public approval become self-restraining and do not attempt to assert their political preferences. Second, they are more likely to intervene in politics when the public is less satisfied about the incumbent government. These findings are illustrated with historical narratives regarding the political involvement of King Bhumibol Adulyadej of Thailand in the 2000s.
      Citation: Asian Journal of Comparative Politics
      PubDate: 2021-02-18T09:36:24Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2057891121991690
       
  • Cultural obstacles to women’s political empowerment in India and
           Bangladesh: A comparative perspective

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      Authors: Mahbub Alam Prodip
      Abstract: Asian Journal of Comparative Politics, Ahead of Print.
      This comparative case study explores the cultural obstructions that women members in reserved seats confront with regards to their political empowerment at the local council level – in the Gram Panchayat in India and the Union Parishad in Bangladesh. Primary data was collected from West Bengal in India and Rajshahi in Bangladesh between July 2018 and February 2019. The results are mixed, and varied significantly from country to country. Patriarchal behaviours are less dominant in the workplace for Indian women, whereas major challenges for Bangladeshi women come from their male colleagues. Proxy representation is still a significant form of male domination in India, while this is not a serious issue in Bangladesh. However, the interference of politicians is another form of male domination which restricts women from effective participation in local councils in India and Bangladesh. Harassment is extensively used to control women in politics in Bangladesh, whereas this is less exercised in India. Religion is no longer a dominant barrier to women’s political participation in either countries. Women members in both countries should fight against patriarchal behaviour and male domination in order to create an environment where they can talk about women’s interests in the decision-making process.
      Citation: Asian Journal of Comparative Politics
      PubDate: 2021-02-03T09:58:16Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2057891121990742
       
  • The struggle for Singapore’s Chinese heartland: The People’s Action
           Party versus the Workers’ Party versus the Singapore Democratic Party,
           1998–2013

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      Authors: Kieran James
      Abstract: Asian Journal of Comparative Politics, Ahead of Print.
      Singapore’s political struggles of the 1950s and 1960s, between a Chinese-educated, working-class left wing and a middle-class, English-educated faction, have not been completely eradicated but continue to cast a shadow over modern political developments. The moderate, English-educated faction achieved an important victory when it took over control of the People’s Action Party (PAP) in the early 1960s. However, the surprise ascendancy of the Workers’ Party (WP), under Low Thia Khiang, has seen a long-marginalized section of the Chinese-educated galvanize around a district, Hougang and Aljunied, and a Teochew-speaking charismatic but low-key individual in Mr Low. The WP’s ability to develop an enduring ‘brand’ over the 2006–2013 period surprised many commentators. By 2013 it had become Singapore’s second-strongest political force.
      Citation: Asian Journal of Comparative Politics
      PubDate: 2021-01-21T09:58:06Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2057891120988067
       
  • Thailand’s new right, social cleansing and the continuing
           military–monarchy entente

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      Authors: James Taylor
      Abstract: Asian Journal of Comparative Politics, Ahead of Print.
      The article looks at the nature of the state and society in contemporary Thailand using a comparative historical analysis. Thailand is led by an officer corps, faithful only to the monarchy regime, while the land is at the disposal of the absolute sovereign who unquestionably holds control over its terrain, resources and people. It is a mix of Siamese palingenetic ultranationalist sentiment with re-interpretations of a conservative Buddhist ideology which is based on the morality and right of the rulers to rule. To the military leaders, its general officers, the military–monarchy nexus embodies a supreme source of secular morality and power with the right to dominate and where the ends (always) justify the means. Thai society has become irreparably divided by the interests of the ruling elites, defining the exceptions and, it is argued, comparable to historical and contemporary authoritarian regimes elsewhere. The article argues that the country, led by the New Right, articulates disarming elements of semi-fascism under the military, in a compact with the interests of the monarchy.
      Citation: Asian Journal of Comparative Politics
      PubDate: 2021-01-06T03:46:37Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2057891120980835
       
  • Using process tracing to evaluate stakeholder disputes: The case of tender
           award dispute in Nepal’s forestry

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      Authors: Stuty Maskey
      Abstract: Asian Journal of Comparative Politics, Ahead of Print.
      In donor aid programs, the claims of causal links between inputs and outputs are crucial to establish the effectiveness of aid. As a result, there has been ample research on the degree and direction of correlation and causality between aid and poverty reduction. While evaluating end outcomes has its merits, this article aims to assess how some donor aid programs come under early criticism and/or are dropped or modified in order to ensure their continuation. This article examines a tender award dispute in a forestry program in Nepal, and traces the causal contribution of actors and actions that obstructed and changed the decisions related to the program implementation plan of this multi-million-dollar initiative. The article employs the process tracing method to search, collect, and assess evidence on the tender dispute case of the selected program. By tracing the logical sequence of evidence, this study establishes causality, linking the hypothesized causes and their effects to explain how the tender award decision that was announced by the lead donor and endorsed by the Government of Nepal was eventually nullified.
      Citation: Asian Journal of Comparative Politics
      PubDate: 2020-11-16T05:47:13Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2057891120970641
       
  • Why the rising China needs alliances

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      Authors: Muhammad Ali Baig
      Abstract: Asian Journal of Comparative Politics, Ahead of Print.
      Alliances remain at the heart of history, since they serve states in achieving geopolitical needs and securing grand strategic necessities. Apart from strategic considerations, the article aspires to highlight the psychological motivation for conceiving and forming alliances. It argues alliances to be the basic instrument in ensuring survival and elaborates the psychological efficacy and utility in employing the same device in gaining and sustaining the status of a functional great power. This article addresses the most significant development in modern times, i.e. rising China and its pursuit to become a pro-active great power, whilst greatly drawing from its strategic history in such endeavours. It explores the ‘China Threat’, and argues that China is likely to enter into alliances based on its geopolitical necessities by engaging its armed forces regionally, most likely in its near abroad. The article interprets China’s Belt and Road Initiative as a soft alliance and predicts the precursors of a military alliance.
      Citation: Asian Journal of Comparative Politics
      PubDate: 2020-10-21T10:59:18Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2057891120965712
       
  • Towards rule-based institutions and economic growth in Asia' Evidence
           from the Asian Financial Crisis 1997–1998

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      Authors: Kee Hoon Chung
      Abstract: Asian Journal of Comparative Politics, Ahead of Print.
      Due to the severity of the Asian Financial Crisis 1997–1998, South Korea, Indonesia, and Thailand resorted to an International Monetary Fund (IMF) bailout. In exchange, the IMF demanded a series of reforms intended to promote rule-based institutions generally found in advanced Western economies, such as the rule of law. Using panel data analysis from 1982 to 2007, we test empirically whether judicial independence, one of the more fundamental rule-based institutions, can positively explain the growth of these countries after the crisis, and find the impact of reforms to be limited. To understand why, we use South Korea as an example to show that top-down reforms by the government prevented a shift towards a rule-based economy. Due to the government selectively bailing out big businesses, big businesses that survived the crisis captured market shares once owned by the dissolved big businesses, becoming too powerful for the government to regulate. This research uses Soifer’s theoretical framework on critical junctures.
      Citation: Asian Journal of Comparative Politics
      PubDate: 2020-10-21T10:56:17Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2057891120962575
       
  • Perception of survival and overconfidence: The case of Najib Razak
           (2009–2018)

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      Authors: Eryan Ramadhani
      Abstract: Asian Journal of Comparative Politics, Ahead of Print.
      This article aims to examine political decision-making by focusing on how leaders’ motivation to maintain power affects their perception of political survival. Such motivation however is susceptible to judgment bias. Built on political psychology, accountability may help leaders improve their cognitive complexity or make them resort to cognitive shortcuts. Where leaders end up in the cognitive spectrum depends on the type of audiences to whom they feel accountable: core (i.e. ruling elites and loyal voters) and external (i.e. the opposition and its supporters) audiences. Preoccupation with the former may prompt leaders to downplay the latter’s challenges. Moreover, leaders’ understanding of their support base may be mistaken—that core audiences may shift their allegiance to the opposition. The result is overconfidence. Analysing Najib Razak’s leadership (2009–2018), I argue that Najib’s perception of survival stemmed from his perceived unwavering loyalty towards core audiences, invulnerability as the United Malays National Organisation (UMNO) standard-bearer and the weakness of the opposition. Unfortunately, his overconfidence resulted in Barisan Nasional’s (BN) defeat in GE14.
      Citation: Asian Journal of Comparative Politics
      PubDate: 2020-09-25T03:15:50Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2057891120959830
       
  • The Belt and Road Initiative (BRI) project legitimisation: The rhetor’s
           innovation and the US response

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      Authors: Tariq H Malik
      Abstract: Asian Journal of Comparative Politics, Ahead of Print.
      The Belt and Road Initiative (BRI) has attracted support and critique for its legitimacy and potential success. Its opponents see challenges more than prospects because of American inattention and resistance, and its proponents see prospects more than challenges because of the attention from the rest of the world. While both sides use valid reasons for their explicit or implicit views, they focus on the legitimacy by its taken-for-granted status. The BRI project as innovation is at the legitimisation process stage. To address the legitimisation of the BRI project innovation, we use rhetorical theory to analyse the Chinese official report in 2019, the American versus European media response to the BRI project and the US direct response to the BRI in the Indo-Pacific Strategy in 2019. Our exploratory findings show insights into the subjects, industries and regions. Firstly, the American media attention far exceeds the European media attention. Secondly, the American media attention and direct response to the BRI highlight the political issues, and the European media attention highlights economic issues. The Chinese official report mentions European countries, and excludes the USA. Thirdly, it uses Pakistan more frequently than other countries or regions in its achievement report, but the US has not mentioned Pakistan at all in its Indo-Pacific Strategy. Fourthly, the US political logic diverges from the logic of the BRI project, while the European economic logic converges to the logic of the BRI project. Based on these findings, we contribute to the legitimisation process of innovation, rhetorical theory and policy implications in the world.
      Citation: Asian Journal of Comparative Politics
      PubDate: 2020-09-23T10:30:57Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2057891120959476
       
  • Examining the importance of the Sino-Africa swap formula in creating
           backward and forward linkages

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      Authors: Ehizuelen Michael Mitchell Omoruyi
      Abstract: Asian Journal of Comparative Politics, Ahead of Print.
      African nations are trying to diversify their economies in order to induce industrialization that will help them eradicate poverty and create employment for their young workforce. One of the continent’s key challenges continues to be the shortage of physical infrastructure. Therefore, finding ways to overcome this problem has become of large importance. China has identified this and has thus enhanced its involvement in Africa primarily via its swap formula. The formula enables the financing and development of infrastructure that African nations critically need by depending on their resource wealth. However, the mounting involvement of the formula has continued to stimulate questions on its impact regarding creating backward and forward linkages. As such, one of the significant aims of this article is to identify linkages that emerge from the Chinese swap formula that involve long-term concessionary loans from China’s Exim Bank to finance major infrastructure projects in Africa. It examines whether the swap formula is creating backward and forward linkages in Africa, and what the infrastructure leads to concerning creating novel opportunities for the continent, by theoretically answering this question: “Can China’s swap formula create backward and forward linkages'” Furthermore, the article theoretically identifies the benefits and linkages of the formula via a case study – that of Abuja-Kaduna railway. Arguably, the article discovers that the formula has multiple benefits and linkages for Africa. It is also seen by the Chinese government as a way of fulfilling its strategic goals in Africa.
      Citation: Asian Journal of Comparative Politics
      PubDate: 2020-08-04T09:24:17Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2057891120938150
       
  • Frustration and motivation towards political participation in Muslim and
           non-Muslim young students in Pakistan

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      Authors: Muhammad Ayub Buzdar, Tahseen Fatima
      Abstract: Asian Journal of Comparative Politics, Ahead of Print.
      The socio-political conditions of Pakistan are not good for many religious and ethnic minority groups. This study explores the frustration and motivation of Muslim and non-Muslim young students around political participation in this environment. A survey research design was followed to achieve this objective. Seven-hundred secondary school students affiliated with Hindu, Christian, Muslim and Ahmadiyya communities participated in the study. A self-reported questionnaire was used to gauge the respondents’ political efficacy, attitude towards democracy and motivation for expected political participation in the country. The findings demonstrate students’ concerns, to varying extents, about the performance of political institutions in the country. The religious affiliations of the participants have significant influence on their motivation to contribute to political affairs. The results are alarming for a country with an uncertain democratic record for religious and ethnic minorities.
      Citation: Asian Journal of Comparative Politics
      PubDate: 2020-07-16T10:55:42Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2057891120941066
       
  • Assaults on capitalism and democratic backsliding: Evidence from Asia

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      Authors: Bruce Gilley
      Abstract: Asian Journal of Comparative Politics, Ahead of Print.
      It is generally assumed that stable democracies depend on sufficient economic freedoms that support ideas of individual independence and that shift resources from state to society. The growth and consolidation of economic freedoms under capitalism has been empirically linked to the growth and consolidation of democracy. Asia as a region has generally conformed to this theory, albeit with delayed democratic transitions due to the state-directed nature of development. This article revisits the capitalism/democracy relationship in East and Southeast Asia with a particular focus on contemporary concerns with global democratic backsliding. It shows the enduring analytic and empirical utility of capitalism to explain structural pressures on democratic development. It also shows how assaults on capitalism have predictive and descriptive value as indicators of authoritarian repression and democratic backsliding. The article highlights the continued relevance of capitalism for understanding democratic development, and underscores the significance of Asia to broader debates on democratic backsliding.
      Citation: Asian Journal of Comparative Politics
      PubDate: 2020-07-16T10:31:24Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2057891120938463
       
  • Populist political ideation and communication of gubernatorial candidates
           in Indonesia’s 2018 gubernatorial elections: Anti-establishment views,
           secular nationalism and Islamism as ideational-populist elements

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      Authors: Nyarwi Ahmad
      Abstract: Asian Journal of Comparative Politics, Ahead of Print.
      Populism has been evolving across the globe. Knowledge of the ways and degree to which political actors in Asian democracy exploited anti-establishment views, secular nationalism and Islamism as ideational elements when they established populist political communication strategies for local elections has, however, been under-developed. Focusing on such issues, this work selects gubernatorial candidates who ran in Indonesia’s 2018 gubernatorial elections as cases, using extracts from materials they posted on their Facebook pages. The findings are as follows. Candidates did not merely advocate anti-establishment views, but also adopted secular nationalism and Islamism as ideational-populist elements for developing populist political communication strategies. Those who exploited anti-economic elites favoured establishing secular nationalist and Islamic-based populist political communication strategies inclusively. Those who propagated anti-economic, anti-political and anti-bureaucratic elites instead greatly preferred advancing an Islamic populist political communication strategy. However, through employing such efforts, only few succeeded in these elections.
      Citation: Asian Journal of Comparative Politics
      PubDate: 2020-07-15T11:02:30Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2057891120931932
       
  • Ethnocentrism and support for nuclear armament in japan

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      Authors: Satoshi Machida
      Abstract: Asian Journal of Comparative Politics, Ahead of Print.
      The goal of this study is to examine factors determining Japanese citizens’ attitudes toward nuclear armament. Previous studies have suggested that Japanese citizens have been strongly opposed to the idea of nuclear armament. However, this study questions the robustness of the anti-nuclear stance among the Japanese population. More specifically, I contend that ethnocentric tendencies among Japanese citizens significantly boost their support for nuclear armament. The statistical analysis relying on the survey data in Japan verifies this hypothesis. Findings from this study are essential in understanding the current discourse surrounding nuclear armament in Japan. Dissecting the process through which Japanese citizens develop their attitudes toward nuclear weapons, this study significantly advances our understanding of Japan’s identity issues in the security arena.
      Citation: Asian Journal of Comparative Politics
      PubDate: 2020-07-09T10:41:52Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2057891120939314
       
  • Nationalism and national identity formation in Bangladesh: A colonial
           legacy behind the clash of language and religion

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      Authors: Bobby Hajjaj
      Abstract: Asian Journal of Comparative Politics, Ahead of Print.
      The nature of identity formation is complex. The production of identity in South Asia, with its colonial past, has been largely dependent on the region’s colonial history. In this article we chart the process of political identity formation in Bangladesh. We identify the various historical causes that led to the creation of each of the two types of identity prevalent today. These two divisive identities based on language and religion, one pitted against the other, each became the central platform of each of the two major political parties, the Awami League (AL) and the Bangladesh Nationalist Party (BNP). This disquisition shows clear patterns of political distress that resulted in the bifurcation of these two divisive political identities that ossified by the late 20th century due chiefly to the actions of the colonial government of the Raj.
      Citation: Asian Journal of Comparative Politics
      PubDate: 2020-07-09T10:40:35Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2057891120938145
       
  • Allocation of teachers among public schools and minimization of cost: The
           case of public education in Sri Lanka

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      Authors: Tikiri Nimal Herath
      Abstract: Asian Journal of Comparative Politics, Ahead of Print.
      Overall, in Sri Lankan public schools, the student–teacher ratio is very low. The number of teachers is considerably greater than the number of classes; sometimes the former is double or more than double the latter. In a school in which all the teachers are individually deployed in each class, many teachers have to remain idle. Thus, every day a certain number of teachers remain idle. This situation points to two issues. Firstly, in Sri Lankan public schools, resources are underutilized and hence costs are not minimized. Secondly, since there is an excess of teachers in schools, a formal and logical method is required to determine the optimal number of teachers. This article tries to develop a formula to determine the required number of teachers for a school, and thereby to find ways to minimize costs when employing teachers. Primary data on classes, teachers and subjects offered with respect to 40 public schools in the North Central Province were collected. When empirical data on the number of teachers in sampled schools were compared with calculated teacher requirements in terms of the developed formula, it was found that school authorities are underutilizing teachers. The article concludes that (a) based on the developed formula to determine the required number of teachers, many public schools have an excess of teachers and hence current transfer policy for school teachers is not logical, (b) teacher requirement can be decided according to the developed formula and (c) by adopting one teacher-two subjects-one school and one teacher-one subject-more schools models, government authorities can minimize costs further.
      Citation: Asian Journal of Comparative Politics
      PubDate: 2020-07-06T11:01:54Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2057891120935993
       
  • Why educated youth inclined toward extremism: A case of higher education
           institutes of Pakistan

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      Authors: Muhammad Ismail, Azmat Ali Shah, Kashif Saleem, Alveena Khan
      Abstract: Asian Journal of Comparative Politics, Ahead of Print.
      This article highlights the determinants leading to extremist behavior, i.e. the push and pull factors. The pull factors include: humanitarian causes; radical Islamic ideology; stipulation of a “purpose and mission”; propaganda through media; attraction to martyrdom; and misinterpretation of religious ideas by religious and non-religious extremists. The push factors are local conditions that force people to hold close the violent ideology of radical or extremist Islam. These comprise: local reaction against Americanization/globalization; lack of basic human rights; authoritarian/oppressive political systems; corruption/lack of meritocracy; high youth unemployment; state collapse; and porous borders. To investigate the causes of extremism in higher education institutes, Positivist philosophy (survey method) was adopted. A self-administered structured questionnaire was used to collect data from a sample of educated youth from all over Pakistan, collected via the probability sampling technique. It was revealed that ‘Promotion of Martyrdom’ was highly correlated with extremism, and contributed more than other variables to causing extremism.
      Citation: Asian Journal of Comparative Politics
      PubDate: 2020-06-05T10:47:02Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2057891120926567
       
  • India under Modi’s second term: Democratic resilience amidst
           illiberal impulses

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      Authors: Shalendra Sharma
      Abstract: Asian Journal of Comparative Politics, Ahead of Print.
      Almost all observers believed that India’s 2019 general election would result in a hung parliament and a coalition government. Yet, the election returned Prime Minister Narendra of the pro-Hindu Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP) to a second five-year term in office. The BJP not only increased its parliamentary majority, it also won seats in states and regions beyond the Hindi heartland. Indeed, Modi is the first prime minister since Indira Gandhi in 1971 to be reelected with a larger majority. What explains Modi’s spectacular electoral victory, and what does his victory bode for India’s representative democratic political order' Will India turn towards illiberalism as Modi tries to turn India into a Hindu majoritarian state' The following pages argue that such pessimism is unwarranted since India’s democracy is far more resilient, with built-in mechanisms against potential strongmen.
      Citation: Asian Journal of Comparative Politics
      PubDate: 2020-05-18T11:46:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2057891120926605
       
  • Vietnam: Increasing influence in South East Asian affairs

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      Authors: Thoi Nguyen
      Abstract: Asian Journal of Comparative Politics, Ahead of Print.
      Vietnam is an intriguing country. Its long history has been complicated by the rise and fall of different political formations and the vicissitudes of modern politics. After the Vietnam War ended in April 1975, the country was torn apart. The human, environmental and economic costs of the war had been overwhelming. Around 2.4 million people had died, mostly Vietnamese civilians, and thousands of Vietnamese had fled to new countries as refugees in search of a better life. The war caused a huge refugee crisis, with thousands of deaths at sea. Vietnam’s infrastructure – from roads to railways, buildings to bridges, and ports to power stations – was severely disrupted. However, Vietnam has changed significantly with the economic reform “Doi Moi” which was introduced in 1986. After the Soviet Union collapsed in December 1991, Vietnam lost its main supporter and the country faced a tough new challenge. Despite its difficulties, Vietnam has changed and grown as a political geographic centre in Asia, and its economy is growing significantly. Vietnam is a resilient country with over 97 million people, enjoying a rich cultural heritage. It has recently seen dramatic changes regarding climate change, the landscape, population, ruling powers, and politics. It is one of the countries in the world most vulnerable to climate change, and has adopted solutions to deal with this. This article will examine Vietnam’s foreign policy, and show how the country has played a key role in complex international events in Asia since its political and economic reforms. It will examine what has happened in Vietnam in recent years, how its climate attracts foreigners both as tourists and as investors, and the challenges and issues affecting the country.
      Citation: Asian Journal of Comparative Politics
      PubDate: 2020-05-05T11:41:29Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2057891119898758
       
  • How does clientelism foster electoral dominance' Evidence from Turkey

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      Authors: Düzgün Arslantaş, Şenol Arslantaş
      Abstract: Asian Journal of Comparative Politics, Ahead of Print.
      This article reveals how the AKP’s use of clientelism contributes to its electoral dominance. It does so by examining the features and actors as well as the structure of the clientelist network. The arguments are based on fieldwork in one of the poorest and most densely populated districts of Bağcılar, where in the 2015 legislative elections the AKP achieved more votes than in any other district in Istanbul.
      Citation: Asian Journal of Comparative Politics
      PubDate: 2020-04-22T09:55:54Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2057891120920718
       
  • Political investors: Political elite oligarchy and mastery of regional
           resources in Indonesia

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      Authors: Mohammad Hidayaturrahman, Bonaventura Ngarawula, Kridawati Sadhana
      Abstract: Asian Journal of Comparative Politics, Ahead of Print.
      The political investors in the regional head election in Indonesia are an interesting phenomenon to be studied, as not all candidates for regional head, whether governors, regents, or mayors, have the capital to financially support their candidacy. Meanwhile, the nomination fee from has been increasing. For instance, in one of the regencies in Indonesia, the cost has reached 30 billion rupiah. This provides opportunities for regional head candidates to be financed by other people or business groups, known as political investors. This research was conducted to determine the extended role of political investors in regional head elections. This descriptive qualitative research collected data through in-depth interviews and observations as well as online and paper documents. The results showed that political investors play an essential role in enabling regional head candidates to win, and that they in turn benefited from the elections.
      Citation: Asian Journal of Comparative Politics
      PubDate: 2020-04-20T05:23:02Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2057891120917213
       
  • The Forum on China–Africa Cooperation (FOCAC) and knowledge transfer in
           Sino-Nigerian development cooperation

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      Authors: Vincent Ibonye
      Abstract: Asian Journal of Comparative Politics, Ahead of Print.
      States always trade across and explore opportunities for relevant information on reforms capable of responding to progressive demands of domestic growth and national development. Presently, the traditional development landscape has expanded to include new actors not only devising new development models but also providing a variegated supply of developmental know-how in support of global prosperity – one of the most visible case studies being China’s South–South-based cooperation with Africa via the Forum on China–Africa Cooperation (FOCAC). In their development cooperation, FOCAC-based initiatives posture to bridge inequality and disparity between both sides often through the transfer of knowledge. Regarding this, the Forum employs knowledge sharing as a combination of capacity development initiatives in the form of training and educational, technical, human capacity-building and human resource development, including technology cooperation. However, citing marginal impact on industrialization processes of African countries, sceptics maintain that FOCAC’s trail in the so-called ‘second continent’ translates as a systematic imposition of a Beijing-centric paradigm of globalization. Notwithstanding, given the promise of cross-cultural cooperation in knowledge production, rather than succumb to monocausal critiques on sub-optimal development assistance, this article evaluates the prospects of Nigeria capitalizing on China’s stock of development know-how more strategically.
      Citation: Asian Journal of Comparative Politics
      PubDate: 2020-04-13T11:36:03Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2057891120912333
       
  • The role of emotions in interstate relations: Using an interpersonal
           conflict model to reconceptualize Pakistan’s obsession vis-a-vis India

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      Authors: Jawad Kadir, Majida Jawad
      Abstract: Asian Journal of Comparative Politics, Ahead of Print.
      Despite use of terms such as “siblings” or “brothers from the same mother (India)”, there have been few or no attempts to explain the wide-ranging sentiments associated with India-Pakistan rivalry from a theoretical perspective. A cross-disciplinary approach has been employed in this article to re-examine and reconceptualize the existing landscape of Pakistan-India conflict. An interpersonal conflict model has been used to theorize the emotions found in their bilateral relations which have often been neglected or marginalized while studying their obsessive rivalry with each other. Despite testing the troublesome dyad of these nation-states on diametrically opposite ethnic or religious grounds, this article categorizes Pakistan and India as former family members who parted ways in 1947. The article explains different phases of an interpersonal conflict model and clarifies how the emotional climate associated with these phases could be transposed to intergroup and interstate levels of conflicts between communities who lived together for centuries, and engage them in a perpetual rivalry.
      Citation: Asian Journal of Comparative Politics
      PubDate: 2020-04-01T11:24:59Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2057891119900651
       
  • Genetic engineering and social justice: A reflection on Amartya
           Sen’s capability approach

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      Authors: Gerry F Arambala
      Abstract: Asian Journal of Comparative Politics, Ahead of Print.
      Over the past decades, biomedical researchers have made great progress in finding the treatment for many diseases which have been considered in the past as incurable. The struggle for longevity and positive health has been addressed by medical science. People who can afford it are assured by the promise of genetic engineering. But while there has been considerable development in the treatment of diseases, the number of mortalities in poor countries remains high, especially in Sub-Saharan Africa and East Asia. Around 8 million people die each year worldwide due to poverty-related health issues. Despite the advancement in the treatment of diseases, poor people in most of the developing countries worldwide are dying each year. This article will argue that human poverty and the existence of infectious diseases are inseparable social phenomena that affect the fate of the poor in developing countries. Following Amartya Sen, this article will argue that access to advanced health care services should be affordable to all, and should form part of individual freedoms that the national policies of a country must secure.
      Citation: Asian Journal of Comparative Politics
      PubDate: 2020-03-24T10:45:38Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2057891120907683
       
  • President Duterte’s bicephalous leadership: Populist at home –
           pragmatic abroad

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      Authors: Christine B Tenorio, Patrik K Meyer, Achmad Nurmandi
      Abstract: Asian Journal of Comparative Politics, Ahead of Print.
      Rodrigo Duterte won the Philippines’ 2016 presidential elections thanks to a well-orchestrated campaign and his populist appeal among Filipinos. Soon after he assumed the presidency, he surprised and upset most of his domestic and western international audiences by pragmatically rejecting the pro-Western approach followed by the previous Aquino administration and adopting a China-friendly one. Adopting Critical Discourse Analysis, this research reveals President Duterte’s bicephalous leadership: populist in domestic policies, and pragmatic but unpopular in foreign relations. To qualitatively describe the dichotomy between the populist and pragmatic nature of Duterte’s leadership, this article surveys the Philippines’ mainstream media from 2016 to 2019. Furthermore, this analysis shows that Duterte is using a defensive neorealist approach in building Philippines-China relations and that Filipinos are willing to consider China as a constructive partner for their country.
      Citation: Asian Journal of Comparative Politics
      PubDate: 2020-03-19T10:17:11Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2057891120912008
       
  • Religion, nationalism, and gender: Perspective from South Asia

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      Authors: Nandini Deo
      Abstract: Asian Journal of Comparative Politics, Ahead of Print.
      Religious mobilization often takes the form of engagement with “the woman question”: how should women as carriers of culture comport themselves' This article shows that many of the debates over the role of women and religion in South Asia are misunderstood when they are seen as instances of religious fundamentalism. Rather, the theoretical framework to make sense of public religion and gender debates should be through the lens of postcolonial nationalism. The creation and consolidation of the nation is what is at stake—not the creation of the religious community as such. In order to make this argument, the article offers both a review of the literature on secularism and gender as well as short case studies from India, Pakistan, and Sri Lanka. These three former British colonies have each struggled to arrive at a secular settlement and often the contestation over the place of religion has centered on the rules and roles of women in these societies.
      Citation: Asian Journal of Comparative Politics
      PubDate: 2020-03-18T10:59:32Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2057891119898523
       
  • The rise and fall of movement for change in the Kurdistan region of Iraq
           (2009–2018)

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      Authors: Hawre Hasan Hama
      Abstract: Asian Journal of Comparative Politics, Ahead of Print.
      The Change Movement, also known in Kurdish as Gorran, was founded in 2009 to address the political demands of some parts of the public in the Kurdistan Region of Iraq (KRI) for political and economic reform. Corruption, lack of transparency in government and financial affairs revenue and expenditure, the lack of legitimate and effective institutions, the existence of political party interference in all sectors of society, and the power-sharing agreement between the Patriotic Union of Kurdistan (PUK) and the Kurdistan Democratic Party (KDP) had all contributed to widespread feelings of discontent among members of the public. Gorran took advantage of these feelings of disenfranchisement to demand a complete change in the political structure that had been built by the KDP and the PUK in the Region. Using this message, Gorran’s first election as an organized party in 2009 saw it become the second biggest political force in the Kurdistan Region and the biggest political party in the PUK’s traditional stronghold in Sulaymaniyah and the Garmian area. This research divides the Gorran Movement’s performance and effectiveness into three primary stages: (1) the opposition stage, which can be described as Gorran’s golden period; (2) the government participation stage after 2013, which can be described as the Movement’s period of weakness; and (3) the post-Nawshirwan Mustafa stage, which can be described as the Gorran Movement’s period of political exhaustion. The central argument of this research is that the Gorran Movement’s fundamental problem is that it became a part of the very structure that it had for many years campaigned against and is no longer a catalyst for reform.
      Citation: Asian Journal of Comparative Politics
      PubDate: 2020-03-12T10:07:42Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2057891120905902
       
  • Public trust in state governments in India: Who are more confident and
           what makes them confident about the government'

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      Authors: Deepak Kumar, Bhanu Pratap, Archana Aggarwal
      Abstract: Asian Journal of Comparative Politics, Ahead of Print.
      Public trust in government is crucial for good governance, encompassing economic and social development of the region in a representative democratic setup. This study uses India Human Development Survey (2004–2005 and 2011–2012) data to examine the changing pattern of household confidence in state governments in India. Using a logit model analysis, we examine how the level of household confidence in the state government changes with households’ socioeconomic status, personal experiences, and benefits received from government programs and direct social benefit schemes. We find that households with a low socioeconomic status (such as Scheduled Castes/Scheduled Tribes, and low-income and less educated households) are more likely to trust the state government. In addition, households that have had a positive experience or have received benefits from a government program and/or social scheme are more likely to exhibit high levels of trust in the state government. We also find that residents of less developed states are more likely to have high levels of trust in their state government than residents of highly developed states.
      Citation: Asian Journal of Comparative Politics
      PubDate: 2020-02-07T02:11:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2057891119898763
       
  • Decentralization, participation, devolution and infrastructure development
           in rural areas: A case study of district Bhakkar, Pakistan

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      Authors: Mumtaz Hussain, Muhammad Ismail
      Abstract: Asian Journal of Comparative Politics, Ahead of Print.
      This article highlights the role of decentralization and participation in democratic countries. Decentralization is a significant political process that enhances society’s enjoyment of the fruits of democracy and helps in developing basic infrastructure, and many regions accept these concepts. Statistical techniques were employed through SPSS on data collected yearly between 2001 and 2005 to draw the outcomes. The findings showed a significant and positive impact of decentralization and participation on rural and urban communities and infrastructure development. This study has great importance for the policy making of district, provincial and central governments.
      Citation: Asian Journal of Comparative Politics
      PubDate: 2020-01-30T11:18:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2057891119900674
       
  • Deliberation about the 2014 Umbrella Movement in a Hong Kong elite
           newspaper: A quantitative study of the Hong Kong Economic Journal

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      Authors: Waikeung Tam
      Abstract: Asian Journal of Comparative Politics, Ahead of Print.
      Deliberative democratic theorists have argued that effective deliberation is central to democracy. Does Hong Kong possess a viable public sphere for deliberating important public issues, as the city has been striving for a full democracy since the 1980s' This article addresses this significant question by examining the quality of deliberation on the 2014 Umbrella Movement by the editorials and commentaries in an elite print Chinese newspaper – the Hong Kong Economic Journal – based on the “Discourse Quality Index” and other criteria used by major works on mediated deliberation. This article argues that the Journal has served as a viable public sphere for deliberating important public concerns in Hong Kong. The Journal’s editorials and commentaries performed well in terms of offering reasoned arguments and engaging in dialogue with opposing viewpoints. Regarding respect for the actors which were involved in the Umbrella Movement, the Journal as a whole had maintained a civilized tone. However, there was an indication that commentary authors had less tolerance toward actors from the opposite camps.
      Citation: Asian Journal of Comparative Politics
      PubDate: 2020-01-21T03:53:54Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2057891119898524
       
  • Transforming the East Asian developmental state: Democratic mobilisation
           and the role of the middle class

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      Authors: Tian He
      Abstract: Asian Journal of Comparative Politics, Ahead of Print.
      Many studies have noted the reduction in the effectiveness of the East Asian developmental state in formulating growth-promoting policy in South Korea and Taiwan. Current literature attributes the transformation of the developmental state model to the rise of business elites and organised labour. This article argues that another type of social actor – the middle class – also contributed to the state’s reduced capability in directing economic development. Unlike business elites and organised labour who directly challenge the state’s policy decision, the middle class forces East Asian ruling elites to democratise the political system of a country. The democratic transition pushed by the middle class consequently facilitates the emergence of policy constraints on the state’s economic decision-making process. I elaborate this argument in the two divergent cases: the transformation of the developmental state in South Korea and the non-transformation of the developmental state in Singapore.
      Citation: Asian Journal of Comparative Politics
      PubDate: 2020-01-06T10:32:30Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2057891119897854
       
 
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