Publisher: Sage Publications   (Total: 1166 journals)

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Showing 1 - 200 of 1166 Journals sorted alphabetically
AADE in Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Abstracts in Anthropology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 29)
Academic Pathology     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Accounting History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18, SJR: 0.527, CiteScore: 1)
Acta Radiologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.754, CiteScore: 2)
Acta Radiologica Open     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Acta Sociologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39, SJR: 0.939, CiteScore: 2)
Action Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 53, SJR: 0.308, CiteScore: 1)
Active Learning in Higher Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 398, SJR: 1.397, CiteScore: 2)
Adaptive Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.288, CiteScore: 1)
Administration & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18, SJR: 0.675, CiteScore: 1)
Adoption & Fostering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25, SJR: 0.313, CiteScore: 0)
Adsorption Science & Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.258, CiteScore: 1)
Adult Education Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 262, SJR: 0.566, CiteScore: 2)
Adult Learning     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 51)
Advances in Dental Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 1.791, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Developing Human Resources     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35, SJR: 0.614, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Mechanical Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 156, SJR: 0.272, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Methods and Practices in Psychological Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20)
Advances in Structural Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 51, SJR: 0.599, CiteScore: 1)
AERA Open     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
Affilia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.496, CiteScore: 1)
Africa Spectrum     Open Access   (Followers: 17)
Agrarian South : J. of Political Economy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Air, Soil & Water Research     Open Access   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.214, CiteScore: 1)
Alexandria : The J. of National and Intl. Library and Information Issues     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 68)
Allergy & Rhinology     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
AlterNative : An Intl. J. of Indigenous Peoples     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 39, SJR: 0.194, CiteScore: 0)
Alternative Law J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.176, CiteScore: 0)
Alternatives : Global, Local, Political     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.351, CiteScore: 1)
Alternatives to Laboratory Animals     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.297, CiteScore: 1)
American Behavioral Scientist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26, SJR: 0.982, CiteScore: 2)
American Economist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
American Educational Research J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 260, SJR: 2.913, CiteScore: 3)
American J. of Alzheimer's Disease and Other Dementias     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23, SJR: 0.67, CiteScore: 2)
American J. of Cosmetic Surgery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
American J. of Evaluation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18, SJR: 0.646, CiteScore: 2)
American J. of Health Promotion     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35, SJR: 0.807, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Hospice and Palliative Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 47, SJR: 0.65, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Law & Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.204, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Lifestyle Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.431, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Medical Quality     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.777, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Men's Health     Open Access   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.595, CiteScore: 2)
American J. of Rhinology and Allergy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.972, CiteScore: 2)
American J. of Sports Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 249, SJR: 3.949, CiteScore: 6)
American Politics Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 36, SJR: 1.313, CiteScore: 1)
American Review of Public Administration     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28, SJR: 2.062, CiteScore: 2)
American Sociological Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 358, SJR: 6.333, CiteScore: 6)
American String Teacher     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Analytical Chemistry Insights     Open Access   (Followers: 26, SJR: 0.224, CiteScore: 1)
Angiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.849, CiteScore: 2)
Animation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.197, CiteScore: 0)
Annals of Clinical Biochemistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.634, CiteScore: 1)
Annals of Otology, Rhinology & Laryngology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20, SJR: 0.807, CiteScore: 1)
Annals of Pharmacotherapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 59, SJR: 1.096, CiteScore: 2)
Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 51, SJR: 1.225, CiteScore: 3)
Annals of the ICRP     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.548, CiteScore: 1)
Anthropocene Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 3.341, CiteScore: 7)
Anthropological Theory     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 48, SJR: 0.739, CiteScore: 1)
Antitrust Bulletin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Antiviral Chemistry and Chemotherapy     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.635, CiteScore: 2)
Antyajaa : Indian J. of Women and Social Change     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Applied Biosafety     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.131, CiteScore: 0)
Applied Psychological Measurement     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21, SJR: 1.17, CiteScore: 1)
Applied Spectroscopy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 27, SJR: 0.489, CiteScore: 2)
Armed Forces & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25, SJR: 0.29, CiteScore: 1)
Arthaniti : J. of Economic Theory and Practice     Full-text available via subscription  
Arts and Humanities in Higher Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 49, SJR: 0.305, CiteScore: 1)
Asia Pacific Media Educator     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.23, CiteScore: 0)
Asia-Pacific J. of Management Research and Innovation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Asia-Pacific J. of Public Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.558, CiteScore: 1)
Asia-Pacific J. of Rural Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Asian and Pacific Migration J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.324, CiteScore: 1)
Asian Cardiovascular and Thoracic Annals     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.305, CiteScore: 0)
Asian J. of Comparative Politics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Asian J. of Legal Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Asian J. of Management Cases     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.101, CiteScore: 0)
ASN Neuro     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 1.534, CiteScore: 3)
Assessment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19, SJR: 1.519, CiteScore: 3)
Assessment for Effective Intervention     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.578, CiteScore: 1)
Australasian J. of Early Childhood     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.535, CiteScore: 1)
Australasian Psychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18, SJR: 0.433, CiteScore: 1)
Australian & New Zealand J. of Psychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30, SJR: 1.801, CiteScore: 2)
Australian and New Zealand J. of Criminology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 547, SJR: 0.612, CiteScore: 1)
Australian J. of Career Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Australian J. of Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 51, SJR: 0.403, CiteScore: 1)
Australian J. of Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.497, CiteScore: 1)
Autism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 358, SJR: 1.739, CiteScore: 4)
Autism & Developmental Language Impairments     Open Access   (Followers: 17)
Avian Biology Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.401, CiteScore: 1)
Behavior Modification     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.877, CiteScore: 2)
Behavioral and Cognitive Neuroscience Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Behavioral Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Beyond Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Bible Translator     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Biblical Theology Bulletin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24, SJR: 0.184, CiteScore: 0)
Big Data & Society     Open Access   (Followers: 55)
Biochemistry Insights     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Bioinformatics and Biology Insights     Open Access   (Followers: 12, SJR: 1.141, CiteScore: 2)
Biological Research for Nursing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.685, CiteScore: 2)
Biomarker Insights     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.81, CiteScore: 2)
Biomarkers in Cancer     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Biomedical Engineering and Computational Biology     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
Biomedical Informatics Insights     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Bioscope: South Asian Screen Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.235, CiteScore: 0)
BMS: Bulletin of Sociological Methodology/Bulletin de Méthodologie Sociologique     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.226, CiteScore: 0)
Body & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29, SJR: 1.531, CiteScore: 3)
Bone and Tissue Regeneration Insights     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Brain and Neuroscience Advances     Open Access  
Brain Science Advances     Open Access  
Breast Cancer : Basic and Clinical Research     Open Access   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.823, CiteScore: 2)
British J. of Music Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
British J. of Occupational Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 253, SJR: 0.323, CiteScore: 1)
British J. of Pain     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31, SJR: 0.579, CiteScore: 2)
British J. of Politics and Intl. Relations     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39, SJR: 0.91, CiteScore: 2)
British J. of Visual Impairment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.337, CiteScore: 1)
British J.ism Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
BRQ Business Review Quarterly     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Building Acoustics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.215, CiteScore: 1)
Building Services Engineering Research & Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.583, CiteScore: 1)
Bulletin of Science, Technology & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Business & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Business and Professional Communication Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.348, CiteScore: 1)
Business Information Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17, SJR: 0.279, CiteScore: 0)
Business Perspectives and Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Cahiers Élisabéthains     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.111, CiteScore: 0)
Calcutta Statistical Association Bulletin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
California Management Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 37, SJR: 2.209, CiteScore: 4)
Canadian Association of Radiologists J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.463, CiteScore: 1)
Canadian J. of Kidney Health and Disease     Open Access   (Followers: 8, SJR: 1.007, CiteScore: 2)
Canadian J. of Nursing Research (CJNR)     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Canadian J. of Occupational Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 168, SJR: 0.626, CiteScore: 1)
Canadian J. of Psychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28, SJR: 1.769, CiteScore: 3)
Canadian J. of School Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.266, CiteScore: 1)
Canadian Pharmacists J. / Revue des Pharmaciens du Canada     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.536, CiteScore: 1)
Cancer Control     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Cancer Growth and Metastasis     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Cancer Informatics     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.64, CiteScore: 1)
Capital and Class     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.282, CiteScore: 1)
Cardiac Cath Lab Director     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Cardiovascular and Thoracic Open     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Career Development and Transition for Exceptional Individuals     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.44, CiteScore: 1)
Cartilage     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.889, CiteScore: 3)
Cell Transplantation     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 1.023, CiteScore: 3)
Cephalalgia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 1.581, CiteScore: 3)
Cephalalgia Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Child Language Teaching and Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34, SJR: 0.501, CiteScore: 1)
Child Maltreatment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 1.22, CiteScore: 3)
Child Neurology Open     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Childhood     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19, SJR: 0.894, CiteScore: 2)
Childhood Obesity and Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
China Information     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.767, CiteScore: 2)
China Report     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.221, CiteScore: 0)
Chinese J. of Sociology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Christian Education J. : Research on Educational Ministry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Chronic Illness     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.672, CiteScore: 2)
Chronic Respiratory Disease     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.808, CiteScore: 2)
Chronic Stress     Open Access  
Citizenship, Social and Economics Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.145, CiteScore: 0)
Cleft Palate-Craniofacial J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.757, CiteScore: 1)
Clin-Alert     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Clinical and Applied Thrombosis/Hemostasis     Open Access   (Followers: 32, SJR: 0.49, CiteScore: 1)
Clinical and Translational Neuroscience     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Clinical Case Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.364, CiteScore: 1)
Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 45, SJR: 0.73, CiteScore: 2)
Clinical EEG and Neuroscience     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.552, CiteScore: 2)
Clinical Ethics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.296, CiteScore: 1)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Arthritis and Musculoskeletal Disorders     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.537, CiteScore: 2)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Blood Disorders     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.314, CiteScore: 2)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Cardiology     Open Access   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.686, CiteScore: 2)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Case Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.283, CiteScore: 1)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Circulatory, Respiratory and Pulmonary Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.425, CiteScore: 2)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Ear, Nose and Throat     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Endocrinology and Diabetes     Open Access   (Followers: 34, SJR: 0.63, CiteScore: 2)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Oncology     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 1.129, CiteScore: 3)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Pediatrics     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Psychiatry     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Reproductive Health     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.776, CiteScore: 0)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Therapeutics     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.172, CiteScore: 0)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Trauma and Intensive Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Women's Health     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Clinical Nursing Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34, SJR: 0.471, CiteScore: 1)
Clinical Pathology     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Clinical Pediatrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25, SJR: 0.487, CiteScore: 1)
Clinical Psychological Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16, SJR: 3.281, CiteScore: 5)
Clinical Rehabilitation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 78, SJR: 1.322, CiteScore: 3)
Clinical Risk     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.133, CiteScore: 0)
Clinical Trials     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22, SJR: 2.399, CiteScore: 2)
Clothing and Textiles Research J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28, SJR: 0.36, CiteScore: 1)
Collections : A J. for Museum and Archives Professionals     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Common Law World Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Communication & Sport     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.385, CiteScore: 1)
Communication and the Public     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Communication Disorders Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.458, CiteScore: 1)
Communication Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24, SJR: 2.171, CiteScore: 3)
Community College Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 1.451, CiteScore: 1)
Comparative Political Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 293, SJR: 3.772, CiteScore: 3)
Compensation & Benefits Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Competition & Change     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.843, CiteScore: 2)

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Similar Journals
Journal Cover
American Journal of Health Promotion
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.807
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 35  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0890-1171 - ISSN (Online) 2168-6602
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1166 journals]
  • In Briefs

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Pages: 887 - 892
      Abstract: American Journal of Health Promotion, Volume 35, Issue 7, Page 887-892, September 2021.

      Citation: American Journal of Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2021-08-05T03:31:30Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08901171211032476
      Issue No: Vol. 35, No. 7 (2021)
       
  • Knowing Well, Being Well: well-being born of understanding: The Science of
           Teamwork

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Sara S. Johnson, Megan Sowa, Rachael McCann, Steven A. Cohen, Caitlin C. Nash, Mary L. Greaney, Rebekah Azaylia Alexander, Jessica Kasten, Matthew P. Martin, Mindy L. McEntee, Yash Suri, Courtney Roman, Scott Bane, Emma Opthof
      Pages: 1028 - 1047
      Abstract: American Journal of Health Promotion, Volume 35, Issue 7, Page 1028-1047, September 2021.

      Citation: American Journal of Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2021-08-05T03:34:08Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08901171211030142
      Issue No: Vol. 35, No. 7 (2021)
       
  • Addressing the Caregiving Crisis: The Roles for Employers and Policy
           Makers

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Sara S. Johnson
      Pages: 1028 - 1029
      Abstract: American Journal of Health Promotion, Volume 35, Issue 7, Page 1028-1029, September 2021.

      Citation: American Journal of Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2021-08-05T03:28:04Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08901171211030142a
      Issue No: Vol. 35, No. 7 (2021)
       
  • No Budget for Caregiver Support' Employers Can Consider Linkages With
           DEI and Mental Health to Retain Talent

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Megan Sowa, Rachael McCann
      Pages: 1029 - 1032
      Abstract: American Journal of Health Promotion, Volume 35, Issue 7, Page 1029-1032, September 2021.

      Citation: American Journal of Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2021-08-05T03:29:09Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08901171211030142b
      Issue No: Vol. 35, No. 7 (2021)
       
  • Informal Caregiving During the COVID-19 Pandemic in the US: Background,
           Challenges, and Opportunities

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Steven A. Cohen, Caitlin C. Nash, Mary L. Greaney
      Pages: 1032 - 1036
      Abstract: American Journal of Health Promotion, Volume 35, Issue 7, Page 1032-1036, September 2021.

      Citation: American Journal of Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2021-08-05T03:29:10Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08901171211030142c
      Issue No: Vol. 35, No. 7 (2021)
       
  • Caregiving in the Age of COVID— Institutionalizing Seniors Doesn’t
           Work: Increasing Home and Community-Based Services Is a Necessary Response
           to the Crisis

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Rebekah Azaylia Alexander
      Pages: 1036 - 1038
      Abstract: American Journal of Health Promotion, Volume 35, Issue 7, Page 1036-1038, September 2021.

      Citation: American Journal of Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2021-08-05T03:29:11Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08901171211030142d
      Issue No: Vol. 35, No. 7 (2021)
       
  • Assessment of Family Caregivers’ Needs: What Employers Need to Know

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Jessica Kasten
      Pages: 1038 - 1041
      Abstract: American Journal of Health Promotion, Volume 35, Issue 7, Page 1038-1041, September 2021.

      Citation: American Journal of Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2021-08-05T03:29:10Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08901171211030142e
      Issue No: Vol. 35, No. 7 (2021)
       
  • Caregiver Quality of Life: How to Measure It and Why

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Matthew P. Martin, Mindy L. McEntee, Yash Suri
      Pages: 1042 - 1045
      Abstract: American Journal of Health Promotion, Volume 35, Issue 7, Page 1042-1045, September 2021.

      Citation: American Journal of Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2021-08-05T03:29:10Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08901171211030142f
      Issue No: Vol. 35, No. 7 (2021)
       
  • How Employers and States Can Support the Essential Workforce of Family
           Caregivers

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Courtney Roman, Scott Bane, Emma Opthof
      Pages: 1045 - 1047
      Abstract: American Journal of Health Promotion, Volume 35, Issue 7, Page 1045-1047, September 2021.

      Citation: American Journal of Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2021-08-05T03:29:27Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08901171211030142g
      Issue No: Vol. 35, No. 7 (2021)
       
  • Shifts in Health Behaviors Amid the COVID-19 Pandemic

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Rachel Mosher Henke
      Abstract: American Journal of Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: American Journal of Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2021-10-19T01:20:20Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08901171211055310
       
  • Leveraging Health Risk Assessment Data to Describe Changes in Health
           Behaviors Associated With the COVID-19 Global Pandemic

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Tyler Amell
      Abstract: American Journal of Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: American Journal of Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2021-10-16T04:24:58Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08901171211055311
       
  • Opportunities to Integrate Mobile App–Based Interventions Into Mental
           Health and Substance Use Disorder Treatment Services in the Wake of
           COVID-19

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Derek D. Satre, Meredith C. Meacham, Lauren D. Asarnow, Weston S. Fisher, Lisa R. Fortuna, Esti Iturralde
      Abstract: American Journal of Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.
      The COVID-19 pandemic has heightened concerns about the impact of depression, anxiety, alcohol, and drug use on public health. Mobile apps to address these problems were increasingly popular even before the pandemic, and may help reach people who otherwise have limited treatment access. In this review, we describe pandemic-related substance use and mental health problems, the growing evidence for mobile app efficacy, how health systems can integrate apps into patient care, and future research directions. If equity in access and effective implementation can be addressed, mobile apps are likely to play an important role in mental health and substance use disorder treatment.
      Citation: American Journal of Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2021-10-15T07:04:57Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08901171211055314
       
  • Promoting and Protecting Mental Health: A Delphi Consensus Study for
           Actionable Public Mental Health Messages

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Josefien J. F. Breedvelt, Jade Yap, Dorien D. Eising, David D. Ebert, Filip Smit, Lucy Thorpe, Antonis A. Kousoulis
      Abstract: American Journal of Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose:Public health campaigns are still relatively rare in mental health. This paper aims to find consensus on the preventive self-management actions (i.e. “healthy behaviors”) for common mental health problems (e.g. depression and anxiety) that should be recommended in mental health campaigns directed at the general public.Approach:A 3-round Delphi studyParticipants:23 international experts in mental health and 1447 members of the public, most of whom had lived experience of mental health problems.Method:The modified Delphi study combined quantitative and qualitative data collection: 1) online qualitative survey data collection thematically analyzed, 2) recommendations rated for consensus, 3) consensus items rated by public panel on a Likert scale.Results:Expert consensus was reached on 15 behaviors that individuals can engage in to sustain mental health. Eight were rated as appropriate by more than half (50%) of the public panel, including: avoiding illicit drugs (80%, n = 1154), reducing debt (72%, n = 1043), improving sleep (69%, n = 1000), regulating mood (65%, n = 941), having things to look forward to (60%, n = 869).Conclusions:A series of healthy behaviors for the promotion and protection of mental health received expert and public consensus. To our knowledge, this is the first study to offer a set of actions for public health messaging for the prevention of poor mental health. Future research should focus on evaluating effectiveness of these actions in a universal primary prevention context.
      Citation: American Journal of Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2021-09-24T12:39:13Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0890117121998536
       
  • Revitalizing HIV Prevention Programs: Recommendations From Those Most
           Impacted by the HIV in the Deep South

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      Authors: Michelle S. Williams, Tonia Poteat, Melverta Bender, Precious Ugwu, Paul A. Burns
      Abstract: American Journal of Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose:The incidence of new HIV infections is disproportionately high among Black men who have sex with men (BMSM) in Mississippi. Community-based organizations received funding through the ACCELERATE! initiative to implement interventions aimed at increasing BMSM’s access to HIV prevention, treatment and care interventions.Approach:We conducted a mixed methods evaluation of the ACCELERATE! initiative to assess its impact. We also explored factors that act as barriers to and facilitators of BMSM’s engagement in HIV prevention interventions.Setting:Interviews were conducted between July 2018 and February 2020.Participants:Thirty-six BMSM and 13 non-grantee key informants who worked in the field of HIV in Mississippi participated.Method:The qualitative data from the interview transcripts was analyzed using an iterative, inductive coding process.Results:We identified 10 key recommendations that were most common across all participants and that were aligned with UNAIDS Global AIDS Strategy strategic priorities. Several recommendations address the reduction of HIV- and LGBT-stigma. Two of the most common recommendations were to increase representation of the target population in health promotion program leadership and to include HIV with other Black health issues in community-based health education programs rather than singling it out. Another recommendation called for programs aimed at addressing underlying factors associated with HIV-risk behaviors, such as mental illness.Conclusion:Our results indicate that HIV education interventions in the Deep South need to be revitalized to enhance their reach and effectiveness.
      Citation: American Journal of Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2021-08-19T09:32:39Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08901171211041097
       
  • Sense of Purpose in Life and Subsequent Physical, Behavioral, and
           Psychosocial Health: An Outcome-Wide Approach

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      Authors: Eric S. Kim, Ying Chen, Julia S. Nakamura, Carol D. Ryff, Tyler J. VanderWeele
      Abstract: American Journal of Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose:Growing evidence indicates that a higher sense of purpose in life (purpose) is associated with reduced risk of chronic diseases and mortality. However, epidemiological studies have not evaluated if change in purpose is associated with subsequent health and well-being outcomes.Design:We evaluated if positive change in purpose (between t0; 2006/2008 and t1;2010/2012) was associated with better outcomes on 35 indicators of physical health, health behaviors, and psychosocial well-being (at t2;2014/2016).Sample:We used data from 12,998 participants in the Health and Retirement study—a prospective and nationally representative cohort of U.S. adults aged>50.Analysis:We conducted multiple linear-, logistic-, and generalized linear regressions.Results:Over the 4-year follow-up period, people with the highest (versus lowest) purpose had better subsequent physical health outcomes (e.g., 46% reduced risk of mortality (95% CI [0.44, 0.66])), health behaviors (e.g., 13% reduced risk of sleep problems (95% CI [0.77, 0.99])), and psychosocial outcomes (e.g., higher optimism (β = 0.41, 95% CI [0.35, 0.47]), 43% reduced risk of depression (95% CI [0.46, 0.69]), lower loneliness (β = −0.35, 95% CI [−0.41, −0.29])). Importantly, however, purpose was not associated with other physical health outcomes, health behaviors, and social factors.Conclusion:With further research, these results suggest that sense of purpose might be a valuable target for innovative policy and intervention work aimed at improving health and well-being.
      Citation: American Journal of Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2021-08-18T09:03:33Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08901171211038545
       
  • Post Syndemic Resiliency and an Interview With Olympians Wendy
           Bruce-Martin and Justin Spring

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      Authors: Paul E. Terry
      Abstract: American Journal of Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: American Journal of Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2021-08-13T09:06:42Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08901171211039664
       
  • Understanding Physical Activity Patterns Across the School Day in Urban
           Pre-Kindergarten and Elementary Schoolchildren

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      Authors: Jennifer M. Sacheck, Emily F. Blake, Hannah Press, Qiushi Huang, Catherine M. Wright, Karina R. Lora, Allison C. Sylvetsky, Amanda J. Visek, Loretta DiPietro
      Abstract: American Journal of Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose:Despite recommendations that children accrue ≥60 min/day of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA), numerous barriers may exist. We examined school-day MVPA patterns in lower-income children (pre-K to 5th grade) to determine whether they were meeting the minimum school-day guidelines of at least 30-min/day of MVPA and to identify opportunities for intervention.Methods:Students (N = 629, pre-K-5th grade) from 4 urban schools wore Actigraph GT3X+ accelerometers over 2 school days. Mixed effects models evaluated sex- and grade-specific differences in MVPA and sedentary time.Results:Only 34.6% of elementary and 25.3% of pre-K students met the school-time MVPA recommendation. Among elementary-aged children, boys accrued more MVPA than girls (30.8 ± 13.3 vs. 23.5 ± 10.7 min/day; p < 0.0001) with similar sex differences observed among pre-K children (51.3 ± 17.1 vs 41.9 ± 17.5 min/day; p < 0.001). Sedentary time also increased significantly with grade among elementary-aged children (207.9 ± 34.7 vs. 252.0 ± 36.1 min/day for those in 1st and 5th grade, respectively; p < 0.001), with girls accruing more sedentary time than boys (242.5 ± 48.2 vs. 233.8 ± 46.8 min/day; p < 0.0001).Conclusion:MVPA declines across elementary school years, with sex disparities observed as early as pre-K. Extended sedentary bouts and clustering of activity highlight opportunities for more movement throughout the school day.
      Citation: American Journal of Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2021-08-13T09:02:37Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08901171211039503
       
  • Assessing the Impact of Online Health Education Interventions From
           2010-2020: A Systematic Review of the Evidence

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      Authors: Suzi B. Claflin, Shannon Klekociuk, Hannah Fair, Emmanuelle Bostock, Maree Farrow, Kathleen Doherty, Bruce V. Taylor
      Abstract: American Journal of Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.
      Objective:Systematically review the evaluation and impact of online health education interventions: assess approaches used, summarize main findings, and identify knowledge gaps.Data Source:We searched the following databases: EMBASE, ERIC, MEDLINE, and Web of Science.Study Inclusion and Exclusion Criteria:Studies were included if (a) published in English between 2010-2020 in a peer-reviewed journal (b) reported an online health education intervention aimed at consumers, caregivers, and the public (c) evaluated implementation OR participant outcomes (d) included ≥ 100 participants per study arm.Data Extraction:Two authors extracted data using a standardized form.Data Synthesis:Data synthesis was structured around the primary outcomes of the included studies.Results:26 studies met the inclusion criteria. We found substantial heterogeneity in study population, design, intervention, and primary outcomes, and significant methodological issues that resulted in moderate to high risk of bias. Overall, interventions that were available to all (e.g., on YouTube) consistently attained a large global reach, and knowledge was consistently improved. However, the impact on other outcomes of interest (e.g., health literacy, health behaviors) remains unclear.Conclusion:Evidence around the impacts of the type of online health education interventions assessed in this review is sparse. A greater understanding of who online interventions work for and what outcomes can be achieved is crucial to determine, and potentially expand, their place in health education.
      Citation: American Journal of Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2021-08-12T09:44:37Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08901171211039308
       
  • The Effects of Exposure to Domestic Violence on Sleep Among Urban Adults

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      Authors: Daniel J. Schober, Susana Shrestha, Jessica C. Bishop-Royse
      Abstract: American Journal of Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose:Domestic violence contributes to poor health including sleep disruptions, which has been associated with risk for chronic conditions and ultimately, premature mortality. The present study examined the effects of ever witnessing domestic violence on sleep among urban neighborhoods of color.Design:Cross-sectional.Setting:Ten of Chicago’s 77 community areas.Participants:Adults, aged 18 years and older (N = 1,543, Response Rate = 28.4%). Over 49% of participants reported a Hispanic ethnicity, 34.8 percent reported being non-Hispanic Black and 14.2 percent reported being White.Measures:We used the Sinai Community Health Survey, 2.0, to examine: average hours of sleep in a 24-hour period, ever witnessing domestic violence, ever being emotionally or physically abused, frequent stress in the past 12 months, and other key covariates (race and ethnicity, annual household income, sex, and health status).Analysis:Multivariate logistic regression.Results:In the full model, participants who reported witnessing domestic violence were significantly less likely to report meeting sleep recommendations even after controlling for ever being emotionally or physically abused, frequently feeling stress, demographic factors, and health status. Non-Hispanic Blacks were most likely to report not meeting sleep recommendations (OR = .54, 95% CI = .30-.96, P = .036).Conclusion:Witnessing domestic violence contributes to not meeting sleep recommendations and this appears to be most salient for Non-Hispanic Blacks. These point-in-time findings document an important potential contributor to racial health disparities.
      Citation: American Journal of Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2021-08-10T08:52:29Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08901171211038474
       
  • Survey Fraud and the Integrity of Web-Based Survey Research

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      Authors: Ronli Levi, Ronit Ridberg, Melissa Akers, Hilary Seligman
      Abstract: American Journal of Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.
      Compared to traditional paper surveys, online surveys offer a convenient, efficient, and socially distant way to conduct human subjects research. The popularity of online research has grown in recent decades. However, without proper precautions, false respondents pose a serious risk to data integrity. In this paper, we describe our research team’s own encounter with survey fraud, steps taken to preserve the integrity of our study, and implications for future public health research.
      Citation: American Journal of Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2021-08-10T08:51:27Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08901171211037531
       
  • Characteristics Associated With Self-Reported Worry Among Adults About
           Food Availability and Food Safety During the COVID-19 Pandemic—United
           States, June 2020 Survey Data

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      Authors: Brianna L. Dumas, Seung Hee Lee, Diane M. Harris, Amy L. Yaroch, Mary A. Pomeroy, Heidi M. Blanck
      Abstract: American Journal of Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose:During a pandemic, persons might experience worry because of threats (real or perceived), or as part of stress-related reactions. We aimed to provide insight into Americans’ worry about food during COVID-19. Design, Subjects, Measures: Online survey data from June 2020 (n = 4,053 U.S. adults; 62.7% response rate) was used to assess 2 outcomes: worry about food availability (FA); food safety (FS). Adults with missing information about FA and FS were excluded from analysis (final n = 3,652).Analysis:We used descriptive statistics and multivariable logistic regression to examine characteristics associated with the outcomes and estimate adjusted odds ratios (aOR) and 95% confidence intervals (95%CI) for associations between sociodemographic variables and outcomes.Results:58.3% of respondents reported worry about FA; 57.5% about FS, with higher odds of worry for FA and FS (versus referents) in lower income households (FA: aOR = 1.76 95%CI [1.30, 2.39]; FS: 1.84[1.35, 2.51]); unemployed (1.54[1.05, 2.28]; 1.90[1.26,2.81]); non-Hispanic Black (1.55[1.14,2.12]); 2.25[1.65,3.07]); Hispanic (1.39[1.06,1.82]; 1.94[1.46,2.56]).Conclusion:Findings highlight the importance of strategies to reduce consumer worry about FA and FS and negative food behaviors, and the need for continued access to hunger safety net programs, which could have positive effects on nutrition security.
      Citation: American Journal of Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2021-08-10T08:37:27Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08901171211039499
       
  • Examining Race and Gender Differences in Associations Among Body
           Appreciation, Eudaimonic Psychological Well-Being, and Intuitive Eating
           and Exercising

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      Authors: Kelly A. Romano, Kristin E. Heron
      Abstract: American Journal of Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose:The present study examined race and gender differences among positive psychological constructs, and adaptive eating and exercise behaviors.Design:Cross-sectional.Setting:Online.Sample:College students (N = 1,228; Mage = 22.27, SD = 5.83).Measures:Participants completed measures assessing positive body image, eudaimonic psychological well-being, and health behaviors.Analyses:Multi-group structural equation modeling was used to examine whether White versus Black race and, separately, woman versus man gender identity moderated associations among body appreciation, eudaimonic psychological well-being, and intuitive eating and intuitive exercising.Results:Results generally indicated that greater body appreciation was associated with greater eudaimonic psychological well-being (βs = 0.48, 0.56) and, in turn, intuitive eating (βs = −0.20, 0.25) and intuitive exercising (βs = −0.06, 0.23). However, notable variations in this pattern of results were identified based on the facet of intuitive eating and exercising under investigation, and participants’ racial identities. For example, greater eudaimonic psychological well-being strictly mediated a positive association between body appreciation and reliance on hunger and satiety cues intuitive eating behaviors among participants who identified as Black (95%CI: 0.01, 0.12), but not White (95%CI: −0.08, 0.04).Conclusions:Although the present findings warrant replication using longitudinal designs due to the cross-sectional nature of the present study, these findings suggest that increasing adults’ eudaimonic psychological well-being may help improve health-promoting eating and exercise behaviors, and should be assessed as a mechanism of change in future clinical research.
      Citation: American Journal of Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2021-08-05T09:18:09Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08901171211036910
       
  • Policy Support for Smoke-Free and E-Cigarette Free Multiunit Housing

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      Authors: Minal Patel, Emily M. Donovan, Michael Liu, Morgan Solomon-Maynard, Barbara S. Schillo
      Abstract: American Journal of Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose:Estimate public support for prohibiting multiunit housing (MUH) e-cigarette and cigarette use.Design:Cross-sectional study.Setting:Data from an online panel survey.Sample:A Fall 2018 nationally representative sample of 3,415 (99.3% response rate) United States (US) adults 18-64 years old.Measures:Policy support for prohibiting MUH smoking and e-cigarette use, sociodemographics, and tobacco perceptions and behaviors.Analysis:Weighted multivariate logistic regression examined predictors of support for prohibiting 1) cigarette use and 2) e-cigarette use in MUH.Results:Most respondents expressed support for prohibiting smoking (76.9%) and e-cigarette use (74.0%) in MUH. About 17% (n = 588) of the sample lived in MUH, and living in MUH was not predictive of support for either policy. For both cigarette and e-cigarette policies, current smokers (n = 630; OR = 0.44, p < 0.001; OR = 0.59, p < 0.01) and current e-cigarette users (n = 305; OR = 0.42, p < 0.001; OR = 0.22, p < 0.001) had lower odds of support. Notably, while most smokers supported prohibiting cigarette (51.4%) and e-cigarette use in MUH (51.1%), there was less support among current e-cigarette users for prohibiting cigarette (48.1%) and e-cigarette use in MUH (34.5%).Conclusion:Majority support for prohibiting smoking and e-cigarette use in MUH is promising for policy adoption; however, lower support of both policies among e-cigarette users needs to be examined, as increasing use of e-cigarettes may be shifting social norms away from support for smoke free housing policies.
      Citation: American Journal of Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2021-08-04T09:00:59Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08901171211035210
       
  • Patterns of Fitbit Use and Activity Levels Among African American Breast
           Cancer Survivors During an eHealth Weight Loss Randomized Controlled Trial
           

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      Authors: Jeanne M. Ferrante, Aaron Lulla, Julie D. Williamson, Katie A. Devine, Pamela Ohman-Strickland, Elisa V. Bandera
      Abstract: American Journal of Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose:This study examined adherence with a physical activity tracker and patterns of activity among different subgroups of African American/Black breast cancer survivors (AABCS).Design:Secondary analysis of weight loss trial that used an activity tracker (FitBit) with or without a commercial eHealth program (SparkPeople) over 12 months.Setting and Subjects:AABCS (N = 44) in New Jersey.Measures and Analysis:Adherence with tracker use, steps per day, and active minutes per week were compared by demographic and clinical characteristics using nonparametric statistics.Results:Median adherence was over 6 days per week throughout the 12-months. Adherence was significantly correlated with steps and active minutes (p < 0.015). Groups with lower adherence included: those with 5 or more conditions (p = 0.039), had higher number of household members (p = 0.008), and younger than 60 years (p = 0.044). Median number of steps per day remained consistently around 7000 throughout 12 months. Factors associated with lower activity included: age> 60; retirement; higher number of household members, comorbidity, or baseline BMI; and those in the SparkPeople + Fitbit group. Self-monitoring, goal setting, and self-efficacy were significantly correlated with activity levels (p < 0.05).Conclusion:Use of a physical activity tracker may help increase activity levels in AABCS. Certain subgroups, e.g. those older than age 60 years, retired, with BMI over 40, higher number of comorbidities or more household members, may require additional interventions.
      Citation: American Journal of Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2021-08-04T09:00:14Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08901171211036700
       
  • Knowledge and Beliefs Regarding Harm From Specific Tobacco Products:
           Findings From the H.I.N.T. Survey

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      Authors: Wenxue Lin, Joshua E. Muscat
      Abstract: American Journal of Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose:Determine whether dual tobacco users have different levels of knowledge about nicotine addiction, perceived harm beliefs of low nicotine cigarettes (LNCs) and beliefs about electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes)Design:Quantitative, Cross-sectionalSetting:Health Information National Trends Survey 5 (Cycle 3, 2019)Participants:Nationally representative adult non-smokers (n=3113), exclusive cigarette smokers (n=302), and dual (cigarette and e-cigarette) users (n=77).Measures:The survey included single item measures on whether nicotine causes addiction and whether nicotine causes cancer. A five-point Likert scale assessed comparative harm of e-cigarettes and LNCs relative to conventional combustible cigarettes (1=much more harmful, 3=equally harmful…5 = much less harmful, or don’t know).Analysis:We used weighted multiple linear regression model to estimate means and 95% confidence intervals (CI) of e-cigarettes and LNCs beliefs by current tobacco user status.Results:Over 97% of dual users, 83% of non-smokers and 86% of exclusive cigarette smokers correctly identified that nicotine is addictive. The majority of subjects incorrectly identified nicotine as a cause of cancer, with dual users having the lowest proportion of incorrect responses (60%). Dual users rated e-cigarette harmfulness as less harmful than combustibles (mean=2.20; 95% CI=1.73, 2.66) while exclusive cigarette smokers and non-smokers rated them as similarly harmful. LNCs were considered equally harmful and addictive as conventional cigarettes.Conclusion:Dual users had a higher knowledge base of tobacco-related health effects. The effectiveness of policies or medical recommendations to encourage smokers to switch from cigarettes to LNCs or e-cigarettes will need to consider accurate and inaccurate misperceptions about the harm and addictiveness of nicotine. Improved public health messages about different tobacco products are needed.
      Citation: American Journal of Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2021-08-02T09:05:29Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08901171211026116
       
  • Evaluating Risk and Protective Factors for Suicidality and Self-Harm in
           Australian Adolescents With Traditional Bullying and Cyberbullying
           Victimizations

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      Authors: Md Irteja Islam, Fakir Md Yunus, Enamul Kabir, Rasheda Khanam
      Abstract: American Journal of Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose:To identify and compare important risk and protective factors associated with suicidality and self-harm among traditional bullying and cyberbullying victims aged 14-17-years in Australia.Design:Cross-sectional population-based study.Setting:Young Minds Matter, a nationwide survey in Australia.Subjects:Adolescents aged 14-17-years (n = 2125).Measures:Suicidality and self-harm were outcome variables, and explanatory variables included sociodemographic factors (age, gender, country of birth, household income, location, family type), risk factors (parental distress, family functioning, family history of substance use, child substance use, mental disorder, psychosis, eating disorders, sexual activity) and protective factors (high self-esteem, positive mental health or resilience, school connectedness, sleep) among 2 types of bullying victims—traditional and cyber. Traditional bullying includes physical (hit, kick, push) or verbal (tease, rumors, threat, ignorance), and cyberbullying includes teasing messages/pictures via email, social medial using the internet and/or mobile phones.Analysis:Bivariate analysis and binary logistic regression models. Statistical metrics include Hosmer-Lemeshow Goodness-of-Fit-test, VIF test, Linktest and ROC curve for model performance and fitness.Results:Overall, 25.6% of adolescents were traditional bullying victims and 12% were cyberbullying victims. The percentages of suicidality (34.4% vs 21.6%) and self-harm (32.8% vs 22.3%) were higher in cyberbullying victims than in traditional bullying victims. Girls were more often bullied and likely to experience suicidal and self-harming behavior than boys. Parental distress, mental disorder and psychosis were found to be significantly associated with the increase risk for self-harm and suicidality among both bullying victims (p < 0.05). While, eating disorder and sexual activity increased the risk of suicidality in traditional bullying victims and self-harm in cyberbullying victims, respectively. Positive mental health/resilience and adequate sleep were found be significantly associated with decreased suicidality and self-harm in both bullying victims.Conclusion:Suicidality and self-harm were common in bullying victims. The findings highlight that the risk and protective factors associated with suicidality and self-harm among adolescent who experienced traditional and cyberbullying victimization should be considered for the promotion of effective self-harm and suicide prevention and intervention programs.
      Citation: American Journal of Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2021-07-26T09:34:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08901171211034105
       
  • Stressful Life Events and Obesity in the United States: The Role of
           Nativity and Length of Residence

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      Authors: Adolfo G. Cuevas, Michael V. Stanton, Keri Carvalho, Natalie Eckert, Kasim Ortiz, Shervin Assari, Yusuf Ransome
      Abstract: American Journal of Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose:Obesity is a public health issue in the United States (US), that disproportionately affects marginalized group members. Stressful life events (SLE) have been implicated as an obesogenic risk factor. However, there is scant research examining of the role of nativity status and length of residence in the relationship between SLE and obesity.Design:Cross-sectional survey.Setting:Wave 2 of the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions.Sample:A total of 34,653 participants were included in these analyses, of whom 10,169 (29.39%) had obesity.Measures:Obesity (measured using body mass index), stressful life events, race/ethnicity, gender, educational attainment, family income, marital status, current smoking status, and alcohol abuse.Analysis:Weighted logistic regression analysis.Results:A total of 10,169 (29.39%) had obesity. There was a significant interaction between SLE and nativity status/length of residence [F (3, 34,642) = 60.50, p < 0.01]. Based on stratified analyses, SLE were associated with greater odds of obesity for US-born individuals (OR = 1.07; 95% CI [1.05, 1.08]) and foreign-born individuals living in the US for ≥ 20 years (OR = 1.17; 95% CI [1.10, 1.25]). There was no evidence that SLE were associated with greater odds of obesity for foreign-born individuals living in the US 20 years. Further research is needed to understand the pathways that may link SLE to obesity among these groups.
      Citation: American Journal of Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2021-07-26T09:25:40Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08901171211034410
       
  • How Ready Are Young Adults to Participate in Community Service' An
           Application of the Transtheoretical Model of Behavior Change

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      Authors: Natalie Fenn, Cheyenne Reyes, Kathleen Monahan, Mark L. Robbins
      Abstract: American Journal of Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose:Engaging in community service, or unpaid work intended to help people in a community, is generally associated with greater overall well-being. However, the process of beginning and maintaining community service engagement has been sparsely examined. The current study applied the Transtheoretical Model (TTM) of behavior change to understanding community service readiness among young adults.Design:Cross-sectional design using an online survey.Setting:Participants were undergraduate students recruited at a mid-sized Northeastern US university in Spring 2018.Sample:Participants (N = 314) had a mean age of 20.36 years (SD = 3.69), were primarily White (78%), female (72%), and from moderately high socioeconomic backgrounds (as measured by parental level of education).Measures:Socio-demographics including age, gender, race-ethnicity, and parental level of education; readiness, pros, cons, and self-efficacy for community service; civic engagement behavior; well-being.Analysis:Participants were classified into very low (n = 62), low (n = 59), moderate (n = 92), high (n = 46), and very high (n = 55) readiness for community service groupings. A MANOVA was conducted to assess relationships between groupings and community service TTM constructs, civic engagement, and well-being.Results:There were significant differences between readiness groupings on all main outcome variables, F(20, 1012) = 10.34, p < .001; Wilks’ Λ = 0.54, η2 = .14. Post-hoc Games-Howell tests showed that those exhibiting higher levels of readiness reported fewer cons, greater pros, higher self-efficacy, more overall civic engagement, and greater well-being compared to lower readiness individuals.Conclusion:Consistent with previous TTM applications, self-efficacy and the importance of pros increased across readiness groupings while the importance of cons decreased. Study findings may be used to inform readiness-tailored interventional work for increasing community service. This area of study would benefit from longitudinal research examining community service readiness beyond the college environment.
      Citation: American Journal of Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2021-07-23T09:03:42Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08901171211034742
       
  • Preferences Toward COVID-19 Diagnostic Testing Features: Results From a
           National Cross-Sectional Survey

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      Authors: Bhagyashree Katare, Shuoli Zhao, Joel Cuffey, Maria I. Marshall, Corinne Valdivia
      Abstract: American Journal of Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose:Describe preferences toward COVID-19 testing features (method, location, hypothetical monetary incentive) and simulate the effect of monetary incentives on willingness to test.Design:Online cross-sectional survey administered in July 2020.Subjects:1,505 nationally representative U.S. respondents.Measures:Choice of preferred COVID-19 testing options in discrete choice experiment. Options differed by method (nasal-swab, saliva), location (hospital/clinic, drive-through, at-home), and monetary incentive ($0, $10, $20).Analysis:Latent class conditional logit model to classify preferences, mixed logit model to simulate incentive effectiveness.Results:Preferences were categorized into 4 groups: 34% (n = 517) considered testing comfort (saliva versus nasal swab) most important, 27% (n = 408) were willing to trade comfort for monetary incentives, 19% (n = 287) would only test at convenient locations, 20% (n = 293) avoided testing altogether. Relative to no monetary incentives, incentives of $100 increased the percent of testing avoiders (16%) and convenience seekers (70%) that were willing to test.Conclusion:Preferences toward different COVID-19 testing features vary, highlighting the need to match testing features with individuals to monitor the spread of COVID-19.
      Citation: American Journal of Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2021-07-21T08:57:56Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08901171211034093
       
  • Weight, Weight Perceptions, and Health and Well-Being Among Canadian
           

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      Authors: Lei Chai, Jia Xue
      Abstract: American Journal of Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose:The present study examines the extent to which (mis)matched weight and weight perceptions predict adolescents’ self-rated health, mental health, and life satisfaction.Design:Quantitative, cross-sectional study.Setting:Data from the 2017-2018 Canadian Community Health Survey (CCHS)—a nationally representative sample collected by Statistics Canada.Participants:Canadian adolescents aged between 12 and 17 (n = 8,081).Measures:The dependent variables are self-rated health, mental health, and life satisfaction. The independent variable is (mis)matched weight and weight perceptions.Analysis:We perform a series of ordinary least squares (OLS) regression models.Results:Overweight adolescents with overweight perceptions are associated with poorer self-rated health (b = −.546, p < .001 for boys; b = −.476, p < .001 for girls), mental health (b = −.278, p < .001 for boys; b = −.433, p < .001 for girls), and life satisfaction (b = −.544, p < .001 for boys; b = −.617, p < .001 for girls) compared to their counterparts with normal weight and normal weight perceptions. Similar patterns have also been observed among normal weight adolescents with overweight perceptions (e.g., normal weight adolescents with overweight perceptions are associated with poorer self-rated health (b = −.541, p < .01 for boys; b = −.447, p < .001 for girls)).Conclusion:Normal weight adolescents are not immune to adverse self-rated health, mental health, and life satisfaction because their weight perceptions are also a contributing factor to health and well-being consequences.
      Citation: American Journal of Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2021-07-20T09:10:50Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08901171211031064
       
  • Perceptions of Arguments in Support of Policies to Reduce Sugary Drink
           Consumption Among Low-Income White, Black and Latinx Parents of Young
           Children

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      Authors: Julie S. Cannon, Elizabeth K. Farkouh, Liana B. Winett, Lori Dorfman, A. Susana Ramírez, Spencer Lazar, Jeff Niederdeppe
      Abstract: American Journal of Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose:To test for racial/ethnic differences in perceived argument strength in favor of structural interventions to curb childhood obesity among lower-income parents of young children.Design:Cross-sectional, self-report.Setting:Online research panel, national sample of 1485 US adults in Fall 2019.Participants:Parents of children (age 0-5 years) with an annual income
      Citation: American Journal of Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2021-07-16T09:19:32Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08901171211030849
       
  • Unique Predictors of Intended Uptake of a COVID-19 Vaccine in Adults
           Living in a Rural College Town in the United States

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      Authors: Robert P. Lennon, Meg L. Small, Rachel A. Smith, Lauren J. Van Scoy, Jessica G. Myrick, Molly A. Martin, Data4 Action Research Group
      Abstract: American Journal of Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose:To explore public confidence in a COVID-19 vaccine.Design:Cross-sectional survey.Setting:A rural college town in central Pennsylvania.Subjects:Adult residents without minor children.Measures:The primary outcome was COVID-19 vaccination intention. Secondary measures included vaccination attitudes, norms, efficacy, past behavior, trust in the vaccination process, and sociodemographic variables of education, financial standing, political viewpoint, and religiosity.Analysis:Descriptive statistics were used to describe quantitative data. Multivariate ordinal regression was used to model predictors of vaccine intention.Results:Of 950 respondents, 55% were “very likely” and 20% “somewhat likely” to take a coronavirus vaccine, even though 70% had taken the flu vaccine since September 2019. The strongest predictors of vaccine acceptance were trust in the system evaluating vaccines and perceptions of local COVID-19 vaccination norms. The strongest predictors of negative vaccine intentions were worries about unknown side-effects and positive attitudes toward natural infection. Sociodemographic factors, political views, and religiosity did not predict vaccine intentions.Conclusion:Fewer adults intend to take a coronavirus vaccine than currently take the flu vaccine. Traditional sociodemographic factors may not be effective predictors of COVID-19 vaccine uptake. Although based on a small sample, the study adds to our limited understanding of COVID-19-specific vaccine confidence among some rural Americans and suggests that traditional public health vaccination campaigns based on sociodemographic characteristics may not be effective.
      Citation: American Journal of Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2021-07-16T09:10:14Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08901171211026132
       
  • Examination of Sleep and Obesity in Children and Adolescents in the United
           States

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      Authors: Puneet Kaur Chehal, Livvy Shafer, Solveig Argeseanu Cunningham
      Abstract: American Journal of Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose:This study contributes to the growing literature on the association between sleep and obesity by examining the associations between hours of sleep, consistency of bedtime, and obesity among children in the US.Design:Analysis of a nationally representative sample of non-institutionalized children from the 2016-17 National Survey of Children’s Health.Setting:US, national.Subjects:Children ages 10-17 years (n = 34,640)Measures:Parent reported weeknight average hours of sleep and consistency of bedtime. Body mass index classified as underweight, normal, overweight or obesity using parent-reported child height and weight information, classified using CDC BMI-for-Age Growth Charts.Analysis:Multivariate logistic regression models were used to estimate associations between measures of sleep and body mass index weight category adjusting for individual, household and neighborhood characteristics.Results:An additional hour of sleep was associated with 10.8% lower odds of obesity, net of consistency in bedtime. After controlling for sleep duration, children who usually went to bed at the same time on weeknights had lower odds of obesity (24.8%) relative to children who always went to bed at the same time.Conclusion:Sleep duration is predictive of lower odds of obesity in US children and adolescents. Some variability in weeknight bedtime is associated with lower odds of obesity, though there were no additional benefits to extensive variability in bedtime.
      Citation: American Journal of Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2021-07-12T08:53:57Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08901171211029189
       
  • Reliability and Validity of the American Heart Association’s Workplace
           Health Achievement Index

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      Authors: Enid Chung Roemer, Karen B. Kent, Ron Z. Goetzel, Chris Calitz, Drew Mills
      Abstract: American Journal of Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.
      Objective:To test the validity and reliability of the American Heart Association’s (AHA) updated Workplace Health Achievement Index (WHAI).Methods:We piloted the updated WHAI with respondent pairs at 94 organizations, and examined the inter-rater reliability (percent agreement) for each item on the survey. To evaluate face and content validity, we conducted preliminary focus groups pre-survey, and follow-up cognitive interviews post-survey administration.Results:Respondents found the updated WHAI to be comprehensive and useful in identifying gaps and opportunities for improving their health and wellbeing programs. The mean percent agreement on all items was 73.1%. Only 9% (or 14 items out of 146) had poor inter-rater reliability (below 61 percent agreement), but through follow-up cognitive interviews we determined that most were due to artifacts of the study design or were resolved through minor revisions to the survey question, instructions, and/or adding examples for clarity. Only 1 question was deleted due to lack of relevance.Conclusion:The updated WHAI is a valid and reliable tool for employers to assess how well they promote the health and wellbeing of their employees.
      Citation: American Journal of Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2021-07-06T09:02:50Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08901171211022925
       
  • Risk Exposures, Risk Perceptions, Negative Attitudes Toward General
           Vaccination, and COVID-19 Vaccine Acceptance Among College Students in
           south Carolina

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      Authors: Shan Qiao, Cheuk Chi Tam, Xiaoming Li
      Abstract: American Journal of Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose:The current study investigated how risk exposures, risk perceptions of COVID-19, and negative attitudes toward general vaccination were related to COVID vaccine acceptance among college students.Design:Cross-sectional study.Setting:Data was collected by online survey using RedCap among college students in South Carolina between September 2020 and October 2020.Sample:1062 college students in South Carolina.Measures:risk exposures to COVID-19, perceived severity of COVID-19, perceived susceptibility of COVID-19, negative attitude toward general vaccination, vaccine acceptance of COVID-19.Analysis:Hierarchical linear regression was used to examine the association of these factors with COVID-19 vaccine acceptance controlling for key demographics.Results:Perceived severity of COVID-19 was positively associated with vaccine acceptance (ß = 0.19, p < 0.001). Higher level of risk exposures (ß = −0.08, p = 0.007) and negative attitude toward general vaccination (ß = −0.38, p < 0.001) were associated with low vaccine acceptance.Conclusion:We need tailored education messages for college students to emphasize the severity of COVID-19, address the concerns of side effects of general vaccines by dispelling the misconception, and target the most vulnerable subgroups who reported high level of risk exposures while showed low intention to take the vaccine.
      Citation: American Journal of Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2021-06-24T09:01:57Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08901171211028407
       
  • Association of Weight Loss With Type 2 Diabetes Remission Among Adults in
           Medically Underserved Areas: A Retrospective Cohort Study

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      Authors: Ming Chen, Satya Surbhi, James E. Bailey
      Abstract: American Journal of Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose:To examine the association between weight loss and type 2 diabetes remission among vulnerable populations living in medically underserved areas of the Mid-Southern United States.Design:Quantitative, retrospective cohort study.Setting:114 ambulatory sites and 5 adults’ hospitals in the Mid-South participating in a regional diabetes registry.Participants:9,900 adult patients with type 2 diabetes, stratified by remission status, with 1 year of baseline electronic medical record data, and 1 year of follow-up data for the 2015-2018 study period.Measures:The outcomes were diabetes remissions, categorized as any remission, partial remission, and complete remission based on the guidelines of the American Diabetes Association. The exposure was weight loss, calculated by the change in the Body Mass Index (BMI) as a proxy measure.Analysis:χ2 tests, Fisher’s exact tests, and the Mann-Whitney U-test were used to examine the differences in patient characteristics by remission status across the 3 remission categories, as appropriate. Multiple multivariable logistic regressions adjusting for confounders were performed to estimate the adjusted odds ratios (aORs) for the associations between weight loss and diabetes remission.Results:Among 9,900 patients identified, a reduction of 0.3 kg/m2 (standard deviation: 2.5) in the average BMI from the baseline to the follow-up was observed. 10.8% achieved any type of remission, with 9.8% for partial and 1.0% for complete remissions. Greater weight loss was significantly associated with an increased likelihood of any (aOR = 1.07, 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.06-1.08), partial (aOR 1.06, 95% CI, 1.04-1.07), and complete diabetes remission (aOR 1.10, 95% CI, 1.07-1.13).Conclusions:Weight loss is significantly associated with diabetes remission among patients living in medically underserved areas, but complete remission is rare.
      Citation: American Journal of Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2021-06-15T10:05:45Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08901171211024426
       
  • Supporting Employee Health at Work: How Perceptions Differ Across Wage
           Category

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      Authors: Kristi Rahrig Jenkins, Emily Stiehl, Bruce W. Sherman, Susan L. Bales
      Abstract: American Journal of Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose:This study examines the association between sources of stress and perceptions of organizational and supervisor support for health and well-being.Design:Retrospective, cross-sectional analysis.Setting:Large university in the mid-western United States.Sample:This study focused on university employees with complete data for all variables (organizational support/N = 19,536; supervisor support/N = 20,287).Measures:2019 socioeconomic and demographic characteristics, count of chronic conditions, sources of stress and perceptions of organizational and supervisor support.Analysis:For the multivariate analyzes, linear regression models were analyzed separately by wage bands (low ≤$46,100; middle>$46,100-$62,800; high>$62,800).Results:For all employees, workplace stressors, including problematic relationships at work and heavy job responsibilities, were negatively associated with perceptions of supervisor and organizational support. In comparison, the most salient home-based stressors were negatively associated with perceptions of supervisor support for the lowest-wage band (the death of a loved one, b = −0.13) and middle-wage band (personal illness or injury, b = −0.09), while the one for the highest-wage band (illness or injury of a loved one, b = 0.07) was positively associated with perceptions of supervisor support.Conclusion:Stressful job responsibilities and work relationships are associated with lower perceptions of supervisor and organizational support for health and well-being across all wage bands. Favorable perceived support for personal stressors only among high wage earning employees may suggest a need for improved equity of perceived support for these stressors among lower wage workers.
      Citation: American Journal of Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2021-06-15T09:47:04Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08901171211024416
       
  • The Neighborhood Environment and Hispanic/Latino Health

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      Authors: Natalia I. Heredia, Tianlin Xu, MinJae Lee, Lorna H. McNeill, Belinda M. Reininger
      Abstract: American Journal of Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose:Hispanic/Latino adults on the Texas-Mexico border have high rates of chronic disease. Neighborhoods can influence health, though there is a limited research on neighborhood environment and health in Hispanics/Latinos. The purpose of this study was to assess the relation of neighborhood environment with health variables in Hispanic/Latino adults, including physical activity [PA], depression, anxiety, and lab-assessed conditions (type 2 diabetes, metabolic syndrome, and chronic inflammation).Methods:Participants were randomly-selected from a Hispanic/Latino cohort on the Texas-Mexico border. Neighborhood environment, self-reported PA, anxiety, and depression were assessed through questionnaires. Laboratory values determined Type 2 diabetes, metabolic syndrome, and C-reactive protein (CRP). We conducted multivariable linear and logistic regression analyses to assess the associations of neighborhood environment and health variables, controlling for covariates.Results:Participants (n = 495) were mostly females, without insurance. After controlling for covariates, crime (Adjusted Odds Ratio [AOR] = 1.59 (95%CI 1.06-2.38), no streetlights (AOR = 1.65, 95%CI 1.06-2.57), and traffic (AOR = 1.74, 95%CI 1.16-2.62) were all significantly associated with anxiety. Only traffic was significantly associated with depression (AOR = 1.61, 95%CI1.05-2.47). A lack of nearby shops (AOR = 0.57, 95%CI 0.38-0.84) and no one out doing PA (AOR = 0.53, 95% CI 0.34-0.83) were both significantly associated with lower odds of meeting PA guidelines. A lack of nearby shops was associated with a 26% increase in the CRP value (β = 0.26, 95%CI 0.04-0.47).Discussion:Several neighborhood environment variables were significantly associated with mental health, PA and CRP, though estimates were small. The neighborhood environment is a meaningful contextual variable to consider for health-related interventions in Hispanic/Latino adults, though more study is needed regarding the magnitude of the estimates.Trial registration:NCT01168765.
      Citation: American Journal of Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2021-06-15T09:12:24Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08901171211022677
       
  • Examining Disparities in Food Access Between Historically Black Colleges
           and Universities and Non-Historically Black Colleges and Universities

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      Authors: Mariah Kornbluh, Shirelle Hallum, Marilyn Wende, Joseph Ray, Zachary Herrnstadt, Andrew T. Kaczynski
      Abstract: American Journal of Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose:Examine if Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) are more likely to be located in low food access area (LFA) census tracts compared to public non-HBCUs.Design:ArcGIS Pro was utilized to capture food environments and census tract sociodemographic data.Setting:The sample included 98 HBCUs and 777 public non-HBCUs within the United States. 28.9% of study census tracts were classified as LFA tracts.Measures:University data were gathered from the National Center for Education Statistics. Census tract-level LFA classification was informed by the United States Department of Agriculture’s Food Access Research Atlas. Covariates included population density and neighborhood socioeconomic status of census tracts containing subject universities.Analysis:Multilevel logistic regression was employed to examine the relationship between university type and LFA classification.Results:A higher percentage of HBCUs (46.9%) than public non-HBCUs (26.6%) were located in LFAs. After adjusting for population density and neighborhood socioeconomic status, university type was significantly associated with food access classification (B=0.71;p=.0036). The odds of an HBCU being located in LFA tracts were 104% greater than for a public non-HBCU (OR=2.04;95% CI=1.26,3.29).Conclusion:Findings underscore the need for policy interventions tailored to HBCU students to promote food security, environmental justice, and public health.
      Citation: American Journal of Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2021-06-09T09:34:39Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08901171211024412
       
  • Changes in Health Behaviors Associated With Weight Gain by Weight
           Classification During the COVID-19 Pandemic

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      Authors: Kristie Rupp, Ciarán P. Friel
      Abstract: American Journal of Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose:To determine whether perceived changes (i.e. perception of engagement during the pandemic relative to pre-pandemic) in specific health behaviors differ by weight status (i.e. healthy weight, overweight, obese).Design:Cross-sectional. Recruitment took place between June-August 2020, via social media posts and Qualtrics online panels.Setting:Participants completed the survey online through the Qualtrics platform.Sample:Analyses included N = 502 participants (≥18 years); 45.2% healthy weight (n = 227), 28.5% overweight (n = 143), and 26.3% obese (n = 132).Measures:Study-specific survey items included questions about demographics and perceived changes in health behaviors.Analysis:Logistic regression models, adjusted for age, race, ethnicity, gender, education, and COVID-19 diagnosis, assessed the odds of perceiving changes in health behaviors considered a risk for weight gain.Results:Participants with obesity, but not overweight, were significantly more likely to report deleterious changes to health behaviors compared to healthy weight peers, including: (1) decreased fruit/vegetable consumption [adjusted odds ratio (AOR) = 1.92; 95% confidence interval (CI): (1.13, 3.26)]; (2) increased processed food consumption [AOR = 1.85; 95%CI: (1.15, 3.00)]; (3) increased caloric intake [AOR = 1.66; 95% CI: (1.06, 2.61)]; (4) decreased physical activity [AOR = 2.07; 95%CI: (1.31, 3.28)]; and (5) deterioration in sleep quality [AOR = 2.07; 95%CI: (1.32, 3.25)].Conclusion:Our findings suggest that adults with obesity may be at greater risk for unhealthy behaviors during a period of prolonged social distancing, potentially exacerbating the obesity epidemic.
      Citation: American Journal of Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2021-06-08T08:59:29Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08901171211022958
       
  • COVID-19 Experiences and Social Distancing: Insights From the Theory of
           Planned Behavior

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      Authors: Rochelle L. Frounfelker, Tara Santavicca, Zhi Yin Li, Diana Miconi, Vivek Venkatesh, Cecile Rousseau
      Abstract: American Journal of Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose:The objective of this study is to identify the relationship between COVID-19 experiences, perceived COVID-19 behavioral control, social norms and attitudes, and future intention to follow social distancing guidelines.Design:This is a cross-sectional study.Setting:Participants responded to an on-line survey in June 2020.Subjects:The study included 3,183 residents within Quebec, Canada aged 18 and over.Measures:Measures include perceived COVID-19 related discrimination, fear of COVID-19 infection, prior exposure to COVID-19, and prior social distancing behavior. Participants self-reported attitudes, perceived behavioral control, and perceived norms related to social distancing. Finally, we measured social distancing behavioral intention.Analysis:We evaluated a theory of planned behavior (TPB) measurement model of social distancing using confirmatory factor analysis (CFA). The association between COVID-19 perceived discrimination, fear of infection, previous social distancing behavior, exposure to COVID-19, TPB constructs and behavioral intentions to social distance were estimated using SEM path analysis.Results:TPB constructs were positively associated with intention to follow social distancing guidelines. Fear of COVID-19 infection and prior social distancing behavior were positively associated with behavioral intentions. In contrast, perceived discrimination was negatively associated with the outcome. Associations between fear of COVID-19, perceived COVID-19 discrimination and behavioral intentions were partially mediated by constructs of TPB.Conclusions:COVID-19 prevention efforts designed to emphasize positive attitudes, perceived control, and social norms around social distancing should carefully balance campaigns that heighten fear of infection along with anti- discrimination messaging.
      Citation: American Journal of Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2021-06-02T08:58:02Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08901171211020997
       
  • Parents’ Perceptions and Engagement Regarding School-Based Physical
           Activity Promotion

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      Authors: Collin A. Webster, Gabriella McLoughlin, Angie Starrett, Jillian Papa, Heather Erwin, Julian A. Reed, Russell L. Carson, Charlene Burgeson
      Abstract: American Journal of Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose:This study examined parents’ perceived importance of, and engagement in, school-based physical activity (PA) promotion.Design:A cross-sectional, quantitative survey design was employed.Setting:The survey was conducted in the United States.Subjects:Using a probability-based panel (AmeriSpeak®), a national sample of 3599 parents was randomly recruited to participate in the survey and 1015 participants (28.2%) completed it. Parents or legal guardians of children enrolled in K-12 during the 2017-2018 school year were eligible to participate.Measures:The survey was developed and distributed by a national collaborative for active schools with the support of a national research center.Analysis:Data were analyzed using structural equation modeling and path analysis.Results:The data supported a 6-factor solution encompassing perceived importance of PA before, during, and after school, communication with administrators, and volunteering and participating in school-based PA (CFI = .974, RMSEA = .034, SRMR = .056). Path coefficients from perceived importance of PA before/after school to current (β = .43; 95%CI[.25, .61]) and future communication with administrators (β = .40; 95%CI[.23, .55]) were statistically significant, as were coefficients from perceived importance of PA before/after school to past (β = .60; 95%CI[.35, .83]) and current volunteering/participating in school-based PA (β = .63; 95%CI[.42, .85]).Conclusion:Parents’ perceived importance of school-based PA opportunities before and after school warrants emphasis in future research and advocacy.
      Citation: American Journal of Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2021-05-28T09:08:46Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08901171211020987
       
  • Sexual Orientation Identity and Its Implication in the Disparities in
           Psychological Health-Related Quality of Life

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      Authors: Hui Xie, Yannan Li, Cailtin Turner
      Abstract: American Journal of Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose:To examine disparities in psychological health-related quality of life (HRQoL) among sexual minority women within racial/ethnic subgroups.Design:A secondary analysis of the 2018 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance Survey (BRFSS).Setting:United States.Subjects:Noninstitutionalized, cisgender, adult women in the U.S (unweighted n = 81,947).Measures:Socioeconomics, health behaviors, and healthcare access as risk factors, whereas 1 item measures psychological HRQoL as an outcome.Analysis:Weighted multivariable logistic regressions to estimate the odds of having adversely psychological HRQoL in relation to sexual orientation and other correlates within a racial/ethnic subgroup independently.Results:The prevalence of adverse psychological HRQoL was greater in bisexual and “other” sexual orientation women. Both bisexual (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] = 1.58; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.26-2.00) and “other” sexual orientation (Aor = 1.93; 95%CI = 1.26-2.96) had greater adjusted odds of adversely psychological HRQoLcompared to their heterosexual peers in non-Hispanic White women. Bisexual women (aOR = 3.42; 95%CI = 1.98-5.88) had greater adjusted odds of adversely psychological HRQoLcompared to their heterosexual peers in Latinas. No similar pattern was observed in non-Hispanic Black women.Conclusion:Disparities in psychological HRQoL varied by sexual orientation identities within different racial/ethnic subgroups. The magnitude of the association for Latina bisexual women was strong. Implications for bisexual health among people with intersecting identities are discussed.
      Citation: American Journal of Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2021-05-25T09:09:52Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08901171211019898
       
  • Socioeconomic Factors Influence Health Information Seeking and Trust Over
           Time: Evidence From a Cross-Sectional, Pooled Analyses of HINTS Data

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      Authors: Naleef Fareed, Pallavi Jonnalagadda, Christine M. Swoboda, Pranav Samineni, Tyler Griesenbrock, Timothy Huerta
      Abstract: American Journal of Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose:Assessed socioeconomic factors in health information seeking behavior and trust of information sources from 2007 to 2017.Design:Pooled cross-sectional survey data.Setting:Health Information National Trends Survey.Participation:Data included 6 iterations of U.S. adults (Pooled: N = 19,496; 2007: N = 3,593; 2011: N = 3,959; 2013: N = 3,185; FDA 2015: N = 3,738; 2017: N = 3,285; and FDA 2017: N = 1,736).Measures:Outcome variables were health information seeking, high confidence, and high trust of health information from several sources. Independent variables were education and income group, controlling for other sociodemographic variables.Analysis:Weighted descriptive and multivariate logistic regression for the pooled sample assessed associations by education and income. Fully interacted models with education/income-survey year interactions compared differences in outcomes between years.Results:We found information seeking, confidence, and trust were associated with income and education, which supported previously reported findings. Additionally, our findings indicated low-and medium-income groups had significantly lower odds of seeking health information compared to those in a high-income group. Regarding trust of information, a high school education was associated with higher odds of trust in family and friends. We also found that, over time, information seeking, confidence, and trust behavior differed by income and education, with some differences persisting.Conclusion:Disparities by income and education in trust of information sources remained across time. Understanding optimal information sources, their reach, and their credibility among groups could enable more targeted interventions and health messaging. We also describe the implications for our findings in the context of COVID-19.
      Citation: American Journal of Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2021-05-19T09:05:12Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08901171211018135
       
  • Social Support Networks and Foreign-Birth Status Associated With Obesity,
           Hypertension and Diabetes Prevalence Among 21-30 and 50-70 Year Old Adults
           Living in the San Francisco Bay Area

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      Authors: Leslie E. Cofie, Jacqueline M. Hirth, Joseph G. L. Lee
      Abstract: American Journal of Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose:To examine whether social network characteristics of US-and foreign-born individuals are related to hypertension, diabetes and obesity prevalence.Design:Cross-sectional.Setting:Six San Francisco Bay Area counties.Participants:N = 1153 cohorts of young and older adults (21-30 and 50-70 years).Measures:Network structure and support measures were calculated using name elicitation and interpreter questions common in egocentric surveys. Hypertension and diabetes were self-reported, and overweight/obesity was determined using body mass index calculations. Foreign-birth status was based on country of birth.Analysis:Adjusted and unadjusted logistic regression models were used to examine associations between network characteristics and hypertension, diabetes and overweight/obesity. These relationships were tested for moderation by foreign-birth status, age and gender.Results:Higher percentages of family members (AOR = 4.16, CI: 1.61-10.76) and same-sex individuals (AOR = 3.41, CI: 1.25-9.35) in the composition of respondents’ networks were associated with overweight/obesity. Higher composition of family members (AOR = 3.54, CI: 1.09-11.48) was associated with hypertension. Respondents whose networks composed of higher numbers of advice individuals (AOR = 0.88, CI: 0.77-0.99), female respondents (AOR = 0.52, CI: 0.35-0.77) and foreign-born respondents (AOR = 0.54, CI: 0.32-0.92) were less likely to report overweight/obesity. Diabetes was associated with higher composition of individuals living within 5-minutes to respondents (AOR = 5.13, CI: 1.04-25.21).Conclusion:Family and network support members such as advice individuals could be potential targets for chronic disease prevention, particularly among older adults and immigrants.
      Citation: American Journal of Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2021-05-18T08:54:54Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08901171211016320
       
  • Effectiveness of Workplace Exercise Interventions on Body Composition: A
           Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

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      Authors: Guillermo García Pérez de Sevilla, Fernando Cobo Vicente-Arche, Israel John Thuissard, Olga Barcelo, Margarita Perez-Ruiz
      Abstract: American Journal of Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.
      Objective:The aim of this review was to analyze the effectiveness of workplace exercise interventions on body composition (BC).Data Source:Studies published in PubMed, Scopus, SPORTDiscus, Web of Science, CINAHL and PsycINFO, from the earliest time point until 8 July 2020.Study Inclusion and Exclusion Criteria:Inclusion criteria were worksite interventions, in adults, Randomized Controlled Trials (RCTs), real exercise practice, and measuring BC outcomes. Exclusion criteria were full-text non-available, abstract not in English, and exercise protocol missing.Data Extraction:157 studies were retrieved and assessed for inclusion by 2 independent reviewers, who also used the Cochrane’s Collaboration Tool to assess study quality and risk of bias.Data Synthesis:We performed a meta-analysis to determine the effect size of the interventions on BC outcomes reported in at least 5 studies.Results:Twelve RCTs were included (n = 1270, 66% women), quality of studies being low to high (25% moderate, 67% high). Interventions achieved a statistically significant decrease in waist circumference (SMD = 0.24; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.06 to 0.41; p = 0.008), total mass fat (SMD = 0.21; 95%CI: 0.00 to 0.41; p = 0.047), and body adiposity index (SMD = 0.20; 95%CI: 0.00 to 0.41; p = 0.049). No changes were observed in body weight (SMD = 0.08 95%CI: −0.02 to 0.18; p = 0.128). Additionally, muscle mass increased in interventions that included strength training. There were no adverse events reported.Conclusion:The most effective workplace exercise interventions to improve BC combined supervised, moderate-intensity aerobic and strength training, for at least 4 months.
      Citation: American Journal of Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2021-05-18T08:40:11Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08901171211014726
       
  • Association of Behavioral Phenotypes With Changes in Sleep During a
           Workplace Wellness Program

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      Authors: Kimberly J. Waddell, Sujatha Changolkar, Gregory Szwartz, Sarah Godby, Mitesh S. Patel
      Abstract: American Journal of Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose:Examine changes in sleep duration by 3 behavioral phenotypes during a workplace wellness program with overweight and obese adults.Design:Secondary analysis of a randomized clinical trialSetting:Remotely monitored intervention conducted across the United StatesSubjects:553 participants with a body mass index ≥25Intervention:Participants were randomized to 1 of 4 study arms: control, gamification with support, gamification with collaboration, and gamification with competition to increase their physical activity. All participants were issued a wrist-worn wearable device to record their daily physical activity and sleep duration.Measures:The primary outcome was change in daily sleep duration from baseline during the 24 week intervention and follow-up period by study arm within behavioral phenotype class.Analysis:Linear mixed effects regression.Results:Participants who had a phenotype of less physically active and less social at baseline, in the gamification with collaboration arm, significantly increased their sleep duration during the intervention period (30.2 minutes [95% CI 6.9, 53.5], P = 0.01), compared to the control arm. There were no changes in sleep duration among participants who were more extroverted and motivated or participants who were less motivated and at-risk.Conclusions:Changes in sleep during a physical activity intervention varied by behavioral phenotype. Behavioral phenotypes may help to precisely identify who is likely to improve sleep duration during a physical activity intervention.
      Citation: American Journal of Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2021-05-17T09:12:04Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08901171211015089
       
  • Understanding the Effects of Individual and State-Level Factors on
           American Public Response to COVID-19

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      Authors: Feng Hao, Wanyun Shao
      Abstract: American Journal of Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose:To examine multilevel predictors on American public response to COVID-19.Design:Multilevel study.Setting:A national survey was conducted by Qualtrics from August 24 to September 11, 2020. The state-level variables were constructed on data from multiple sources.Subjects:2,440 respondents 18 years and older from all 50 states and D.C.Measures:The outcome variable is the public response to COVID-19 measured by threat perception, behavioral adjustment, and policy support. The predictors include individual-level sociodemographic factors and state-level indicators about public health conditions, political context, and economic recovery.Analysis:Multilevel structural equation modeling is used for statistical estimation.Results:People from states with more COVID-19 cases (β = 0.020, p < 0.1), mandatory face mask policies (β = 0.069, p < 0.05), and liberal governments (β = 0.002, p < 0.05) are more likely to respond while people from states whose economies have recovered closer to the pre-pandemic level are less likely to do so (β = −0.005, p < 0.05). Regarding individual-level predictors, older people (β = 0.005, p < 0.001) and people with better education (β = 0.029, p < 0.01), leaning toward the Democrat Party (β = 0.066, p < 0.001) and liberal political ideology (β = 0.094, p < 0.001), and have stronger generalized trust (β = 0.033, p < 0.001) are more likely to respond than their counterparts.Conclusion:Differences in the public response to the pandemic stem from variations in individual characteristics and contextual factors of states where people live. These findings contribute to the rapidly growing literature and have implications for public health policies.
      Citation: American Journal of Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2021-05-13T08:58:06Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08901171211017286
       
  • E-Cigarette Beliefs and Intentions Among U.S. Adults Before and After
           EVALI Outbreak

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      Authors: Julia M. Alber, Kimiya Ganjooi, Siena Gibbs, Rebeca Almeida, Lorraine D. Jackson
      Abstract: American Journal of Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose:This study examined attitudes, perceived control, perceived norms, intention, and policy support before and after the peak of E-cigarette or Vaping Product Use-Associated Lung Injury (EVALI) cases among 2 independent samples of U.S. adults.Design:This study used a successive independent samples design.Setting:Data was collected through online surveys in July 2019 (n = 521) and October 2019 (n = 536).Subjects:Participants were recruited through the Qualtrics Survey Panel. Eligibility criteria included: 1) 18 years or older, and 2) currently living in the U.S.Measures:The 2 surveys were collected from 2 separate samples examined e-cigarette attitudes, perceived control, perceived norms, intention, and policy support.Analysis:Linear regressions were used to examine the association between time, attitudinal, and belief factors associated with intention and policy support.Results:Participants in the October sample (n = 521) were significantly more likely to have negative attitudes towards e-cigarettes when compared to the July sample (n = 536), F(8,1047) = 52.671, p < .01, R2 = 0.287. Lower perceived social acceptance towards e-cigarettes and negative attitudes were related to higher support for restricting where e-cigarettes could be used, F(11, 1042) = 63.218, p < .010, R2 = .401. Higher perceived control over accessing e-cigarettes, but lower social acceptance of e-cigarettes and negative beliefs were associated with higher support for limiting places where e-cigarettes could be purchased, F(11,1039) = 36.200, p < .01, R2 = .277.Conclusion:Results indicate that EVALI cases may have had an immediate negative effect on attitudes but did not appear to decrease intention to use e-cigarettes. Results could inform future public health campaigns' programming and research. More research is needed to understand the long-term impact of EVALI on e-cigarette use.
      Citation: American Journal of Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2021-05-12T10:04:27Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08901171211016327
       
  • A Systematic Review of Multi-Component Comprehensive School Physical
           Activity Program (CSPAP) Interventions

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      Authors: Ann Pulling Kuhn, Peter Stoepker, Brian Dauenhauer, Russell L. Carson
      Abstract: American Journal of Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.
      Objective:To identify, review, and describe multicomponent physical activity (PA) interventions in terms of: (a) number and combination of Comprehensive School Physical Activity Program (CSPAP) components, (b) study characteristics, and (c) primary outcomes.Data Source:Five electronic databases (i.e., PubMed, PsychInfo, Physical Education Index, Sport Discus, and ERIC).Study Inclusion and Exclusion Criteria:Included articles were peer-reviewed, written in English language, published since 1987, and included multicomponent school-based interventions.Data Extraction:Data items extracted were: school level, setting, CSPAP component description, health outcomes, academic outcomes, main conclusion, and reference.Data Synthesis:Included articles were synthesized by: (1) CSPAP components utilized, and (2) research outcome measured (i.e., health or academic).Results:Across 32 studies, 11 included physical education plus 1 additional CSPAP component (PE + 1); 10 included PE + 2 additional CSPAP components; 8 included PE + 3 additional CSPAP components; and 1 included all 5 CSPAP components. Two other studies included 2 or 3 CSPAP components without PE. Most interventions targeted health outcomes (94%) rather than academic outcomes (6%).Conclusions:Multicomponent approaches aligned with CSPAPs are effective in promoting PA and other positive outcomes for youth in schools. Future research should seek to understand effects of CSPAP components on a variety of outcomes and settings.
      Citation: American Journal of Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2021-05-06T09:30:21Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08901171211013281
       
  • “A Bowl of Vegetables With Someone You Love”: Faith, Health
           and Workplace Well-Being

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      Authors: Paul E. Terry
      First page: 893
      Abstract: American Journal of Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.
      Worksite health and well-being initiatives will ideally be integrated with employers’ efforts to address diversity, equity and inclusion issues. Social Determinants of Health (SDOH) include race, class, community health, income and other variables that companies can play a role in ameliorating. As much as spirituality is commonly espoused as a component of a holistic approach to health promotion, making space to discuss faith and health remains an uncommon strategy in the workplace wellness movement. Recognizing the value on investment (VOI) in wellness has eclipsed a return on investment as a driver of an employer’s well-being strategy. This editorial argues that making space for learning about faith and health will intersect in vital ways with anti-racism work, diversity programs and similar efforts to eliminate health inequities, address SDOH and bolster the VOI of worksite well-being initiatives. A fictional dialogue between executives is used to review these issues and related literature.
      Citation: American Journal of Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2021-07-12T08:54:30Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08901171211030141
       
  • Improving Evidence-Based Program Repositories: Introducing the
           Evidence-Based Cancer Control Programs (EBCCP) Web Repository

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      Authors: Antoinette Percy-Laurry, Prajakta Adsul, Annabelle Uy, Cynthia Vinson
      First page: 897
      Abstract: American Journal of Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.
      To reduce the research to practice gap, promoting the utility of evidence-based repositories is essential among both practitioners and researchers. Organizing these repositories to address the needs of these audiences requires a user-centered design approach as proposed recently in an article by Harden et al, 2020. This commentary builds on the proposed solutions to introduce a recently redesigned Evidence-Based Cancer Control Programs (EBCCP) web repository (formerly Research-Tested Intervention Programs (RTIPs)) from the National Cancer Institute. Specifically, we describe the user-centered redesign process, strategies for broader dissemination of the repository using digital tools and provide future directions for the evidence-based program repository.
      Citation: American Journal of Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2021-04-08T08:02:11Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08901171211006589
       
  • Why Should Businesses Support Public Health'

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      Authors: Inge Myburgh, Ron Z. Goetzel, Enid Chung Roemer, Karen B. Kent
      First page: 900
      Abstract: American Journal of Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.
      The COVID-19 pandemic presents a unique opportunity to gain support from the business community for rebuilding a more effective and resilient public health infrastructure in the U.S. This commentary provides the rationale for more engaged business involvement in efforts to promote public health during the time of COVID-19. Drawing on the current pandemic, the commentary highlights the implications of a fragmented public health system for businesses and the nation at large, the shortcomings of which are apparent as never before.
      Citation: American Journal of Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2021-04-16T07:29:25Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08901171211009050
       
  • Virtual Group Visits: Hope for Improving Chronic Disease Management in
           Primary Care During and After the COVID-19 Pandemic

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      Authors: Jacob B. Mirsky, Anne N. Thorndike
      First page: 904
      Abstract: American Journal of Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.
      As health care systems respond to the COVID-19 pandemic, new virtual care approaches are emerging for health promotion and chronic disease management. Virtual group visits (VGVs) supporting a healthy lifestyle, adapted from the well-established shared medical appointment (SMA) model, hold promise as a primary care delivery tool for preventing and managing chronic disease. In order to establish VGVs as standard of care, evidence for clinical effectiveness, financial sustainability, and access for vulnerable populations is needed. In the future, VGVs could improve the quality and reach of chronic disease prevention and management strategies.
      Citation: American Journal of Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2021-04-28T07:14:03Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08901171211012543
       
  • Extent of and Reasons for Vaccine Hesitancy in Adults at High-Risk for
           Pneumococcal Disease

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      Authors: Justin Gatwood, Madison McKnight, Kelsey Frederick, Kenneth Hohmeier, Shiyar Kapan, Chi-Yang Chiu, Chelsea Renfro, Tracy Hagemann
      First page: 908
      Abstract: American Journal of Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose:To determine the extent of and reasons for hesitancy toward vaccination among adults at high-risk for pneumococcal disease.Design:Cross-sectional.Setting:Online survey in March-April 2019 via QuestionPro.Subjects:Tennessee adults (18-64 years) at high-risk of pneumococcal disease (n = 1,002).Measures:Modified version of the validated Vaccine Hesitancy Scale assessed vaccine-related beliefs, reasons for hesitancy, external influences on vaccination, and prior vaccinationAnalysis:Descriptive and inferential statistics provided an overview of the responses and comparisons among subgroups. Logistic regression determined the odds of being hesitant using the listed beliefs and influencers as predictors. Thematic analysis was performed on the qualitative data gathered from free response questions throughout the survey.Results:Analysis included 1,002 complete responses (12% response rate [total viewed = 8,331]) with 34.3% indicating hesitancy toward one or more recommended vaccinations, with 53% of which indicating hesitancy to the pneumococcal vaccine despite it being recommended by the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) for all respondents. The odds of vaccine hesitancy or resistance were higher in minorities (OR: 1.6; 95% CI: 1.19-2.11), those not believing others like them get vaccinated (OR: 1.82; 95% CI: 1.262-2.613), and respondents recalling negative media about vaccines (OR: 2.56; 95% CI: 1.797-3.643).Conclusions:Patients at high-risk of pneumococcal disease lack awareness of the need for the recommended vaccine, and provider education may need improving to increase vaccination in this population.
      Citation: American Journal of Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2021-03-04T09:39:42Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0890117121998141
       
  • Civic Engagement and Well-Being: Examining a Mediational Model Across
           Gender

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      Authors: Natalie Fenn, Mark L. Robbins, Lisa Harlow, Shanna Pearson-Merkowitz
      First page: 917
      Abstract: American Journal of Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose:The relationship between civic engagement and mental health is generally positive, yet particularly complex among those from low socioeconomic backgrounds and women. The current study examined pathways between civic engagement and well-being to clarify its merit as a health promotional tool for young adults.Design:Cross-sectional design using an online questionnaire.Setting:Participants were recruited at a mid-sized Northeastern US university.Sample:Participants (N = 438) were primarily White (78%) and female (72%).Measures:Demographics, socioeconomic status, civic engagement behavior, well-being, meaning in life, self-efficacy toward service, and social support.Analysis:Structural equation modeling to test an a priori model of civic engagement behavior and well-being in young adults. Models were conducted across men and women, covarying for social support.Results:The full effects model fit well, demonstrating positive relationships between civic engagement and well-being for both men and women with mediation by service self-efficacy and meaning in life (χ2(2) = 1.05, p = .59; CFI = 1.0; RMSEA = .00, 90%CI [.00, .07]; R 2 = .46). Type of engagement (civic, electoral, sociopolitical) showed mixed results in relation to well-being.Conclusion:Civic activity was associated with well-being when mediated by service self-efficacy while sociopolitical voice correlated to stronger well-being when mediated by meaning in life. Future longitudinal studies should be conducted among more socioeconomically diverse populations to verify the role of civic engagement in health promotion.
      Citation: American Journal of Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2021-03-19T09:04:39Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08901171211001242
       
  • Association Between Self-Reported Sedentary Behavior and Health-Related
           Quality of Life Among Multimorbidity Patients in Singapore

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      Authors: Jue Hua Lau, Eng Sing Lee, Yunjue Zhang, Janhavi Ajit Vaingankar, Edimansyah Abdin, Siow Ann Chong, Mythily Subramaniam
      First page: 929
      Abstract: American Journal of Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.
      Background:The study examined the association between sedentary behavior and self-rated health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in a sample of patients with multimorbidity in Singapore recruited from a primary care clinic.Methods:Sedentary behavior and physical activity were assessed with the International Physical Activity Questionnaire short form (IPAQ-SF). HRQoL was assessed with EuroQol-5 Dimension (EQ-5D) utility index, visual analogue scale (EQ-VAS) and its 5 subscales (Mobility, Self-care, Usual Activities, Pain/Discomfort, and Anxiety/Depression). Depression was assessed via Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9). Logistic and linear regression analyses adjusting for the effect of physical activity, depression, and sociodemographic variables (i.e., age, gender, ethnicity, education) were conducted.Results:932 patients participated in the study (mean age:64.5±8.5 years, range: 35-80) and 55% were men. Results indicated that women were less likely to have sedentary behavior (≥7 hrs/day) than men. Results indicated sedentary behavior was associated with lower EQ-5D index scores, but not EQ-VAS scores. Participants who were sedentary for ≥7 hrs/day were more likely to endorse having problems with mobility, self-care, and usual activities, but not with pain/discomfort, nor anxiety/depression.Conclusion:Sedentary behavior was associated with poorer HRQoL. There is a need for interventions and health promotions to reduce sedentary behavior in patients with multimorbidity.
      Citation: American Journal of Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2021-03-19T09:05:58Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08901171211001274
       
  • Theoretical Mediators of Diabetes Risk and Quality of Life Following a
           Diabetes Prevention Program for Latino Youth With Obesity

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      Authors: Erica G. Soltero, Stephanie L. Ayers, Marvyn A. Avalos, Armando Peña, Allison N. Williams, Micah L. Olson, Yolanda P. Konopken, Felipe G. Castro, Kimberly J. Arcoleo, Colleen S. Keller, Donald L. Patrick, Justin Jager, Gabriel Q. Shaibi
      First page: 939
      Abstract: American Journal of Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose:This study tested self-efficacy and social support for activity and dietary changes as mediators of changes in type 2 diabetes related outcomes following a lifestyle intervention among Latino youth.Setting and Intervention:Latino adolescents (14-16 years) with obesity (BMI% = 98.1 ± 1.4) were randomized to a 3-month intervention (n = 67) that fostered self-efficacy and social support through weekly, family-centered sessions or a comparison condition (n = 69).Measures:Primary outcomes included insulin sensitivity and weight specific quality of life. Mediators included self-efficacy, friend, and family social support for health behaviors. Data was collected at baseline, 3-months, 6-months, and 12-months.Analysis:Sequential path analysis was used to examine mediators as mechanisms by which the intervention influenced primary outcomes.Results:The intervention had a direct effect on family (β = 0.33, P < .01) and friend social support (β = 0.22, P < .001) immediately following the intervention (3-months). Increased family social support mediated the intervention’s effect on self-efficacy at 6-months (β = 0.09, P < .01). However, social support and self-efficacy did not mediate long-term changes in primary outcomes (P> .05) at 12-months.Conclusions:Family social support may improve self-efficacy for health behaviors in high-risk Latino youth, highlighting the important role of family diabetes prevention. Fostering family social support is a critical intervention target and more research is needed to understand family-level factors that have the potential to lead to long-term metabolic and psychosocial outcome in vulnerable youth.
      Citation: American Journal of Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2021-05-05T09:36:14Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08901171211012951
       
  • Neighborhood Environment and Child Health in Immigrant Families: Using
           Nationally Representative Individual, Family, and Community Datasets

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      Authors: Jeong-Kyun Choi, Megan Kelley, Dan Wang, Hannah Kerby
      First page: 948
      Abstract: American Journal of Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose:This study aimed to examine neighborhood effects on the physical and socioemotional health of children from immigrant families, after controlling for parents’ demographic characteristics, socioeconomic status, acculturation, and health care issues.Design:Pooled cross-sectional data were merged with community profiles.Setting:The United States in 2013, 2014, and 2015.Participants:10,399 children from immigrant families in the 2013-2015 National Health Interview Surveys and the U.S. Census Data.Measures:Both objective and subjective measures of neighborhood environments were assessed, including neighborhood physical disorder, socioeconomic status, demographic composition, community resources, and social trust.Analysis:Descriptive statistics, logistic regression models.Results:About half of the sampled children were male (51%); 68% were white; 56% were of Hispanic; and 34% were school-aged. Three neighborhood factors—neighborhood trust, area-level poverty rate, and the presence of primary care physician—were identified as significant predictors for child health outcomes. Foreign-born population, green space, and food desert were not significant. At the individual level, parents’ racial and ethnic minority status, non-marital status, and healthcare issues were found to be risk factors. Families’ financial resources and parental education were identified as protective factors of socioemotional health.Conclusion:Intervention approaches to build on neighborhood trust may have broad potential to improve child outcomes. Programs focusing on immigrant families with children in high poverty neighborhoods should be a high priority.
      Citation: American Journal of Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2021-04-28T07:38:44Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08901171211012522
       
  • Associations Between Occupational and Leisure-Time Physical Activity With
           

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      Authors: Marilyn Batan Wolff, Patrick J. O’Connor, Mark G. Wilson, Jennifer L. Gay
      First page: 957
      Abstract: American Journal of Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose:Examine the associations of occupational and leisure-time physical activity with job stress, burnout, and well-being among healthcare industry workers.Design:Quantitative; cross-sectional.Setting:Healthcare Industry.Sample:US Amazon Mechanical Turk participants (n = 550) employed in the healthcare industry, worked 35 hours or more per week, had ≥ 1 supervisor and ≥ 1 co-worker, and were ≥ 18 years old.Measures:Self-reported measures of occupational physical activity (OPA) and leisure-time physical activity (LTPA), employee well-being, job stress, and burnout operationalized as exhaustion and disengagement.Analysis:Associations between OPA and LTPA with employee well-being, job stress, exhaustion and disengagement were assessed with separate multiple linear regression models.Results:OPA had positive significant associations with job stress (β = 0.10, P value = .003) and exhaustion (β = 0.21, P value < .0001). No significant associations were found between OPA with other psychological outcomes. A significant inverse association was found between LTPA and exhaustion (β = −0.04, P value = .007).Conclusion:In a sample of U.S. health care workers, and consistent with prior epidemiological studies, greater LTPA was associated with lower feelings of exhaustion. In contrast, health care workers with greater OPA reported higher perceptions of job stress and exhaustion. The findings underscore the need for more research aimed at understanding relationships between OPA and psychological health among healthcare workers.
      Citation: American Journal of Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2021-06-09T09:12:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08901171211011372
       
  • Examination of the ‘5-2-1-0’ Recommendations in Racially Diverse Young
           Children Exposed to Tobacco Smoke

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      Authors: E. Melinda Mahabee-Gittens, Lili Ding, Ashley L. Merianos, Jane C. Khoury, Judith S. Gordon
      First page: 966
      Abstract: American Journal of Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose:The ‘5-2-1-0’ guidelines recommend that children: eat ≥5 servings of fruits/vegetables (‘5’), have ≤2 hours of screen-time (‘2’), have ≥1 hour of activity (‘1’), and drink 0 sugar-sweetened beverages (‘0’) daily. The pediatric emergency department (PED) treats children at risk for obesity and tobacco smoke exposure (TSE). We examined body mass index (BMI), overweight, obesity, TSE, and ‘5-2-1-0’ rates in children with TSE in the PED.Design:Cross-sectional study of PED children.Setting:The PED of a children’s hospital.Sample:Children with TSE>6 months-5 years old (N = 401).Measures:Sociodemographics, ‘5-2-1-0’ behaviors, BMI, and cotinine-confirmed TSE.Analysis:Associations between ‘5-2-1-0’ and sociodemographics were examined with logistic regression.Results:Mean (SD) age = 2.4 (1.6) years; 53.1% were Black; 65.8% had low-income; and 93.4% had TSE. Of 2-5-year-olds, mean (SD) BMI percentile was 66.2 (30.1), 16.1% were overweight and 20.6% were obese. In total, 10.5% attained ‘5’, 72.6% attained ‘2’, 57.8% of 2-5-year-olds attained ‘1’, and 9.8% attained ‘0’. Compared to White children, “other” race children were more likely to meet ‘5’ (aOR(95% CI):4.67(1.41, 5.45)); 2-5-years-olds (aOR(95%CI):0.60(0.38, 0.95)) and Black children (aOR(95%CI):0.36(0.21, 0.60)) were at decreased odds to meet ‘2’ compared to younger or White children, respectively. Compared to younger children, 2-5-year-olds were at decreased odds to meet ‘0’ (aOR(95%CI):0.08(0.02, 0.26)).Conclusion:Racially diverse, low-income children with TSE had low ‘5-2-1-0’ attainment. Interventions are needed to improve lifestyle habits in this population.
      Citation: American Journal of Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2021-03-01T09:12:30Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0890117121995772
       
  • Leisure-Time Physical Activity Reduces the Risk of Long-Term Sickness
           Absence Among Older Healthy Female Eldercare Workers

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      Authors: Rubén López-Bueno, Thomas Clausen, Joaquín Calatayud, José A. Casajús, Lars L. Andersen
      First page: 973
      Abstract: American Journal of Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose:This study aimed to examine the association between leisure-time physical activity (PA) and risk of long-term sickness absence (LTSA).Design:Data on LTSA (≥3 consecutive weeks during a 1-year follow-up) were acquired from the Danish Register for Evaluation of Marginalization and linked to a questionnaire via personal identification number.Setting:Eldercare workers from 36 Danish municipalities.Subjects:Data were retrieved from 4605 healthy Danish female eldercare (i.e., workers assisting senior citizens with daily activities and health) aged 19 to 69 years, who answered a questionnaire on health, and work environment in 2005.Measures:Calculated risk of LTSA and its association with self-reported leisure-time PA.Analysis:A Cox proportional hazards model was used to calculate adjusted hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI).Results:Eldercare workers showed significantly reduced risk of LTSA when performing moderate (HR = 0.67, 95%CI 0.47-0.96), and vigorous leisure-time PA (HR = 0.45, 95%CI 0.25-0.81) (reference group: sedentary). In subgroup analyses, females over 45 years showed a risk reduction of LTSA for moderate (HR = 0.54, 95%CI 0.32-0.90), and vigorous leisure-time PA (HR = 0.43, 95%CI 0.18-0.99), whereas younger eldercare workers did not show significant risk reductions for either moderate (HR = 0.86, 95%CI 0.51-1.43) or vigorous leisure-time PA (HR = 0.50, 95%CI 0.21-1.16) in the fully adjusted model.Conclusions:The results indicate that moderate and, particularly, vigorous leisure-time PA reduced risk of LTSA in eldercare workers aged over 45 years.
      Citation: American Journal of Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2021-02-22T09:42:21Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0890117121995789
       
  • Perceived Beliefs, Uncertainty, and Behavioral Responses During the
           COVID-19 Outbreak in China: Findings From a Convenience Sample

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      Authors: Dan Wu, Ian R. H. Rockett, Tingzhong Yang, Xiaozhao Yousef Yang, Mengmeng Wang, Can Jiao
      First page: 977
      Abstract: American Journal of Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose:To investigate perceived beliefs, uncertainty, and behavioral responses among Chinese residents toward the COVID-19 outbreak, and explore their relationships amid an incipient pandemic.Design:A cross-sectional correlational survey with a combination of a convenience and snowball sampling design.Setting:This study was conducted online from February 7 to 14, 2020, the third week after the lockdown of Wuhan city on January 23.Participants:A total of 2,654 residents was contacted, 2,534 agreed to participate, and 2,215 completed valid questionnaires. The sample covered 30 provinces, municipalities, autonomous regions of China, and a broader region.Measures:The Uncertainty About COVID-19 Scale was applied to assess perceived public uncertainty. Five dimensions of health beliefs about COVID-19 and 12 health-related response behaviors were measured.Analysis:Univariate analysis and multiple linear regression models were used to identify associations. Mediation was assessed by a bootstrapping technique.Results:Five constructs of health beliefs were found to be significant predictors of multiple response behaviors. Uncertainty about COVID-19 has a direct relationship with general response behaviors (β=-0.119**) and sanitization practices (β=-0.068**). Emergency coping behaviors aside, uncertainty also partially mediated associations between perceived susceptibility, perceived effectiveness, and perceived barriers influencing general response behaviors and sanitization practices, respectively.Conclusion:Findings provide evidence-based information to government and policymakers for designing effective health communication messages and intervention strategies by targeting the key constructs of the health belief model and reducing perceived uncertainty about COVID-19. They support public health-related response behaviors to prevent COVID-19 spread among the population.
      Citation: American Journal of Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2021-03-31T09:03:09Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08901171211004249
       
  • Association of the Quality Rating and Improvement System, Texas Rising
           Star, on Physical Activity and Screen Time Policies and Practices in Texas
           Child Care Centers

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      Authors: Erin E. Dooley, Cari Browning, Christina A. Thi, Deanna M. Hoelscher, Courtney E. Byrd-Williams
      First page: 984
      Abstract: American Journal of Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose:Quality rating and improvement systems (QRIS) are systems approaches to assist states in providing high quality early childhood education. Texas Rising Star (TRS), a voluntary QRIS, exceeds state licensing standards and meets some obesity prevention guidelines. This study examines differences in physical activity, screen time, and outdoor policies and practices by QRIS certification.Design:Cross-sectional.Setting:Online.Sample:After exclusion criteria, respondents were 431 Texas childcare centers.Measures:2016 survey of policies and Go NAPSACC best practices.Analysis:Chi-square and t-tests indicated differences in 1) practices and 2) policies by QRIS status.Results:TRS-certified centers reported more policies for physical activity (M = 4.57 ± 3.07 vs. 3.61 ± 2.95, p = 0.009) and screen time (M = 1.91 ± 1.84 vs. 1.28 ± 1.56, p < 0.001) than non-certified centers. TRS-certified centers reported significantly higher frequencies for 7 of 14 physical activity practices, however no significant differences for screen time practices were found. Additionally, TRS-certified centers reported more outdoor practices, including more classrooms/storage (p < 0.001) and vegetable gardens (p = 0.025).Conclusion:TRS-certified centers reported more physical activity policies and practices, more screen time policies, and more outdoor practices. TRS certification was not associated with screen time practices. QRIS can be a practical way to insert obesity prevention in early care and education. Using items from a widely used survey enables comparisons, however future research is needed in larger-scale studies. Some COVID-19 implications are discussed.
      Citation: American Journal of Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2021-03-31T09:02:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08901171211003826
       
  • A Comparison of Two Diabetes Self-Management Education Programs for the
           Reduction of Participant A1c Levels

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      Authors: Edward Sharpless, Nancy Borkowski, Stephen J. O’Connor, Larry Hearld, Jeffery Szychowski
      First page: 988
      Abstract: American Journal of Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose:Compare the effectiveness of two educational teaching methods for diabetic patients.Design:Quasi-experimental study comparing two interventions using a pretest/post-test design.Setting:Three clinics within a western U.S. regional health system.Subjects:818 adult diabetic participants (60.5 mean age, 52% female) attended one to four sessions between 2013-2017, and had A1c tests within 180 days of first attended session and 30 to 365 days after last attended session.Intervention:A group-based, highly interactive learning experience (n = 561) and a traditional, lecture-style class (n = 257).Measures:Pre and post measures of A1c.Analysis:Paired t-tests measured change within each group pre-post intervention. Two-sample t-tests measured mean change pre-post intervention between the two groups. Multivariable linear regression measured mean change in A1c between groups, adjusted for pre-test scores and controlling for demographic variables.Results:Both interactive and traditional teaching interventions were effective at significantly reducing patient A1c levels by 1.3 (p < 0.001) and 1.0 (p < 0.001) points respectively. The between groups difference in A1c was not significant, t(512) = 1.66, p = 0.0985, but when controlling for age, pre-A1c and days post-A1c, the interactive intervention was significantly (p < 0.05) more effective reducing patient A1c levels by 0.19 points than the traditional intervention.Conclusion:Group-based, interactive diabetes self-management education programs may be an effective model for reducing patient A1c levels.
      Citation: American Journal of Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2021-04-01T09:05:28Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08901171211003829
       
  • Face Mask Use During the COVID-19 Outbreak: How Did Educated Brazilians
           Behave'

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      Authors: Danilo Euclides Fernandes, Michelle T. P. Riguetti, Gianna Mastroianni Kirsztajn
      First page: 991
      Abstract: American Journal of Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose:To describe Brazilians’ behavior regarding face mask use and health literacy during the COVID-19 pandemic before and after the Ministry of Health of Brazil formal recommendation.Design:Cross-sectional surveys using a web-based questionnaire. Participants were recruited via snowball techniques.Setting:São Paulo state, the urban epicenter of the COVID-19 pandemic in Brazil at the time of the study.Participants:2.203 clicks to the survey link and 1.223 surveys completed (55.5% response rate). However, only 1118 surveys were considered after the exclusion criteria (>18 years-old and consent).Measures:Demographics, educational status, COVID-19-related symptoms (headache, cough, sore throat, rhinorrhea, fever, asthenia, diarrhea, dyspnea, nausea, vomiting, vertigo, anosmia, and ageusia), and face mask use.Analysis:Self-reports of COVID-19 symptoms were categorized as dichotomous variables (Cohen’s h = 0.94). Pearson Chi-square test evaluated differences between T1 and T2 and logistic multiple regression analyzed odds-ratio for the presence of symptoms and independent variables.Results:Face mask use increased from 43.60% in T1 to 90.52% in T2 (P < .0001) as the pandemic went on. Health literacy also changed within 2 weeks and people started to assume everybody should use face masks (62.93% in T1 vs 94.12% in T2; P < .0001; ES = 0.29) during outside activities (43.60% in T1 vs 90.52% in T2; P < .0001; ES = 0.39). Self-reports of face mask use were associated with fewer self-reports of COVID-19 symptoms (OR = 0.65, P = .01, 95% CI 0.48; 0.88).Conclusion:Face mask use was already high among educated Brazilians before the formal recommendation by the authorities. This may have contributed to fewer self-reports of COVID-19-related symptoms.
      Citation: American Journal of Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2021-04-27T07:45:31Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08901171211011352
       
  • Using the CDC Worksite Health ScoreCard to Promote Organizational Change

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      Authors: Richard Scott Safeer, Meg Mia Lucik, Katherine Claire Christel
      First page: 997
      Abstract: American Journal of Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose:To measure the impact of tying adoption of evidence-based worksite health promotion (WHP) interventions to annual organizational strategic objectives, as measured by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Worksite Health ScoreCard (ScoreCard).Design:A prospective cohort study following Johns Hopkins Medicine (JHM) affiliates against industry-specific and large employer benchmarks from 2016-2020.Settings:JHM, the largest private employer in Maryland with facilities in Florida and the District of Columbia.Subjects:Twelve JHM affiliates representing over 40,000 employees.Intervention:A strategic objective was established annually based on the ScoreCard and organizational priorities.Measures:JHM affiliates measured their WHP efforts annually using the ScoreCard. CDC industry-specific and large employer benchmarks were collected for comparison.Analysis:ScoreCard data was assessed annually to measure deviations from CDC benchmarks, determine whether strategic objectives were met, and inform additional annual objectives.Results:JHM demonstrated improvement from 8.9 percentage points above industry-specific and 3.4 percentage points below large employer benchmarks in 2016, to 26.4 percentage points above industry-specific and 21.8 percentage points above large employer benchmarks in 2020.Conclusion:Large employers face unique challenges in implementing WHP programs. Our study suggests embedding health promotion in annual strategic objectives may alleviate these challenges by prioritizing the goal and ensuring adequate resources to be successful. There are however, some limitations on using benchmarking data for comparison.
      Citation: American Journal of Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2021-06-07T09:31:46Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08901171211012948
       
  • The Impact of Theory in HPV Vaccination Promotion Research: A Systematic
           Review and Meta-Analysis

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      Authors: Xizhu Xiao, Danielle Ka Lai Lee, Rachel Min Wong, Porismita Borah
      First page: 1002
      Abstract: American Journal of Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.
      Objective:Numerous studies examined HPV vaccination promotional strategies. However, an overview of theory use, a synthesis of strategies’ effectiveness and an examination of the moderating influence of theory are absent.Data Source:We retrieved studies from Academic Search Complete, Business Source Complete, PubMed, PsycINFO, Web of Science, CMMC, CINAHL, and MEDLINE.Study Inclusion and Exclusion Criteria:1) peer-reviewed articles written in English, 2) experimental or quasi-experimental, 3) measure HPV vaccination-related outcomes, 4) had to contain a control condition and report statistics necessary for conversion (for meta-analysis only).Data Extraction:70 and 30 studies were included for the systematic review and meta-analysis respectively.Data Synthesis:Four major categories were coded: study information, theory use, type of theory, and outcomes. Two independent coders coded the sample (Cohen’s Kappa ranged from .8 to 1).Results:Most of the studies were based in the U.S. (77%, k = 54) with convenient samples (80%, k = 56), targeted toward females (46%, k = 32), and around a quarter did not employ any theories (47%, k = 33). Among theory-driven studies, the most commonly used were Framing (22%, k = 19), Health Belief Model (HBM; 13%, k = 12), and Narrative (7%, k = 6). Among controlled studies, promotional strategies were significantly more effective compared to the control (r+ = .25, p < .001). Strategies guided by the information, motivation, behavioral skills model (IMB) were more effective (r+ = .75, p < .001) than studies guided by framing theory (r+ = −.23, p < .001), HBM (r+ = .01, p < .001), and other theories (r+ = .11, p < .001).Conclusion:This review contributes to HPV vaccination promotion literature by offering a comprehensive overview of promotional strategies and practical suggestions for future research and practices.
      Citation: American Journal of Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2021-05-05T09:35:30Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08901171211012524
       
  • Place, Power, and Premature Mortality: A Rapid Scoping Review on the
           Health of Women in Appalachia

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      Authors: Jessica R. Thompson, Lauren R. Risser, Madeline N. Dunfee, Nancy E. Schoenberg, Jessica G. Burke
      First page: 1015
      Abstract: American Journal of Health Promotion, Ahead of Print.
      Objective:Appalachian women continue to die younger than in other US regions. We performed a rapid scoping review to summarize women’s health research in Appalachia from 2000 to 2019, including health topics, study populations, theoretical frameworks, methods, and findings.Data Source:We searched bibliographic databases (eg, PubMed, PsycINFO, Google Scholar) for literature focusing on women’s health in Appalachia.Study Inclusion and Exclusion Criteria:Included articles were: (1) on women’s health in Appalachia; (2) published January 2000 to June 2019; (3) peer-reviewed; and (4) written in English. We excluded studies without reported data findings.Data Extraction:Two coders reviewed articles for descriptive information to create summary tables comparing variables of interest.Data Synthesis:Two coders co-reviewed a sub-sample to ensure consensus and refine data charting categories. We categorized major findings across the social-ecological framework.Results:A search of nearly 2 decades of literature revealed 81 articles, which primarily focused on cancer disparities (49.4%) and prenatal/pregnancy outcomes (23.5%). Many of these research studies took place in Central Appalachia (eg, 42.0% in Kentucky) with reproductive or middle-aged women (82.7%). Half of the studies employed quantitative methods, and half used qualitative methods, with few mixed method or community-engaged approaches (3.7%). Nearly half (40.7%) did not specify a theoretical framework. Findings included complex multi-level factors with few articles exploring the co-occurrence of factors across multiple levels.Conclusions:Future studies should: 1) systematically include Appalachian women at various life stages from under-represented sub-regions; 2) expand the use of rigorous methods and specified theoretical frameworks to account for complex interactions of social-ecological factors; and 3) build upon existing community assets to improve health in this vulnerable population.
      Citation: American Journal of Health Promotion
      PubDate: 2021-04-28T07:34:02Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08901171211011388
       
 
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