Publisher: Sage Publications   (Total: 1166 journals)

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Showing 1 - 200 of 1166 Journals sorted alphabetically
AADE in Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Abstracts in Anthropology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 29)
Academic Pathology     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Accounting History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18, SJR: 0.527, CiteScore: 1)
Acta Radiologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.754, CiteScore: 2)
Acta Radiologica Open     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Acta Sociologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39, SJR: 0.939, CiteScore: 2)
Action Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 53, SJR: 0.308, CiteScore: 1)
Active Learning in Higher Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 396, SJR: 1.397, CiteScore: 2)
Adaptive Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.288, CiteScore: 1)
Administration & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18, SJR: 0.675, CiteScore: 1)
Adoption & Fostering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25, SJR: 0.313, CiteScore: 0)
Adsorption Science & Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.258, CiteScore: 1)
Adult Education Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 258, SJR: 0.566, CiteScore: 2)
Adult Learning     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 51)
Advances in Dental Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 1.791, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Developing Human Resources     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35, SJR: 0.614, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Mechanical Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 156, SJR: 0.272, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Methods and Practices in Psychological Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20)
Advances in Structural Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 51, SJR: 0.599, CiteScore: 1)
AERA Open     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
Affilia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.496, CiteScore: 1)
Africa Spectrum     Open Access   (Followers: 17)
Agrarian South : J. of Political Economy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Air, Soil & Water Research     Open Access   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.214, CiteScore: 1)
Alexandria : The J. of National and Intl. Library and Information Issues     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 68)
Allergy & Rhinology     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
AlterNative : An Intl. J. of Indigenous Peoples     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 39, SJR: 0.194, CiteScore: 0)
Alternative Law J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.176, CiteScore: 0)
Alternatives : Global, Local, Political     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.351, CiteScore: 1)
Alternatives to Laboratory Animals     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.297, CiteScore: 1)
American Behavioral Scientist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26, SJR: 0.982, CiteScore: 2)
American Economist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
American Educational Research J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 259, SJR: 2.913, CiteScore: 3)
American J. of Alzheimer's Disease and Other Dementias     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23, SJR: 0.67, CiteScore: 2)
American J. of Cosmetic Surgery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
American J. of Evaluation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18, SJR: 0.646, CiteScore: 2)
American J. of Health Promotion     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35, SJR: 0.807, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Hospice and Palliative Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 47, SJR: 0.65, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Law & Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.204, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Lifestyle Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.431, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Medical Quality     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.777, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Men's Health     Open Access   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.595, CiteScore: 2)
American J. of Rhinology and Allergy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.972, CiteScore: 2)
American J. of Sports Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 249, SJR: 3.949, CiteScore: 6)
American Politics Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 36, SJR: 1.313, CiteScore: 1)
American Review of Public Administration     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28, SJR: 2.062, CiteScore: 2)
American Sociological Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 356, SJR: 6.333, CiteScore: 6)
American String Teacher     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Analytical Chemistry Insights     Open Access   (Followers: 26, SJR: 0.224, CiteScore: 1)
Angiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.849, CiteScore: 2)
Animation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.197, CiteScore: 0)
Annals of Clinical Biochemistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.634, CiteScore: 1)
Annals of Otology, Rhinology & Laryngology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20, SJR: 0.807, CiteScore: 1)
Annals of Pharmacotherapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 59, SJR: 1.096, CiteScore: 2)
Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 51, SJR: 1.225, CiteScore: 3)
Annals of the ICRP     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.548, CiteScore: 1)
Anthropocene Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 3.341, CiteScore: 7)
Anthropological Theory     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 48, SJR: 0.739, CiteScore: 1)
Antitrust Bulletin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Antiviral Chemistry and Chemotherapy     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.635, CiteScore: 2)
Antyajaa : Indian J. of Women and Social Change     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Applied Biosafety     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.131, CiteScore: 0)
Applied Psychological Measurement     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21, SJR: 1.17, CiteScore: 1)
Applied Spectroscopy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 27, SJR: 0.489, CiteScore: 2)
Armed Forces & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25, SJR: 0.29, CiteScore: 1)
Arthaniti : J. of Economic Theory and Practice     Full-text available via subscription  
Arts and Humanities in Higher Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 49, SJR: 0.305, CiteScore: 1)
Asia Pacific Media Educator     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.23, CiteScore: 0)
Asia-Pacific J. of Management Research and Innovation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Asia-Pacific J. of Public Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.558, CiteScore: 1)
Asia-Pacific J. of Rural Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Asian and Pacific Migration J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.324, CiteScore: 1)
Asian Cardiovascular and Thoracic Annals     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.305, CiteScore: 0)
Asian J. of Comparative Politics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Asian J. of Legal Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Asian J. of Management Cases     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.101, CiteScore: 0)
ASN Neuro     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 1.534, CiteScore: 3)
Assessment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19, SJR: 1.519, CiteScore: 3)
Assessment for Effective Intervention     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.578, CiteScore: 1)
Australasian J. of Early Childhood     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.535, CiteScore: 1)
Australasian Psychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18, SJR: 0.433, CiteScore: 1)
Australian & New Zealand J. of Psychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30, SJR: 1.801, CiteScore: 2)
Australian and New Zealand J. of Criminology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 546, SJR: 0.612, CiteScore: 1)
Australian J. of Career Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Australian J. of Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 51, SJR: 0.403, CiteScore: 1)
Australian J. of Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.497, CiteScore: 1)
Autism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 355, SJR: 1.739, CiteScore: 4)
Autism & Developmental Language Impairments     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
Avian Biology Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.401, CiteScore: 1)
Behavior Modification     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.877, CiteScore: 2)
Behavioral and Cognitive Neuroscience Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Behavioral Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Beyond Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Bible Translator     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Biblical Theology Bulletin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24, SJR: 0.184, CiteScore: 0)
Big Data & Society     Open Access   (Followers: 55)
Biochemistry Insights     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Bioinformatics and Biology Insights     Open Access   (Followers: 12, SJR: 1.141, CiteScore: 2)
Biological Research for Nursing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.685, CiteScore: 2)
Biomarker Insights     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.81, CiteScore: 2)
Biomarkers in Cancer     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Biomedical Engineering and Computational Biology     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Biomedical Informatics Insights     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Bioscope: South Asian Screen Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.235, CiteScore: 0)
BMS: Bulletin of Sociological Methodology/Bulletin de Méthodologie Sociologique     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.226, CiteScore: 0)
Body & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29, SJR: 1.531, CiteScore: 3)
Bone and Tissue Regeneration Insights     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Brain and Neuroscience Advances     Open Access  
Brain Science Advances     Open Access  
Breast Cancer : Basic and Clinical Research     Open Access   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.823, CiteScore: 2)
British J. of Music Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
British J. of Occupational Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 252, SJR: 0.323, CiteScore: 1)
British J. of Pain     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31, SJR: 0.579, CiteScore: 2)
British J. of Politics and Intl. Relations     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39, SJR: 0.91, CiteScore: 2)
British J. of Visual Impairment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.337, CiteScore: 1)
British J.ism Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
BRQ Business Review Quarterly     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Building Acoustics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.215, CiteScore: 1)
Building Services Engineering Research & Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.583, CiteScore: 1)
Bulletin of Science, Technology & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Business & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Business and Professional Communication Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.348, CiteScore: 1)
Business Information Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17, SJR: 0.279, CiteScore: 0)
Business Perspectives and Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Cahiers Élisabéthains     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.111, CiteScore: 0)
Calcutta Statistical Association Bulletin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
California Management Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 37, SJR: 2.209, CiteScore: 4)
Canadian Association of Radiologists J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.463, CiteScore: 1)
Canadian J. of Kidney Health and Disease     Open Access   (Followers: 8, SJR: 1.007, CiteScore: 2)
Canadian J. of Nursing Research (CJNR)     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Canadian J. of Occupational Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 166, SJR: 0.626, CiteScore: 1)
Canadian J. of Psychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28, SJR: 1.769, CiteScore: 3)
Canadian J. of School Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.266, CiteScore: 1)
Canadian Pharmacists J. / Revue des Pharmaciens du Canada     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.536, CiteScore: 1)
Cancer Control     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Cancer Growth and Metastasis     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Cancer Informatics     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.64, CiteScore: 1)
Capital and Class     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.282, CiteScore: 1)
Cardiac Cath Lab Director     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Cardiovascular and Thoracic Open     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Career Development and Transition for Exceptional Individuals     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.44, CiteScore: 1)
Cartilage     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.889, CiteScore: 3)
Cell Transplantation     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 1.023, CiteScore: 3)
Cephalalgia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 1.581, CiteScore: 3)
Cephalalgia Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Child Language Teaching and Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34, SJR: 0.501, CiteScore: 1)
Child Maltreatment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 1.22, CiteScore: 3)
Child Neurology Open     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Childhood     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19, SJR: 0.894, CiteScore: 2)
Childhood Obesity and Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
China Information     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.767, CiteScore: 2)
China Report     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.221, CiteScore: 0)
Chinese J. of Sociology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Christian Education J. : Research on Educational Ministry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Chronic Illness     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.672, CiteScore: 2)
Chronic Respiratory Disease     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.808, CiteScore: 2)
Chronic Stress     Open Access  
Citizenship, Social and Economics Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.145, CiteScore: 0)
Cleft Palate-Craniofacial J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.757, CiteScore: 1)
Clin-Alert     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Clinical and Applied Thrombosis/Hemostasis     Open Access   (Followers: 32, SJR: 0.49, CiteScore: 1)
Clinical and Translational Neuroscience     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Clinical Case Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.364, CiteScore: 1)
Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 45, SJR: 0.73, CiteScore: 2)
Clinical EEG and Neuroscience     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.552, CiteScore: 2)
Clinical Ethics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.296, CiteScore: 1)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Arthritis and Musculoskeletal Disorders     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.537, CiteScore: 2)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Blood Disorders     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.314, CiteScore: 2)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Cardiology     Open Access   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.686, CiteScore: 2)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Case Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.283, CiteScore: 1)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Circulatory, Respiratory and Pulmonary Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.425, CiteScore: 2)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Ear, Nose and Throat     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Endocrinology and Diabetes     Open Access   (Followers: 33, SJR: 0.63, CiteScore: 2)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Oncology     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 1.129, CiteScore: 3)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Pediatrics     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Psychiatry     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Reproductive Health     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.776, CiteScore: 0)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Therapeutics     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.172, CiteScore: 0)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Trauma and Intensive Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Women's Health     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Clinical Nursing Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34, SJR: 0.471, CiteScore: 1)
Clinical Pathology     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Clinical Pediatrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25, SJR: 0.487, CiteScore: 1)
Clinical Psychological Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16, SJR: 3.281, CiteScore: 5)
Clinical Rehabilitation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 78, SJR: 1.322, CiteScore: 3)
Clinical Risk     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.133, CiteScore: 0)
Clinical Trials     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22, SJR: 2.399, CiteScore: 2)
Clothing and Textiles Research J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28, SJR: 0.36, CiteScore: 1)
Collections : A J. for Museum and Archives Professionals     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Common Law World Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Communication & Sport     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.385, CiteScore: 1)
Communication and the Public     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Communication Disorders Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.458, CiteScore: 1)
Communication Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24, SJR: 2.171, CiteScore: 3)
Community College Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 1.451, CiteScore: 1)
Comparative Political Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 291, SJR: 3.772, CiteScore: 3)
Compensation & Benefits Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Competition & Change     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.843, CiteScore: 2)

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Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Clinical Psychological Science
Journal Prestige (SJR): 3.281
Citation Impact (citeScore): 5
Number of Followers: 16  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 2167-7026 - ISSN (Online) 2167-7034
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1166 journals]
  • The Factor Structure of Social Cognition in Schizophrenia: A Focus on
           Replication With Confirmatory Factor Analysis and Machine Learning

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Philipp Riedel, William P. Horan, Junghee Lee, Gerhard S. Hellemann, Michael F. Green
      Abstract: Clinical Psychological Science, Ahead of Print.
      Social cognition has become a major focus in psychosis research aimed at explaining heterogeneity in functional outcome and developing interventions oriented to functional recovery. However, there is still no consensus on the structure of social cognition in psychosis, and research in this area has been plagued by lack of replication. Our first goal was to replicate the factor structure of social cognition using nearly identical tasks in independent samples. Our second goal was to externally validate the factors as they relate to nonsocial cognition and various symptoms in the prediction of functioning using machine learning. Confirmatory factor analyses validated a three-factor model for social cognition in psychosis (low-level, high-level, attributional bias factor). A least absolute shrinkage and selection operator regression and cross-validation provided evidence for external validity of data-driven linear models including the social-cognitive factors, nonsocial cognition, and symptoms. We addressed the replicability problems that have impeded research in this area, and our results will guide future psychosis studies.
      Citation: Clinical Psychological Science
      PubDate: 2020-10-05T11:40:43Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2167702620951527
       
  • Does Distanced Self-Talk Facilitate Emotion Regulation Across a Range of
           Emotionally Intense Experiences'

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Ariana Orvell, Brian D. Vickers, Brittany Drake, Philippe Verduyn, Ozlem Ayduk, Jason Moser, John Jonides, Ethan Kross
      Abstract: Clinical Psychological Science, Ahead of Print.
      Research indicates that a subtle shift in language—silently referring to oneself using one’s own name and non–first-person-singular pronouns (i.e., distanced self-talk)—promotes emotion regulation. Yet it remains unclear whether the efficacy of distanced self-talk depends on the intensity of the negative experience reflected on and whether the benefits extend to emotionally vulnerable individuals. Two high-powered experiments addressed these issues. Distanced as opposed to immersed self-talk reduced emotional reactivity when people reflected on negative experiences that varied in their emotional intensity. These findings held when participants focused on future and past autobiographical events and when they scored high on individual difference measures of emotional vulnerability. The results also generalized across various types of negative events. These findings illuminate the functionality of language for allowing people to regulate their emotions when reflecting on negative experiences across the spectrum of emotional intensity and highlight the need for future research to examine the clinical implications of this technique.
      Citation: Clinical Psychological Science
      PubDate: 2020-10-05T11:40:23Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2167702620951539
       
  • Spontaneous Self-Distancing Mediates the Association Between Working
           Memory Capacity and Emotion Regulation Success

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: T. H. Stanley Seah, Lindsey M. Matt, Karin G. Coifman
      Abstract: Clinical Psychological Science, Ahead of Print.
      Self-distancing is associated with adaptive emotion regulation (ER), thereby making it a common treatment target across psychotherapies. However, less is known about cognitive processes that facilitate self-distancing. Working memory capacity (WMC) has been associated with self-distancing and ER, although research has not directly examined WMC and spontaneous self-distancing activity. Here, we tested the association between WMC and self-distancing (indexed by pronoun use) in relation to ER during a negative-mood induction in college students (N = 209). Results suggested a mediation model: Higher WMC predicted lower I and greater we pronouns (i.e., greater self-distancing), which in turn predicted lower negative affect. Furthermore, higher WMC predicted greater we pronouns, which predicted higher positive affect. No significant mediation was observed for you. These findings enrich current theoretical models describing WMC and self-distancing in ER and suggest important future research to further elucidate the cognitive processes underlying self-distancing with implications for clinical practice.
      Citation: Clinical Psychological Science
      PubDate: 2020-10-02T12:39:08Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2167702620953636
       
  • Trait Negative Affect Interacts With Ovarian Hormones to Predict Risk for
           Emotional Eating

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Megan E. Mikhail, Pamela K. Keel, S. Alexandra Burt, Cheryl L. Sisk, Michael Neale, Steven Boker, Kelly L. Klump
      Abstract: Clinical Psychological Science, Ahead of Print.
      Ovarian hormones significantly influence dysregulated eating in females. However, most women do not develop appreciable disordered eating, which suggests that ovarian hormones may not affect all women equally. We examined whether individual differences in trait negative affect (NA) moderate ovarian hormone–dysregulated eating associations in 446 women who provided saliva samples for hormone measurements and ratings of NA and emotional eating daily for 45 consecutive days. Women were at greatest risk for emotional eating when they had high trait NA and experienced a hormonal milieu characterized by low estradiol or high progesterone. Although effects were evident in all women, the combination of high trait NA and high progesterone was particularly risky for women with a history of clinically significant binge-eating episodes. These findings provide initial evidence that affective and hormonal risk interact to promote emotional eating and that effects may be amplified in women with clinically significant binge eating.
      Citation: Clinical Psychological Science
      PubDate: 2020-10-02T12:38:28Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2167702620951535
       
  • Integrating Multiple Informants’ Reports: How Conceptual and Measurement
           Models May Address Long-Standing Problems in Clinical Decision-Making

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Bridget A. Makol, Eric A. Youngstrom, Sarah J. Racz, Noor Qasmieh, Lara E. Glenn, Andres De Los Reyes
      Abstract: Clinical Psychological Science, Ahead of Print.
      Assessing youth psychopathology involves collecting multiple informants’ reports. Yet multi-informant reports often disagree, which necessitates integrative strategies that optimize predictive power. The trait-score approach leverages principal components analysis to account for the context and perspective from which informants provide reports. This approach may boost the predictive power of multi-informant reports and thus warrants rigorous testing. We tested the trait score approach using multi-informant reports of adolescent social anxiety in a mixed clinical and community sample of adolescents (N = 127). The trait score incrementally predicted observed social anxiety (βs = 0.47–0.67) and referral status (odds ratios = 2.66–6.53) above and beyond individual informants’ reports and a composite of informants’ reports. The trait score predicted observed behavior at magnitudes well above those typically observed for individual informants’ reports of internalizing psychopathology (i.e., rs = .01–.15). Findings demonstrate the ability of the trait score to improve prediction of clinical indices and potentially transform widely used practices in multi-informant assessments.
      Citation: Clinical Psychological Science
      PubDate: 2020-09-23T08:16:33Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2167702620924439
       
  • Genetic and Environmental Influences on Disgust Proneness, Contamination
           Sensitivity, and Their Covariance

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      Authors: Joshua M. Tybur, Laura W. Wesseldijk, Patrick Jern
      Abstract: Clinical Psychological Science, Ahead of Print.
      Dozens of studies have indicated that individuals more prone to experiencing disgust have stronger symptoms of anxiety disorders—especially contamination sensitivity. However, no work has informed the degree to which this relationship arises from genetic factors versus environmental factors. In the present study, we fill this gap by measuring disgust proneness and contamination sensitivity in a sample of 7,199 twins and siblings of twins, including 1,411 complete twin pairs. Disgust proneness was related to contamination sensitivity, r = .32. Multivariate twin modeling revealed that genetic factors accounted for 34% and 40% of the variance in disgust proneness and contamination sensitivity, respectively, and that the correlation between the two traits reflected overlapping genetic (54%) and unshared environmental (46%)—but not shared environmental—influences. Although consistent with work indicating that disgust proneness relates to contamination sensitivity, results suggest that prevailing parental-modeling hypotheses for explaining this relationship be reevaluated.
      Citation: Clinical Psychological Science
      PubDate: 2020-09-15T09:59:06Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2167702620951510
       
  • Ruminative Inertia and Its Association With Current Severity and Lifetime
           Course of Depression

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Christian A. L. Bean, Luke F. Heggeness, David A. Kalmbach, Jeffrey A. Ciesla
      Abstract: Clinical Psychological Science, Ahead of Print.
      Rumination has been consistently shown to play a critical role in the severity and course of depression. Relatively understudied, however, is the nature of rumination across time and how individual differences in the temporal dynamics of rumination may be related to depression. In this study, we investigated the association between ruminative inertia (the degree to which rumination levels are resistant to change from day to day) and both current and past depression in a clinical sample. Participants (N = 71) completed daily-diary surveys for 3 weeks. Ruminative inertia was positively associated with current depressive symptoms and negatively associated with the number of past depressive episodes. These findings suggest that more severe depressive symptoms are associated with rumination that is more resistant to change over time, whereas a greater number of past depressive episodes is related to less ruminative inertia. Additional research is needed to explore the directionality of these effects.
      Citation: Clinical Psychological Science
      PubDate: 2020-09-15T09:58:25Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2167702620949174
       
  • Trajectories of Distress Following the Great East Japan Earthquake: A
           Multiwave Prospective Study

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      Authors: Robin Goodwin, Kemmyo Sugiyama, Shaojing Sun, Masahito Takahashi, Jun Aida
      Abstract: Clinical Psychological Science, Ahead of Print.
      The March 2011 Great East Japan Earthquake, tsunami, and nuclear leak were complex traumas. We examined psychological distress in the years following the earthquake using growth mixture modeling to classify responses from 2,599 linked respondents (2012–2016). We identified four classes of trajectories following the disaster: resilient (76% of respondents), delayed distress (8%), recovery (8%), and chronic distress (7%). Compared with the resilient class, other class members were less likely to be female and had less social support. Survivors in the recovery group were more likely to live in prefabricated housing. Although distress has decreased over time, specific populations continue to require targeted intervention.
      Citation: Clinical Psychological Science
      PubDate: 2020-09-15T09:58:05Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2167702620949156
       
  • The Role of Attentional Control in Cognitive Deficits Associated With
           Chronic Pain

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      Authors: Hazel K. Godfrey, Amy T. Walsh, Ronald Fischer, Gina M. Grimshaw
      Abstract: Clinical Psychological Science, Ahead of Print.
      Cognitive deficits in chronic pain are often attributed to difficulties in attentional control. According to the deficit view, these difficulties stem from a reduction in attentional capacity driven by attentional focus on pain experience; alternatively, according to the motivated-attention view, attentional biases toward pain-relevant threats in the environment reduce attention available for everyday tasks and goals. We tested both accounts using a task in which 72 people with chronic pain and 72 without chronic pain performed a simple perceptual task while attempting to ignore pain-relevant images of body mutilations or neutral scenes. They also completed a common test of attentional control. Although people with chronic pain reported subjective difficulty with attentional control and were slower on both tasks, groups did not differ on behavioral measures of attentional control. Findings suggest that attentional control may not be an optimal target for interventions intended to improve cognitive function in chronic pain.
      Citation: Clinical Psychological Science
      PubDate: 2020-08-10T07:55:58Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2167702620925744
       
  • Reward Processing Modulates the Association Between Trauma Exposure and
           Externalizing Psychopathology

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      Authors: Steven W. Kasparek, Jessica L. Jenness, Katie A. McLaughlin
      Abstract: Clinical Psychological Science, Ahead of Print.
      Childhood adversity is common and strongly associated with risk for psychopathology. Identifying factors that buffer children from experiencing psychopathology following adversity is critical for developing more effective intervention approaches. In the present study, we examined several behavioral metrics of reward processing reflecting global approach motivation for reward and the degree to which reward responses scaled with reward value (i.e., behavioral sensitivity to reward value) as potential moderators of the association of multiple dimensions of adversity—including trauma, caregiver neglect, and food insecurity—with depression and externalizing psychopathology in a sample of youths ages 8 to 16 (n = 132). Trauma exposure and externalizing problems were positively associated at low and moderate levels of reward reactivity, but this association became nonsignificant at high levels of reward reactivity. Our findings extend prior work by demonstrating that high behavioral sensitivity to reward value may buffer against externalizing problems following exposure to trauma.
      Citation: Clinical Psychological Science
      PubDate: 2020-08-07T05:26:48Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2167702620933570
       
  • Women With Generalized Anxiety Disorder Show Increased Repetitive Negative
           Thinking During the Luteal Phase of the Menstrual Cycle

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      Authors: Sophie H. Li, Thomas F. Denson, Bronwyn M. Graham
      Abstract: Clinical Psychological Science, Ahead of Print.
      Repetitive negative thinking (RNT) is a transdiagnostic feature of psychiatric disorders. Women report greater RNT than do men, yet the association between uniquely female characteristics, such as fluctuating sex hormones during the menstrual cycle, and RNT has not been established. Here we examined changes in RNT and anxiety symptoms across the menstrual cycle in women with (n = 40) and without (n = 41) generalized anxiety disorder (GAD). Women with GAD reported an increase in RNT and negative affect from the follicular phase to the luteal phase; unexpectedly, this was not associated with changes in anxiety symptoms, estradiol, or progesterone. Nonanxious women reported no changes in RNT or anxiety symptoms over the menstrual cycle, but higher within-participants progesterone was associated with reduced RNT and negative affect. These results indicate that uniquely female biological processes may influence core cognitive processes that underlie anxiety disorders, but further investigations to determine the implications for symptom severity are required.
      Citation: Clinical Psychological Science
      PubDate: 2020-08-05T09:30:47Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2167702620929635
       
  • Low Emotional Awareness as a Transdiagnostic Mechanism Underlying
           Psychopathology in Adolescence

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      Authors: David G. Weissman, Erik C. Nook, Aridenne A. Dews, Adam Bryant Miller, Hilary K. Lambert, Stephanie F. Sasse, Leah H. Somerville, Katie A. McLaughlin
      Abstract: Clinical Psychological Science, Ahead of Print.
      The ability to identify and label one’s emotions is associated with effective emotion regulation, rendering emotional awareness important for mental health. We evaluated how emotional awareness was related to psychopathology and whether low emotional awareness was a transdiagnostic mechanism explaining the increase in psychopathology during the transition to adolescence and as a function of childhood trauma—specifically, violence exposure. In Study 1, children and adolescents (N = 120, age range = 7–19 years) reported on emotional awareness and psychopathology. Emotional awareness was negatively associated with psychopathology (p-factor) and worsened across age in females but not males. In Study 2 (N = 262, age range = 8–16 years), we replicated these findings and demonstrated longitudinally that low emotional awareness mediated increases in p-factor as a function of age in females and violence exposure. These findings indicate that low emotional awareness may be a transdiagnostic mechanism linking adolescent development, sex, and trauma with the emergence of psychopathology.
      Citation: Clinical Psychological Science
      PubDate: 2020-07-22T07:27:59Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2167702620923649
       
  • A Meta-Analysis of the Relationship Between Sleep Problems and Loneliness

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      Authors: Melanie A. Hom, Carol Chu, Megan L. Rogers, Thomas E. Joiner
      First page: 799
      Abstract: Clinical Psychological Science, Ahead of Print.
      In this meta-analysis, we aimed to evaluate the cross-sectional and longitudinal relationships between various forms of sleep problems and loneliness. A total of 84 articles (110 samples, N = 227,112) were identified for inclusion. Random effects models revealed a significant medium association between overall sleep problems and loneliness (r = .336, 95% confidence interval = [.315, .357]) as well as specific sleep complaints (i.e., insomnia, nightmares, poor sleep efficiency, and poor sleep quality) and loneliness (rs = .165–.354). The longitudinal relationships between overall sleep problems and subsequent loneliness, and vice versa, were also significant (rs = .249–.297). Although no consistent moderation patterns emerged, several significant moderators were identified for specific associations. Results support a robust association between more severe sleep problems and greater perceptions of loneliness; both also appear reciprocally associated longitudinally. Findings point to research directions that may enhance understanding of the interplay between sleep problems and loneliness—constructs with transdiagnostic relevance.
      Citation: Clinical Psychological Science
      PubDate: 2020-07-29T04:28:50Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2167702620922969
       
  • Improving the Reach of Clinical Practice Guidelines: An Experimental
           Investigation of Message Framing on User Engagement

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      Authors: Alexandra Werntz, Lynn Bufka, Brian E. Adams, Bethany A. Teachman
      First page: 825
      Abstract: Clinical Psychological Science, Ahead of Print.
      Despite strong evidence for the efficacy of treatments for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), most affected individuals are not receiving these treatments, in part because they may not know that evidence-based treatments exist. The American Psychological Association published a website to disseminate information about its Clinical Practice Guideline for treating PTSD. In Study 1, Google Optimize was used in a field study to examine whether altering the subheadings to three of the website pages would increase site visitor engagement. On the main page and on the page with treatment descriptions, no subheading alterations improved engagement. On the Patients and Families page, the subheading “say goodbye to symptoms” improved engagement on three outcome variables, including clicking a link to find a psychologist (although there were a small number of clicks). In a preregistered conceptual replication in a sample not actively seeking information about the PTSD guideline (N = 578), the results were not replicable. Results highlight challenges of disseminating information about evidence-based treatment.
      Citation: Clinical Psychological Science
      PubDate: 2020-07-02T09:16:56Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2167702620920722
       
  • The Disruptive Effects of Estrogen Removal Before Puberty on Risk for
           Binge Eating in Female Rats

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      Authors: Kelly L. Klump, Elaine B. Sinclair, Britny A. Hildebrandt, Deborah A. Kashy, Shannon O’Connor, Megan E. Mikhail, Kristen M. Culbert, Alexander Johnson, Cheryl L. Sisk
      First page: 839
      Abstract: Clinical Psychological Science, Ahead of Print.
      Recent research suggests that estrogen is protective against binge eating in adult females and that pubertal estrogen may be critical for these effects. Nonetheless, to date, no study has examined the role of pubertal estrogen in adult binge-eating phenotypes in females, potentially because of difficulties experimentally manipulating estrogen in humans to examine causal effects. We used a novel animal model to examine whether estrogen removal before puberty (via prepubertal ovariectomy, or P-OVX) increased rates of binge-eating-prone (BEP) phenotypes in adulthood in female rats. Seventy-seven P-OVX rats and 79 intact rats were followed from prepuberty into adulthood and phenotyped for BEP status in adulthood. Results showed significantly increased rates (~2–8 times higher) of adult BEP phenotypes in P-OVX compared with intact rats. Findings confirm that estrogen removal substantially increases later risk for binge eating in females, potentially by disrupting typical adolescent brain development.
      Citation: Clinical Psychological Science
      PubDate: 2020-07-02T09:16:35Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2167702620921343
       
  • Differences in Affective Dynamics Among Eating-Disorder Diagnostic Groups

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      Authors: Gail A. Williams-Kerver, Stephen A. Wonderlich, Ross D. Crosby, Li Cao, Kathryn E. Smith, Scott G. Engel, Scott J. Crow, Carol B. Peterson, James E. Mitchell, Daniel Le Grange
      First page: 857
      Abstract: Clinical Psychological Science, Ahead of Print.
      Emotion-regulation theories suggest that affect intensity is crucial in the development and maintenance of eating disorders. However, other aspects of emotional experience, such as lability, differentiation, and inertia, are not as well understood. This study is the first to use ecological momentary assessment (EMA) to examine differences in several daily negative affect (NA) indicators among adults diagnosed with anorexia nervosa (AN), bulimia nervosa (BN), or binge-eating disorder (BED). We used EMA data from three large studies to run a series of linear mixed models; the results showed that participants in the AN and BN groups experienced significantly greater NA intensity and better emotion differentiation than participants in the BED group. Alternatively, the BN group demonstrated significantly greater NA lability than the AN group and greater NA inertia than the BED group. These results suggest that several daily affective experiences differ among eating-disorder diagnostic groups and have implications toward distinct conceptualizations and treatments.
      Citation: Clinical Psychological Science
      PubDate: 2020-06-24T12:04:28Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2167702620917196
       
  • Risk and Resilience in an Acute Stress Paradigm: Evidence From Salivary
           Cortisol and Time-Frequency Analysis of the Reward Positivity

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      Authors: Paige Ethridge, Nida Ali, Sarah E. Racine, Jens C. Pruessner, Anna Weinberg
      First page: 872
      Abstract: Clinical Psychological Science, Ahead of Print.
      Both abnormal stress and reward responsivity are consistently linked to multiple forms of psychopathology; however, the nature of the associations between stress and reward sensitivity remains poorly understood. In the present study, we examined associations between the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal-axis stress response and event-related potentials sensitive to the receipt of reward-related feedback in a pre–post experimental paradigm. Neural responses were recorded while male participants completed a simple monetary-reward guessing task before and after the Montreal Imaging Stress Task. Results demonstrated that acute psychosocial stress significantly reduced the magnitude of neural responses to feedback in the reward-sensitive delta-frequency band but not the loss-sensitive theta-frequency band. In addition, a larger delta-frequency response to rewards at baseline predicted reduced overall cortisol response in the stress condition. These findings suggest, therefore, that neural reward circuitry may be associated with both risk for and resilience to stress-related psychopathology.
      Citation: Clinical Psychological Science
      PubDate: 2020-07-02T09:16:27Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2167702620917463
       
  • Do Suicidal Behaviors Increase the Capability for Suicide' A
           Longitudinal Pretest–Posttest Study of More Than 1,000 High-Risk
           Individuals

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      Authors: Jessica D. Ribeiro, Lauren M. Harris, Kathryn P. Linthicum, Chloe P. Bryen
      First page: 890
      Abstract: Clinical Psychological Science, Ahead of Print.
      Despite the prominence of the capability-for-suicide construct in suicide research, fundamental hypotheses about its nature and development remain largely untested. In this study, we tested the primary mechanism proposed to account for its development: habituation to painful or provocative events. More than a thousand adults were recruited worldwide from online suicide, self-injury, and mental health web forums and subsequently followed for 28 days. Analyses examined the experiences purported to have the strongest effects: suicidal and nonsuicidal-self-injurious behaviors. Capability was measured explicitly and implicitly. Multiple mediation was used to test whether changes in capability between baseline and 28-day follow-up were accounted for by exposure to self-injurious behaviors that occurred over the intervening time interval. Results failed to support the habituation hypothesis, at least as studied within the methodological constraints of this study. Post hoc power analyses indicated ample power to detect small effects. Results raise questions about the validity of the habituation hypothesis.
      Citation: Clinical Psychological Science
      PubDate: 2020-07-15T09:41:59Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2167702620921511
       
  • Helping or Harming' The Effect of Trigger Warnings on Individuals With
           Trauma Histories

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      Authors: Payton J. Jones, Benjamin W. Bellet, Richard J. McNally
      First page: 905
      Abstract: Clinical Psychological Science, Ahead of Print.
      Trigger warnings alert trauma survivors about potentially disturbing forthcoming content. However, empirical studies on trigger warnings suggest that they are functionally inert or cause small adverse side effects. We conducted a preregistered replication and extension of a previous experiment. Trauma survivors (N = 451) were randomly assigned to either receive or not to receive trigger warnings before reading passages from world literature. We found no evidence that trigger warnings were helpful for trauma survivors, for participants who self-reported a posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) diagnosis, or for participants who qualified for probable PTSD, even when survivors’ trauma matched the passages’ content. We found substantial evidence that trigger warnings countertherapeutically reinforce survivors’ view of their trauma as central to their identity. Regarding replication hypotheses, the evidence was either ambiguous or substantially favored the hypothesis that trigger warnings have no effect. In summary, we found that trigger warnings are not helpful for trauma survivors.
      Citation: Clinical Psychological Science
      PubDate: 2020-06-01T08:47:24Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2167702620921341
       
  • Clarifying the Link Between Amygdala Functioning During Emotion Processing
           and Antisocial Behaviors Versus Callous-Unemotional Traits Within a
           Population-Based Community Sample

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      Authors: Hailey L. Dotterer, Rebecca Waller, Tyler C. Hein, Alicia Pardon, Colter Mitchell, Nestor Lopez-Duran, Christopher S. Monk, Luke W. Hyde
      First page: 918
      Abstract: Clinical Psychological Science, Ahead of Print.
      Prominent theories suggest that disruptions in amygdala reactivity and connectivity when processing emotional cues are key to the etiology of youth antisocial behavior (AB) and that these associations may be dependent on co-occurring levels of callous-unemotional (CU) traits. We examined the associations among AB, CU traits, and amygdala reactivity and functional connectivity while viewing emotional faces (fearful, angry, sad, happy) in 165 adolescents (46% male; 73.3% African American) from a representative, predominantly low-income community sample. AB was associated with increased amygdala activation in response to all emotions and was associated with greater amygdala reactivity to emotion only at low levels of CU traits. AB and CU traits were also associated with distinct patterns of amygdala connectivity. These findings demonstrate that AB-related deficits in amygdala functioning may extend across all emotions and highlight the need for further research on amygdala connectivity during emotion processing in relation to AB and CU traits within community populations.
      Citation: Clinical Psychological Science
      PubDate: 2020-07-16T07:03:30Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2167702620922829
       
  • Addiction or Transgression' Moral Incongruence and Self-Reported
           Problematic Pornography Use in a Nationally Representative Sample

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      Authors: Joshua B. Grubbs, Brinna N. Lee, K. Camille Hoagland, Shane W. Kraus, Samuel L. Perry
      First page: 936
      Abstract: Clinical Psychological Science, Ahead of Print.
      In the United States, pornography use is common, and it is increasingly a clinical concern under some circumstances. Excessive pornography use may qualify for the new diagnosis of compulsive sexual behavior disorder (CSBD) in the forthcoming 11th version of the International Classification of Diseases. There is also evidence, however, that moral incongruence (i.e., a misalignment of moral beliefs about sexual behavior and actual sexual behavior) may inflate self-reports of problems associated with pornography use. Prior work suggests religiousness may drive such moral incongruence. Using a large sample matched to U.S. representative norms (total: N = 2,519; past-year pornography users: n = 1,424, 66.4% men), we examined the interaction between pornography use and religiousness in predicting self-reported addiction to pornography. Results indicated that religiousness moderated the association between pornography use and self-reported addiction so that, despite a negative association between religiousness and use, at higher levels of religiousness, pornography use was more strongly related to self-reports of addiction.
      Citation: Clinical Psychological Science
      PubDate: 2020-06-05T11:26:34Z
      DOI: 10.1177/2167702620922966
       
 
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