Publisher: Sage Publications   (Total: 1166 journals)

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Showing 1 - 200 of 1166 Journals sorted alphabetically
AADE in Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Abstracts in Anthropology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 29)
Academic Pathology     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Accounting History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18, SJR: 0.527, CiteScore: 1)
Acta Radiologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.754, CiteScore: 2)
Acta Radiologica Open     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Acta Sociologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39, SJR: 0.939, CiteScore: 2)
Action Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 53, SJR: 0.308, CiteScore: 1)
Active Learning in Higher Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 396, SJR: 1.397, CiteScore: 2)
Adaptive Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.288, CiteScore: 1)
Administration & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18, SJR: 0.675, CiteScore: 1)
Adoption & Fostering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25, SJR: 0.313, CiteScore: 0)
Adsorption Science & Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.258, CiteScore: 1)
Adult Education Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 259, SJR: 0.566, CiteScore: 2)
Adult Learning     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 51)
Advances in Dental Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 1.791, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Developing Human Resources     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35, SJR: 0.614, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Mechanical Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 156, SJR: 0.272, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Methods and Practices in Psychological Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20)
Advances in Structural Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 51, SJR: 0.599, CiteScore: 1)
AERA Open     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
Affilia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.496, CiteScore: 1)
Africa Spectrum     Open Access   (Followers: 17)
Agrarian South : J. of Political Economy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Air, Soil & Water Research     Open Access   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.214, CiteScore: 1)
Alexandria : The J. of National and Intl. Library and Information Issues     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 68)
Allergy & Rhinology     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
AlterNative : An Intl. J. of Indigenous Peoples     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 39, SJR: 0.194, CiteScore: 0)
Alternative Law J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.176, CiteScore: 0)
Alternatives : Global, Local, Political     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.351, CiteScore: 1)
Alternatives to Laboratory Animals     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.297, CiteScore: 1)
American Behavioral Scientist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26, SJR: 0.982, CiteScore: 2)
American Economist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
American Educational Research J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 259, SJR: 2.913, CiteScore: 3)
American J. of Alzheimer's Disease and Other Dementias     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23, SJR: 0.67, CiteScore: 2)
American J. of Cosmetic Surgery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
American J. of Evaluation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18, SJR: 0.646, CiteScore: 2)
American J. of Health Promotion     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35, SJR: 0.807, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Hospice and Palliative Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 47, SJR: 0.65, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Law & Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.204, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Lifestyle Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.431, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Medical Quality     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.777, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Men's Health     Open Access   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.595, CiteScore: 2)
American J. of Rhinology and Allergy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.972, CiteScore: 2)
American J. of Sports Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 247, SJR: 3.949, CiteScore: 6)
American Politics Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 36, SJR: 1.313, CiteScore: 1)
American Review of Public Administration     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28, SJR: 2.062, CiteScore: 2)
American Sociological Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 356, SJR: 6.333, CiteScore: 6)
American String Teacher     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Analytical Chemistry Insights     Open Access   (Followers: 26, SJR: 0.224, CiteScore: 1)
Angiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.849, CiteScore: 2)
Animation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.197, CiteScore: 0)
Annals of Clinical Biochemistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.634, CiteScore: 1)
Annals of Otology, Rhinology & Laryngology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20, SJR: 0.807, CiteScore: 1)
Annals of Pharmacotherapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 58, SJR: 1.096, CiteScore: 2)
Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 51, SJR: 1.225, CiteScore: 3)
Annals of the ICRP     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.548, CiteScore: 1)
Anthropocene Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 3.341, CiteScore: 7)
Anthropological Theory     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 48, SJR: 0.739, CiteScore: 1)
Antitrust Bulletin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Antiviral Chemistry and Chemotherapy     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.635, CiteScore: 2)
Antyajaa : Indian J. of Women and Social Change     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Applied Biosafety     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.131, CiteScore: 0)
Applied Psychological Measurement     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21, SJR: 1.17, CiteScore: 1)
Applied Spectroscopy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 27, SJR: 0.489, CiteScore: 2)
Armed Forces & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25, SJR: 0.29, CiteScore: 1)
Arthaniti : J. of Economic Theory and Practice     Full-text available via subscription  
Arts and Humanities in Higher Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 49, SJR: 0.305, CiteScore: 1)
Asia Pacific Media Educator     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.23, CiteScore: 0)
Asia-Pacific J. of Management Research and Innovation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Asia-Pacific J. of Public Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.558, CiteScore: 1)
Asia-Pacific J. of Rural Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Asian and Pacific Migration J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.324, CiteScore: 1)
Asian Cardiovascular and Thoracic Annals     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.305, CiteScore: 0)
Asian J. of Comparative Politics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Asian J. of Legal Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Asian J. of Management Cases     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.101, CiteScore: 0)
ASN Neuro     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 1.534, CiteScore: 3)
Assessment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19, SJR: 1.519, CiteScore: 3)
Assessment for Effective Intervention     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.578, CiteScore: 1)
Australasian J. of Early Childhood     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.535, CiteScore: 1)
Australasian Psychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18, SJR: 0.433, CiteScore: 1)
Australian & New Zealand J. of Psychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30, SJR: 1.801, CiteScore: 2)
Australian and New Zealand J. of Criminology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 546, SJR: 0.612, CiteScore: 1)
Australian J. of Career Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Australian J. of Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 51, SJR: 0.403, CiteScore: 1)
Australian J. of Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.497, CiteScore: 1)
Autism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 356, SJR: 1.739, CiteScore: 4)
Autism & Developmental Language Impairments     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
Avian Biology Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.401, CiteScore: 1)
Behavior Modification     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.877, CiteScore: 2)
Behavioral and Cognitive Neuroscience Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Behavioral Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Beyond Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Bible Translator     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Biblical Theology Bulletin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24, SJR: 0.184, CiteScore: 0)
Big Data & Society     Open Access   (Followers: 55)
Biochemistry Insights     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Bioinformatics and Biology Insights     Open Access   (Followers: 12, SJR: 1.141, CiteScore: 2)
Biological Research for Nursing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.685, CiteScore: 2)
Biomarker Insights     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.81, CiteScore: 2)
Biomarkers in Cancer     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Biomedical Engineering and Computational Biology     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Biomedical Informatics Insights     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Bioscope: South Asian Screen Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.235, CiteScore: 0)
BMS: Bulletin of Sociological Methodology/Bulletin de Méthodologie Sociologique     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.226, CiteScore: 0)
Body & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29, SJR: 1.531, CiteScore: 3)
Bone and Tissue Regeneration Insights     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Brain and Neuroscience Advances     Open Access  
Brain Science Advances     Open Access  
Breast Cancer : Basic and Clinical Research     Open Access   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.823, CiteScore: 2)
British J. of Music Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
British J. of Occupational Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 252, SJR: 0.323, CiteScore: 1)
British J. of Pain     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31, SJR: 0.579, CiteScore: 2)
British J. of Politics and Intl. Relations     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39, SJR: 0.91, CiteScore: 2)
British J. of Visual Impairment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.337, CiteScore: 1)
British J.ism Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
BRQ Business Review Quarterly     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Building Acoustics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.215, CiteScore: 1)
Building Services Engineering Research & Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.583, CiteScore: 1)
Bulletin of Science, Technology & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Business & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Business and Professional Communication Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.348, CiteScore: 1)
Business Information Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17, SJR: 0.279, CiteScore: 0)
Business Perspectives and Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Cahiers Élisabéthains     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.111, CiteScore: 0)
Calcutta Statistical Association Bulletin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
California Management Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 37, SJR: 2.209, CiteScore: 4)
Canadian Association of Radiologists J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.463, CiteScore: 1)
Canadian J. of Kidney Health and Disease     Open Access   (Followers: 8, SJR: 1.007, CiteScore: 2)
Canadian J. of Nursing Research (CJNR)     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Canadian J. of Occupational Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 166, SJR: 0.626, CiteScore: 1)
Canadian J. of Psychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28, SJR: 1.769, CiteScore: 3)
Canadian J. of School Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.266, CiteScore: 1)
Canadian Pharmacists J. / Revue des Pharmaciens du Canada     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.536, CiteScore: 1)
Cancer Control     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Cancer Growth and Metastasis     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Cancer Informatics     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.64, CiteScore: 1)
Capital and Class     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.282, CiteScore: 1)
Cardiac Cath Lab Director     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Cardiovascular and Thoracic Open     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Career Development and Transition for Exceptional Individuals     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.44, CiteScore: 1)
Cartilage     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.889, CiteScore: 3)
Cell Transplantation     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 1.023, CiteScore: 3)
Cephalalgia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 1.581, CiteScore: 3)
Cephalalgia Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Child Language Teaching and Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34, SJR: 0.501, CiteScore: 1)
Child Maltreatment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 1.22, CiteScore: 3)
Child Neurology Open     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Childhood     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19, SJR: 0.894, CiteScore: 2)
Childhood Obesity and Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
China Information     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.767, CiteScore: 2)
China Report     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.221, CiteScore: 0)
Chinese J. of Sociology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Christian Education J. : Research on Educational Ministry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Chronic Illness     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.672, CiteScore: 2)
Chronic Respiratory Disease     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.808, CiteScore: 2)
Chronic Stress     Open Access  
Citizenship, Social and Economics Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.145, CiteScore: 0)
Cleft Palate-Craniofacial J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.757, CiteScore: 1)
Clin-Alert     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Clinical and Applied Thrombosis/Hemostasis     Open Access   (Followers: 32, SJR: 0.49, CiteScore: 1)
Clinical and Translational Neuroscience     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Clinical Case Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.364, CiteScore: 1)
Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 45, SJR: 0.73, CiteScore: 2)
Clinical EEG and Neuroscience     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.552, CiteScore: 2)
Clinical Ethics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.296, CiteScore: 1)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Arthritis and Musculoskeletal Disorders     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.537, CiteScore: 2)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Blood Disorders     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.314, CiteScore: 2)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Cardiology     Open Access   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.686, CiteScore: 2)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Case Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.283, CiteScore: 1)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Circulatory, Respiratory and Pulmonary Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.425, CiteScore: 2)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Ear, Nose and Throat     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Endocrinology and Diabetes     Open Access   (Followers: 33, SJR: 0.63, CiteScore: 2)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Oncology     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 1.129, CiteScore: 3)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Pediatrics     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Psychiatry     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Reproductive Health     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.776, CiteScore: 0)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Therapeutics     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.172, CiteScore: 0)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Trauma and Intensive Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Women's Health     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Clinical Nursing Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34, SJR: 0.471, CiteScore: 1)
Clinical Pathology     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Clinical Pediatrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25, SJR: 0.487, CiteScore: 1)
Clinical Psychological Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16, SJR: 3.281, CiteScore: 5)
Clinical Rehabilitation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 78, SJR: 1.322, CiteScore: 3)
Clinical Risk     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.133, CiteScore: 0)
Clinical Trials     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22, SJR: 2.399, CiteScore: 2)
Clothing and Textiles Research J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28, SJR: 0.36, CiteScore: 1)
Collections : A J. for Museum and Archives Professionals     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Common Law World Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Communication & Sport     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.385, CiteScore: 1)
Communication and the Public     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Communication Disorders Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.458, CiteScore: 1)
Communication Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24, SJR: 2.171, CiteScore: 3)
Community College Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 1.451, CiteScore: 1)
Comparative Political Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 291, SJR: 3.772, CiteScore: 3)
Compensation & Benefits Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Competition & Change     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.843, CiteScore: 2)

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Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Communication Research
Journal Prestige (SJR): 2.171
Citation Impact (citeScore): 3
Number of Followers: 24  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0093-6502 - ISSN (Online) 1552-3810
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1166 journals]
  • Adapting the Selective Exposure Perspective to Algorithmically Governed
           Platforms: The Case of Google Search

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Laura Slechten, Cédric Courtois, Lennert Coenen, Bieke Zaman
      Abstract: Communication Research, Ahead of Print.
      Experimental research on selective exposure on online platforms is generally limited by a narrow focus on specific parts of the information selection process, rather than integrating the entire sequence of user-platform interactions. The current study, focusing on online search, incorporates the entire process that stretches from formulating an initial query to finally satisfying an information need. As such, it comprehensively covers how both users and platforms exercise agency by enabling and constraining each other in progressively narrowing down the available information. During a tailored online experiment, participants are asked to search for social and political information in a fully tracked, manipulated Google Search environment. Although the results show a structural impact of varying search result rankings, users still appear to be able to tailor their information exposure to maintain their prior beliefs, hence defying that algorithmic impact. This corroborates the need to conceptually and methodologically expand online selective exposure research.
      Citation: Communication Research
      PubDate: 2021-04-30T07:26:29Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00936502211012154
       
  • Moments of Connection for the Disconnected: People with Negative Relations
           with Others Experience Less, but Benefit More from, Positive Everyday
           Interaction

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Andy J. Merolla, Afsoon Hansia, Jeffrey A. Hall, Shuangyue Zhang
      Abstract: Communication Research, Ahead of Print.
      Analysis of over 2,000 moments of social interaction collected through smartphone-based experience sampling showed that, over a week-long period, people who have experienced negative relations with others (relative to those who have not), interacted with individuals from less-established relationships, perceived less partner responsiveness during interactions (particularly from their established relationship partners), and were more likely to report being alone than engaged in positive communication episodes. People with high negative relations with others also tended to have lower perceptions of affective well-being and relational connection, and greater perceptions of stress-related cognition, during moments of social interaction. Yet, results also indicated that while positive communication appears harder to come by for people with high negative relations with others, these individuals gain outsized benefits from positive interaction when it occurs (e.g., sharper increases in well-being and decreases in stress). This suggests that heightened negative relations with others might lead people to “hyperabsorb” the benefits of positive moments of communication. The results have implications for key perspectives on communication, relational life, and well-being (i.e., affection deprivation, appraisal, implicit vigilance, and resource insufficiency) and suggest potential routes for intervention development for people with difficult relational lives.
      Citation: Communication Research
      PubDate: 2021-04-08T01:09:06Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00936502211005890
       
  • Casual Condomless Sex, Range of Pornography Exposure, and Perceived
           Pornography Realism

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      Authors: Paul J. Wright, Debby Herbenick, Bryant Paul
      Abstract: Communication Research, Ahead of Print.
      Pornography consumption is becoming more prevalent and may be a source of sexual learning for some users. Because popular male-female pornography rarely includes condoms, communication researchers have hypothesized that pornography use increases the likelihood of condomless sex in mixed sex encounters. A recent meta-analysis supported this prediction, but was unable to report on psychological moderators of the association due to a dearth of contingency-oriented research. The present study reports findings on U.S. adults’ exposure to pornography, perceptions of pornography’s realism, and casual condomless sex. Despite theory positing that realism perceptions moderate the relationship between sexual media use and sexual behavior, very few studies have tested pornography exposure x perceived realism interactions in general, and no previous inquiry appears to have tested this interaction in the context of pornography exposure and condom use. Results indicated that a higher range of exposure was associated with a higher likelihood of condomless sex when perceptions of pornography’s realism were high. Conversely, when perceptions of pornography’s realism were low, range of exposure was unrelated to the likelihood of condomless sex. These results were not moderated by age or gender. These findings are part of a growing literature suggesting the importance of media literacy education directed specifically at pornography.
      Citation: Communication Research
      PubDate: 2021-04-08T01:07:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00936502211003765
       
  • Mistake or Manipulation' Conceptualizing Perceived Mis- and
           Disinformation among News Consumers in 10 European Countries

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      Authors: Michael Hameleers, Anna Brosius, Franziska Marquart, Andreas C. Goldberg, Erika van Elsas, Claes H. de Vreese
      Abstract: Communication Research, Ahead of Print.
      In the midst of heated debates surrounding the veracity and honesty of communication, scholarly attention has turned to the conceptualization of mis- and disinformation on the supply-side of (political) communication. Yet, we lack systematic research on the conceptualization of perceived mis- and disinformation on the demand-side. Original survey data collected in ten European countries (N = 6,643) shows that news consumers distinguish general misinformation from disinformation. Yet, the high correlation between the two dimensions indicates that disinformation perceptions may be regarded as a sub-type of misinformation perceptions in which intentional deception is a core element. This paper aims to make a contribution to the misinformation and media credibility literature by proposing a first conceptualization of perceived untruthfulness corresponding to increasing levels of cynicism and skepticism toward the factual status and honesty of information.
      Citation: Communication Research
      PubDate: 2021-04-05T07:36:46Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0093650221997719
       
  • When Brands (Don’t) Take My Stance: The Ambiguous Effectiveness of
           Political Brand Communication

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      Authors: Marc Jungblut, Marius Johnen
      Abstract: Communication Research, Ahead of Print.
      Brands increasingly take a stance on political issues, whereas consumers increasingly choose to either support a brand by buying their products (“buycotting”), or turn away from a brand (“boycotting”) for political reasons. While buycotts can be understood as a rewarding and cooperative form of mostly individual behavior, boycotts are a conflict-oriented form of collective punishment. Even though research has acknowledged these conceptual differences, studies have failed to analyze the difference in the absolute effect of consumers’ disapproval and approval. Moreover, research to date has not identified boundary conditions that might explain variation in the difference between consumers’ willingness to boycott or buycott. This research investigates this different effectiveness by conducting two experiments with different sets of brands, issues, and countries. Our results suggest that boycotting outweighs buycotting, implying that political brand communication is a risky strategy. Furthermore, we identify consumers’ political interest and category involvement as moderators of this imbalance.
      Citation: Communication Research
      PubDate: 2021-04-02T09:16:17Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00936502211001622
       
  • Communication Privacy Management in Open Adoption Relationships:
           Negotiating Co-ownership across In-person and Mediated Communication

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      Authors: Colleen Warner Colaner, Alyssa L. Bish, Maria Butauski, Alexie Hays, Haley Kranstuber Horstman, Leslie R. Nelson
      Abstract: Communication Research, Ahead of Print.
      Open adoption relationships are rife with privacy dilemmas and fuzzy boundaries, which require ongoing coordination of private disclosures as a result. The present study employed communication privacy management (CPM) theory to examine adoptive parents’ (N = 354) private disclosures with the birth family across in-person and mediated (i.e., texting and social media) contexts. SEM analysis revealed that adoptive families who were more private and were concerned about the birth family sharing private information with others viewed disclosures to the birth family as risky. These privacy concerns related to adoptive parents being more clear with the birth family about preferences for sharing that private information with others. More social media contact between birth and adoptive parents predicted increased perceptions of risk of disclosure to birth parents. Results advance CPM theorizing by underscoring the motivational bases of perceived risk, the importance of anticipated boundary turbulence, and the nuanced privacy management processes within communication modes.
      Citation: Communication Research
      PubDate: 2021-03-26T01:05:42Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0093650221998474
       
  • “It’s Going to be Out There For a Long Time”: The Influence of
           Message Persistence on Users’ Political Opinion Expression in Social
           Media

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      Authors: German Neubaum
      Abstract: Communication Research, Ahead of Print.
      In light of the growing politicization of social media, the spiral of silence theory and its predictions on the conditions under which individuals express political opinions have gained increasing scholarly attention. This study contributes to this line of research by identifying the influence of a central characteristic of social media: message persistence. It was expected that high technical durability of political messages reduces users’ propensity to voice their opinion, moderating the silence effect. A pre-registered experiment (N = 772) revealed a small-to-medium persistence effect in three out of four topical contexts. While perceived congruence with the opinion climate was not associated with the likelihood of opinion expression, the latter could be explained by a mental cost-benefit calculus that was shaped by message persistence. Theoretical implications are discussed referring to (a) a situational approach regarding silencing processes on social media and (b) its connection to a behavioral calculus of human communication.
      Citation: Communication Research
      PubDate: 2021-03-06T10:39:44Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0093650221995314
       
  • What People Look at in Multimodal Online Dating Profiles: How Pictorial
           and Textual Cues Affect Impression Formation

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      Authors: Tess van der Zanden, Maria B. J. Mos, Alexander P. Schouten, Emiel J. Krahmer
      Abstract: Communication Research, Ahead of Print.
      This study investigates how online dating profiles, consisting of both pictures and texts, are visually processed, and how both components affect impression formation. The attractiveness of the profile picture was varied systematically, and texts either included language errors or not. By collecting eye tracking and perception data, we investigated whether picture attractiveness determines attention to the profile text and if the text plays a secondary role. Eye tracking results revealed that pictures are more likely to attract initial attention and that more attractive pictures receive more attention. Texts received attention regardless of the picture’s attractiveness. Moreover, perception data showed that both the pictorial and textual cues affect impression formation, but that they affect different dimensions of perceived attraction differently. Based on our results, a new multimodal information processing model is proposed, which suggests that pictures and texts are processed independently and lead to separate assessments of cue attractiveness before impression formation.
      Citation: Communication Research
      PubDate: 2021-03-03T11:34:22Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0093650221995316
       
  • Multiple Selves and Multitasking: A Dynamic Longitudinal Study

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      Authors: Shan Xu, Zheng Wang
      Abstract: Communication Research, Ahead of Print.
      This study integrates the theory of multiple selves within the theoretical framework of dynamic motivational activation (DMA) to identify the dynamic patterns of multiple self-concepts (i.e., the potential self, the actual self) in multitasking (e.g., primary and secondary activities) in daily life. A three-week experience sampling study was conducted on college students. Dynamic panel modeling results suggest that the self-concepts are both sustaining and shifting in daily activities and media activities. Specifically, the potential and actual selves sustained themselves over time in primary and secondary activities, but they also shifted from one to another to achieve a balance in primary activities over time. Interestingly, secondary activities were not driven by the alternative self-concept in primary activities, but instead, by the emotional experiences of primary activities. Furthermore, the findings identified that multitasking to fulfill their actual self did not motivate people to re-prioritize their potential self later.
      Citation: Communication Research
      PubDate: 2021-02-09T11:08:50Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0093650221991493
       
  • Constructing Discourses on (Un)truthfulness: Attributions of Reality,
           Misinformation, and Disinformation by Politicians in a Comparative Social
           Media Setting

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      Authors: Michael Hameleers, Sophie Minihold
      Abstract: Communication Research, Ahead of Print.
      In the setting of increasingly more fragmented digital communication settings, the accuracy and honesty of (political) information has become subject of fierce debates and partisan attacks. Hence, the challenge of mis- and disinformation not only pertains to the truthfulness of information itself, but also to the discursive construction of supporting information as truthful and dissonant information as untrue or deliberately false. This paper inductively analyzes discourses of (un)truthfulness (Study 1, N = 1,777) and uses an Automated Content Analysis (Study 2, N = 56,666) to assess how reality, mis-, and disinformation are constructed by politicians in Austria, Germany, and the Netherlands. The findings point to an affinity between populism and disinformation: Right-wing populist politicians take issue ownership in discrediting established knowledge and attempt to create momentum for alternative realities that resonate with populist worldviews. Such discourses of (un)truthfulness may have an important impact on defining reality for voters.
      Citation: Communication Research
      PubDate: 2020-12-24T10:21:21Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0093650220982762
       
  • Understanding the Internal and External Communicative Drivers of
           Organizational Innovativeness

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      Authors: Jiawei Sophia Fu
      Abstract: Communication Research, Ahead of Print.
      Organizational and communication studies have established that communication plays a critical role in organizational innovation, because internal and external communication allows individuals, groups, and organizations to recombine existing knowledge into new ideas. In light of this, this research re-directs our attention to the specific communicative antecedents of an organization’s overall propensity for innovation. Survey data from 293 nonprofit organizations showed that interorganizational partnership diversity, knowledge sharing via the use of information communication technologies (ICTs), and entrepreneurial orientation affect organizational innovativeness, with differential effects on administrative innovativeness and technological innovativeness. Specifically, interorganizational partnership diversity promoted administrative innovativeness but had an inverted U-shaped curvilinear relationship with technological innovativeness. Effective ICT-mediated knowledge sharing improved technological innovativeness only. The combination of interorganizational partnership diversity and EO (i.e., proactiveness) increased administrative innovativeness. However, interorganizational partnership diversity and effective knowledge sharing indirectly influenced technological innovativeness via proactiveness. This study advances research on organizational innovation, ICTs, and interorganizational networks.
      Citation: Communication Research
      PubDate: 2020-12-21T10:44:06Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0093650220981299
       
  • How Perpetrator Identity (Sometimes) Influences Media Framing Attacks as
           “Terrorism” or “Mental Illness”

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      Authors: Allison E. Betus, Erin M. Kearns, Anthony F. Lemieux
      Abstract: Communication Research, Ahead of Print.
      Do media frame attacks with Muslim perpetrators as “terrorism” and attacks with White perpetrators as the result of “mental illness”' Despite public speculation and limited academic work with relatively small subsets of cases, there have been no systematic analyses of potential biases in how media frame terrorism. We addressed this gap by examining the text of print news coverage of all terrorist attacks in the United States between 2006 and 2015. Controlling for fatalities, affiliation with a group, and existing mental illness, the odds that an article references terrorism are approximately five times greater for a Muslim versus a non-Muslim perpetrator. In contrast, the odds that an article references mental illness do not significantly differ between White and non-White perpetrators. Results partially confirm public speculation and are robust against numerous alternative explanations. Differences in media framing can influence public (mis)perceptions of violence and threats, and ultimately harm counterterrorism policy.
      Citation: Communication Research
      PubDate: 2020-11-30T01:31:03Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0093650220971142
       
  • Computer-Mediated Communication, Social Media, and Mental Health: A
           Conceptual and Empirical Meta-Review

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      Authors: Adrian Meier, Leonard Reinecke
      Abstract: Communication Research, Ahead of Print.
      Computer-mediated communication (CMC), and specifically social media, may affect the mental health (MH) and well-being of its users, for better or worse. Research on this topic has accumulated rapidly, accompanied by controversial public debate and numerous systematic reviews and meta-analyses. Yet, a higher-level integration of the multiple disparate conceptual and operational approaches to CMC and MH and individual review findings is desperately needed. To this end, we first develop two organizing frameworks that systematize conceptual and operational approaches to CMC and MH. Based on these frameworks, we integrate the literature through a meta-review of 34 reviews and a content analysis of 594 publications. Meta-analytic evidence, overall, suggests a small negative association between social media use and MH. However, effects are complex and depend on the CMC and MH indicators investigated. Based on our conceptual review and the evidence synthesis, we devise an agenda for future research in this interdisciplinary field.
      Citation: Communication Research
      PubDate: 2020-10-21T11:19:56Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0093650220958224
       
  • Using a Personality-Profiling Algorithm to Investigate Political
           Microtargeting: Assessing the Persuasion Effects of Personality-Tailored
           Ads on Social Media

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      Authors: Brahim Zarouali, Tom Dobber, Guy De Pauw, Claes de Vreese
      Abstract: Communication Research, Ahead of Print.
      Political advertisers have access to increasingly sophisticated microtargeting techniques. One such technique is tailoring ads to the personality traits of citizens. Questions have been raised about the effectiveness of this political microtargeting (PMT) technique. In two experiments, we investigate the causal effects of personality-congruent political ads. In Study 1, we first assess participants’ extraversion trait by means of their own text data (i.e., by using a personality profiling algorithm), and in a second phase, target them with either a personality-congruent or incongruent political ad. In Study 2, we followed the same protocol, but instead targeted participants with emotionally-charged congruent ads, to establish whether PMT can be effective on an affect-based level. The results show evidence that citizens are more strongly persuaded by political ads that match their own personality traits. These findings feed into relevant and timely contributions to a salient academic and societal debate.
      Citation: Communication Research
      PubDate: 2020-10-20T11:16:10Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0093650220961965
       
  • A Relational Turbulence Model of Sexual Communication in Couples With
           Depression

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      Authors: Amy L. Delaney
      Abstract: Communication Research, Ahead of Print.
      Couples coping with depression are prone to unique and pervasive sexual intimacy challenges and experience troubles communicating effectively. Successful sexual communication improves sexual and relationship satisfaction, making communication particularly important for couples facing sexual difficulties. In this study, the relational turbulence model serves as a framework to examine associations between sexual communication and both sexual and relationship satisfaction in couples (N = 106) in which one or both partners live with depression. Results of a cross-sectional survey suggest sexual communication mediates relationships between both relational uncertainty and interference from a partner with sexual/relationship satisfaction. Results illuminate functions of communication about sex as couples navigate sexual and relational effects of depression.
      Citation: Communication Research
      PubDate: 2020-09-19T10:21:49Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0093650220958222
       
  • Parental Knowledge of Children’s Screen Time: The Role of Parent-Child
           Relationship and Communication

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      Authors: Laura Marciano, Serena Petrocchi, Anne-Linda Camerini
      Abstract: Communication Research, Ahead of Print.
      The ubiquity of media in children’s lives makes it increasingly difficult for parents to keep track of their children’s screen time, leading to considerable discrepancies in parent- and child-report. In the present study, we aimed to examine if and how these discrepancies can be explained by parent-child communication, in terms of children’s self-disclosure, secrecy, and parental solicitation, and to what extend the quality of the parent-child relationship can influence these communication patterns. We tested two structural equation models to investigate the absolute discrepancy between parent and child estimates of children’s screen time and parental underestimation, using dyadic data from 854 11-year-olds and their parents, in Switzerland. Our results showed that children’s self-disclosure and secrecy behaviors were significantly associated with parental knowledge, where the relationship between self-disclosure and parental knowledge of children’s screen time was the stronger among the two. Moreover, a good parent-child relationship, especially parents’ ability in perspective taking, was significantly related to increased self-disclosure and decreased secrecy behaviors by children.
      Citation: Communication Research
      PubDate: 2020-09-05T06:32:37Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0093650220952227
       
  • The Indirect Effects of Thinspiration and Fitspiration Images on Young
           Women’s Sexual Attitudes

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      Authors: Karikarn Chansiri, Thipkanok Wongphothiphan, Autumn Shafer
      Abstract: Communication Research, Ahead of Print.
      Applying the sociocultural theory and the objectification theory, this experiment examined the indirect effects of inspirational Instagram images (i.e., fitspiration and thinspiration) on young women’s sexual attitudes. A post-test only between-subjects design with three experimental conditions (i.e., fitspiration, thinspiration, and control images) was conducted with female college students (N = 221). The results supported the sociocultural theory, revealing that viewing inspirational Instagram images led to higher appearance comparison and greater body dissatisfaction, respectively, which, in turn, predicted lower sexual self-efficacy and greater sexual self-consciousness. Testing a new theoretical model combining the sociocultural theory components and self-objectification reported a significant causal mediating chain of appearance comparison, self-objectification, and body dissatisfaction, respectively, in the relationship between viewing inspirational Instagram images and sexual attitudes (i.e., lower sexual self-efficacy and greater sexual self-consciousness). The indirect effect sizes of fitspiration were larger than those of thinspiration. Implications and limitations are discussed.
      Citation: Communication Research
      PubDate: 2020-08-25T10:56:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0093650220952231
       
  • To Share or Not to Share' How Emotional Judgments Drive Online
           Political Expression in High-Risk Contexts

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      Authors: Aysenur Dal, Erik C. Nisbet
      Abstract: Communication Research, Ahead of Print.
      Previous scholarship on networked authoritarianism has examined an array of repressive legal and political strategies employed by regimes to constrain online political expression. How the tension between citizens’ desires to engage in online political expression and the possible dire consequences of doing so is resolved, however, is understudied. We address this lacuna by drawing upon concepts from risk and decision-making research and examining how the emotional and cognitive components of risk and decision-making shape citizens’ online political expression. Employing a three-wave panel survey of Turkish internet users collected over 8 months, our fixed-effects regression analyzes show that anticipatory emotions drive expressive behavior, but that risk assessment does not. Furthermore, the influence of negative emotions on online expression is moderated by individuals’ degree of regime opposition. We discuss the importance of understanding the psychological mechanisms by which networked authoritarian contexts influences citizens’ decisions to engage in contentious online speech.
      Citation: Communication Research
      PubDate: 2020-08-20T04:34:29Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0093650220950570
       
  • Keep Them Apart or Join Them Together' How Identification Processes
           Shape Orientations to Network Brokerage

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      Authors: Camille G. Endacott, Paul M. Leonardi
      Abstract: Communication Research, Ahead of Print.
      This article investigates how the targets with which brokers identify shape the orientation with which they approach their network position. Brokers are often thought of as exhibiting a tertius gaudens orientation toward their network position through their efforts to keep disconnected groups apart, thereby maintaining their ability to control the flow of information between the groups. However, brokers may also exhibit a tertius iungens orientation if they make decisions to join disconnected groups together, bridging structural holes and enabling information to flow freely between them. Drawing on data from an in-depth field study, this article shows that when brokers identify with their community of practice or their profession, they are more likely to exhibit a tertius iungens orientation than when brokers identify with personal or workgroup targets. The qualitative data suggest that this relationship between identification with targets and brokerage orientation was guided by the rules and resources of the identities they enacted. The targets with which brokers identified shaped how they took perspectives in their work and the flexibility with which they enacted their role, which in turn shaped their decisions about whether to join people together or to keep them apart.
      Citation: Communication Research
      PubDate: 2020-08-14T01:52:11Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0093650220947316
       
  • The Highs in Communication Research: Research Topics With High Supply,
           High Popularity, and High Prestige in High-Impact Journals

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      Authors: Chung-hong Chan, Christiane Grill
      Abstract: Communication Research, Ahead of Print.
      More and more scholarly attention is paid to dissecting discipline of communication research under the microscope thereby aiming at revealing foci of scientific interest. The lion’s share of research has hereby focused either on the supply side of research examining what topics scholars write about or at the popularity side of research shedding light on what scientific publications receive the most citations. Building up on this, we argue that these research strands are inadequate to the task of exhaustively identifying foci of scientific interest. Tailoring for the fragmented topical landscape of communication research, we propose an integrative combination of three metrics: supply, popularity, and prestige of research topics. By means of topic modeling, citation counts and citation networks, our study showcases how our approach is able to reveal the intellectual architecture of our discipline in order to identify relevant paths for further scientific inquiry.
      Citation: Communication Research
      PubDate: 2020-07-30T10:45:31Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0093650220944790
       
  • Using Media for Coping: A Scoping Review

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      Authors: Lara N. Wolfers, Frank M. Schneider
      Abstract: Communication Research, Ahead of Print.
      Mobile phones, television, internet services, games, and social media offer diverse and numerous opportunities for coping with stress in everyday life. Different disciplines have contributed to answering how these media are used for coping. Consequently, fragmented and disconnected research perspectives have evolved. To improve integration, we conducted a scoping review. A total of 318 articles met the inclusion criteria. Three main perspectives on media use for coping were identified: (1) stress and coping, (2) mood management and emotion regulation, and (3) media addiction and problematic media use. Each perspective has contributed to different aspects of the use of media for coping. Six advancements are proposed, which attempt to integrate perspectives and to guide future research on coping using media.
      Citation: Communication Research
      PubDate: 2020-07-25T09:57:54Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0093650220939778
       
  • The Importance of Trending Topics in the Gatekeeping of Social Media News
           Engagement: A Natural Experiment on Weibo

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      Authors: Tian Yang, Yilang Peng
      Abstract: Communication Research, Ahead of Print.
      Digital gatekeepers have greatly shaped the gatekeeping process of news consumption and news engagement, but how digital gatekeepers work is understudied. This study focuses on one example of digital gatekeepers, trending topics on social media, which aggregate the most popular search terms and present them to the public. We utilize a natural experiment on Weibo by analyzing user engagement data of 36,239 posts in three consecutive weeks, during which trending topics were removed for 1 week. We show that trending topics implemented two layers of gatekeeping: trending topics increased user engagement with top news posts within each news outlet and widened the engagement gap between popular posts and less popular ones (intra-outlet gatekeeping), and the increases in engagement with top news items were most salient among the least popular news outlets, thus reducing the inequality among outlets (inter-outlet gatekeeping).
      Citation: Communication Research
      PubDate: 2020-06-20T06:14:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0093650220933729
       
  • 13 Reasons Why, Perceived Norms, and Reports of Mental Health-Related
           Behavior Change among Adolescent and Young Adult Viewers in Four Global
           Regions

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      Authors: Michael C. Carter, Drew P. Cingel, Alexis R. Lauricella, Ellen Wartella
      Abstract: Communication Research, Ahead of Print.
      Media programing addressing controversial topics among youth has grown; however, research has yet to consider the correlates of viewing on a global scale. Using the theory of normative social behavior (TNSB), this study examined perceived norms about mental illness among a sample of 3,520 adolescent and young adult viewers and nonviewers of 13 Reasons Why in Australia/New Zealand, the United Kingdom, the United States, and Brazil. We assessed the influence of viewer age and culture on the association between descriptive and injunctive mental illness norms and reports of prosocial mental health-related behaviors (e.g., talking about suicide with others). Results indicated a positive association between the number of episodes viewed and perceived norms, and among viewers, descriptive and injunctive norms related to reports of mental health-related behavior change in all regions, although the process differed based on age and culture. We conclude with implications for the predictions of the TNSB.
      Citation: Communication Research
      PubDate: 2020-06-11T01:53:53Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0093650220930462
       
  • Exploring the Relationship Between Interdisciplinary Ties and Linguistic
           Familiarity Using Multilevel Network Analysis

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      Authors: William C. Barley, Ly Dinh, Hallie Workman, Chengyu Fang
      Abstract: Communication Research, Ahead of Print.
      Research shows that teams comprised of individuals with differing knowledge are increasingly important to enabling innovation in organizations. Beyond diverse connections, research also shows individuals must be familiar with their collaborators’ areas of expertise to effectively integrate knowledge. Despite growing recognition of the importance of familiarity for interdisciplinary collaboration, we argue that there is reason to suspect this form of relationship is likely to be particularly rare in organizations. We present an egocentric analysis of collaboration networks in a scientific organization, exploring factors associated with the copresence of interdisciplinary ties alongside familiarity with a collaborator’s area of expertise. Our results demonstrate pressures toward similarity of expertise that minimized connections to differing alters. Furthermore, those respondents who had diverse connections tended to be unfamiliar with their distant collaborators’ domains. Interaction counteracted this effect but participants reported pressures inhibiting interaction across knowledge boundaries. The findings demonstrate how network forces compound to inhibit what we call “different yet familiar” ties and, by doing so, offer conceptual and practical implications for contemporary organizations.
      Citation: Communication Research
      PubDate: 2020-05-29T10:51:14Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0093650220926001
       
  • The Hidden Costs of Requiring Accounts: Quasi-Experimental Evidence From
           Peer Production

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      Authors: Benjamin Mako Hill, Aaron Shaw
      Abstract: Communication Research, Ahead of Print.
      Online communities, like Wikipedia, produce valuable public information goods. Whereas some of these communities require would-be contributors to create accounts, many do not. Does this requirement catalyze cooperation or inhibit participation' Prior research provides divergent predictions but little causal evidence. We conduct an empirical test using longitudinal data from 136 natural experiments where would-be contributors to wikis were suddenly required to log in to contribute. Requiring accounts leads to a small increase in account creation, but reduces both high- and low-quality contributions from registered and unregistered participants. Although the change deters a large portion of low-quality participation, the vast majority of deterred contributions are of higher quality. We conclude that requiring accounts introduces an undertheorized tradeoff for public goods production in interactive communication systems.
      Citation: Communication Research
      PubDate: 2020-05-27T06:57:23Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0093650220910345
       
  • Contagious Politics: Tie Strength and the Spread of Political Knowledge

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      Authors: Katherine Ognyanova
      Abstract: Communication Research, Ahead of Print.
      This work explores the influence of social connections on young people’s political knowledge. Extending previous research on individual and interpersonal predictors of political learning, the study examines relational characteristics and their role in informed citizenship. Factors expected to affect social contagion in political behavior include conversation content, interaction frequency, relational closeness, mutual communication partners, and shared ideology. The analyses were based on longitudinal network data from 13 residential student communities. The study found evidence consistent with social contagion. The political knowledge of participants was predicted by the knowledge of their strong social ties. Political discussants were not as influential as high-frequency general conversation partners. These findings have important implications for research exploring social influence on political behavior. They signal that the contacts we tend to identify as political are not necessarily the ones that matter most in shaping our opinions and attitudes.
      Citation: Communication Research
      PubDate: 2020-05-26T12:31:33Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0093650220924179
       
  • Beyond Incivility: Understanding Patterns of Uncivil and Intolerant
           Discourse in Online Political Talk

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      Authors: Patrícia Rossini
      Abstract: Communication Research, Ahead of Print.
      This article takes up the popular argument that much online discussion is toxic and hence harmful to democracy, and argues that the pervasiveness of incivility is not incompatible with democratically relevant political talk. Instead of focusing on the tone of political talk, scholars interested in understanding the extent to which digital platforms threaten democratic values should focus on expressions of intolerance. I demonstrate the validity of this conceptual model by investigating the discursive and contextual features associated with incivility and intolerance online in the context of public comments in two different platforms—news websites and Facebook. Results show that incivility and intolerance occur in meaningfully different discussion settings. Whereas incivility is associated with features that reveal meaningful discursive engagement, such as justified opinion expression and engagement with disagreement, intolerance is likely to occur in homogeneous discussions about minorities and civil society—exactly when it can hurt democracy the most.
      Citation: Communication Research
      PubDate: 2020-05-26T12:31:14Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0093650220921314
       
  • Credibility Perceptions and Detection Accuracy of Fake News Headlines on
           Social Media: Effects of Truth-Bias and Endorsement Cues

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      Authors: Mufan Luo, Jeffrey T. Hancock, David M. Markowitz
      Abstract: Communication Research, Ahead of Print.
      This article focuses on message credibility and detection accuracy of fake and real news as represented on social media. We developed a deception detection paradigm for news headlines and conducted two online experiments to examine the extent to which people (1) perceive news headlines as credible, and (2) accurately distinguish fake and real news across three general topics (i.e., politics, science, and health). Both studies revealed that people often judged news headlines as fake, suggesting a deception-bias for news in social media. Across studies, we observed an average detection accuracy of approximately 51%, a level consistent with most research using this deception detection paradigm with equal lie-truth base-rates. Study 2 evaluated the effects of endorsement cues in social media (e.g., Facebook likes) on message credibility and detection accuracy. Results showed that headlines associated with a high number of Facebook likes increased credibility, thereby enhancing detection accuracy for real news but undermining accuracy for fake news. These studies introduce truth-default theory to the context of news credibility and advance our understanding of how biased processing of news information can impact detection accuracy with social media endorsement cues.
      Citation: Communication Research
      PubDate: 2020-05-23T08:33:09Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0093650220921321
       
  • The Paradox of Interaction: Communication Network Centralization, Shared
           Task Experience, and the Wisdom of Crowds in Online Crowdsourcing
           Communities

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      Authors: Bei Yan, Lian Jian, Ruqin Ren, Janet Fulk, Emily Sidnam-Mauch, Peter Monge
      Abstract: Communication Research, Ahead of Print.
      Research on the wisdom of crowds (WOC) identifies two paradoxical effects of communication. The social influence effect hampers the WOC, whereas the collective learning effect improves crowd wisdom. Yet it remains unclear under what conditions such communication impedes or enhances collective wisdom. The current study examined two features characterizing communication in online communities, communication network centralization and shared task experience, and their effect on the WOC. Both these features can serve as indicators of the likelihood that underlying communication may facilitate either social influence or collective learning. With an 8-year longitudinal behavioral-trace data set of 269,871 participants and 1,971 crowds, we showed that communication network centralization negatively affected the WOC. By contrast, shared task experience positively predicted the WOC. Shared task experience also moderated the effect of communication network centralization such that centralized communication networks became more beneficial for crowd performance as shared task experience increased.
      Citation: Communication Research
      PubDate: 2020-05-04T10:42:16Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0093650220915033
       
  • Talking Politics: The Relationship Between Supportive and Opposing
           Discussion With Partisan Media Credibility and Use

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      Authors: Jay D. Hmielowski, Sarah Staggs, Myiah J. Hutchens, Michael A. Beam
      Abstract: Communication Research, Ahead of Print.
      In this article, we test a dynamic intracommunication process looking at the relationships between interpersonal discussion, perceived credibility of partisan media, and partisan media use. Using the theoretical foundation of hostile media perceptions, with a specific focus on relative hostile media, we examine whether interpersonal communication affects perceived credibility of liberal and conservative media outlets and whether these effects translate into increased use or avoidance of partisan media outlets. Using data collected during the 2016 U.S. election, we find that supportive interpersonal discussion is associated with greater perceived credibility of liberal media outlets (e.g., MSNBC) among liberals, which results in increased use of liberal leaning news outlets. In addition, we find that discussion with those who hold opposing views is associated with increased perceived credibility of conservative media outlets (e.g., Fox News) among conservatives, which translates into greater use of conservative leaning outlets. Similarly, talking to those who hold opposing views decreases perceived credibility of liberal media outlets (e.g., MSNBC) among conservatives, resulting in decreased use of liberal leaning outlets.
      Citation: Communication Research
      PubDate: 2020-04-22T06:47:10Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0093650220915041
       
  • Mortality Salience and Mobile Voice Calling: A Case of a Massive Natural
           Disaster

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      Authors: Takahisa Suzuki, Tetsuro Kobayashi, Jeffrey Boase, Yuko Tanaka, Ryutaro Wakimoto, Tsutomu Suzuki
      Abstract: Communication Research, Ahead of Print.
      Observational studies have found that the frequency of mobile communication with close ties increases in times of emergency. However, the mechanisms underlying such increases are not well understood. Drawing upon terror management theory, this study predicted that increased mortality salience due to disaster promotes mobile voice calling to close ties. By analyzing digitally traced behavioral data, Study 1 found that mobile voice calls to close ties increased after the Great East Japan Earthquake in 2011, especially in areas where there were severe tremors. Study 2 employed a field experiment and demonstrated that psychologically priming respondents to recall the earthquake led to an increase in the number of outgoing mobile voice calls to close ties, but not to non-close ties. The theoretical implications for mobile communication in time of disaster are discussed.
      Citation: Communication Research
      PubDate: 2020-04-06T06:33:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0093650220911809
       
  • Trusting Others: A Pareto Distribution of Source and Message Credibility
           Among News Reporters

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      Authors: Aviv Barnoy, Zvi Reich
      Abstract: Communication Research, Ahead of Print.
      This study uses the case study of journalists to explore the socio-cognitive nature of interpersonal trust in growingly deceptive ecosystems. Journalists are ideal test subjects to explore these issues as professional trust allocators, who receive immediate feedback on right and wrong trust decisions. The study differentiates, for the first time, between source and message credibility evaluations, based on a combination of qualitative and quantitative methods. Findings show that journalists can distinguish source and message credibility. However, in practice they rely on source evaluations as an “autopilot” default mode, shifting gears to observations of source and message credibility in epistemically complex cases. The proportion between both is close to Pareto distribution. This extreme division challenges both inductive and mixed inference theories of epistemic trust and suggests revisiting the “typification” doctrine of newswork. Data partially support the hegemony and “epistemic injustice” theory, showing that traditional credibility criteria might trigger the exclusion of nontraditional voices.
      Citation: Communication Research
      PubDate: 2020-04-04T01:57:07Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0093650220911814
       
  • “There’s Always Going to Be Uncertainty”: Exploring Undergraduate
           Student Parents’ Sources of Uncertainty and Related Management Practices
           

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      Authors: Kristina M. Scharp, R. Amanda Cooper, Jared V. Worwood, Elizabeth Dorrance Hall
      Abstract: Communication Research, Ahead of Print.
      Framed by uncertainty management theory, the present study explores the uncertainty issues and management practices of undergraduate student parents. Results from 40 narrative interviews reveal seven sources of uncertainty, eight management practices, and two uncertainty trade-offs. Findings reveal that having two interrelated identities (student and parent) not only exacerbate some uncertainties but create completely new ones. This intersectionality also holds implications for management practices. Theoretical implications and practical applications are discussed.
      Citation: Communication Research
      PubDate: 2020-03-02T06:29:07Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0093650220903872
       
  • How Are Competitive Framing Environments Transformed by Person-to-Person
           Communication' An Integrated Social Transmission, Content Analysis,
           and Eye Movement Monitoring Approach

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      Authors: Jason C. Coronel, Jared M. Ott, Austin Hubner, Matthew D. Sweitzer, Samuel Lerner
      Abstract: Communication Research, Ahead of Print.
      Person-to-person communication is ubiquitous in everyday life, yet the literature on framing has not examined how the content and number of frames change when transmitted across individuals. In Study 1, we use the serial reproduction paradigm to examine how person-to-person communication and message length influence the number of frames in the information environment. In Study 2, we use eye movement monitoring to examine whether individuals direct greater attention to pro- or counter-attitudinal frames in a competitive framing environment. We find that the process of retelling frames from person to person can transform an environment containing multiple competing frames into an environment with a single frame. This is important given work showing that framing effects in competitive environments are more likely to cancel out. Furthermore, message length and prior attitudes play important roles in determining whether individuals direct attention to, remember, and transmit frames.
      Citation: Communication Research
      PubDate: 2020-03-02T06:27:25Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0093650220903596
       
  • Creating News Literacy Messages to Enhance Expert Corrections of
           Misinformation on Twitter

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      Authors: Emily K. Vraga, Leticia Bode, Melissa Tully
      Abstract: Communication Research, Ahead of Print.
      A number of solutions have been proposed to address concerns about misinformation online, including encouraging experts to engage in corrections of misinformation being shared and improving media literacy among the American public. This study combines these approaches to examine whether news literacy (NL) messages on social media enhance the effectiveness of expert correction of misinformation on Twitter. Two experiments suggest that expert organizations can successfully correct misinformation on social media across two controversial issues with a single tweet. However, three different NL messages did not improve the effectiveness of expert corrections. We discuss the difficulties of crafting NL messages that break through the clutter on social media and suggest guidelines for organizations attempting to address misinformation online.
      Citation: Communication Research
      PubDate: 2020-01-30T12:59:41Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0093650219898094
       
  • The Development and Influence of Parasocial Relationships With Television
           Characters: A Longitudinal Experimental Test of Prejudice Reduction
           Through Parasocial Contact

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      Authors: Bradley J. Bond
      Abstract: Communication Research, Ahead of Print.
      The current study investigates parasocial relationships as the underlying mechanism explaining prejudice reduction following extended exposure to mediated outgroups. Heterosexual participants viewed a fictional television series for 10 weeks depicting outgroup (gay) characters in which the outgroup attribute (sexuality) was accentuated or sanitized. Parasocial relationships with outgroup characters grew significantly over the course of the study regardless of condition. White participants and participants who reported the strongest pretest prejudice experienced the most intense growth. Outgroup prejudice decreased significantly over time for participants in both experimental conditions. Parasocial relationships predicted both prejudice reduction over time and behavioral responses to the outgroup. Parasocial relationships with an ingroup character engaged in intergroup contact did not contribute to prejudice reduction beyond parasocial relationships with outgroup characters. This research suggests that audiences can develop socioemotional bonds with outgroup television characters that can influence attitudes and behaviors much the same as direct, interpersonal intergroup contact.
      Citation: Communication Research
      PubDate: 2020-01-30T12:57:58Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0093650219900632
       
  • Exploring How Beliefs About Algorithms Shape (Offline) Success in Online
           Dating: A Two-Wave Longitudinal Investigation

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      Authors: Liesel L. Sharabi
      Abstract: Communication Research, Ahead of Print.
      Matching algorithms are a central feature of online dating, yet little research exists on their effectiveness—or people’s perceptions of their effectiveness—for recommending a mate. Accordingly, this study explores the effects of people’s beliefs in the legitimacy of algorithms on their first date with an online dating partner. Longitudinal survey data were collected from online dating participants leading up to and following the first date. Findings suggested that whether algorithms actually worked mattered less than whether participants had the perception that they worked for finding a partner. Moreover, participants reported better first dates to the extent that they believed in the efficacy of the compatibility matching process. The results have implications for understanding the role of algorithms in shaping relationship success on and off the internet.
      Citation: Communication Research
      PubDate: 2020-01-21T06:37:36Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0093650219896936
       
 
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