Publisher: Sage Publications   (Total: 1166 journals)

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Showing 1 - 200 of 1166 Journals sorted alphabetically
AADE in Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Abstracts in Anthropology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 29)
Academic Pathology     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Accounting History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18, SJR: 0.527, CiteScore: 1)
Acta Radiologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.754, CiteScore: 2)
Acta Radiologica Open     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Acta Sociologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39, SJR: 0.939, CiteScore: 2)
Action Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 53, SJR: 0.308, CiteScore: 1)
Active Learning in Higher Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 396, SJR: 1.397, CiteScore: 2)
Adaptive Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.288, CiteScore: 1)
Administration & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18, SJR: 0.675, CiteScore: 1)
Adoption & Fostering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25, SJR: 0.313, CiteScore: 0)
Adsorption Science & Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.258, CiteScore: 1)
Adult Education Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 260, SJR: 0.566, CiteScore: 2)
Adult Learning     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 51)
Advances in Dental Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 1.791, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Developing Human Resources     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35, SJR: 0.614, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Mechanical Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 156, SJR: 0.272, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Methods and Practices in Psychological Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20)
Advances in Structural Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 51, SJR: 0.599, CiteScore: 1)
AERA Open     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
Affilia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.496, CiteScore: 1)
Africa Spectrum     Open Access   (Followers: 17)
Agrarian South : J. of Political Economy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Air, Soil & Water Research     Open Access   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.214, CiteScore: 1)
Alexandria : The J. of National and Intl. Library and Information Issues     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 68)
Allergy & Rhinology     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
AlterNative : An Intl. J. of Indigenous Peoples     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 39, SJR: 0.194, CiteScore: 0)
Alternative Law J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.176, CiteScore: 0)
Alternatives : Global, Local, Political     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.351, CiteScore: 1)
Alternatives to Laboratory Animals     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.297, CiteScore: 1)
American Behavioral Scientist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26, SJR: 0.982, CiteScore: 2)
American Economist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
American Educational Research J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 260, SJR: 2.913, CiteScore: 3)
American J. of Alzheimer's Disease and Other Dementias     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23, SJR: 0.67, CiteScore: 2)
American J. of Cosmetic Surgery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
American J. of Evaluation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18, SJR: 0.646, CiteScore: 2)
American J. of Health Promotion     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35, SJR: 0.807, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Hospice and Palliative Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 47, SJR: 0.65, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Law & Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.204, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Lifestyle Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.431, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Medical Quality     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.777, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Men's Health     Open Access   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.595, CiteScore: 2)
American J. of Rhinology and Allergy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.972, CiteScore: 2)
American J. of Sports Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 248, SJR: 3.949, CiteScore: 6)
American Politics Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 36, SJR: 1.313, CiteScore: 1)
American Review of Public Administration     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28, SJR: 2.062, CiteScore: 2)
American Sociological Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 357, SJR: 6.333, CiteScore: 6)
American String Teacher     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Analytical Chemistry Insights     Open Access   (Followers: 26, SJR: 0.224, CiteScore: 1)
Angiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.849, CiteScore: 2)
Animation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.197, CiteScore: 0)
Annals of Clinical Biochemistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.634, CiteScore: 1)
Annals of Otology, Rhinology & Laryngology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20, SJR: 0.807, CiteScore: 1)
Annals of Pharmacotherapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 59, SJR: 1.096, CiteScore: 2)
Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 51, SJR: 1.225, CiteScore: 3)
Annals of the ICRP     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.548, CiteScore: 1)
Anthropocene Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 3.341, CiteScore: 7)
Anthropological Theory     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 48, SJR: 0.739, CiteScore: 1)
Antitrust Bulletin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Antiviral Chemistry and Chemotherapy     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.635, CiteScore: 2)
Antyajaa : Indian J. of Women and Social Change     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Applied Biosafety     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.131, CiteScore: 0)
Applied Psychological Measurement     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21, SJR: 1.17, CiteScore: 1)
Applied Spectroscopy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 27, SJR: 0.489, CiteScore: 2)
Armed Forces & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25, SJR: 0.29, CiteScore: 1)
Arthaniti : J. of Economic Theory and Practice     Full-text available via subscription  
Arts and Humanities in Higher Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 49, SJR: 0.305, CiteScore: 1)
Asia Pacific Media Educator     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.23, CiteScore: 0)
Asia-Pacific J. of Management Research and Innovation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Asia-Pacific J. of Public Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.558, CiteScore: 1)
Asia-Pacific J. of Rural Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Asian and Pacific Migration J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.324, CiteScore: 1)
Asian Cardiovascular and Thoracic Annals     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.305, CiteScore: 0)
Asian J. of Comparative Politics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Asian J. of Legal Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Asian J. of Management Cases     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.101, CiteScore: 0)
ASN Neuro     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 1.534, CiteScore: 3)
Assessment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19, SJR: 1.519, CiteScore: 3)
Assessment for Effective Intervention     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.578, CiteScore: 1)
Australasian J. of Early Childhood     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.535, CiteScore: 1)
Australasian Psychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18, SJR: 0.433, CiteScore: 1)
Australian & New Zealand J. of Psychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30, SJR: 1.801, CiteScore: 2)
Australian and New Zealand J. of Criminology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 545, SJR: 0.612, CiteScore: 1)
Australian J. of Career Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Australian J. of Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 51, SJR: 0.403, CiteScore: 1)
Australian J. of Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.497, CiteScore: 1)
Autism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 356, SJR: 1.739, CiteScore: 4)
Autism & Developmental Language Impairments     Open Access   (Followers: 17)
Avian Biology Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.401, CiteScore: 1)
Behavior Modification     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.877, CiteScore: 2)
Behavioral and Cognitive Neuroscience Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Behavioral Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Beyond Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Bible Translator     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Biblical Theology Bulletin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24, SJR: 0.184, CiteScore: 0)
Big Data & Society     Open Access   (Followers: 55)
Biochemistry Insights     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Bioinformatics and Biology Insights     Open Access   (Followers: 12, SJR: 1.141, CiteScore: 2)
Biological Research for Nursing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.685, CiteScore: 2)
Biomarker Insights     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.81, CiteScore: 2)
Biomarkers in Cancer     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Biomedical Engineering and Computational Biology     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
Biomedical Informatics Insights     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Bioscope: South Asian Screen Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.235, CiteScore: 0)
BMS: Bulletin of Sociological Methodology/Bulletin de Méthodologie Sociologique     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.226, CiteScore: 0)
Body & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29, SJR: 1.531, CiteScore: 3)
Bone and Tissue Regeneration Insights     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Brain and Neuroscience Advances     Open Access  
Brain Science Advances     Open Access  
Breast Cancer : Basic and Clinical Research     Open Access   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.823, CiteScore: 2)
British J. of Music Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
British J. of Occupational Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 253, SJR: 0.323, CiteScore: 1)
British J. of Pain     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31, SJR: 0.579, CiteScore: 2)
British J. of Politics and Intl. Relations     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39, SJR: 0.91, CiteScore: 2)
British J. of Visual Impairment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.337, CiteScore: 1)
British J.ism Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
BRQ Business Review Quarterly     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Building Acoustics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.215, CiteScore: 1)
Building Services Engineering Research & Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.583, CiteScore: 1)
Bulletin of Science, Technology & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Business & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Business and Professional Communication Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.348, CiteScore: 1)
Business Information Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17, SJR: 0.279, CiteScore: 0)
Business Perspectives and Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Cahiers Élisabéthains     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.111, CiteScore: 0)
Calcutta Statistical Association Bulletin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
California Management Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 37, SJR: 2.209, CiteScore: 4)
Canadian Association of Radiologists J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.463, CiteScore: 1)
Canadian J. of Kidney Health and Disease     Open Access   (Followers: 8, SJR: 1.007, CiteScore: 2)
Canadian J. of Nursing Research (CJNR)     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Canadian J. of Occupational Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 167, SJR: 0.626, CiteScore: 1)
Canadian J. of Psychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28, SJR: 1.769, CiteScore: 3)
Canadian J. of School Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.266, CiteScore: 1)
Canadian Pharmacists J. / Revue des Pharmaciens du Canada     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.536, CiteScore: 1)
Cancer Control     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Cancer Growth and Metastasis     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Cancer Informatics     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.64, CiteScore: 1)
Capital and Class     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.282, CiteScore: 1)
Cardiac Cath Lab Director     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Cardiovascular and Thoracic Open     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Career Development and Transition for Exceptional Individuals     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.44, CiteScore: 1)
Cartilage     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.889, CiteScore: 3)
Cell Transplantation     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 1.023, CiteScore: 3)
Cephalalgia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 1.581, CiteScore: 3)
Cephalalgia Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Child Language Teaching and Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34, SJR: 0.501, CiteScore: 1)
Child Maltreatment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 1.22, CiteScore: 3)
Child Neurology Open     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Childhood     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19, SJR: 0.894, CiteScore: 2)
Childhood Obesity and Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
China Information     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.767, CiteScore: 2)
China Report     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.221, CiteScore: 0)
Chinese J. of Sociology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Christian Education J. : Research on Educational Ministry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Chronic Illness     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.672, CiteScore: 2)
Chronic Respiratory Disease     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.808, CiteScore: 2)
Chronic Stress     Open Access  
Citizenship, Social and Economics Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.145, CiteScore: 0)
Cleft Palate-Craniofacial J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.757, CiteScore: 1)
Clin-Alert     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Clinical and Applied Thrombosis/Hemostasis     Open Access   (Followers: 32, SJR: 0.49, CiteScore: 1)
Clinical and Translational Neuroscience     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Clinical Case Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.364, CiteScore: 1)
Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 45, SJR: 0.73, CiteScore: 2)
Clinical EEG and Neuroscience     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.552, CiteScore: 2)
Clinical Ethics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.296, CiteScore: 1)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Arthritis and Musculoskeletal Disorders     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.537, CiteScore: 2)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Blood Disorders     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.314, CiteScore: 2)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Cardiology     Open Access   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.686, CiteScore: 2)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Case Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.283, CiteScore: 1)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Circulatory, Respiratory and Pulmonary Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.425, CiteScore: 2)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Ear, Nose and Throat     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Endocrinology and Diabetes     Open Access   (Followers: 33, SJR: 0.63, CiteScore: 2)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Oncology     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 1.129, CiteScore: 3)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Pediatrics     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Psychiatry     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Reproductive Health     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.776, CiteScore: 0)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Therapeutics     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.172, CiteScore: 0)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Trauma and Intensive Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Women's Health     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Clinical Nursing Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34, SJR: 0.471, CiteScore: 1)
Clinical Pathology     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Clinical Pediatrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25, SJR: 0.487, CiteScore: 1)
Clinical Psychological Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16, SJR: 3.281, CiteScore: 5)
Clinical Rehabilitation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 78, SJR: 1.322, CiteScore: 3)
Clinical Risk     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.133, CiteScore: 0)
Clinical Trials     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22, SJR: 2.399, CiteScore: 2)
Clothing and Textiles Research J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28, SJR: 0.36, CiteScore: 1)
Collections : A J. for Museum and Archives Professionals     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Common Law World Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Communication & Sport     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.385, CiteScore: 1)
Communication and the Public     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Communication Disorders Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.458, CiteScore: 1)
Communication Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24, SJR: 2.171, CiteScore: 3)
Community College Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 1.451, CiteScore: 1)
Comparative Political Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 292, SJR: 3.772, CiteScore: 3)
Compensation & Benefits Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Competition & Change     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.843, CiteScore: 2)

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Similar Journals
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Adaptive Behavior
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.288
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 9  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1059-7123 - ISSN (Online) 1741-2633
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1166 journals]
  • Towards a functional classification of behaviour: a taxonomy based on
           outcomes

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Dave EW Mallpress
      Abstract: Adaptive Behavior, Ahead of Print.
      The classification of behaviour has historically been done using one of the two approaches, either through the hypothetical causes (such as ‘instincts’, ‘drives’ and ‘needs’) or through the cataloguing of the observable form of behaviour using an ethogram. This article offers an alternative framework for classification of behaviour based upon only the behavioural outcomes. The framework is specified from first principles of a state-space approach, allowing us to discuss intermediate outcomes that may have instrumental value. This approach could provide a firmer foundation to consider the hierarchical nature of goals and allows us to address both the ‘how’ and the ‘why’ questions within a single framework. This taxonomy is designed to complement rather than replace existing attempts; the classification of behaviour by outcome is orthogonal to questions of the mechanisms of decision making or of the implementation of actions. This article specifies nine basic classes of behaviour and provides precise definitions for each of these. We then develop a formal language for the description of observed activities, the representation of behavioural hierarchies and for the analysis of possibility sets for achieving future goals. We follow up with some critique and discussion of the problems such a framework poses.
      Citation: Adaptive Behavior
      PubDate: 2021-09-07T01:47:47Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10597123211040574
       
  • Epilogue to “Questioning Life and Cognition” by John Stewart

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Tom Froese
      Abstract: Adaptive Behavior, Ahead of Print.
      In 2012, John Stewart contributed a book manuscript entitled “Questioning Life and Cognition: Some Foundational Issues in the Paradigm of Enaction” to the Enaction Series in Online Collaborative Publishing, edited by Olivier Gapenne and Bruno Bachimont. Along with Mattéo Mossio, I was invited by Olivier to serve as a glossator of this text. The purpose was to thereby continue our long and fruitful dialogues with John that began when we were both students. I took advantage of the opportunity to also express my gratitude to John for his participation in that formative stage of my personal academic journey. My reflections were included as an epilogue to his book. In memoriam, the epilogue is reproduced in this report unchanged. I will always be grateful to John for making the research community of enaction feel like family to me and for helping me recognize that there is a place for my diverse interests in the continued pursuit of an academic career.
      Citation: Adaptive Behavior
      PubDate: 2021-08-11T10:15:31Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10597123211031720
       
  • Editorial

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      Authors: Pierre Steiner, Olivier Gapenne, Charles Lenay
      Abstract: Adaptive Behavior, Ahead of Print.
      This editorial presents the context of the special issue and some basic elements of John’s Stewart biography.
      Citation: Adaptive Behavior
      PubDate: 2021-08-04T08:52:29Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10597123211032038
       
  • Living creatures, humankind, and the history of who we are

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Laura Mojica
      Abstract: Adaptive Behavior, Ahead of Print.
      Breathing Life into Biology is a brave attempt to do science while wearing its values on its sleeves. It is written under the commitment that life is intrinsically valuable, and its value has to be taken seriously in doing biology. Stewart defends a conception of life in which every living organism has a subjective point of view from which it makes sense of the world. Under this conception and the commitment that life is valuable in itself, the book presents the story of life from its origin and our history as humankind. However, the book is more successful in presenting the former than the latter. Yet Stewart’s conception of enaction opens the possibility for cognitive science and his conception of what makes us human enables us to embrace the histories and the forms of life of those who have been systematically silenced.
      Citation: Adaptive Behavior
      PubDate: 2021-08-03T06:13:38Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10597123211031702
       
  • Perceiving at a distance: enaction, exteriority and possibility – a
           tribute to John Stewart

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Charles Lenay
      Abstract: Adaptive Behavior, Ahead of Print.
      The aim of this article is to offer a new approach of perception regarding the position of a distant object. It is also a tribute to John Stewart who accompanied the first stages of this research. Having already examined the difficulties surrounding questions of the perception of exteriority within the framework of enactive approaches, we will proceed in two stages. The first stage will consist of an attempt to explain distal perception in terms of individual sensorimotor invariants. This poses the problem but fails to solve it. The second stage will propose a new pathway to account for spatial perception; a pathway that does not deny the initial intuitions of the autopoietic enactive approaches, but one which radically changes the conception of cognition by considering, from the perceptual stage, the need to take into account interindividual interactions. The protocol of an original experimental study will characterize this new approach considering the perceptual experience of objects at a distance, in exteriority, in a space of possibilities without parting from the domain of interaction. To do this, we have to work at the limits of the perceptual crossing, that is, at the moment when the perceptual reciprocity between different subjects begins to disappear.
      Citation: Adaptive Behavior
      PubDate: 2021-07-30T04:50:53Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10597123211031016
       
  • Autopoiesis and evolution: the role of organisms in natural drift

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      Authors: Vincenzo Raimondi
      Abstract: Adaptive Behavior, Ahead of Print.
      Genetic reductionism is increasingly seen as a severely limited approach to understanding living systems. The Neo-Darwinian explanatory framework tends to overlook the role of the organism for an understanding of development and evolution. In the current fast-changing theoretical landscape, the autopoietic approach provides conceptual distinctions and tools that may contribute to building an alternative framework. In this article, I examine the implications of the theories of autopoiesis and natural drift for an organism-centered view of evolution. By shifting the attention from genes to ontogenetic organism-niche configurations and their transformations over generations, this approach presents a compelling perspective on the role of organismal behavior in guiding phylogenetic drift.
      Citation: Adaptive Behavior
      PubDate: 2021-07-30T04:48:35Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10597123211030694
       
  • The design of self-organizing human–swarm intelligence

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      Authors: Jonas D Hasbach, Maren Bennewitz
      Abstract: Adaptive Behavior, Ahead of Print.
      Human–swarm interaction is a frontier in the realms of swarm robotics and human-factors engineering. However, no holistic theory has been explicitly formulated that can inform how humans and robot swarms should interact through an interface while considering real-world demands, the relative capabilities of the components, as well as the desired joint-system behaviours. In this article, we apply a holistic perspective that we refer to as joint human–swarm loops, that is, a cybernetic system made of human, swarm and interface. We argue that a solution for human–swarm interaction should make the joint human–swarm loop an intelligent system that balances between centralized and decentralized control. The swarm-amplified human is suggested as a possible design that combines perspectives from swarm robotics, human-factors engineering and theoretical neuroscience to produce such a joint human–swarm loop. Essentially, it states that the robot swarm should be integrated into the human’s low-level nervous system function. This requires modelling both the robot swarm and the biological nervous system as self-organizing systems. We discuss multiple design implications that follow from the swarm-amplified human, including a computational experiment that shows how the robot swarm itself can be a self-organizing interface based on minimal computational logic.
      Citation: Adaptive Behavior
      PubDate: 2021-07-03T10:21:39Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10597123211017550
       
  • Locomotion postural variability and coordination in boys with overweight

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      Authors: Shahab Parvinpour, Marzie Balali, Mohsen Shafizadeh, Fatemeh Samimi Pazhuh, Michael Duncan, David R Broom
      Abstract: Adaptive Behavior, Ahead of Print.
      The purpose of this study was to examine the variability and coordination of postural adaptations in normal weight children and those with overweight in running and hopping. Fifty-six boys between 7 and 10 years were classified into groups as overweight (n = 33) or normal-weight (n = 23). They performed two trials of running and hopping over a 20-m straight line distance. Accelerometers were attached on the trunk and head for collecting body movements in different directions from 15 strides. Postural variability and coordination were calculated by multiscale entropy and cross approximate entropy for the running and hopping trials, separately. Findings highlight overweight boys had significantly higher trunk-head coordination in mediolateral direction than normal-weight boys (0.72 vs. 0.68). The hopping movement pattern had highest variability (9.88 vs. 8.77) and trunk–head coordination (0.61 vs. 0.67) than running. Excess body mass demands additional postural adaptations to compensate for reducing the risk of losing balance laterally in boys with overweight.
      Citation: Adaptive Behavior
      PubDate: 2021-06-19T05:35:07Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10597123211024008
       
  • Converging enactivisms: radical enactivism meets linguistic bodies

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      Authors: Giovanni Rolla, Jeferson Huffermann
      Abstract: Adaptive Behavior, Ahead of Print.
      We advance a critical examination of two recent branches of the enactivist research program, namely, Radically Enactive Cognition and Linguistic Bodies. We argue that, although these approaches may look like diverging views within the wider enactivist program, when appraised in a conciliatory spirit, they can be interpreted as developing converging ideas. We examine how the notion of know-how figures in them to show an important point of convergence, namely, that the normativity of human cognitive capacities rests on shared know-how. Radical enactivism emphasizes the diachronic dimension of shared know-how, and linguistic bodies emphasize the synchronic one. Given that know-how is a normative notion, it is subject to success conditions. We then argue it implies basic content, which is the content of the successful ongoing interactions between agent(s) and environment. Basic content does not imply accuracy conditions and representational content, so it evades Hutto and Myin’s Hard Problem of Content. Moreover, this account is amenable to the central claim by Di Paolo et al. that the participatory sense-making relations at play in linguistic exchanges are explained in continuity with explanations of biological organization and sensorimotor engagements.
      Citation: Adaptive Behavior
      PubDate: 2021-06-11T06:54:56Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10597123211020782
       
  • The study of motor skills under a view of hierarchical organisation of
           open system

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      Authors: Umberto Cesar Corrêa, Fabian Alberto Romero Clavijo, Marcos Antônio Mattos dos Reis, Go Tani
      Abstract: Adaptive Behavior, Ahead of Print.
      This article considers human motor skills based on the concept of the hierarchical organisation of living systems. This concept considers apparently opposite phenomena (e.g. consistency-variability) as complementary and as contemplated in the same structure. The hierarchy in open systems is characterised by three main relativities: (a) whole and parts, (b) control and (c) variability. From a hierarchical standpoint, motor skills phenomena are structured under two levels: macro (responsible for the consistency and configuration of patterns) and micro (responsible for variability and, consequently, the flexibility of patterns). Study findings make it possible to understand how adaptations in the soccer, futsal, swimming, golf, coincident timing and graphic motor skills take place by altering the microstructure (parameterisation) or reorganising the macrostructure (self-organisation). The distinction between these two modes of adaptation allows us to consider the increase of complexity in the motor skills phenomena as a basic feature of living systems.
      Citation: Adaptive Behavior
      PubDate: 2021-06-05T05:43:09Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10597123211019793
       
  • Smooth coping: an embodied, Heideggerian approach to dual-process theory

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      Authors: Zachariah A Neemeh
      Abstract: Adaptive Behavior, Ahead of Print.
      Dual-process theories divide cognition into two kinds of processes: Type 1 processes that are autonomous and do not use working memory, and Type 2 processes that are decoupled from the immediate situation and use working memory. Often, Type 1 processes are also fast, high capacity, parallel, nonconscious, biased, contextualized, and associative, while Type 2 processes are typically slow, low capacity, serial, conscious, normative, abstract, and rule-based. This article argues for an embodied dual-process theory based on the phenomenology of Martin Heidegger. According to Heidegger, the basis of human agents’ encounters with the world is in a prereflective, pragmatically engaged disposition marked by readiness-to-hand (Zuhandenheit), sometimes equated with “smooth coping.” Examples of smooth coping include walking, throwing a ball, and other embodied actions that do not require reflective thought. I argue that smooth coping primarily consists of Type 1 processes. The Heideggerian dual-process model yields distinctly different hypotheses from Hubert Dreyfus’ model of smooth coping, and I will critically engage with Dreyfus’ work.
      Citation: Adaptive Behavior
      PubDate: 2021-05-28T09:03:13Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10597123211017337
       
  • Non-discursive philosophy by imagining new practices through design

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      Authors: Caroline Hummels, Sander van der Zwan, Maarten Smith, Jelle Bruineberg
      Abstract: Adaptive Behavior, Ahead of Print.
      In this commentary on Rietveld’s inaugural lecture, we exemplify with one of our design cases for project Expedition RWS 2050, how Rietveld’s and our method are complementary. Within this project, RWS invited us to contribute our design skills and make relevant future scenarios experienceable. To scaffold imaginative discussions about everyday life in 2050 with a cross-section of the Dutch population, we wrote seven short speculative stories and designed a set of physical discussion tools. When looking at this design case and the cases Rietveld describes in his inaugural lecture, one can see that we both are guided by and contributing to the development of ecological and enactive philosophy, which rejects the dichotomy between sensorimotor and higher cognition. In his approach, Rietveld pushes the boundaries of the affordances of the material during the making process, whereas we predominantly investigate the affordances of the things and practices which we have designed. Despite these differences, we are both pursuing engagement with philosophical practice through non-discursive means while imagining new sociomaterial practices.
      Citation: Adaptive Behavior
      PubDate: 2021-04-19T08:52:11Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10597123211006463
       
  • Rethinking relationality

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      Authors: Dirk van den Heuvel
      Abstract: Adaptive Behavior, Ahead of Print.
      The text presents a discussion of possible connections between the ideas of Erik Rietveld and concepts of relationality and materiality in modern architecture, with a special focus on Dutch Structuralism and the New Brutalism.
      Citation: Adaptive Behavior
      PubDate: 2021-04-02T04:38:14Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10597123211000188
       
  • Get up, stand up: art’s affordances for unseating and unsettling

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      Authors: Flora Lysen
      Abstract: Adaptive Behavior, Ahead of Print.
      In response to Erik Rietveld’s text “The affordances of art for making technologies,” this commentary probes art’s affordances for what Rietveld calls behavioral “changeability.” I ask, how can a view of art’s affordances help to better understand collective and relational affects and habitual behaviors' Can artworks help to “radically change the affordances available in our surroundings,” to generate collective social action and behavioral change'
      Citation: Adaptive Behavior
      PubDate: 2021-03-29T05:31:31Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10597123211000895
       
  • Preserving without conserving: Memoryscopes and historically burdened
           heritage

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      Authors: John Sutton
      Abstract: Adaptive Behavior, Ahead of Print.
      Rather than conserving or ignoring historically burdened heritage, RAAAF intervene. Their responses are striking, sometimes dramatic or destructive. Prompted by Rietveld’s discussion of the Luftschloss project, I compare some other places with difficult pasts which engage our embodied and sensory responses, without such active redirection or disruption. Ross Gibson’s concept of a ‘memoryscope’ helps us identify distinct but complementary ways of focussing the forces of the past. Emotions and imaginings are transmitted over time in many forms. The past is not easily washed, blasted or sliced away. By considering other settings and modes of encounter, we can recognise and applaud the novelty of RAAAF’s interventions while urging further attention to the variable dynamics and rhythms of remembering and of sociomaterial residues.
      Citation: Adaptive Behavior
      PubDate: 2021-03-19T04:44:42Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10597123211000833
       
  • Affordance as general value function: a computational model

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      Authors: Daniel Graves, Johannes Günther, Jun Luo
      Abstract: Adaptive Behavior, Ahead of Print.
      General value functions (GVFs) in the reinforcement learning (RL) literature are long-term predictive summaries of the outcomes of agents following specific policies in the environment. Affordances as perceived action possibilities with specific valence may be cast into predicted policy-relative goodness and modeled as GVFs. A systematic explication of this connection shows that GVFs and especially their deep-learning embodiments (1) realize affordance prediction as a form of direct perception, (2) illuminate the fundamental connection between action and perception in affordance, and (3) offer a scalable way to learn affordances using RL methods. Through an extensive review of existing literature on GVF applications and representative affordance research in robotics, we demonstrate that GVFs provide the right framework for learning affordances in real-world applications. In addition, we highlight a few new avenues of research opened up by the perspective of “affordance as GVF,” including using GVFs for orchestrating complex behaviors.
      Citation: Adaptive Behavior
      PubDate: 2021-03-19T04:42:42Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1059712321999421
       
  • Let’s talk about affordances: some implications of the
           social-material affordances approach

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      Authors: Paul Voestermans
      Abstract: Adaptive Behavior, Ahead of Print.
      In Erik Rietveld’s inaugural lecture “The Affordances of Art for Making Technologies,” art is presented as a valuable avenue to enrich the environment with material and social affordances that may enhance human meaning giving practices. In this contribution, I make a distinction between conventional and unconventional practices and argue for an account of sociomateriality that covers the whole spectrum and not just the evidently artistic and artful ones. In this context, I plea for a cognitive science program that adds to the rich resources art has to offer for understanding the whole spectrum of practices and deals with the complexity of social, material, and cultural practices.
      Citation: Adaptive Behavior
      PubDate: 2021-03-11T06:16:32Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10597123211000172
       
  • Power-efficient adaptive behavior through a shape-changing elastic robot

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      Authors: Shiv Ashutosh Katiyar, Darwin Gouwanda, Fumiya Iida, Surya Girinatha Nurzaman
      Abstract: Adaptive Behavior, Ahead of Print.
      The adaptive morphology of a robot, such as shape adaptation, plays a significant role in adapting its behaviors. Shape adaptation should ideally be achieved without considerable cost, like the power required to deform the robot’s body, and therefore, it is reasonably considered as the last resort in classical rigid robots. However, the last decade has seen an increasing interest in soft robots: robots that can achieve deformability through their inherent material properties or structural compliance. Nevertheless, the dynamics of these types of robots is often complex and therefore it is difficult to substantiate whether the cost like the required power for changing its shape will be worthwhile to achieve the desired behavior. This article presents an approach in the development and analysis of a shape-changing locomoting robot, which relies on the ability of elastic beams to deform and vibrate. Through a proper use of elastic materials and the robot’s vibration-based dynamics, it will be shown both analytically and experimentally how shape adaptation can be designed such that it leads to desirable behaviors, with better power efficiency compared to when the robot solely relies on changing its control input. The results encourage emerging direction in robotics that investigates approaches to change robots’ behaviors through their adaptive morphology.
      Citation: Adaptive Behavior
      PubDate: 2021-03-06T04:46:04Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1059712321990186
       
  • The dynamic of body and brain co-evolution

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      Authors: Paolo Pagliuca, Stefano Nolfi
      Abstract: Adaptive Behavior, Ahead of Print.
      We introduce a method that permits to co-evolve the body and the control properties of robots. It can be used to adapt the morphological traits of robots with a hand-designed morphological bauplan or to evolve the morphological bauplan as well. Our results indicate that robots with co-adapted body and control traits outperform robots with fixed hand-designed morphologies. Interestingly, the advantage is not due to the selection of better morphologies but rather to the mutual scaffolding process that results from the possibility to co-adapt the morphological traits to the control traits and vice versa. Our results also demonstrate that morphological variations do not necessarily have destructive effects on robots’ skills.
      Citation: Adaptive Behavior
      PubDate: 2021-03-01T12:51:52Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1059712321994685
       
  • Making and embedding humane technologies: can artistic practices provide
           normative guidance'

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      Authors: Janna Bertchen van Grunsven
      Abstract: Adaptive Behavior, Ahead of Print.
      In this commentary, I raise one question and one critical comment about Rietveld’s normative claim that ‘artistic practices afford embedding technologies better in society’ (2019, p. 5). In what exact sense is this the case' It seems that Rietveld offers two interconnected but conceptually distinct answers to this question. The first focuses on art’s habit-breaking possibilities. The second concerns art’s ability to make the lived experiences of the stakeholders potentially affected by a given technology experientially concrete. I will discuss both points, and why I think more needs to be said about them.
      Citation: Adaptive Behavior
      PubDate: 2021-02-27T06:53:55Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1059712321995229
       
  • Experience shapes future foraging decisions in a brainless organism

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      Authors: Jules Smith-Ferguson, Terence C Burnham, Madeleine Beekman
      Abstract: Adaptive Behavior, Ahead of Print.
      The ability to change one’s behaviour based on past experience has obvious fitness benefits. Drawing from past experience requires some kind of information storage and retrieval. The acellular slime mould Physarum polycephalum has previously been shown to use stored information about negative stimuli. Here, we repeatedly exposed the slime mould to three stimuli with differing levels of potential risk: light, salt and lavender. We asked if the slime mould would change its foraging behaviour depending on the level of risk. In our experiment, taking risk yielded better food. We consistently selected individuals that made the same foraging decision (accepting risk or avoiding risk) over multiple trials. Hence, the same individuals were tested over a period of time, but only individuals that continued to make the same decision were allowed to continue. Regardless of selection regime, slime moulds in the light became more likely to select the food in the light over time, while those exposed to salt became more salt averse. Lavender had no effect. Our results can cautiously be interpreted as examples of non-associative learning, adding to a growing body of work showing that the absence of a central nervous system is no impediment to possessing sophisticated information processing.
      Citation: Adaptive Behavior
      PubDate: 2021-02-27T06:52:36Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1059712321994684
       
  • The affordances of art: the role of the individual and the case of
           literature

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      Authors: Martin Stokhof
      Abstract: Adaptive Behavior, Ahead of Print.
      This short note addresses the question whether Rietveld’s account of visual arts and adaptive behaviour be extended to literature.
      Citation: Adaptive Behavior
      PubDate: 2021-02-24T10:56:29Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1059712321995604
       
  • Portrait of the artist as a philosopher

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      Authors: Jeannette Pols
      Abstract: Adaptive Behavior, Ahead of Print.
      The response asks about the relationship between artist and audience in the RAAAF artworks. Is the artist an Autonomous Innovator who breaches the ties with the past and the environment' Or is the aesthetic practice located in the creation of relationships around these objects, hence expanding the artwork by using know-how, experiences and enthusiasm of the audience/users'
      Citation: Adaptive Behavior
      PubDate: 2021-02-24T10:47:41Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1059712321994688
       
  • On the naturalisation of teleology: self-organisation, autopoiesis and
           teleodynamics

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      Authors: Miguel García-Valdecasas
      Abstract: Adaptive Behavior, Ahead of Print.
      In recent decades, several theories have claimed to explain the teleological causality of organisms as a function of self-organising and self-producing processes. The most widely cited theories of this sort are variations of autopoiesis, originally introduced by Maturana and Varela. More recent modifications of autopoietic theory have focused on system organisation, closure of constraints and autonomy to account for organism teleology. This article argues that the treatment of teleology in autopoiesis and other organisation theories is inconclusive for three reasons: First, non-living self-organising processes like autocatalysis meet the defining features of autopoiesis without being teleological; second, organisational approaches, whether defined in terms of the closure of constraints, self-determination or autonomy, are unable to specify teleological normativity, that is, the individuation of an ultimate beneficiary; third, all self-organised systems produce local order by maximising the throughput of energy and/or material (obeying the maximum entropy production (MEP) principle) and thereby are specifically organised to undermine their own critical boundary conditions. Despite these inadequacies, an alternative approach called teleodynamics accounts for teleology. This theory shows how multiple self-organising processes can be collectively linked so that they counter each other’s MEP principle tendencies to become codependent. Teleodynamics embraces – not ignoring – the difficulties of self-organisation, but reinstates teleology as a radical phase transition distinguishing systems embodying an orientation towards their own beneficial ends from those that lack normative character.
      Citation: Adaptive Behavior
      PubDate: 2021-02-24T10:07:11Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1059712321991890
       
  • What is architecture for' designing as enriching the landscape of
           affordances

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      Authors: Andrea Jelić
      Abstract: Adaptive Behavior, Ahead of Print.
      Starting from the understanding of architecture as an existential art, this commentary highlights the relevance of Rietveld’s view on the affordances of art for making technologies in two ways: (a) first, by discussing the value of the notion of affordances for educating architecture students in thinking what a space can do and increasing their sensitivity for understanding and incorporating the diversity of users’ needs and abilities in design and (b) second, by outlining the implications for thinking about architectural design as a life-affirming practice, which originates in and enriches our landscape of affordances.
      Citation: Adaptive Behavior
      PubDate: 2021-02-23T11:37:48Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1059712321994686
       
  • Intra-performance: the choreographies of K.G. Guttman

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      Authors: Kitty Zijlmans
      Abstract: Adaptive Behavior, Ahead of Print.
      This contribution takes as point of departure the particular response-ability allowed by the contemporary choreographic performance works of settler (Canadian) visual artist Karen Ginger Guttman, in which the visitor-beholder’s body becomes involved in the choreographic ‘dance’. These site-situated works echo the Rietveld’s works, but Guttman’s site performances take place in a residential environment, they specifically challenge guest-host-site ‘íntra-actions’ as coined by Karen Barad and reveal constraints that occur in the choreographic ‘dance’ of continuously changing relationalities.
      Citation: Adaptive Behavior
      PubDate: 2021-02-20T05:10:39Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1059712321994689
       
  • Skill learning in making and experiencing artworks: technologies that
           transform detached intellectuals into bodily engaged actors

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      Authors: Duarte Araújo
      Abstract: Adaptive Behavior, Ahead of Print.
      Rietveld discusses three skills that artistic practices have to offer to makers of technologies for embedding such technologies in society. An ecological dynamics model of skill learning empowers the embedding of Rietveld’s described skills in three social domains: technology makers, artworkers, and visitors of such artworks.
      Citation: Adaptive Behavior
      PubDate: 2021-02-19T05:11:16Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1059712321994687
       
  • Evolution of coordination in pairwise and multi-player interactions via
           prior commitments

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      Authors: Ndidi Bianca Ogbo, Aiman Elgarig, The Anh Han
      Abstract: Adaptive Behavior, Ahead of Print.
      Upon starting a collective endeavour, it is important to understand your partners’ preferences and how strongly they commit to a common goal. Establishing a prior commitment or agreement in terms of posterior benefits and consequences from those engaging in it provides an important mechanism for securing cooperation. Resorting to methods from Evolutionary Game Theory (EGT), here we analyse how prior commitments can also be adopted as a tool for enhancing coordination when its outcomes exhibit an asymmetric payoff structure, in both pairwise and multi-party interactions. Arguably, coordination is more complex to achieve than cooperation since there might be several desirable collective outcomes in a coordination problem (compared to mutual cooperation, the only desirable collective outcome in cooperation dilemmas). Our analysis, both analytically and via numerical simulations, shows that whether prior commitment would be a viable evolutionary mechanism for enhancing coordination and the overall population social welfare strongly depends on the collective benefit and severity of competition, and more importantly, how asymmetric benefits are resolved in a commitment deal. Moreover, in multi-party interactions, prior commitments prove to be crucial when a high level of group diversity is required for optimal coordination. The results are robust for different selection intensities. Overall, our analysis provides new insights into the complexity and beauty of behavioural evolution driven by humans’ capacity for commitment, as well as for the design of self-organised and distributed multi-agent systems for ensuring coordination among autonomous agents.
      Citation: Adaptive Behavior
      PubDate: 2021-02-18T07:10:17Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1059712321993166
       
  • Centralizing the cut: a feminist, queer, crip response to powerful
           playgrounds

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      Authors: Simon(e) van Saarloos
      Abstract: Adaptive Behavior, Ahead of Print.
      Responding to Erik Rietveld’s inaugural lecture, this commentary asks which bodies and what sites of design and architecture are centralized when thinking about “The Affordances of Art for Making Technologies”' Departing from personal experience and Nicholas Mirzoeff’s counterhistory of visuality, I analyze what it means to imagine “the end of sitting.” Through an engagement with crip theory and disability activism, I aim to understand which architectural sites should be disrupted. RAAAF’s practice of cutting and splitting closely relates to the work of the ‘70s artist Gordon Matta-Clark. But the radical proposals of both RAAAF and Matta-Clark engage with power in almost oppositional ways. While Matta-Clark offers the cut as a final space, RAAAF aims to create new worlds. I question the need for new worlds, since they are built on current power structures, instead of dismantling them.
      Citation: Adaptive Behavior
      PubDate: 2021-02-11T05:42:39Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1059712321989098
       
  • On making futures with human touch

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      Authors: Anna M. Barona, Lambros Malafouris
      Abstract: Adaptive Behavior, Ahead of Print.
      We commend Rietveld’s affordance-based approach to art and architecture for foregrounding an oft-neglected area in the cognitive sciences: the material dimension of human cognition, creativity and imagination. We suggest that supplementing the cross-disciplinary approach that Rietveld calls for with insights from archaeology and anthropology can not only help us create futures ‘with human touch’ but also gain a deeper understanding creativity more broadly.
      Citation: Adaptive Behavior
      PubDate: 2021-01-28T09:49:02Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1059712321989428
       
  • The effect of freedom of relevant choice on the 7-m throw in university
           students practicing handball

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      Authors: Julia Dias Barros, Priscila Garcia Marques, Paulo H Borges, Dourivaldo Teixeira, Umberto Cesar Corrêa
      Abstract: Adaptive Behavior, Ahead of Print.
      The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of freedom of relevant choice, that is, associated with performance success, on the motor learning. Forty players of both sexes (21.2 ± 2.4 years) participated in the study and were divided into four experimental groups: alternated, random, choice, and yoked. The task was the Handball 7-m throw, in specific right and left side throw. Participants performed five blocks of six throws in the practice phase and, after 30 min, another six throws in the retention test. A mixed model analyses of variance (ANOVA) were run with data from the performance success and consistency rates considering first and last blocks of acquisition and retention block as repeated measures. Groups were analyzed as independent variables by considering their interaction with sex (4 × 2 × 3 (groups × sex × blocks)) and time of practice (4 × 4 × 3 (groups × time of practice × blocks)). Results showed that the alternated and choice groups presented superior rates of performance success to the random and yoked groups. The findings of this study allowed us to conclude that learning was benefited by the alternated and choice conditions compared to the random and yoked conditions.
      Citation: Adaptive Behavior
      PubDate: 2021-01-27T07:21:09Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1059712320983042
       
  • Sculpting the landscape of affordances

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      Authors: Marek McGann
      Abstract: Adaptive Behavior, Ahead of Print.
      The work of Rietveld and his colleagues offers an engaging and valuable framework for considering the relationship between art, technology, culture and habit, and challenges us to consider our ethical perspective on these things.
      Citation: Adaptive Behavior
      PubDate: 2021-01-25T08:52:25Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1059712321989426
       
  • Material playgrounds: opening an ontology of active matter

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      Authors: Laura Mojica
      Abstract: Adaptive Behavior, Ahead of Print.
      Rietveld’s conception of artistic practices and artworks allows us to engage with nature in a radically different manner: in a way that is more active and alive than we routinely do within the practices of philosophy and cognitive sciences. I argue that Rietveld’s material playgrounds allow us to challenge our understanding of matter as purely passive and devoid of agency; they show us that nature’s existence is a unique, raw, and powerful occurrence that intrinsically has a horizon of open possibilities.
      Citation: Adaptive Behavior
      PubDate: 2021-01-25T07:28:38Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1059712320988178
       
  • What does the concept of affordances afford'

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      Authors: Rob Withagen, Alan Costall
      Abstract: Adaptive Behavior, Ahead of Print.
      Gibson once suggested that his ecological approach could provide architecture and design with a new theoretical basis. Erik Rietveld takes up this suggestion—the concept of affordances figures prominently not only in his philosophical and scientific work but also in the design practices he is engaged in. However, as Gibson introduced affordances as a functional concept, it seems ill-suited to capture the many dimensions of our lived experience of the (manufactured) environment. Can the concept of affordances also take on the expressive and aesthetic qualities of artifacts and buildings'
      Citation: Adaptive Behavior
      PubDate: 2021-01-25T05:39:34Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1059712320982683
       
  • The paradox of unconventional affordances

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      Authors: Marc Slors
      Abstract: Adaptive Behavior, Ahead of Print.
      Responsiveness to affordances that are salient in our conventional practices is usually automatic and unreflective—for good reasons. Responsiveness to unconventional affordances, by contrast, must be enforced. This is what artistic interventions of studio RAAAF do. I argue that it is precisely the fact that affordances are more or less forced on us that makes it possible for us to relate to them freely.
      Citation: Adaptive Behavior
      PubDate: 2021-01-23T06:45:20Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1059712321989100
       
  • Bridges and hobby-horses: John Stewart’s adventure of ideas

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      Authors: Ezequiel A Di Paolo
      Abstract: Adaptive Behavior, Ahead of Print.
      I briefly reflect on the work of John Stewart and his instrumental role in the development of enactive cognitive science, his outstanding ability to communicate across disciplines, and his research obsessions.
      Citation: Adaptive Behavior
      PubDate: 2021-01-23T06:29:21Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1059712320988216
       
  • Disrupting the Flow of Perception-Action through Design

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      Authors: Harry Heft
      Abstract: Adaptive Behavior, Ahead of Print.
      It is usually a mark of good design when technologies and tools that mediate goal-directed action are such that the user’s attentional focus is maintained on the intended ends of action rather than on the technologies and tools themselves. When the mediators become the focus, the continuity of goal-directed action is disrupted, and the flow of action can be re-directed. What then is the purpose of the projects designed by the RAAAF studio, as described by Rietveld, which seem to be intended to do both' Disruption of the continuity of goal-directed perception-action may prompt reflection about the circumstances at work, and in so doing provoke a transformation in habitual patterns of action and of thought. The project “The End of Sitting” is intended to remediate the adverse health effects of standard chair-dominated offices through an unconventional office landscape that prompts intermittent postural readjustments, boosting the levels of activity common in such settings. The project “Bunker 599” demonstrates that seemingly unremarkable features of the landscape can sometimes conceal aspects of culture’s history, and that design can function to draw attention to a hidden and even vanishing history. Design can enrich an individual’s sense of place in a stream of cultural history.
      Citation: Adaptive Behavior
      PubDate: 2021-01-22T08:35:42Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1059712321989099
       
  • A self-adaptive landmark-based aggregation method for robot swarms

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      Authors: Arash Sadeghi Amjadi, Mohsen Raoufi, Ali Emre Turgut
      Abstract: Adaptive Behavior, Ahead of Print.
      Aggregation, a widely observed behavior in social insects, is the gathering of individuals on any location or on a cue. The former being called the self-organized aggregation, and the latter being called the cue-based aggregation. One of the fascinating examples of cue-based aggregation is the thermotactic behavior of young honeybees. Young honeybees aggregate on optimal temperature zones in the hive using a simple set of behaviors. The state-of-the-art cue-based aggregation method BEECLUST was derived based on these behaviors. The BEECLUST method is a very simple, yet a very capable method that has favorable characteristics such as robustness to noise and simplicity to apply. However, the BEECLUST method does not perform well in low robot densities. In this article, inspired by the navigation techniques used by ants and bees, a self-adaptive landmark-based aggregation method is proposed. In this method, robots use landmarks in the environment to locate the cue once they “learn” the relative position of the cue with respect to the landmark. With the introduction of an error threshold parameter, the method also becomes adaptive to changes in the environment. Through systematic experiments in kinematic and realistic simulators with different parameters, robot densities, and cue sizes, it was observed that using the information of the environment makes the proposed method to show better performance than the BEECLUST in all the settings, including low robot density, high noise, and dynamic conditions.
      Citation: Adaptive Behavior
      PubDate: 2021-01-19T05:19:35Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1059712320985543
       
  • Doing philosophy with a water-lance: art and the future of embodied
           cognition

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      Authors: Tim Elmo Feiten, Kristopher Holland, Anthony Chemero
      Abstract: Adaptive Behavior, Ahead of Print.
      We take the approach developed by Rietveld and RAAAF to be a paradigm example of a much-needed development in embodied cognitive science: applying the insights gained into the nature of cognition back to embodied cognition itself, back to the practice of bodily engagements with our sociocultural environments. Rietveld’s work is groundbreaking precisely because it stands almost alone as a prototype of this move: to raise embodiment from a mere content of our theorizing to the practical level of determining the form of our activity, including our scholarly activity. We describe some of our own artistic-scholarly work that follows similar principles.
      Citation: Adaptive Behavior
      PubDate: 2021-01-19T05:19:16Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1059712320983041
       
  • Material philosophy and the adaptability of materials

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      Authors: Annemarie Mol
      Abstract: Adaptive Behavior, Ahead of Print.
      This reflection on Erik Rietveld’s The Affordances of Art for Making Technologies addresses, first, what it is to engage in material philosophy and make material propositions and then, second, what different materialities, or rather different ways of handling materialities, allow material philosophers to say. It notes that solidity is not an intrinsic property of any stuff. If only they are handled with care, and loved enough, even wood, concrete and metal turn out to be adaptable.
      Citation: Adaptive Behavior
      PubDate: 2021-01-13T06:28:28Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1059712320984510
       
  • Letting the affordances fool around: architectural space from the
           users’ point of view

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      Authors: Edward Baggs, Kerstin Sailer
      Abstract: Adaptive Behavior, Ahead of Print.
      Erik Rietveld’s lecture describes the creation of architectural works from the point of view of the architects. We are curious about architectural space as a living system: what happens once the architects have left' We introduce the space syntax notion of virtual community, and suggest that this is compatible with Rietveld’s distinction between the field and the landscape of affordances.
      Citation: Adaptive Behavior
      PubDate: 2021-01-09T08:49:40Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1059712320983050
       
  • Machine learning for rediscovering revolutionary ideas of the past

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      Authors: R Alexander Bentley, Joshua Borycz, Simon Carrignon, Damian J Ruck, Michael J O’Brien
      Abstract: Adaptive Behavior, Ahead of Print.
      The explosion of online knowledge has made knowledge, paradoxically, difficult to find. A web or journal search might retrieve thousands of articles, ranked in a manner that is biased by, for example, popularity or eigenvalue centrality rather than by informed relevance to the complex query. With hundreds of thousands of articles published each year, the dense, tangled thicket of knowledge grows even more entwined. Although natural language processing and new methods of generating knowledge graphs can extract increasingly high-level interpretations from research articles, the results are inevitably biased toward recent, popular, and/or prestigious sources. This is a result of the inherent nature of human social-learning processes. To preserve and even rediscover lost scientific ideas, we employ the theory that scientific progress is punctuated by means of inspired, revolutionary ideas at the origin of new paradigms. Using a brief case example, we suggest how phylogenetic inference might be used to rediscover potentially useful lost discoveries, as a way in which machines could help drive revolutionary science.
      Citation: Adaptive Behavior
      PubDate: 2021-01-08T05:39:22Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1059712320983045
       
 
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