Publisher: Sage Publications   (Total: 1166 journals)

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Showing 1 - 200 of 1166 Journals sorted alphabetically
AADE in Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Abstracts in Anthropology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 29)
Academic Pathology     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Accounting History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18, SJR: 0.527, CiteScore: 1)
Acta Radiologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.754, CiteScore: 2)
Acta Radiologica Open     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Acta Sociologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39, SJR: 0.939, CiteScore: 2)
Action Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 53, SJR: 0.308, CiteScore: 1)
Active Learning in Higher Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 396, SJR: 1.397, CiteScore: 2)
Adaptive Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.288, CiteScore: 1)
Administration & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18, SJR: 0.675, CiteScore: 1)
Adoption & Fostering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25, SJR: 0.313, CiteScore: 0)
Adsorption Science & Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.258, CiteScore: 1)
Adult Education Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 259, SJR: 0.566, CiteScore: 2)
Adult Learning     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 51)
Advances in Dental Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 1.791, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Developing Human Resources     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35, SJR: 0.614, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Mechanical Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 156, SJR: 0.272, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Methods and Practices in Psychological Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20)
Advances in Structural Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 51, SJR: 0.599, CiteScore: 1)
AERA Open     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
Affilia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.496, CiteScore: 1)
Africa Spectrum     Open Access   (Followers: 17)
Agrarian South : J. of Political Economy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Air, Soil & Water Research     Open Access   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.214, CiteScore: 1)
Alexandria : The J. of National and Intl. Library and Information Issues     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 68)
Allergy & Rhinology     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
AlterNative : An Intl. J. of Indigenous Peoples     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 39, SJR: 0.194, CiteScore: 0)
Alternative Law J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.176, CiteScore: 0)
Alternatives : Global, Local, Political     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.351, CiteScore: 1)
Alternatives to Laboratory Animals     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.297, CiteScore: 1)
American Behavioral Scientist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26, SJR: 0.982, CiteScore: 2)
American Economist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
American Educational Research J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 259, SJR: 2.913, CiteScore: 3)
American J. of Alzheimer's Disease and Other Dementias     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23, SJR: 0.67, CiteScore: 2)
American J. of Cosmetic Surgery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
American J. of Evaluation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18, SJR: 0.646, CiteScore: 2)
American J. of Health Promotion     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35, SJR: 0.807, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Hospice and Palliative Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 47, SJR: 0.65, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Law & Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.204, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Lifestyle Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.431, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Medical Quality     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.777, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Men's Health     Open Access   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.595, CiteScore: 2)
American J. of Rhinology and Allergy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.972, CiteScore: 2)
American J. of Sports Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 247, SJR: 3.949, CiteScore: 6)
American Politics Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 36, SJR: 1.313, CiteScore: 1)
American Review of Public Administration     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28, SJR: 2.062, CiteScore: 2)
American Sociological Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 356, SJR: 6.333, CiteScore: 6)
American String Teacher     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Analytical Chemistry Insights     Open Access   (Followers: 26, SJR: 0.224, CiteScore: 1)
Angiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.849, CiteScore: 2)
Animation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.197, CiteScore: 0)
Annals of Clinical Biochemistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.634, CiteScore: 1)
Annals of Otology, Rhinology & Laryngology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20, SJR: 0.807, CiteScore: 1)
Annals of Pharmacotherapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 58, SJR: 1.096, CiteScore: 2)
Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 51, SJR: 1.225, CiteScore: 3)
Annals of the ICRP     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.548, CiteScore: 1)
Anthropocene Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 3.341, CiteScore: 7)
Anthropological Theory     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 48, SJR: 0.739, CiteScore: 1)
Antitrust Bulletin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Antiviral Chemistry and Chemotherapy     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.635, CiteScore: 2)
Antyajaa : Indian J. of Women and Social Change     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Applied Biosafety     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.131, CiteScore: 0)
Applied Psychological Measurement     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21, SJR: 1.17, CiteScore: 1)
Applied Spectroscopy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 27, SJR: 0.489, CiteScore: 2)
Armed Forces & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25, SJR: 0.29, CiteScore: 1)
Arthaniti : J. of Economic Theory and Practice     Full-text available via subscription  
Arts and Humanities in Higher Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 49, SJR: 0.305, CiteScore: 1)
Asia Pacific Media Educator     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.23, CiteScore: 0)
Asia-Pacific J. of Management Research and Innovation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Asia-Pacific J. of Public Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.558, CiteScore: 1)
Asia-Pacific J. of Rural Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Asian and Pacific Migration J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.324, CiteScore: 1)
Asian Cardiovascular and Thoracic Annals     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.305, CiteScore: 0)
Asian J. of Comparative Politics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Asian J. of Legal Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Asian J. of Management Cases     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.101, CiteScore: 0)
ASN Neuro     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 1.534, CiteScore: 3)
Assessment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19, SJR: 1.519, CiteScore: 3)
Assessment for Effective Intervention     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.578, CiteScore: 1)
Australasian J. of Early Childhood     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.535, CiteScore: 1)
Australasian Psychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18, SJR: 0.433, CiteScore: 1)
Australian & New Zealand J. of Psychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30, SJR: 1.801, CiteScore: 2)
Australian and New Zealand J. of Criminology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 546, SJR: 0.612, CiteScore: 1)
Australian J. of Career Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Australian J. of Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 51, SJR: 0.403, CiteScore: 1)
Australian J. of Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.497, CiteScore: 1)
Autism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 356, SJR: 1.739, CiteScore: 4)
Autism & Developmental Language Impairments     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
Avian Biology Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.401, CiteScore: 1)
Behavior Modification     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.877, CiteScore: 2)
Behavioral and Cognitive Neuroscience Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Behavioral Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Beyond Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Bible Translator     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Biblical Theology Bulletin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24, SJR: 0.184, CiteScore: 0)
Big Data & Society     Open Access   (Followers: 55)
Biochemistry Insights     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Bioinformatics and Biology Insights     Open Access   (Followers: 12, SJR: 1.141, CiteScore: 2)
Biological Research for Nursing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.685, CiteScore: 2)
Biomarker Insights     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.81, CiteScore: 2)
Biomarkers in Cancer     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Biomedical Engineering and Computational Biology     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Biomedical Informatics Insights     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Bioscope: South Asian Screen Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.235, CiteScore: 0)
BMS: Bulletin of Sociological Methodology/Bulletin de Méthodologie Sociologique     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.226, CiteScore: 0)
Body & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29, SJR: 1.531, CiteScore: 3)
Bone and Tissue Regeneration Insights     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Brain and Neuroscience Advances     Open Access  
Brain Science Advances     Open Access  
Breast Cancer : Basic and Clinical Research     Open Access   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.823, CiteScore: 2)
British J. of Music Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
British J. of Occupational Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 252, SJR: 0.323, CiteScore: 1)
British J. of Pain     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31, SJR: 0.579, CiteScore: 2)
British J. of Politics and Intl. Relations     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39, SJR: 0.91, CiteScore: 2)
British J. of Visual Impairment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.337, CiteScore: 1)
British J.ism Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
BRQ Business Review Quarterly     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Building Acoustics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.215, CiteScore: 1)
Building Services Engineering Research & Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.583, CiteScore: 1)
Bulletin of Science, Technology & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Business & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Business and Professional Communication Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.348, CiteScore: 1)
Business Information Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17, SJR: 0.279, CiteScore: 0)
Business Perspectives and Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Cahiers Élisabéthains     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.111, CiteScore: 0)
Calcutta Statistical Association Bulletin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
California Management Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 37, SJR: 2.209, CiteScore: 4)
Canadian Association of Radiologists J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.463, CiteScore: 1)
Canadian J. of Kidney Health and Disease     Open Access   (Followers: 8, SJR: 1.007, CiteScore: 2)
Canadian J. of Nursing Research (CJNR)     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Canadian J. of Occupational Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 166, SJR: 0.626, CiteScore: 1)
Canadian J. of Psychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28, SJR: 1.769, CiteScore: 3)
Canadian J. of School Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.266, CiteScore: 1)
Canadian Pharmacists J. / Revue des Pharmaciens du Canada     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.536, CiteScore: 1)
Cancer Control     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Cancer Growth and Metastasis     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Cancer Informatics     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.64, CiteScore: 1)
Capital and Class     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.282, CiteScore: 1)
Cardiac Cath Lab Director     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Cardiovascular and Thoracic Open     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Career Development and Transition for Exceptional Individuals     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.44, CiteScore: 1)
Cartilage     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.889, CiteScore: 3)
Cell Transplantation     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 1.023, CiteScore: 3)
Cephalalgia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 1.581, CiteScore: 3)
Cephalalgia Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Child Language Teaching and Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34, SJR: 0.501, CiteScore: 1)
Child Maltreatment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 1.22, CiteScore: 3)
Child Neurology Open     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Childhood     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19, SJR: 0.894, CiteScore: 2)
Childhood Obesity and Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
China Information     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.767, CiteScore: 2)
China Report     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.221, CiteScore: 0)
Chinese J. of Sociology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Christian Education J. : Research on Educational Ministry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Chronic Illness     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.672, CiteScore: 2)
Chronic Respiratory Disease     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.808, CiteScore: 2)
Chronic Stress     Open Access  
Citizenship, Social and Economics Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.145, CiteScore: 0)
Cleft Palate-Craniofacial J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.757, CiteScore: 1)
Clin-Alert     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Clinical and Applied Thrombosis/Hemostasis     Open Access   (Followers: 32, SJR: 0.49, CiteScore: 1)
Clinical and Translational Neuroscience     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Clinical Case Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.364, CiteScore: 1)
Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 45, SJR: 0.73, CiteScore: 2)
Clinical EEG and Neuroscience     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.552, CiteScore: 2)
Clinical Ethics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.296, CiteScore: 1)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Arthritis and Musculoskeletal Disorders     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.537, CiteScore: 2)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Blood Disorders     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.314, CiteScore: 2)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Cardiology     Open Access   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.686, CiteScore: 2)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Case Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.283, CiteScore: 1)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Circulatory, Respiratory and Pulmonary Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.425, CiteScore: 2)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Ear, Nose and Throat     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Endocrinology and Diabetes     Open Access   (Followers: 33, SJR: 0.63, CiteScore: 2)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Oncology     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 1.129, CiteScore: 3)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Pediatrics     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Psychiatry     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Reproductive Health     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.776, CiteScore: 0)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Therapeutics     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.172, CiteScore: 0)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Trauma and Intensive Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Women's Health     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Clinical Nursing Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34, SJR: 0.471, CiteScore: 1)
Clinical Pathology     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Clinical Pediatrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25, SJR: 0.487, CiteScore: 1)
Clinical Psychological Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16, SJR: 3.281, CiteScore: 5)
Clinical Rehabilitation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 78, SJR: 1.322, CiteScore: 3)
Clinical Risk     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.133, CiteScore: 0)
Clinical Trials     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22, SJR: 2.399, CiteScore: 2)
Clothing and Textiles Research J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28, SJR: 0.36, CiteScore: 1)
Collections : A J. for Museum and Archives Professionals     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Common Law World Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Communication & Sport     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.385, CiteScore: 1)
Communication and the Public     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Communication Disorders Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.458, CiteScore: 1)
Communication Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24, SJR: 2.171, CiteScore: 3)
Community College Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 1.451, CiteScore: 1)
Comparative Political Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 291, SJR: 3.772, CiteScore: 3)
Compensation & Benefits Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Competition & Change     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.843, CiteScore: 2)

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Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.73
Citation Impact (citeScore): 2
Number of Followers: 45  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1359-1045 - ISSN (Online) 1461-7021
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1166 journals]
  • A year supporting youth within a pandemic: A shared reflection

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Deborah Christie, April Elliott
      Pages: 309 - 312
      Abstract: Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry, Volume 26, Issue 2, Page 309-312, April 2021.

      Citation: Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry
      PubDate: 2021-03-19T05:19:28Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13591045211000173
      Issue No: Vol. 26, No. 2 (2021)
       
  • Integrating psychology into paediatric healthcare: A UK perspective

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      Authors: Gail Dovey-Pearce, Halina Flannery
      Pages: 313 - 322
      Abstract: Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry, Volume 26, Issue 2, Page 313-322, April 2021.

      Citation: Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry
      PubDate: 2021-03-25T05:07:34Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13591045211000786
      Issue No: Vol. 26, No. 2 (2021)
       
  • Who should we ask about mental health symptoms in adolescents with
           CFS/ME' Parent-child agreement on the revised children’s anxiety and
           depression scale

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      Authors: Teona Serafimova, Maria Loades, Daisy Gaunt, Esther Crawley
      Pages: 367 - 380
      Abstract: Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry, Volume 26, Issue 2, Page 367-380, April 2021.
      Background:One in three adolescents with chronic fatigue syndrome/myalgic encephalomyelitis (CFS/ME) have mental health problems. Multi-informant perspectives are key to psychological assessment. Understanding parent-child agreement is crucial to accurate diagnosis, particularly where severe fatigue limits self-report.Methods:Agreement on the revised children’s anxiety and depression scale (RCADs) was assessed between parents and children with CFS/ME (n = 93) using Bland-Altman plots, cross tabulations and regression analyses.Results:Diagnostic thresholds were met more frequently based on child-report. Parent- and child-report had similar sensitivity and specificity on RCADS compared to gold-standard diagnostic interviews. Regression analysis found similar accuracy between both reports. For anxiety diagnoses, odds ratio (OR) for child-report was 1.10 (CI = 1.06–1.14), and 1.10 (CI = 1.05–1.14) for parent-report. For depression, OR for child report was 1.26 (CI = 1.11–1.43), while for parent-report is was 1.25 (CI = 1.10–1.41). For total score, OR for child-report was 1.10 (CI = 1.05–1.13) while OR for parent-report was 1.09 (CI = 1.05–1.13).Conclusions:Reasonable agreement was observed between parent- and child-report of mental health symptoms in paediatric CFS/ME. While parent-report can facilitate psychological evaluation in CFS/ME, this is not a substitute for a child’s own report.
      Citation: Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry
      PubDate: 2021-02-15T10:50:37Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1359104521994880
      Issue No: Vol. 26, No. 2 (2021)
       
  • Attachment representations to parents and emotional-behavioral problems: A
           comparison between children with type 1 diabetes mellitus and healthy
           children in middle childhood

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      Authors: Fabiola Bizzi, Anna Maria Della Vedova, Elena Prandi, Donatella Cavanna, Paola Manfredi
      Pages: 393 - 405
      Abstract: Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry, Volume 26, Issue 2, Page 393-405, April 2021.
      Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1D) is one of the most demanding chronic diseases for children and their families, since controlling diabetes involves a process of co-regulation with attachment figures. However, there is insufficient evidence in middle childhood on psychological mechanisms involved that might complicate the adaptation of these children. Therefore, 106 children (N = 31 with T1D and N = 75 as matched healthy group [HG]) aged 8 to 13 were assessed using the Child Attachment Interview, the Child Behavior Checklist, and the measure of glycated hemoglobin. Results showed that insecure T1D children did not have worse diabetes control than the secure ones. However, T1D children differed from HG for higher levels of idealization to father and withdrawn/depressed problems. Moreover, T1D children with insecure attachment to mother scored significantly higher in anxious/depressed, withdrawn/depressed, attention problems, and rule-breaking behavior, while T1D children with insecure attachment to father scored significantly higher only in the withdrawn/depressed scale compared to the remaining children. Therefore, diabetes does not in itself determine a psychological vulnerability in middle childhood, but the presence of an insecure attachment, especially to the mother, worsens the psychological adaptation of T1D children. Psychological support should be provided for these young patients and their families.
      Citation: Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry
      PubDate: 2021-01-20T06:34:07Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1359104520987871
      Issue No: Vol. 26, No. 2 (2021)
       
  • Association of yogic breathing with perceived stress and conception of
           strengths and difficulties in teenagers

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      Authors: Divya Kanchibhotla, Saumya Subramanian, Bharti Kaushik
      Pages: 406 - 417
      Abstract: Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry, Volume 26, Issue 2, Page 406-417, April 2021.
      Background:Mental health problems are increasing at an alarming rate throughout the world, and teenagers are no exception. They experience high levels of stress in their formative years which often leads to poor social behavior. In the present study, we examine the effect of Sudarshan Kriya Yoga (SKY), a yogic breathing technique on perceived stress and social behavior of school going teenagers.Method:A cross-sectional survey was conducted. Teenagers who practiced SKY daily constituted the study group and teenagers who did not practice any form of yoga or meditation formed the control group. Child Perceived Stress scale (C-PSS) and Strength and Difficulty questionnaire (SDQ) were used to evaluate the mental health and social behavior of both groups.Results:Lower stress scores were observed among students who practiced SKY compared to their peers. A significant difference was observed between the groups with respect to emotional problems, conduct problems, peer problems, and pro-social behavior. Gender wise comparison highlighted that the females from the SKY group scored lower on emotional problems sub-scale compared to their counterparts from control group. Results also highlighted an improved peer to peer interaction among both boys and girls in the SKY group.Conclusion:The results indicate the practice of SKY is associated with reduced stress, improved self-awareness, and social behavior.
      Citation: Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry
      PubDate: 2021-02-16T08:53:29Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1359104521994633
      Issue No: Vol. 26, No. 2 (2021)
       
  • Sensation seeking and nonsuicidal self-injurious behavior among adolescent
           psychiatric patients

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      Authors: Shane D Kentopp, Bradley T Conner, Theodore J Fetterling, Arianna A Delgadillo, Rachel A Rebecca
      Pages: 430 - 442
      Abstract: Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry, Volume 26, Issue 2, Page 430-442, April 2021.
      The Benefits and Barriers model of NSSI postulates that engagement in NSSI is positively reinforced by potent benefits, however there are a host of barriers to engagement, any one of which is salient enough to prevent engagement. It is possible that individual differences in sensation seeking, a trait that describes optimal level of positive reinforcement, may alter the balance between the benefits and barriers of engagement in NSSI. There are significant associations between engagement in NSSI and sensation seeking in college undergraduates, a population with disproportionately high rates of NSSI. However, it is unclear whether these traits play a similar role in adolescents. We expected that higher levels of sensation seeking would positively relate to any NSSI history, lifetime frequency of NSSI, and earlier age at onset of NSSI among a sample of 200 adolescents in a psychiatric hospital. Consistent with previous research, results indicated that females were more likely to engage in NSSI than males. Additionally, increased sensation seeking was associated with greater likelihood of ever engaging in NSSI and a greater number of different NSSI methods tried. Though we expected sensation seeking would be significantly related to lifetime NSSI frequency and earlier onset of NSSI, it was not. Findings suggest that individual differences may alter relations between the benefits and barriers of NSSI and that measuring sensation seeking in adolescents, especially females, and especially those experiencing psychological distress, may identify those at highest risk for engaging in NSSI and may allow for targeted intervention with these individuals.
      Citation: Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry
      PubDate: 2021-02-22T07:23:49Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1359104521994627
      Issue No: Vol. 26, No. 2 (2021)
       
  • Therapist self-disclosure: Let’s tackle the elephant in the room

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      Authors: Clark Johnsen, Helen T Ding
      Pages: 443 - 450
      Abstract: Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry, Volume 26, Issue 2, Page 443-450, April 2021.
      Therapist Self-Disclosure (TSD), the revealing of a therapist’s feelings, thoughts or personal information to a client, is an inevitable aspect of therapeutic relationships. However, despite its prevalence in clinical settings, we believe there is insufficient recognition and exploration of TSD in our work with children and adolescents. Because TSD is not often formally addressed during training, therapists across the spectrum of clinical child psychology and psychiatry are often left with the belief that disclosures are rare or inherently negative occurrences that should be avoided. As a byproduct, therapists often develop a blind spot to many disclosures that they make and are thus underprepared to navigate the complex decision-making process that surrounds TSD. In our article, we address the elephant in the room: that most therapists disclose in some form or other. In addressing this topic, we hope to encourage replacement of avoidance and silence with discourse and reflection around TSD occurrences. We explore developmental considerations pertinent to child and adolescent clients as well as suggest a framework for TSD decisions. We feel that improved supervision and clinical practice around TSD is a worthy and achievable aim that merits further recognition, consideration and educational focus.
      Citation: Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry
      PubDate: 2021-02-11T09:45:40Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1359104521994178
      Issue No: Vol. 26, No. 2 (2021)
       
  • Improving lives not just saying no to substances: Evaluating outcomes for
           a young people’s substance use team trained in the AMBIT approach

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      Authors: Peter Fuggle, Laura Talbot, James Wheeler, Jessica Rees, Emily Ventre, Verity Beehan, Suzanne Hare, Dickon Bevington, Liz Cracknell
      Pages: 490 - 504
      Abstract: Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry, Volume 26, Issue 2, Page 490-504, April 2021.
      Adaptive Mentalization Based Integrative Therapy (AMBIT) is a systemic, mentalization based intervention designed for young people with multiple problems including mental health problems. The purpose of this paper is to examine the impact of this approach both on clinical and functional outcomes for young people seen by a specialist young people’s substance use service between 2015 and 2018. About 499 cases were seen by the service during this period. Substance use outcomes were obtained for 383 cases using the Treatment Outcome Profile (TOP). Cannabis and alcohol use were the key substance use problems for 81% and 63% respectively. Functional outcomes using the AMBIT Integrative Measure (AIM) were obtained for 100 cases covering domains of daily living, socio-economic context, peer relationships and mental health. At treatment end, cannabis use reduced significantly (t = 10.78; df = 311; p = .00; Cohen’s d ES.61 as did alcohol use (t = 6.938; df = 242; p = .000; ES 0.44). Functional improvements were shown in five out of seven domains with highly significant total functional improvements on key problems selected by the client (t = 14.01; df = 99; p = .000; ES1.34). Measuring functional as well as clinical outcomes appears to reflect more accurately the overall benefit of the service to clients.
      Citation: Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry
      PubDate: 2021-02-22T07:25:30Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1359104521994875
      Issue No: Vol. 26, No. 2 (2021)
       
  • A mixed methods study of clinician reported challenges in the assessment
           of ADHD and treatment decisions for children with ADHD in Brazil

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      Authors: Fabiola Honorio Neto, Ana Paula Camargo, Gilherme Polanczyk, Dimitrios Adamis, Fiona McNicholas
      Pages: 505 - 517
      Abstract: Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry, Volume 26, Issue 2, Page 505-517, April 2021.
      Objective: This ADHD national survey has obtained original data on the assessment and treatment of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) reported by Brazilian paediatricians and child psychiatrists; and has compared their practice. Method: The study questionnaire was delivered to 165 neuro/community paediatricians and 272 child and adolescent psychiatrists. Quantitative and qualitative data were collected and analysed. Results: Paediatricians assess children with a suspected ADHD, but do not feel confident to prescribe methylphenidate alone. Both paediatricians and child psychiatrists consider combined treatment of medication and psychotherapy more effective. Clinicians want to involve other professionals in the medical decisions but experience difficulties accessing specialist services, especially in public practice. Conclusion: This study showed the impact of the public–private mix in the delivery of and access to appropriate assessment and treatment services for children with ADHD in Brazil.
      Citation: Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry
      PubDate: 2021-02-16T08:55:43Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1359104521994634
      Issue No: Vol. 26, No. 2 (2021)
       
  • Cannabis use among early adolescents and transdiagnostic mental health
           risk factors

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      Authors: Sara Moreno-Mansilla, Jorge J Ricarte, David J Hallford
      Pages: 531 - 543
      Abstract: Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry, Volume 26, Issue 2, Page 531-543, April 2021.
      Introduction:Cannabis is the most widely used psychoactive substance among adolescents worldwide, and the age at which consumption begins to decrease. Cannabis use in adolescents is associated with a wide range of adverse consequences in adulthood including increased vulnerability to psychosis and other mental disorders, as well as suicidal ideation and attempt. The aim of this study is to extend understanding of the link between cannabis use and mental illness by examining whether cannabis use at early ages predicts transdiagnostic variables that are precursors to severe clinical diagnoses.Methods:A descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted. The sample was made up of 605 adolescents from 7th to 9th grades, with a mean age of 13.2 years (SD = 1.0, 47% girls). The variables evaluated were: anomalous perception of reality, intolerance of uncertainty, rumination, suicide attempt, hopelessness, and symptoms of depression and anxiety. The administration of the questionnaires was carried out in groups of 20 participants under the supervision of a researcher in a unique session of 1 hour.Results:Adolescent cannabis users scored higher on all variables assessed: anomalous perception of reality (Cohen’s d = .60), rumination (d = .48), intolerance of uncertainty (d = .11), suicidal attempt (affirmative answer: 25.9% of users vs 7.7% of non-users), hopelessness (d = .85), symptoms of depression (d = .80), and anxiety (d = .39). A binary logistic regression showed that the only variable uniquely related to cannabis use was hopelessness (Wald = 4.560, OR: 1.159, p = .033).Conclusions:Among some mental health risk factors, hopelessness appears uniquely related to cannabis use. Adolescents may use cannabis as a coping strategy for negative thoughts and emotions, or it may be a consequence of cannabis use. Future prevention programs should focus on preventing/treating modifiable factors such as hopelessness, and delaying cannabis use in specific subgroups of adolescents who experience pathologies such as depression or suicide attempts.
      Citation: Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry
      PubDate: 2021-02-20T05:18:23Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1359104521994637
      Issue No: Vol. 26, No. 2 (2021)
       
  • Help-seeking pathways prior to referral to outpatient child and adolescent
           mental health services

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      Authors: Anna Sofie Hansen, Gry Kjaersdam Telléus, Emil Færk, Christina Mohr-Jensen, Marlene Briciet Lauritsen
      Pages: 569 - 585
      Abstract: Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry, Volume 26, Issue 2, Page 569-585, April 2021.
      Aim:To investigate parental help-seeking patterns prior to referral to outpatient child and adolescent mental health services (CAMHS), and whether type of symptoms or duration of mental health problems prior to referral influence help-seeking.Setting:Child mental health services in Denmark involve several sectors collaborating based on stepped-care principles. Access to CAMHS is free of charge but requires a formal referral.Methods:In this cross-sectional observational study, parents of 250 children were interviewed about pathways to outpatient CAMHS using the Children’s Services Interview.Results:The median parent-reported duration of mental health problems prior to referral to CAMHS was 6.0 (IQR 3.4–8.5) years for children referred for neurodevelopmental disorders compared to 2.8 (IQR 1.0–6.5) years for children referred for emotional disorders. Educational services were the first help-seeking contact for the majority (57.5%) but referrals to CAMHS were most frequently from healthcare services (56.4%), predominantly general practitioners. Educational services played a greater part in help-seeking pathways for children referred for neurodevelopmental disorders.Conclusion:The majority of children referred to CAMHS have mental health problems for years before referral. The delay in time-to-referral was most pronounced for children referred for neurodevelopmental disorders. Help-seeking pathways differ by symptom duration and type of symptoms.
      Citation: Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry
      PubDate: 2021-02-16T08:51:36Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1359104521994192
      Issue No: Vol. 26, No. 2 (2021)
       
  • Internal conversations, self-reliance and social support in emerging
           adults transitioning from out-of-home care: An interpretative
           phenomenological study

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      Authors: Peter Appleton, Isabelle Hung, Caroline Barratt
      Abstract: Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry, Ahead of Print.
      Young people transitioning from out-of-home care frequently have a history of maltreatment and multiple psychosocial challenges. ‘Survivalist self-reliance’ – thought to involve social disconnection from others, and reluctance to seek support – provides one coping strategy. However, little is known about the self-reliant young person’s own reflexive interpretations of social relationships and support during transition. This qualitative study addresses the question: In the context of transitioning from out-of-home care, what reflexive meanings do ‘avowedly’ self-reliant individuals attribute to current social support and social relationships' Participants were four avowedly self-reliant young adults in transition from care, each with a history of maltreatment and multiple adversities. In this secondary analysis, data were from semi-structured interviews utilizing Margaret Archer’s internal conversations interview framework. Data were analyzed using Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis (IPA). Three thematic contexts were identified in which social support was salient: (a) current thoughts and active memories of both the birth family and foster families; (b) the importance of socializing; and (c) perceptions of formal services. There was evidence of cognitive reappraisal (a known amenable resilience factor) and selective engagement with social support, despite the strong overall stance of self-reliance. The findings suggest a more nuanced approach to our understanding of ‘survivalist self-reliance’.
      Citation: Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry
      PubDate: 2021-04-22T12:29:11Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13591045211005827
       
  • Subjective experiences of participating in an attachment-based early
           intervention parenting program

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      Authors: Sophie Li-Shan Tan, Lesley Stafford, Christina Bryant, Hannah Jensen, Angela Komiti, Louise Newman
      Abstract: Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry, Ahead of Print.
      This qualitative study evaluated an attachment-based group parenting program that utilises mentalisation-based approach. The Building Early Attachment and Resilience (BEAR) program was designed to promote parent-child attachment across the perinatal period and has pre- and post-natal arms. The post-natal component targets mothers and infants at risk for early disturbances of attachment to, and emotional interaction. This evaluation study aimed to explore mothers’ subjective experiences of the post-natal BEAR program in encouraging mothers’ reflection on their role as a parent. Thirteen mothers were interviewed. Transcripts were analysed using thematic analysis, with five themes emerging. Overall, mothers reported that the intervention promoted reflection about the parenting role, contributed to perceptions of improved mother-infant interactions and increased understanding of their infant’s internal experiences. The results suggest the BEAR program is acceptable and facilitates the development of secure parent-infant attachment.
      Citation: Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry
      PubDate: 2021-04-21T05:03:11Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13591045211008220
       
  • Mental health literacy websites for children of parents with a mental
           illness

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      Authors: Daniel L Cavanaugh, Joanne Riebschleger, Jennifer M Tanis
      Abstract: Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry, Ahead of Print.
      Objective:This review of online mental health resources was conducted to evaluate and document the availability of mental health resources pertinent to the needs of children of parents with a mental illness (COPMI). This review identified available websites and analyzed the appropriateness of content and readability.Methods:We conducted an extensive 6-month review of websites with available mental health literacy content that may be found by COPMI searching for information. Web content was evaluated and described with qualitative thematic analysis techniques. Web content was also evaluated for reading levels using the Flesch-Kincaid readability analysis tool.Results:The researchers described 7 descriptive themes, 10 content areas, and described what information was available across websites and where gaps existed. They also concluded the average reading level of the websites was 9.7, which was substantially higher than current web development recommendations.Conclusions:Websites can be a valuable tool for COPMI without access to direct services. To improve current web resources, developers should strive to offer content specific to the identified needs of COPMI. Additionally, web content should be developed at a level that is accessible to teens and parents.
      Citation: Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry
      PubDate: 2021-04-20T09:32:52Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13591045211005514
       
  • Exploring anhedonia in adolescents with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS): A
           mixed-methods study

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      Authors: Lucie Smith, Esther Crawley, Madeleine Riley, Megan McManus, Maria Elizabeth Loades
      Abstract: Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry, Ahead of Print.
      Background:Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS/ME) may get in the way of enjoying activities. A substantial minority of adolescents with CFS/ME are depressed. Anhedonia is a core symptom of depression. Anhedonia in adolescents with CFS/ME has not been previously investigated.Method:One hundred and sixty-four adolescents, age 12 to 18, with CFS/ME completed a diagnostic interview (K-SADS) and questionnaires (HADS, RCADS). We used a mixed-methods approach to explore the experience of anhedonia and examine how common it is, comparing those with clinically significant anhedonia to those without.Results:Forty-two percent of adolescents with CFS/ME reported subclinical or clinical levels of anhedonia. Fifteen percent had clinically significant anhedonia. Thematic analysis generated two themes: (1) stopping activities that they previously enjoyed and (2) CFS/ME obstructs enjoyment. Most (72%) of those who reported clinically significant anhedonia met the depression diagnostic criteria. Those who were depressed used more negative language to describe their experience of activities than in those who were not depressed, although the themes were broadly similar.Conclusions:Experiencing pleasure from activities may be affected in CFS/ME, particularly in those who are depressed. Anhedonia may get in the way of behavioural strategies used within CFS/ME treatments.
      Citation: Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry
      PubDate: 2021-04-17T04:54:08Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13591045211005515
       
  • Comorbid chronic tic disorder and tourette syndrome in children requiring
           inpatient mental health treatment

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      Authors: Shaheen Zinna, Rebecca Luxton, Efstathios Papachristou, Danai Dima, Marinos Kyriakopoulos
      Abstract: Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry, Ahead of Print.
      Objective:Children needing admission to an inpatient mental health unit often present with severe neuropsychiatric disorders characterised by complex psychopathology. We aimed to examine all admitted children with comorbid chronic tic disorder (CTD) and Tourette syndrome (TS) over a 10-year period and determine the clinical significance of these diagnoses.Method:A retrospective, naturalistic study was conducted, comparing children with and without CTD/TS in terms of co-morbid diagnoses, medication use, access to education, aggression contributing to the admission, duration of admission, functional outcomes and satisfaction with treatment. Data were analysed using Chi-square/Fisher’s exact test and t-test for categorical and continuous variables, respectively, and subsequently with unadjusted and adjusted linear and logistic regression analyses.Results:A relatively high proportion of children had co-morbid CTD/TS (19.7%). There was a significant association with co-morbid obsessive-compulsive disorder, intellectual disability and autism spectrum disorder but not attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. CTD/TS were associated with longer admissions even after adjustments for confounding but did not seem to be independently associated with other examined clinical characteristics.Conclusions:The prevalence of CTD/TS in children needing inpatient treatment is significant. In our sample, comorbid CTD/TS seem to represent a marker of overall symptom severity as evidenced by longer admissions.
      Citation: Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry
      PubDate: 2021-04-16T09:03:40Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13591045211007918
       
  • Preterm birth: Educational and mental health outcomes

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      Authors: Elizabeth O’Nions, Dieter Wolke, Samantha Johnson, Eilis Kennedy
      Abstract: Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry
      PubDate: 2021-04-16T09:02:19Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13591045211006754
       
  • Mediation analysis of social deficits between self-criticism and
           aggression in adolescents

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      Authors: Sayyeda Taskeen Zahra, Sadia Saleem, Halima Khurshid
      Abstract: Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry, Ahead of Print.
      This research aims to determine the mediating role of social deficits in self-criticism and aggression using a sample of 695 adolescents (girls = 49%, boys = 51%), aged 12 to 19 years (M = 14.97, SD = 1.30) from an urbanized city of Pakistan. Interpersonal Difficulties Scale, Self-Criticism Scale, and Aggressive Behavior Scale were used in the present study. Results indicated a significant positive association of social deficits with self-criticism and aggression (p 
      Citation: Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry
      PubDate: 2021-04-16T09:00:59Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13591045211005823
       
  • Aerobic exercise for adolescent outpatients with persistent major
           depression: Feasibility and acceptability of moderate to vigorous group
           exercise in a clinically referred sample

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      Authors: Håkan Jarbin, Kristina Höglund, Gudmundur Skarphedinsson, Ann Bremander
      Abstract: Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry, Ahead of Print.
      Aims:To assess feasibility and acceptability of exercise in clinically referred adolescents with major depression.Methods:Outpatients12 to 17 years with mild to moderate persistent depression participated in a supervised, pulse monitored, 14-week aerobic exercise but without control group. Primary outcome was adherence and secondary was clinician-rated Quick Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology – Adolescent (QIDS-A17-C), aerobic capacity, functioning, and well-being.Results:Twenty-one (66%) of 32 eligible adolescents with major depression with disease duration 2.4 (1.1–5.3) years and comorbid ADHD (71%) and anxiety disorders (62%) consented. Estimated maximum heart rate above 70% was achieved for mean 31.6 minutes, indicating that the intensity and duration of the exercise intervention was well received. Fourteen patients (67%) participated throughout the program and attended a median of 29 (81%, range 20–35) supporting satisfaction with the intervention by most patients. QIDS-A17-C score decreased compared to baseline at 15 weeks (p 
      Citation: Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry
      PubDate: 2021-04-16T08:57:38Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13591045211000782
       
  • COVID-19 pandemic: Impacts on mothers’ and infants’ mental health
           during pregnancy and shortly thereafter

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      Authors: Noa Vardi, Gil Zalsman, Nir Madjar, Abraham Weizman, Gal Shoval
      Abstract: Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry, Ahead of Print.
      The COVID-19 pandemic brought about a global crisis, with profound implications on public mental health. The current review focuses on the impact of the pandemic on the mental health of mothers and their infants during pregnancy and shortly after delivery. Literature shows that in similar disaster situations, mothers’ stress reaction and mental health have a critical impact on infant development. Research data on perinatal mental health during the current COVID-19 pandemic is reviewed in conjunction with studies on the relationship between maternal stress, infant development, and psychopathology. Recommendations for perinatal mental health enhancement are discussed and topics for future research suggested.
      Citation: Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry
      PubDate: 2021-04-15T09:32:48Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13591045211009297
       
  • A systematic review of the experience of being a sibling of a child with
           an autism spectrum disorder

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      Authors: Lucy Watson, Paul Hanna, Christina J Jones
      Abstract: Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry, Ahead of Print.
      Difficulties associated with Autism Spectrum Disorders can cause considerable impact on personal, familial, social, educational and occupational functioning. Living with a child who has an Autism Spectrum Disorder can therefore pose a challenge to family members, including typically developing siblings. However, it is only in recent years that the experience of typically developing siblings has become a focal point. A systematic review using keywords across six databases was undertaken to summarise qualitative studies that focused on the experience of being a sibling of a child with an Autism Spectrum Disorder. Fifteen studies met inclusion criteria and a thematic synthesis was completed. The synthesis found that having a sibling who has an Autism Spectrum Disorder can impact typically developing sibling’s self-identity and personal development in a number of ways. Similarly, interactions with the sibling who has Autism Spectrum Disorders and with other individuals can evoke a myriad of experiences that can both benefit and challenge typically developing siblings. The ability of typically developing siblings to cope with adverse experiences needs to remain a focus. This synthesis concludes that further research is needed to identify which methods are the most effective in supporting typically developing siblings of children with Autism Spectrum Disorders.
      Citation: Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry
      PubDate: 2021-04-08T04:53:56Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13591045211007921
       
  • The experience of sleep problems for adolescents with depression in
           short-term psychological therapy

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      Authors: Maria Jernslett, Lisa Thackeray, Faith Orchard, Nick Midgley
      Abstract: Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry, Ahead of Print.
      A growing body of literature demonstrates a strong relationship between sleep disturbances and depression in adolescence. In spite of this, few studies have explored how adolescents with depression experience sleep problems. The present study aimed to qualitatively explore the experience of sleep problems in adolescents with depression, including their understanding of how a psychological therapy impacted on these sleep difficulties. The sample included 12 adolescents with sleep disturbances who had been offered treatment for depression through a large, multi-centre, randomised controlled trial. Semi-structured interviews conducted after treatment and 1-year post treatment were analysed using thematic analysis. Two main themes were identified. Both themes demonstrated how an overarching desire to escape impacted the adolescents’ sleep in distinct ways; ‘thinking about the ‘bad stuff’’ was characterised by ruminative thinking, which prevented sleep, whereas ‘sleep as an escape’ indicated a desire to sleep excessively due to feelings of helplessness. Overall, the findings demonstrate a nuanced relationship between sleep and depression in adolescence, and imply that the underlying meaning of the sleep difficulties for each young person should be considered in the delivery of therapy for adolescent depression.
      Citation: Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry
      PubDate: 2021-04-08T04:49:36Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13591045211006157
       
  • Gender identity development in children and young people: A systematic
           review of longitudinal studies

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      Authors: Hannah Stynes, Chloe Lane, Beth Pearson, Talen Wright, Veronica Ranieri, Una Masic, Eilis Kennedy
      Abstract: Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry, Ahead of Print.
      Background:Children are presenting in greater numbers to gender clinics around the world. Prospective longitudinal research is important to better understand outcomes and trajectories for these children. This systematic review aims to identify, describe and critically evaluate longitudinal studies in the field.Method:Five electronic databases were systematically searched from January 2000 to February 2020. Peer-reviewed articles assessing gender identity and psychosocial outcomes for children and young people (
      Citation: Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry
      PubDate: 2021-04-08T04:47:56Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13591045211002620
       
  • Association between single session service attendance and clinical
           characteristics in administrative data

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      Authors: Julian Edbrooke-Childs, Daniel Hayes, Rebecca Lane, Shaun Liverpool, Jenna Jacob, Jessica Deighton
      Abstract: Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry, Ahead of Print.
      A large proportion of young people accessing specialist mental health services do so for a single session. The aim of the present study was to examine the characteristics of young people attending specialist mental health services for a single session and to examine associations between single session attendance and clinical characteristics. Secondary analysis of administrative data on N = 23,300 young people (mean age = 12.73 years, 57% female, 64% White British) was conducted. The mean number of sessions attended was 4.33 and 46% (10,669) attended for a single session. Multilevel logistic regression analysis showed that younger children, Black young people (OR = 1.20, 95% CI = 1.01–1.43) or those whose ethnicity was not stated (OR = 1.25, 95% CI = 1.15–1.35), young people with peer relationship difficulties (OR = 1.11, 95% CI = 1.04–1.19) or low frequency problems (OR = 1.06, 95% CI = 0.99–1.14), and those with more complexity factors (OR = 1.07, 95% CI = 1.04–1.10) were more likely to attend services for a single session. The present study sets out research questions to prompt future research: (1) the experience of attending services for a single session, (2) identifying groups of single session attenders who do not require further support compared to those who are not able to sustain engagement with more sessions, and (3) whether new care pathways are needed for these groups who currently access specialist mental health services for a single session.
      Citation: Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry
      PubDate: 2021-03-27T11:00:14Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13591045211002609
       
  • Body image in children with gender incongruence

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      Authors: Anouk Verveen, Baudewijntje PC Kreukels, Nastasja M de Graaf, Thomas D Steensma
      Abstract: Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry, Ahead of Print.
      Background:In the DSM-5 diagnosis of childhood Gender Dysphoria, two of the eight criteria focus on body satisfaction of the child. Nevertheless, this subject is understudied. This study aims to describe the body image of children with gender incongruence (GI) in relation to birth assigned sex and the intensity of GI.Method:Self-report and parent-report measures on body satisfaction and gender incongruence were obtained from 207 children (
      Citation: Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry
      PubDate: 2021-03-25T05:06:34Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13591045211000797
       
  • Can Money Buy Happiness for a Family' Family Income, Parenting Style,
           and Life Satisfaction in Parents and Adolescents

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      Authors: Kyoung Min Kim, Un Sun Chung
      Abstract: Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry, Ahead of Print.
      This study investigated the associations among family income and life satisfaction in parents, and parenting styles, income, and overall happiness and depression in their adolescents. A total of 1,913 participants comprising adolescents (aged 14–16) and their parents were recruited for this study. Participants were assessed using self-report questionnaires. Monthly household income was recorded by an open-ended question item. The life satisfaction of parents and overall happiness of adolescents were assessed by one item each, rated on a 4-point Likert scale. Three subtypes of parenting style (affectionate, monitoring, over-control) were evaluated by adolescents using an inventory consisting of 21 items on a 4-point Likert scale. Adolescents’ depression was assessed with a checklist rated by the adolescents, consisting of 10 items on a 4-point Likert scale. The odds ratio (OR) for life dissatisfaction in adults was significantly higher in the lower (1st and 2nd) quintile groups of household income, by 9.94 (p 
      Citation: Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry
      PubDate: 2021-03-22T04:30:53Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13591045211000781
       
  • Youth and parent report of sleep-based interventions and utilization of
           technology resources in the treatment of pediatric mood disorders

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      Authors: Jarrod M Leffler, Kate J Zelic, Amelia F Kruser, Hadley J Lange
      Abstract: Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry, Ahead of Print.
      Objectives:Mood disorders in youth are associated with social and academic impairment, and difficulties within the family system. Engagement in sleep hygiene, and family- and technology-based treatment models can address these impairments. The current study evaluates changes in functioning for youth who participated in a family-based partial hospitalization program (PHP) for mood disorders. Child and parent views of the importance and application of sleep hygiene and utilization of technology-based interventions were also evaluated.Methods:474 youth diagnosed with a primary mood disorder and their caregivers participated in a family-based PHP that addressed the role of sleep hygiene, technology use for symptom management, and components of evidence-based treatments in ameliorating mood disorders. Participants were evaluated 1-, 3-, and 6-month following treatment.Results:Participants demonstrated improved functioning in social, home, and school domains. The majority of participants and parents found the sleep hygiene content and application important or very important as a component of treatment. Parents were significantly more likely than youth to be interested in using technology to access after care resources.Conclusions:Findings revealed significantly less impairment in functioning at follow-up. Parents and youth reported interest in sleep hygiene strategies as part of a comprehensive treatment for mood disorders as well as the use of technology-based resources to assist with treatment. Limitations include sample demographics and follow-up sample size.
      Citation: Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry
      PubDate: 2021-03-19T05:17:48Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13591045211000104
       
  • Making sense of child and adolescent mental health services (CAMHS): An
           audit of the referral journey and the use of routine outcome measures
           (ROMS)

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      Authors: Naomi Gibbons, Emma Harrison, Paul Stallard
      Abstract: Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry, Ahead of Print.
      Background:There is increased emphasis on the national reporting of Routine Outcome Measures (ROMS) as a way of improving Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services (CAMHS). This data needs to be viewed in context so that reasons for outcome completion rates are understood and monitored over time.Method:We undertook an in-depth prospective audit of consecutive referrals accepted into the Bath and North East Somerset, Swindon and Wiltshire (BSW) CAMHS service from November 2017 to January 2018 (n = 1074) and April to September 2019 (n = 1172).Results:Across both audits 90% of those offered an appointment were seen with three quarters completing baseline ROMS. One in three were not seen again with around 30% still being open to the service at the end of each audit. Of those closed to the service, paired ROMS were obtained for 46% to 60% of cases. There were few changes in referral problems or complexity factors over time.Conclusion:Understanding the referral journey and the reasons for attrition will help to put nationally collected data in context and can inform and monitor service transformation over time.
      Citation: Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry
      PubDate: 2021-03-12T06:45:07Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1359104521999709
       
  • Parental autonomy support in relation to preschool aged children’s
           behavior: Examining positive guidance, negative control, and
           responsiveness

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      Authors: Delane Linkiewich, Vincenza VA Martinovich, Christina M Rinaldi, Nina Howe, Rebecca Gokiert
      Abstract: Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry, Ahead of Print.
      This study evaluated the relationship between parental autonomy support and preschool-aged children’s display of autonomy. Specifically, we examined if mothers’ and fathers’ use of positive guidance, negative control, and responsiveness during parent-child interactions predicted children’s autonomous behavior. One hundred families comprised of mothers, fathers, and their children participated. Parent-child dyads were filmed engaging in an unstructured play task and interactions were coded using the Parent-Child Interaction System. Mothers’ use of negative control and father’s use of positive guidance, negative control, and responsiveness predicted children’s displays of autonomy, whereas mothers’ positive guidance and responsiveness did not. The results offer insight into how parents play unique roles in promoting their children’s autonomy, which has implications for practitioners and researchers who work with families. Our findings provide examples of behaviors that parents can employ to promote their children’s autonomy.
      Citation: Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry
      PubDate: 2021-03-11T06:36:54Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1359104521999762
       
  • Assessing change in suicidal ideation intensity for youth in treatment for
           pediatric bipolar disorder

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      Authors: Meredith A Gruhn, Amy West, Elissa Hamlat, Sally Weinstein
      Abstract: Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry, Ahead of Print.
      Objective:Suicidal ideation (SI) is significantly higher for youth with pediatric bipolar disorder (PBD), yet clinical correlates of suicidality remain poorly understood in this population. The current study investigates how change in risk factors for SI relate to change in SI intensity over a 6-month period of treatment.Method:Children ages 9 to 13 (N = 71; 41% female; 54% Caucasian; Mean age = 9.17) engaged in one of two psychotherapy treatment conditions and completed assessments of SI risk factors and psychopathology symptoms at baseline (pre-treatment), 4 and 8 weeks (during treatment), 12 weeks (post-treatment), and 39 weeks (follow-up assessment at 6 months post-treatment). Children also completed assessments of SI intensity at baseline, post-treatment (12 weeks), and 6 months post-treatment.Results:Mixed-effects regression models indicate that increases in health-related quality of life in the family, mobilization of the family to acquire/accept help for PBD, and child self-concept were associated with decreased SI intensity over time.Conclusions:Findings highlight the importance of family and child level factors in influencing longitudinal change in SI intensity in youth with PBD. Clinical implications and future directions are discussed.
      Citation: Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry
      PubDate: 2021-03-10T04:49:07Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1359104521996762
       
  • Psychological and neuropsychological underpinnings of
           attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder assessment

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      Authors: A. Jordan Wright
      Abstract: Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry, Ahead of Print.
      The identification and diagnosis of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is extremely important in order to help change the trajectory of an individual’s life outcomes. A review of the current state of evidence-based assessment of ADHD is dominated by the DSM-5’s conceptualization of behaviorally-oriented diagnostic criteria. This assumption that the DSM-5’s method for identifying ADHD is the gold standard underlies the research base that evaluates the incremental validity of measures and methods for diagnosing it. That is, when evaluating whether a measure is useful in the identification of ADHD, the ‘right answer’ is based on the DSM-5’s behaviorally-oriented definition. An alternative model for considering the fact that ADHD is a neurodevelopmental disorder, with its roots in executive dysfunction, is proposed. Using neuropsychological and cognitive tests to identify executive functioning problems can be combined with rating scales and interviews to diagnose ADHD in a way that does not ascribe entirely to a behavioral definition of the disorder.
      Citation: Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry
      PubDate: 2021-02-24T11:53:31Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1359104521996765
       
  • The girl who cried wolf: A literature review and case report of pediatric
           factitious disorder

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      Authors: Ryan Ruppert, Kai-Hong Jeremy Mao
      Abstract: Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry, Ahead of Print.
      Pediatric presentations of factitious disorder (Munchausen syndrome) remain underdiagnosed and poorly understood compared to adult cases. The purpose of this study is to review the current literature on child and adolescent factitious disorder in order to better understand the differences between pediatric and adult presentations of this disorder. We also present the case of an adolescent girl with factitious disorder; her hospital course draws attention to the excessive healthcare expenditures and risk of iatrogenic complications associated with this diagnosis. We utilized MEDLINE and Google Scholar databases to conduct our review. Despite the limited number of high-quality studies analyzing pediatric presentations of factitious disorder, our review yielded several important findings. Studies suggest that the general acceptance of somatization as a common way for young people to manifest emotional stress may explain the under-diagnosis of this disorder in pediatric populations. Studies also highlighted differences in the clinical characteristics of factitious disorder when patients are stratified by age; most notably, younger patients are more willing to admit intentional falsifications when confronted and more likely to accept treatment, making them a potentially more effective target for intervention.
      Citation: Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry
      PubDate: 2021-02-24T11:52:11Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1359104521996742
       
  • Understanding developmental psychopathology in Type 1 diabetes through
           attachment, mentalisation and diabetes distress

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      Authors: Christopher J. Garrett, Khalida Ismail, Peter Fonagy
      Abstract: Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry, Ahead of Print.
      This article examines the combined roles of attachment mentalisation and diabetes distress in the psychological development of young people with Type 1 diabetes (T1D). We use these ideas to unify the evidence for psychological variables affecting young people and their families and suggest how diabetes distress and mentalisation might be part of the pathways for development of psychiatric diagnoses.Attachment theory’s central hypothesis is that a secure relationship with a care-giver in the early life of a child is essential to normal emotional and relational development, whilst diabetes distress is a well recognised phenomena of burden experienced by both child and parent in relation to the condition.We extend the ideas of attachment, into the psychological adaptation processes for young people at the time of diagnosis of T1D with emphasis on the function of the parent/caregiver in mentalising the experience of the child. We also connect our current understanding of diabetes distress to the associated increased risk for disorders of eating and personality in T1D.Using principles learnt in other areas of psychotherapeutic practice we end by suggesting interventions that could impact mental health and diabetes outcomes using the mentalisation model.
      Citation: Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry
      PubDate: 2021-02-24T10:45:41Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1359104521994640
       
  • Prevention and early help for eating disorders in young people with type 1
           diabetes

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      Authors: Rosie Oldham-Cooper, Claire Semple
      Abstract: Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry, Ahead of Print.
      There is building evidence that early intervention is key to improving outcomes in eating disorders, whereas a ‘watch and wait’ approach that has been commonplace among GPs and other healthcare professionals is now strongly discouraged. Eating disorders occur at approximately twice the rate in individuals with type 1 diabetes compared to the general population. In this group, standard eating disorder treatments have poorer outcomes, and eating disorders result in a particularly high burden of morbidity. Therefore, our first priority must be prevention, with early intervention where disordered eating has already developed. Clinicians working in both eating disorders and diabetes specialist services have highlighted the need for multidisciplinary team collaboration and specific training, as well as improved treatments. We review the current evidence and future directions for prevention, identification and early intervention for eating disorders in children and young people with type 1 diabetes.
      Citation: Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry
      PubDate: 2021-02-19T05:15:39Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1359104521994172
       
  • Reconsidering a role for attachment in eating disorder management in the
           context of paediatric diabetes

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      Authors: Rosie Oldham-Cooper, Claire Semple, Laura L. Wilkinson
      Abstract: Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry, Ahead of Print.
      We suggest a reconsideration of the role of ‘attachment orientation’ in the context of eating disorders and paediatric diabetes. Attachment orientation is a psychological construct that describes a relatively stable set of expectations and behaviours an individual relies upon in managing relationships. There is considerable evidence of an association between attachment orientation and the development and maintenance of disordered eating in individuals without diabetes, though evidence is more scant in populations with diabetes. We discuss the underpinning theory and critically examine the existing literature for the relationship between attachment orientation and disordered eating in paediatric diabetes. Finally, we draw on adjacent literatures to highlight potential future directions for research should this area be revisited. Overall, we contextualise our discussion in terms of patient-centred, holistic care that addresses the mind and body (i.e., our discussion of attachment orientation assumes a psycho-biological approach).
      Citation: Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry
      PubDate: 2021-02-19T05:15:36Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1359104520986215
       
 
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