Publisher: Sage Publications   (Total: 1166 journals)

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Showing 1 - 200 of 1166 Journals sorted alphabetically
AADE in Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Abstracts in Anthropology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 29)
Academic Pathology     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Accounting History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18, SJR: 0.527, CiteScore: 1)
Acta Radiologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.754, CiteScore: 2)
Acta Radiologica Open     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Acta Sociologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39, SJR: 0.939, CiteScore: 2)
Action Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 53, SJR: 0.308, CiteScore: 1)
Active Learning in Higher Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 396, SJR: 1.397, CiteScore: 2)
Adaptive Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.288, CiteScore: 1)
Administration & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18, SJR: 0.675, CiteScore: 1)
Adoption & Fostering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25, SJR: 0.313, CiteScore: 0)
Adsorption Science & Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.258, CiteScore: 1)
Adult Education Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 260, SJR: 0.566, CiteScore: 2)
Adult Learning     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 51)
Advances in Dental Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 1.791, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Developing Human Resources     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35, SJR: 0.614, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Mechanical Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 156, SJR: 0.272, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Methods and Practices in Psychological Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20)
Advances in Structural Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 51, SJR: 0.599, CiteScore: 1)
AERA Open     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
Affilia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.496, CiteScore: 1)
Africa Spectrum     Open Access   (Followers: 17)
Agrarian South : J. of Political Economy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Air, Soil & Water Research     Open Access   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.214, CiteScore: 1)
Alexandria : The J. of National and Intl. Library and Information Issues     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 68)
Allergy & Rhinology     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
AlterNative : An Intl. J. of Indigenous Peoples     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 39, SJR: 0.194, CiteScore: 0)
Alternative Law J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.176, CiteScore: 0)
Alternatives : Global, Local, Political     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.351, CiteScore: 1)
Alternatives to Laboratory Animals     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.297, CiteScore: 1)
American Behavioral Scientist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26, SJR: 0.982, CiteScore: 2)
American Economist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
American Educational Research J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 260, SJR: 2.913, CiteScore: 3)
American J. of Alzheimer's Disease and Other Dementias     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23, SJR: 0.67, CiteScore: 2)
American J. of Cosmetic Surgery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
American J. of Evaluation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18, SJR: 0.646, CiteScore: 2)
American J. of Health Promotion     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35, SJR: 0.807, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Hospice and Palliative Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 47, SJR: 0.65, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Law & Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.204, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Lifestyle Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.431, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Medical Quality     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.777, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Men's Health     Open Access   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.595, CiteScore: 2)
American J. of Rhinology and Allergy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.972, CiteScore: 2)
American J. of Sports Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 248, SJR: 3.949, CiteScore: 6)
American Politics Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 36, SJR: 1.313, CiteScore: 1)
American Review of Public Administration     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28, SJR: 2.062, CiteScore: 2)
American Sociological Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 357, SJR: 6.333, CiteScore: 6)
American String Teacher     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Analytical Chemistry Insights     Open Access   (Followers: 26, SJR: 0.224, CiteScore: 1)
Angiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.849, CiteScore: 2)
Animation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.197, CiteScore: 0)
Annals of Clinical Biochemistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.634, CiteScore: 1)
Annals of Otology, Rhinology & Laryngology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20, SJR: 0.807, CiteScore: 1)
Annals of Pharmacotherapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 59, SJR: 1.096, CiteScore: 2)
Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 51, SJR: 1.225, CiteScore: 3)
Annals of the ICRP     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.548, CiteScore: 1)
Anthropocene Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 3.341, CiteScore: 7)
Anthropological Theory     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 48, SJR: 0.739, CiteScore: 1)
Antitrust Bulletin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Antiviral Chemistry and Chemotherapy     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.635, CiteScore: 2)
Antyajaa : Indian J. of Women and Social Change     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Applied Biosafety     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.131, CiteScore: 0)
Applied Psychological Measurement     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21, SJR: 1.17, CiteScore: 1)
Applied Spectroscopy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 27, SJR: 0.489, CiteScore: 2)
Armed Forces & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25, SJR: 0.29, CiteScore: 1)
Arthaniti : J. of Economic Theory and Practice     Full-text available via subscription  
Arts and Humanities in Higher Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 49, SJR: 0.305, CiteScore: 1)
Asia Pacific Media Educator     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.23, CiteScore: 0)
Asia-Pacific J. of Management Research and Innovation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Asia-Pacific J. of Public Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.558, CiteScore: 1)
Asia-Pacific J. of Rural Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Asian and Pacific Migration J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.324, CiteScore: 1)
Asian Cardiovascular and Thoracic Annals     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.305, CiteScore: 0)
Asian J. of Comparative Politics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Asian J. of Legal Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Asian J. of Management Cases     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.101, CiteScore: 0)
ASN Neuro     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 1.534, CiteScore: 3)
Assessment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19, SJR: 1.519, CiteScore: 3)
Assessment for Effective Intervention     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.578, CiteScore: 1)
Australasian J. of Early Childhood     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.535, CiteScore: 1)
Australasian Psychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18, SJR: 0.433, CiteScore: 1)
Australian & New Zealand J. of Psychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30, SJR: 1.801, CiteScore: 2)
Australian and New Zealand J. of Criminology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 545, SJR: 0.612, CiteScore: 1)
Australian J. of Career Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Australian J. of Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 51, SJR: 0.403, CiteScore: 1)
Australian J. of Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.497, CiteScore: 1)
Autism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 356, SJR: 1.739, CiteScore: 4)
Autism & Developmental Language Impairments     Open Access   (Followers: 17)
Avian Biology Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.401, CiteScore: 1)
Behavior Modification     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.877, CiteScore: 2)
Behavioral and Cognitive Neuroscience Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Behavioral Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Beyond Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Bible Translator     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Biblical Theology Bulletin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24, SJR: 0.184, CiteScore: 0)
Big Data & Society     Open Access   (Followers: 55)
Biochemistry Insights     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Bioinformatics and Biology Insights     Open Access   (Followers: 12, SJR: 1.141, CiteScore: 2)
Biological Research for Nursing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.685, CiteScore: 2)
Biomarker Insights     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.81, CiteScore: 2)
Biomarkers in Cancer     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Biomedical Engineering and Computational Biology     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
Biomedical Informatics Insights     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Bioscope: South Asian Screen Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.235, CiteScore: 0)
BMS: Bulletin of Sociological Methodology/Bulletin de Méthodologie Sociologique     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.226, CiteScore: 0)
Body & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29, SJR: 1.531, CiteScore: 3)
Bone and Tissue Regeneration Insights     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Brain and Neuroscience Advances     Open Access  
Brain Science Advances     Open Access  
Breast Cancer : Basic and Clinical Research     Open Access   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.823, CiteScore: 2)
British J. of Music Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
British J. of Occupational Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 253, SJR: 0.323, CiteScore: 1)
British J. of Pain     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31, SJR: 0.579, CiteScore: 2)
British J. of Politics and Intl. Relations     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39, SJR: 0.91, CiteScore: 2)
British J. of Visual Impairment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.337, CiteScore: 1)
British J.ism Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
BRQ Business Review Quarterly     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Building Acoustics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.215, CiteScore: 1)
Building Services Engineering Research & Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.583, CiteScore: 1)
Bulletin of Science, Technology & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Business & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Business and Professional Communication Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.348, CiteScore: 1)
Business Information Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17, SJR: 0.279, CiteScore: 0)
Business Perspectives and Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Cahiers Élisabéthains     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.111, CiteScore: 0)
Calcutta Statistical Association Bulletin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
California Management Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 37, SJR: 2.209, CiteScore: 4)
Canadian Association of Radiologists J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.463, CiteScore: 1)
Canadian J. of Kidney Health and Disease     Open Access   (Followers: 8, SJR: 1.007, CiteScore: 2)
Canadian J. of Nursing Research (CJNR)     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Canadian J. of Occupational Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 167, SJR: 0.626, CiteScore: 1)
Canadian J. of Psychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28, SJR: 1.769, CiteScore: 3)
Canadian J. of School Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.266, CiteScore: 1)
Canadian Pharmacists J. / Revue des Pharmaciens du Canada     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.536, CiteScore: 1)
Cancer Control     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Cancer Growth and Metastasis     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Cancer Informatics     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.64, CiteScore: 1)
Capital and Class     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.282, CiteScore: 1)
Cardiac Cath Lab Director     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Cardiovascular and Thoracic Open     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Career Development and Transition for Exceptional Individuals     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.44, CiteScore: 1)
Cartilage     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.889, CiteScore: 3)
Cell Transplantation     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 1.023, CiteScore: 3)
Cephalalgia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 1.581, CiteScore: 3)
Cephalalgia Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Child Language Teaching and Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34, SJR: 0.501, CiteScore: 1)
Child Maltreatment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 1.22, CiteScore: 3)
Child Neurology Open     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Childhood     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19, SJR: 0.894, CiteScore: 2)
Childhood Obesity and Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
China Information     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.767, CiteScore: 2)
China Report     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.221, CiteScore: 0)
Chinese J. of Sociology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Christian Education J. : Research on Educational Ministry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Chronic Illness     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.672, CiteScore: 2)
Chronic Respiratory Disease     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.808, CiteScore: 2)
Chronic Stress     Open Access  
Citizenship, Social and Economics Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.145, CiteScore: 0)
Cleft Palate-Craniofacial J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.757, CiteScore: 1)
Clin-Alert     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Clinical and Applied Thrombosis/Hemostasis     Open Access   (Followers: 32, SJR: 0.49, CiteScore: 1)
Clinical and Translational Neuroscience     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Clinical Case Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.364, CiteScore: 1)
Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 45, SJR: 0.73, CiteScore: 2)
Clinical EEG and Neuroscience     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.552, CiteScore: 2)
Clinical Ethics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.296, CiteScore: 1)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Arthritis and Musculoskeletal Disorders     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.537, CiteScore: 2)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Blood Disorders     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.314, CiteScore: 2)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Cardiology     Open Access   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.686, CiteScore: 2)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Case Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.283, CiteScore: 1)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Circulatory, Respiratory and Pulmonary Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.425, CiteScore: 2)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Ear, Nose and Throat     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Endocrinology and Diabetes     Open Access   (Followers: 33, SJR: 0.63, CiteScore: 2)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Oncology     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 1.129, CiteScore: 3)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Pediatrics     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Psychiatry     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Reproductive Health     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.776, CiteScore: 0)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Therapeutics     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.172, CiteScore: 0)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Trauma and Intensive Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Women's Health     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Clinical Nursing Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34, SJR: 0.471, CiteScore: 1)
Clinical Pathology     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Clinical Pediatrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25, SJR: 0.487, CiteScore: 1)
Clinical Psychological Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16, SJR: 3.281, CiteScore: 5)
Clinical Rehabilitation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 78, SJR: 1.322, CiteScore: 3)
Clinical Risk     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.133, CiteScore: 0)
Clinical Trials     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22, SJR: 2.399, CiteScore: 2)
Clothing and Textiles Research J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28, SJR: 0.36, CiteScore: 1)
Collections : A J. for Museum and Archives Professionals     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Common Law World Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Communication & Sport     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.385, CiteScore: 1)
Communication and the Public     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Communication Disorders Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.458, CiteScore: 1)
Communication Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24, SJR: 2.171, CiteScore: 3)
Community College Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 1.451, CiteScore: 1)
Comparative Political Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 292, SJR: 3.772, CiteScore: 3)
Compensation & Benefits Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Competition & Change     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.843, CiteScore: 2)

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Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Chronic Respiratory Disease
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.808
Citation Impact (citeScore): 2
Number of Followers: 12  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1479-9723 - ISSN (Online) 1479-9731
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1166 journals]
  • Pulmonary rehabilitation for interstitial lung disease: Referral and
           patient experiences

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Mariana Hoffman, Christie Mellerick, Karen Symons, Ian Glaspole, Anne E Holland
      Abstract: Chronic Respiratory Disease, Volume 18, Issue , January-December 2021.
      Objectives: The objectives of this study were to determine the proportion of patients with interstitial lung disease (ILD) referred to pulmonary rehabilitation (PR) and to understand their experiences of participation or non-participation. Methods: Adults (>18 years old) with a diagnosis of ILD were identified from the Alfred Health ILD registry in Melbourne. Information regarding PR referral and attendance were collected from medical records. Semi-structured interviews with open-ended questions were conducted with patients who had been referred to PR. Results: Of 336 patients eligible for inclusion, PR referral was identified in 137 patients (40.7%). Patients referred to PR had worse respiratory function than those not referred (forced vital capacity mean 64 (SD 23) vs 79 (19) % predicted) and more desaturation during a 6-min walk test (86.6 (7.8%) vs 88.5 (7.0%)). Semi-structured interviews identified three major themes: valued components of PR (supervision and individualization, improved confidence with exercise, education and peer support); limited knowledge about PR prior to attendance and barriers to attending PR (lack of perceived benefits, fear of exercise and accessibility). Discussion: Over 40% of patients who attended a specialist ILD clinic were referred to pulmonary rehabilitation, with higher referral rates in those with more severe disease. There are opportunities to improve patient knowledge regarding the role and expected benefits of PR in people with ILD.
      Citation: Chronic Respiratory Disease
      PubDate: 2021-10-12T06:43:54Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14799731211046022
      Issue No: Vol. 18 (2021)
       
  • Physical and social isolation during COVID-19 – How did it impact the
           functional status of people with advanced respiratory disease'

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Tania Janaudis-Ferreira
      Abstract: Chronic Respiratory Disease, Volume 18, Issue , January-December 2021.

      Citation: Chronic Respiratory Disease
      PubDate: 2021-10-11T07:08:57Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14799731211051730
      Issue No: Vol. 18 (2021)
       
  • Psychometric properties of patient reported outcome measures in idiopathic
           pulmonary fibrosis

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Jee Whang Kim, Allan Clark, Surinder S Birring, Christopher Atkins, Moira Whyte, Andrew M Wilson
      Abstract: Chronic Respiratory Disease, Volume 18, Issue , January-December 2021.
      Background: Various patient reported outcome measures (PROMs) are used in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). We aimed to describe their psychometric properties, assess their relationship with 1-year mortality and determine their minimal clinically important differences (MCIDs). Methods: In a prospective multicentre study, participants with IPF completed the King’s Brief Interstitial Lung Disease Questionnaire (K-BILD), the modified Medical Research Council (mMRC) dyspnoea scale, St George’s Respiratory Questionnaire (SGRQ) and University of California, San Diego shortness of breath questionnaire (UCSD-SOBQ) three-monthly intervals over a 12-month period. Forced vital capacity (FVC) was matched with questionnaires and mortality was captured. Anchor- and distribution-based methods were used to derive MCID. Results: Data were available from 238 participants. All PROMs had good internal consistency and high degree of correlations with other tools (except UCSD-SOBQ correlated poorly with FVC). There were significant associations with mortality for K-BILD (hazard ratio 16.67; 95% CI 2.38–100) and SGRQ (hazard ratio 4.65; 95% CI 1.32–16.62) but not with the other PROMs or FVC. The median MCID (range) for K-BILD was 6.3 (4.1–7.0), SGRQ was 7.0 (3.8–9.6), mMRC was 0.4 (0.1–0.5) and UCSD-SOBQ was 9.6 (4.1–14.2). Conclusions: The K-BILD was related to other severity measures and had the strongest relationship with mortality.
      Citation: Chronic Respiratory Disease
      PubDate: 2021-10-05T12:34:37Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14799731211033925
      Issue No: Vol. 18 (2021)
       
  • Factors related to instrumental activities of daily living in persons with
           chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension

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      Authors: Tatsuya Iwasawa, Shogo Fukui, Michiyuki Kawakami, Takashi Kawakami, Masaharu Kataoka, Shinsuke Yuasa, Keiichi Fukuda, Toshiyuki Fujiwara, Tetsuya Tsuji
      Abstract: Chronic Respiratory Disease, Volume 18, Issue , January-December 2021.
      Instrumental activities of daily living (IADL) are significantly related to quality of life and mortality among individuals with heart disease. However, few reports have examined IADL in persons with chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH). The aim of this study was to clarify factors related to IADL in persons with CTEPH. This retrospective, observational study enrolled 163 persons with CTEPH (mean ± standard deviation age = 65 ± 13 years; 68% female) admitted to the Department of Cardiology at Keio University Hospital between January 2015 and July 2019. The Frenchay Activities Index (FAI) was used to assess IADL. Age, sex, body mass index, World Health Organization functional class (WHO-FC), cardiac function (mean pulmonary arterial pressure, mean right atrial pressure, pulmonary capillary wedge pressure, and cardiac index), pulmonary function (percentage vital capacity, percentage forced expiratory volume in 1 s, diffusion capacity of carbon monoxide (DLCO)/alveolar volume (VA)), physical function (knee extension strength and walking speed), and 6-min walking distance (6MWD) were assessed. Multiple regression analysis was performed to identify factors significantly associated with FAI. Mean FAI was 25 ± 8. Univariate analysis showed that sex, WHO-FC, DLCO/VA, walking speed, and 6MWD were correlated with FAI. Multiple regression analysis showed that 6MWD (sβ = 0.338, 95% CI 0.014–0.034, p < .001), sex (sβ = 0.268, 95% CI 2.238–7.165, p < .001), and DLCO/VA (sβ = 0.257, 95% CI 1.011–3.528, p < .001) were significantly correlated with FAI (R2 = 0.261). IADL were associated with exercise tolerance, sex, and DLCO/VA in persons with CTEPH. In the future, more details of IADL are expected to be clarified by analyzing individual components of IADL and investigating social background characteristics, including living environment.
      Citation: Chronic Respiratory Disease
      PubDate: 2021-10-01T01:17:48Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14799731211046634
      Issue No: Vol. 18 (2021)
       
  • Patient reported side-effects of prednisone and methotrexate in a
           real-world sarcoidosis population

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      Authors: Vivienne Kahlmann, Catharina C Moor, Marcel Veltkamp, Marlies S Wijsenbeek
      Abstract: Chronic Respiratory Disease, Volume 18, Issue , January-December 2021.
      Currently prednisone is the first-line pharmacological treatment option for pulmonary sarcoidosis. Methotrexate is used as second-line therapy and seems to have fewer side-effects. No prospective comparative studies of first-line treatment with methotrexate exist. In this study, we evaluated patient reported presence and bothersomeness of side-effects of prednisone and methotrexate in a sarcoidosis population to guide the design of a larger prospective study. During a yearly patient information meeting 67 patients completed a questionnaire on medication use; 11 patients never used prednisone or methotrexate and were excluded from further analysis. Of the remaining 56 patients, 89% used prednisone and 70% methotrexate (present or former). Significantly more side-effects were reported for prednisone than for methotrexate, 78% versus 49% (p = 0.006). In conclusion, methotrexate seems to have fewer and less bothersome side-effects than prednisone. These findings need to be confirmed in a prospective study.
      Citation: Chronic Respiratory Disease
      PubDate: 2021-09-26T10:47:19Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14799731211031935
      Issue No: Vol. 18 (2021)
       
  • Comparison of the sensitivity of patient-reported outcomes for detecting
           the benefit of biologics in severe asthma

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      Authors: Michael E Hyland, Joseph W Lanario, Andrew Menzies-Gow, Adel H Mansur, James W Dodd, Stephen J Fowler, Gemma Hayes, Rupert C Jones, Matthew Masoli
      Abstract: Chronic Respiratory Disease, Volume 18, Issue , January-December 2021.
      BackgroundThe sensitivity of patient-reported outcomes (PROs) to detect the effects of treatment change depends on the match between the change in items of the PRO and the change that takes place in a sample of people. The aim of this study is to compare the sensitivity of different PROs in detecting changes following the initiation of biologic treatment in asthma. Methods: Patients starting a biologic treatment as part of clinical care completed the Asthma Control Questionnaire (ACQ-6), the Severe Asthma Questionnaire (SAQ and SAQ-global scores) and the EQ5D (EQ-5D-5L and EQ5D-VAS) at baseline. They completed the ACQ-6, SAQ, SAQ-global and a retrospective global rating of change (GRoC) scale at weeks 4, 8 and 16 and completed the EQ-5D-5L and EQ5D-VAS at week 16. The SAQ-global and EQ5D-VAS differ but both are single item 100-point questions. Sensitivity was measured by Cohen’s D effect size at each of the three time points. Results: 110 patients were recruited. Depending on the time of assessment, effect size varied between 0.45 and 0.64 for the SAQ, between 0.50 and 0.77 for the SAQ-global; between 0.45 and 0.69 for ACQ-6; between 0.91 and 1.22 for GRoC; 0.32 for EQ-5D-5L and 0.49 for EQ5D-VAS. Conclusion: The sensitivity to change of a questionnaire varies with the time of measurement. The three asthma-specific prospective measures (SAQ, SAQ-global and ACQ-6) have similar sensitivity to change. The single-item EQ5D-VAS was less sensitive than the asthma specific measures and less sensitive than the single-item SAQ-global. The EQ-5D-5L was least sensitive.
      Citation: Chronic Respiratory Disease
      PubDate: 2021-09-25T07:07:13Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14799731211043530
      Issue No: Vol. 18 (2021)
       
  • CRD Editor’s corner archive: April-June 2021

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      Authors: Michael C Steiner, Samantha L Harrison
      Abstract: Chronic Respiratory Disease, Volume 18, Issue , January-December 2021.

      Citation: Chronic Respiratory Disease
      PubDate: 2021-09-21T12:39:51Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14799731211035461
      Issue No: Vol. 18 (2021)
       
  • CRD Editor’s Corner Archive: January–March 2021

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      Authors: Michael C Steiner
      Abstract: Chronic Respiratory Disease, Volume 18, Issue , January-December 2021.

      Citation: Chronic Respiratory Disease
      PubDate: 2021-08-17T10:07:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14799731211020577
      Issue No: Vol. 18 (2021)
       
  • Free diving-inspired breathing techniques for COPD patients: A pilot study

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      Authors: Morten Borg, Tue Thastrup, Kurt L Larsen, Kristian Overgaard, Ole Hilberg, Anders Løkke
      Abstract: Chronic Respiratory Disease, Volume 18, Issue , January-December 2021.
      Objectives: Pulmonary rehabilitation (PR) is a key factor in enhancing self-management and exercise capacity in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The content and length of PR varies between countries and authorities responsible for rehabilitation. After completion of rehabilitation, it is often difficult for patients to stay motivated and perform regular exercise. Methods: In this pilot study, nine patients with moderate to severe COPD completed a 6-week training programme consisting of free diving-inspired breathing techniques, designed to be incorporated into daily activities. Results: Participants significantly increased the distance walked in 6 min by 48 m (p < 0.05) and a significant reduction was seen on the COPD self-efficacy scale (p < 0.05). Furthermore, adherence to the programme sessions was very high at 96.3% and no adverse events occurred. Discussion: This pilot study tested the feasibility of introducing breathing techniques used by COPD patients to enhance their walking capacity. The techniques were well tolerated and participant’s adherence to the weekly group sessions was high.
      Citation: Chronic Respiratory Disease
      PubDate: 2021-08-17T08:44:17Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14799731211038673
      Issue No: Vol. 18 (2021)
       
  • Relationships between prolonged physical and social isolation during the
           COVID-19 pandemic, reduced physical activity and disability in activities
           of daily living among people with advanced respiratory disease

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      Authors: Lucy Fettes, Joanne Bayly, Leonora Michelle de Bruin, Malini Patel, Stephen Ashford, Irene J Higginson, Matthew Maddocks
      Abstract: Chronic Respiratory Disease, Volume 18, Issue , January-December 2021.
      In people with advanced respiratory disease, we examined (i) the impact of COVID-19–related physical and social isolation on physical activity and (ii) relationships between time spent in isolation and disability in activities of daily living. Cross-sectional analysis was conducted in adults with advanced non-small cell lung cancer, chronic obstructive lung disease or interstitial lung disease. Measures included change in physical activity since physically and socially isolating (Likert scale) and disability (Barthel Index and Lawton–Brody IADL scale) or difficulty (World Health Organisation Disability Assessment Schedule-2.0) in daily activities. Multiple logistic regression was used to examine factors associated with disability in daily activities. 194/201 participants were isolating for a median [IQR] 5 [3–8]-month period, often leading to lower levels of physical activity at home (n = 94, 47%), and outside home (n = 129, 65%). 104 (52%) and 142 (71%) were not fully independent in basic and instrumental activities of daily living, respectively. 96% reported some degree of difficulty in undertaking daily activities. Prolonged physical and social isolation related to increased disability in basic (r = −0.28, p < 0.001) and instrumental (r = −0.24, p < 0.001) activities of daily living, and greater difficulty in daily activities (r = 0.22, p = 0.002). Each month spent in physical or social isolation was independently related to disability in basic activities of daily living (odds ratio [OR], 1.17 [95% CI: 1.03–1.33], p = 0.013). These findings suggest disability in daily activities is associated with prolonged physical or social isolation, which may present as difficulty in people who are fully independent. Post-isolation recovery and rehabilitation needs should be considered for all people deemed extremely clinically vulnerable.
      Citation: Chronic Respiratory Disease
      PubDate: 2021-08-12T02:19:32Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14799731211035822
      Issue No: Vol. 18 (2021)
       
  • A review of respiratory manifestations and their management in
           Ehlers-Danlos syndromes and hypermobility spectrum disorders

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      Authors: Karan Chohan, Nimish Mittal, Laura McGillis, Laura Lopez-Hernandez, Encarna Camacho, Maxim Rachinsky, Daniel Santa Mina, W Darlene Reid, Clodagh Mai Ryan, Kateri Agnes Champagne, Ani Orchanian-Cheff, Hance Clarke, Dmitry Rozenberg
      Abstract: Chronic Respiratory Disease, Volume 18, Issue , January-December 2021.
      Background:Ehlers-Danlos Syndromes (EDS) and Hypermobility Spectrum Disorders (HSD) are a heterogeneous group of heritable genetic connective tissue disorders with multiple characteristics including joint hypermobility, tissue fragility, and multiple organ dysfunction. Respiratory manifestations have been described in EDS patients, but have not been systematically characterized. A narrative review was undertaken to describe the respiratory presentations and management strategies of individuals with EDS and HSD.Methods:A broad literature search of Medline, Embase, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, and Cochrane CENTRAL was undertaken from inception to November 2020 of all study types, evaluating EDS/ HSD and pulmonary conditions. This narrative review was limited to adult patients and publications in English.Results:Respiratory manifestations have generally been described in hypermobile EDS (hEDS), classical and vascular EDS subtypes. Depending on EDS subtype, they may include but are not limited to dyspnea, dysphonia, asthma, sleep apnea, and reduced respiratory muscle function, with hemothorax and pneumothorax often observed with vascular EDS. Respiratory manifestations in HSD have been less frequently characterized in the literature, but exertional dyspnea is the more common symptom described. Respiratory symptoms in EDS can have an adverse impact on quality of life. The respiratory management of EDS patients has followed standard approaches with thoracotomy tubes and pleurodesis for pleural manifestations, vocal cord strengthening exercises, continuous positive pressure support for sleep apnea, and exercise training. Reduced respiratory muscle function in hEDS patients responds to inspiratory muscle training.Conclusion:Respiratory symptoms and manifestations are described in EDS and HSD, and have generally been managed using conservative non-surgical strategies. Research into the prevalence, incidence and specific respiratory management strategies in EDS and HSD is needed to mitigate some of the associated morbidity.
      Citation: Chronic Respiratory Disease
      PubDate: 2021-07-22T09:52:06Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14799731211025313
      Issue No: Vol. 18 (2021)
       
  • The burden of chronic respiratory diseases in adults in Nepal: A
           systematic review

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      Authors: Winifred Ekezie, Alex Robert Jenkins, Ian Philip Hall, Catrin Evans, Rajendra Koju, Om Prakash Kurmi, Charlotte Emma Bolton
      Abstract: Chronic Respiratory Disease, Volume 18, Issue , January-December 2021.
      While chronic lung disease causes substantial global morbidity and mortality, global estimates have primarily been based on broad assumptions. Specific country data from low-income countries such as Nepal are limited. This review assessed primary evidence on chronic respiratory disease burden among adults in Nepal. A systematic search was performed in June 2019 (updated May 2020) for studies through nine databases. High levels of heterogeneity deemed a narrative synthesis appropriate. Among 27 eligible studies identified, most were low-moderate quality with cross-sectional and retrospective study design. Chronic lung diseases identified were chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), asthma, bronchiectasis and restrictive lung diseases. Studies were categorised as: (i) community-based, (ii) hospital-based and (iii) comorbidity-related and disease burden. Reported disease prevalence varied widely (COPD, 1.67–14.3%; asthma, 4.2–8.9%). The prevalence of airflow obstruction was higher among rural dwellers (15.8%) and those exposed to household air pollution from domestic biomass burning as opposed to liquid petroleum gas users (Odds Ratio: 2.06). Several comorbidities, including hypertension and diabetes mellitus added to the disease burden. The review shows limited literature on lung disease burden in Nepal. Publications varied in terms of overall quality. Good quality research studies with prospective cohorts related to respiratory conditions are required.
      Citation: Chronic Respiratory Disease
      PubDate: 2021-07-06T09:57:07Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1479973121994572
      Issue No: Vol. 18 (2021)
       
  • Reliability and validity of the Glittre-ADL test to assess the functional
           status of patients with interstitial lung disease

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      Authors: Hellen Fontão Alexandre, Katerine Cristhine Cani, Juliana Araújo, Anamaria Fleig Mayer
      Abstract: Chronic Respiratory Disease, Volume 18, Issue , January-December 2021.
      The study objective was to investigated the reliability and validity of the ADL-Glittre test (TGlittre) to assess the functional status of patients with interstitial lung disease (ILD). Twenty-one individuals with ILD participated (age: 63 ± 11 years; DLCO: 51.0 ± 12.6%predicted), evaluated with body plethysmography, Saint George Respiratory Questionnaire, modified Medical Research Council dyspnea scale, six-minute walk test (6MWT) and monitoring of physical activity of daily living. Two TGlittre were performed, with an interval of 30 minutes between them. The TGlittre demonstrated high test-retest reliability, with an intraclass correlation coefficient of 0.90 (95%CI: 0.75–0.96; p < 0.001). Nineteen patients (90.5%) performed better on the second test (mean difference between TGlittre 1 and 2: −0.57 ± 0.96 minute; p = 0.001), with a learning effect of 11.6%. The time in TGlittre correlated with 6MWT (r = −0.70; p = 0.002) and with the total energy expenditure in physical activity of daily living (r = −0.52; p = 0.02). In %predicted, TGlittre and 6MWT also correlated (r = −0.50; p = 0.04). Correlations were observed between TGlittre and pulmonary function variables (r = −0.47 to −0.57; p = 0.01 to p = 0.04). There was no difference in the physiological response between TGlittre 1 and 2, and between TGlittre and 6MWT (p> 0.05). In conclusion, the TGlittre is reliable and valid for assessing functional status of patients with ILD.
      Citation: Chronic Respiratory Disease
      PubDate: 2021-07-05T10:16:07Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14799731211012962
      Issue No: Vol. 18 (2021)
       
  • Asthma patients experience increased symptoms of anxiety, depression and
           fear during the COVID-19 pandemic

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      Authors: Geertje M de Boer, Laura Houweling, Rudi W Hendriks, Jan H Vercoulen, Gerdien A Tramper-Stranders, Gert-Jan Braunstahl
      Abstract: Chronic Respiratory Disease, Volume 18, Issue , January-December 2021.
      Population studies showed a decrease in psychological wellbeing during the COVID-19 pandemic. Asthma is associated with a negative effect on anxiety and depression, which might worsen during the COVID-19 lockdown. The aim of the study was to compare fear, anxiety and depression between asthma patients and patients wit hout asthma pre-COVID-19 and during COVID-19 pandemic.This study compares fear, anxiety and depression in asthma patients and controls between pre-COVID-19 and during COVID-19 lockdown with a cross-sectional online survey. Participants were invited to fill out several questionnaires pertaining to fear, anxiety, depression, asthma control and quality of life.Asthma patients (N = 37) displayed, during the course of the pandemic, a clinically relevant increase in anxiety (3.32 ± 2.95 vs. 6.68 ± 3.78; p < 0.001) and depression (1.30 ± 1.15 vs. 3.65 ± 3.31; p < 0.001), according to the hospital anxiety and depression levels (HADS) compared to pre-COVID-19 assessment. This was not seen in controls. Also, asthma patients displayed more anxiety about acquiring COVID-19 disease compared to controls ((5.11 ± 1.99 vs. 3.50 ± 2.79), p = 0.006).Patients with asthma experienced an increase in anxiety and depression levels and were more afraid of acquiring COVID-19 disease compared to controls. Also, patients with asthma were more likely to avoid healthcare facilities due to fear of acquiring COVID-19 disease compared to controls. Therefore, we advise health care workers to address these possible negative effects on mental health by phone or e-consults.
      Citation: Chronic Respiratory Disease
      PubDate: 2021-07-05T10:15:28Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14799731211029658
      Issue No: Vol. 18 (2021)
       
  • Sexual health communication in COPD: The role, contents and design of
           patient information leaflets

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      Authors: Sandra Esperanza Rubio-Rask, Ingeborg Farver-Vestergaard, Ole Hilberg, Anders Løkke
      Abstract: Chronic Respiratory Disease, Volume 18, Issue , January-December 2021.
      Understanding need for support and information among people with COPD is important for the delivery of patient-centred care. Especially regarding intimacy matters, many people wish to remain sexually active but may be struggling to find out how, as information and communication regarding sexual health is scarce. This is especially true when it comes to people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The present review seeks to provide an overview of the role, contents and design of patient information leaflets (PILs) and discuss their application in sexual health communication for COPD. Based on the literature, a number of key points in the design of high-quality PILs are suggested, and important areas for the improvement of patients-clinician communication are highlighted. While PILs is a commonly used format to provide information in healthcare, other formats, e.g. video and podcasts, could be explored. Prioritizing the development of material to support communication in the future is necessary to address the needs of both patients and caregivers and to support clinicians in initiating conversations about sexual health and intimacy matters.
      Citation: Chronic Respiratory Disease
      PubDate: 2021-06-30T09:12:56Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14799731211020322
      Issue No: Vol. 18 (2021)
       
  • An expert review on breaking barriers in severe asthma in Brazil: Time to
           act

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      Authors: Paulo Márcio Pitrez, Pedro Giavina-Bianchi, José Ângelo Rizzo, Adelmir Souza-Machado, Guilherme Freire Garcia, Marcia Margaret Menezes Pizzichini
      Abstract: Chronic Respiratory Disease, Volume 18, Issue , January-December 2021.
      Currently, Brazil lacks a national asthma management program and is burdened with nearly 200,000 hospitalizations due to the disease per year and approximately 5 deaths per day. The purpose of this article was to analyze the current issues surrounding severe asthma in Brazil, as the status of diagnosis and treatment is largely unknown, and to provide feasible recommendations to elicit imminent action. A panel of Brazilian medical experts in the field of severe asthma was provided with a series of relevant questions to address prior to a multi-day conference. Within this conference, each narrative was discussed and edited by the entire group. Through numerous rounds of discussion consensus was achieved. In order to overcome barriers to adequate asthma treatment, this panel recommends specific initiatives that can be implemented in the short-term to decrease the burden of severe asthma in Brazil. With increasing healthcare costs and limited resources globally, there is an opportunity to implement these recommendations in other countries in order to achieve adequate asthma care. Severe asthma is a heterogeneous and complex disease with various phenotypes that requires strict attention for diagnosis and management. Although this disease affects only a small proportion of the population with asthma, it poses a great burden to healthcare systems. Thus, barriers to diagnosis, treatment, and management should be overcome as quickly and efficiently as possible.
      Citation: Chronic Respiratory Disease
      PubDate: 2021-06-25T09:01:19Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14799731211028259
      Issue No: Vol. 18 (2021)
       
  • Physiotherapy service provision in a specialist adult cystic fibrosis
           service: A pre-post design study with the inclusion of an allied health
           assistant

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      Authors: Kathleen Hall, Lyndal Maxwell, Robyn Cobb, Michael Steele, Rebecca Chambers, Mark Roll, Scott Cameron Bell, Suzanne Kuys
      Abstract: Chronic Respiratory Disease, Volume 18, Issue , January-December 2021.
      What is the impact of including an allied health assistant (AHA) role on physiotherapy service delivery in an acute respiratory service' A pragmatic pre-post design study examined physiotherapy services across two 3-month periods: current service delivery [P1] and current service delivery plus AHA [P2]. Clinical and non-clinical activity quantified as number, type and duration (per day) of all staff activity categorised for skill level (AHA, junior, senior). Physiotherapy service delivery increased in P2 compared to P1 (n = 4730 vs n = 3048). Physiotherapists undertook fewer respiratory (p < 0.001) and exercise treatments (p < 0.001) but increased reviews for inpatients (p < 0.001) and at multidisciplinary clinics in P2 (56% vs 76%, p < 0.01). The AHA accounted for 20% of all service provision. AHA activity comprised mainly non-direct clinical care including oversight of respiratory equipment use (e.g. supply, set-up, cleaning, loan audits) and other patient-related administrative tasks associated with delegation handovers, supervision and clinical documentation (72%), delegated supervision of established respiratory (5%) and exercise treatments (10%) and delegated exercise tests (3%). The AHA completed most of the exercise tests (n = 25). AHA non-direct clinical tasks included departmental management activities (11%). No adverse events were reported. AHA inclusion in an acute respiratory care service changed physiotherapy service provision. The AHA completed delegated routine clinical and non-clinical tasks. Physiotherapists increased clinic activity and annual reviews. Including an AHA role offers sustainable options for enhancing physiotherapy service provision in acute respiratory care.
      Citation: Chronic Respiratory Disease
      PubDate: 2021-06-18T09:21:37Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14799731211017895
      Issue No: Vol. 18 (2021)
       
  • Serum albumin is a predictor of respiratory hospitalization in patients
           with bronchiectasis

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      Authors: Sunmi Ju, Jong Hwan Jeong, Manbong Heo, I Re Heo, Tae Hoon Kim, Ho Cheol Kim, Jung-Wan Yoo, Yu Ji Cho, Yi Yeong Jeong, Jong Deog Lee, Seung Jun Lee
      Abstract: Chronic Respiratory Disease, Volume 18, Issue , January-December 2021.
      We evaluated serum albumin as an index for predicting respiratory hospitalization in patients with bronchiectasis. We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 177 patients with bronchiectasis, categorized them into low and normal albumin groups, and compared their clinical characteristics. The prediction of respiratory hospitalization by factors such as serum albumin level, bronchiectasis severity index (BSI), and FACED score (an acronym derived from five variables of forced expiratory volume in 1 s; FEV1, age, chronic colonization of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, extent of bronchiectasis, and dyspnea) was assessed. There were 15 and 162 patients categorized in the low and normal albumin groups, respectively. The low albumin group had lower body mass index and forced expiratory volume in 1 s, and higher age, frequency of previous respiratory hospitalization, percentage of Pseudomonas colonization, number of affected lobes, BSI and FACED scores, and C-reactive protein (CRP) level, than the normal albumin group. The areas under the receiver operating characteristic curve of serum albumin level and BSI and FACED scores for predicting respiratory hospitalization were 0.732 (95% confidence interval (CI), 0.647–0.816), 0.873 (95% CI, 0.817–0.928), and 0.708 (95% CI, 0.618–0.799), respectively. Albumin level, CRP, modified Medical Research Council score, and chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa (and other organisms) colonization were independent risk factors for respiratory hospitalization. Low serum albumin level was associated with worse clinical condition, higher severity scores, and respiratory hospitalization in patients with bronchiectasis.
      Citation: Chronic Respiratory Disease
      PubDate: 2021-05-25T09:30:08Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14799731211017548
      Issue No: Vol. 18 (2021)
       
  • Early experiences of rehabilitation for individuals post-COVID to improve
           fatigue, breathlessness exercise capacity and cognition – A cohort study
           

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      Authors: Enya Daynes, Charlotte Gerlis, Emma Chaplin, Nikki Gardiner, Sally J Singh
      Abstract: Chronic Respiratory Disease, Volume 18, Issue , January-December 2021.
      Individuals with lasting symptoms of COVID-19 should be offered a comprehensive recovery programme. 30 individuals (mean[SD] age 58[16]) that completed a 6 week, twice supervised rehabilitation programme demonstrated statistically significant improvements in exercise capacity, respiratory symptoms, fatigue and cognition. Participants improved by 112 m on the Incremental Shuttle Walking Test and 544 seconds on the Endurance Shuttle Walking Test. There were no serious adverse events recorded, and there were no dropouts related to symptom worsening. COVID-19 rehabilitation appears feasible and significantly improves clinical outcomes.
      Citation: Chronic Respiratory Disease
      PubDate: 2021-05-07T02:46:38Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14799731211015691
      Issue No: Vol. 18 (2021)
       
  • Erratum to “Contribution of pulmonary diseases to COVID-19 mortality in
           a diverse urban community of New York”

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      Abstract: Chronic Respiratory Disease, Volume 18, Issue , January-December 2021.

      Citation: Chronic Respiratory Disease
      PubDate: 2021-05-04T05:48:41Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14799731211013120
      Issue No: Vol. 18 (2021)
       
  • Validation of a breath-holding test as a screening test for
           exercise-induced hypoxemia in chronic respiratory diseases

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      Authors: Hideharu Ideguchi, Hidenori Ichiyasu, Kazuaki Fukushima, Hiroko Okabayashi, Kimitaka Akaike, Shohei Hamada, Kazuyoshi Nakamura, Susumu Hirosako, Hirotsugu Kohrogi, Takuro Sakagami, Kazuhiko Fujii
      Abstract: Chronic Respiratory Disease, Volume 18, Issue , January-December 2021.
      The detection of exercise-induced hypoxemia is important for evaluating disease status in patients with chronic respiratory diseases. The 6-min walk test (6MWT) is useful for detecting exercise-induced hypoxemia. This pilot study aimed to validate the breath-holding test (BHT) as a screening for exercise-induced hypoxemia and compare its utility with that of the 6MWT in patients with chronic respiratory diseases. Fifty-nine patients with chronic respiratory diseases underwent BHTs lasting 10, 15, and 20 s. Percutaneous oxygen saturation (SpO2), pulse rate, and severity of dyspnoea were measured. The participants also underwent a 6MWT, a pulmonary function test, and analysis of arterial blood gas at rest. Multivariate linear regression analysis was performed to identify significant predictors of desaturation in the 6MWT. The minimum SpO2 during the BHT (all durations) and 6MWT were significantly correlated. Receiver operating characteristic analysis revealed the optimal cut-off for predicting SpO2 < 90% during the 6MWT as a minimum SpO2 ≤ 94% during the 15-s BHT. Perceived dyspnoea and maximum pulse rate were significantly lower during the 15-s BHT than during the 6MWT. In the multivariate linear regression analysis, the minimum SpO2 during the 15-s BHT (β, 0.565, p < 0.001) and %DLco (β, 0.255, p < 0.028) were independent predictors of desaturation in the 6MWT. The minimum SpO2 during the 15-s BHT may be a useful measure for screening for exercise-induced hypoxemia in patients with chronic respiratory diseases. The BHT is easier to perform, more readily available, and better tolerated than the 6MWT.
      Citation: Chronic Respiratory Disease
      PubDate: 2021-04-28T07:01:24Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14799731211012965
      Issue No: Vol. 18 (2021)
       
  • Pharmacological or non-pharmacological interventions for treatment of
           

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      Authors: Saeed Farooq, Jessica Tunmore, Rifat Comber
      Abstract: Chronic Respiratory Disease, Volume 18, Issue , January-December 2021.
      We aimed to review the literature on interventions for treating Common Mental Disorders (CMD) in people with Tuberculosis (TB). We followed PRISMA guidelines and the protocol was registered at PROSPERO. The electronic databases (PsycInfo, CINAHL, Medline, Google Scholar, Embase) were searched from 1982 to 2020. 349 relevant records were screened, with 26 examined at full text. 13 studies were included totalling 4326 participants. A meta-analysis was not possible due to nature of data, thus descriptive synthesis was conducted. Eleven studies evaluated psychosocial interventions, which significantly improved adherence or cure rates from TB, anxiety and depression. The elements of effective psychosocial interventions included; combating stigma, socioeconomic disadvantage, managing associated guilt and fear of contagion, and explanatory models of illness in local population. Two articles evaluated pharmacological interventions (antidepressants and Vitamin D). This is the first systematic review of interventions to treat CMD in TB. The studies were mostly low quality and mental health outcomes were not adequately described. However, this review suggests that it is feasible to develop and test interventions for improving mental health outcomes and enhancing treatment adherence in TB.
      Citation: Chronic Respiratory Disease
      PubDate: 2021-04-26T07:48:25Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14799731211003937
      Issue No: Vol. 18 (2021)
       
  • Thanks to reviewers

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      Abstract: Chronic Respiratory Disease, Volume 18, Issue , January-December 2021.

      Citation: Chronic Respiratory Disease
      PubDate: 2021-04-22T07:09:54Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14799731211008628
      Issue No: Vol. 18 (2021)
       
  • Addressing the changing rehabilitation needs of patients undergoing
           thoracic surgery

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      Authors: Daniel Langer
      Abstract: Chronic Respiratory Disease, Volume 18, Issue , January-December 2021.
      The rehabilitation needs of individuals undergoing thoracic surgery are changing, especially as surgical management is increasingly being offered to patients who are at risk of developing functional limitations during and after hospital discharge. In the past rehabilitative management of these patients was frequently limited to specific respiratory physiotherapy interventions in the immediate postoperative setting with the aim to prevent postoperative pulmonary complications. In the past two decades, this focus has shifted toward pulmonary rehabilitation interventions that aim to improve functional status of individuals, both in the pre- and (longer-term) postoperative period. While there is increased interest in (p)rehabilitation interventions the majority of thoracic surgery patients are however currently on their own with respect to progression of their exercise and physical activity regimens after they have been discharged from hospital. There are also no formal guidelines supporting the referral of these patients to outpatient rehabilitation programs. The current evidence regarding rehabilitation interventions initiated before, during, and after the hospitalization period will be briefly reviewed with special focus on patients undergoing surgery for lung cancer treatment and patients undergoing lung transplantation. More research will be necessary in the coming years to modify or change clinical rehabilitation practice beyond the acute admission phase in patients undergoing thoracic surgery. Tele rehabilitation or web-based activity counseling programs might also be interesting emerging alternatives in the (long-term) postoperative rehabilitative treatment of these patients.
      Citation: Chronic Respiratory Disease
      PubDate: 2021-04-15T08:33:50Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1479973121994783
      Issue No: Vol. 18 (2021)
       
  • Women with COPD from biomass smoke have reduced serum levels of biomarkers
           of angiogenesis and cancer, with EGFR predominating, compared to women
           with COPD from smoking

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      Authors: Martha Montaño, Oliver Pérez-Bautista, Yadira Velasco-Torres, Georgina González-Ávila, Carlos Ramos
      Abstract: Chronic Respiratory Disease, Volume 18, Issue , January-December 2021.
      The main causes of COPD are smoking (COPD-TS) and exposure to biomass smoke (COPD-BS), considered as different phenotypes. The association of COPD-TS with lung cancer (LC) is well established, but not in COPD-BS. Thus, we studied the serum concentration of cytokines that participate in inflammation, angiogenesis, and tumor progression, used frequently as LC biomarkers, in women with COPD-BS compared with COPD-TS (n = 70). Clinical and physiological characteristics and the serum concentration (multiplex immunoassay) of 16 cytokines were evaluated. The analysis revealed that women with COPD-BS were shorter and older, and had lower concentrations of 12 serum cytokines: 6 proinflammatory and angiogenic IL-6Rα, PECAM-1, leptin, osteopontin, prolactin, and follistatin; and 6 that participate in angiogenesis and in tumor progression FGF-2, HGF, sVEGFR-2, sHER2/neu, sTIE-2, G-CSF, and SCF. Notably, there was a significant increase in sEGFR in women with COPD-BS compared to women with COPD-TS. PDGF-AA/BB and sTIE-2 did not change. These findings suggest that women with COPD-BS have markedly decreased proinflammatory, angiogenic, and tumor progression potential, compared to women with COPD-TS, with sEGFR as the predominant mediator, which might reflect a differential pattern of inflammation in women exposed to BS, favoring the development of chronic bronchitis.
      Citation: Chronic Respiratory Disease
      PubDate: 2021-03-31T09:40:21Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14799731211005023
      Issue No: Vol. 18 (2021)
       
  • Diagnostic accuracy of multichannel intraluminal impedance-pH monitoring
           for gastroesophageal reflux-induced chronic cough

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      Authors: Na Li, Qiang Chen, Siwan Wen, Mengru Zhang, Ran Dong, Xianghuai Xu, Li Yu, Zhongmin Qiu
      Abstract: Chronic Respiratory Disease, Volume 18, Issue , January-December 2021.
      Objectives:To elucidate the accuracy and advantages of Multichannel intraluminal impedance-pH monitoring (MII-pH) in diagnosing gastroesophageal reflux-induced chronic cough (GERC).Methods:The patients with suspected GERC were recruited and underwent MII-pH, GERC was confirmed by subsequent anti-reflux treatment despite the findings of MII-pH. Its diagnostic accuracy in identifying GERC were evaluated by receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis and compared with that of 24-h esophageal pH monitoring.Results:Among 158 patients completing both MII-pH and anti-reflux therapy, GERC was diagnosed in 136 patients, including acid GERC in 96 patients (70.6%), non-acid GERC in 30 patients (22.0%), neither one of both GERC in 10 patients (7.4%). For the identification of GERC, MII-pH presented with the sensitivity of 92.6%, specificity of 63.6%, positive predictive value of 94.0%, negative predictive value of 58.3% and area under ROC curve of 0.863, which was totally superior to 24-h esophageal pH monitoring. As the essential criteria of MII-pH, esophageal acid exposure time and symptom associated probability had a limited diagnostic value when used alone, but improved greatly the diagnostic yield when used in combination, even with a suboptimal efficacy.Conclusion:MII-pH is a more sensitive test for identifying GERC, but with a suboptimal diagnostic efficacy.
      Citation: Chronic Respiratory Disease
      PubDate: 2021-03-29T09:45:20Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14799731211006682
      Issue No: Vol. 18 (2021)
       
  • Confidence of nurses with inhaler device education and competency of
           device use in a specialised respiratory inpatient unit

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      Authors: Vinita Swami, Jin-Gun Cho, Tracy Smith, John Wheatley, Mary Roberts
      Abstract: Chronic Respiratory Disease, Volume 18, Issue , January-December 2021.
      We performed a cross-sectional study within a specialised respiratory inpatient unit assessing 25 nurses’ [85% female, 8.0 ± 7.9 (mean ± SD) years’ experience in nursing] confidence in providing inhaler device education using a self-reported questionnaire, and their competency (% correct steps) in using eight different inhaler devices. Sixteen percent of participants were ‘not confident’ providing inhaler education, while 84% were ‘moderately’ or ‘extremely’ confident. The mean (±SD)% correct steps for all devices was 47 ± 17%. There was no correlation between % correct steps and nursing years (r = 0.21, p = 0.31), or ‘confidence’ with providing inhaler education (r = 0.02, p = 0.91) but % correct steps strongly correlated with number of individual device prescriptions within the hospital in the preceding year (r = 0.78, p = 0.039). Most respiratory nurses felt confident in teaching inhaler technique but their overall demonstrated ability to correctly use inhalers was poor, especially for less frequently prescribed devices within our hospital. Regular assessment and ongoing education on correct inhaler technique for respiratory nurses is necessary to optimise all device usage by nurses, irrespective of experience or confidence.
      Citation: Chronic Respiratory Disease
      PubDate: 2021-03-19T10:03:16Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14799731211002241
      Issue No: Vol. 18 (2021)
       
  • Prevalence of potential respiratory symptoms in survivors of hospital
           admission after coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19): A systematic review
           and meta-analysis

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      Authors: Kevin Cares-Marambio, Yessenia Montenegro-Jiménez, Rodrigo Torres-Castro, Roberto Vera-Uribe, Yolanda Torralba, Xavier Alsina-Restoy, Luis Vasconcello-Castillo, Jordi Vilaró
      Abstract: Chronic Respiratory Disease, Volume 18, Issue , January-December 2021.
      Knowledge on the sequelae of Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) remains limited due to the relatively recent onset of this pathology. However, the literature on other types of coronavirus infections prior to COVID-19 reports that patients may experience persistent symptoms after discharge. To determine the prevalence of respiratory symptoms in survivors of hospital admission after COVID-19 infection. A living systematic review of five databases was performed in order to identify studies which reported the persistence of respiratory symptoms in COVID-19 patients after discharge. Two independent researchers reviewed and analysed the available literature, and then extracted and assessed the quality of those articles. Of the 1,154 reports returned by the initial search nine articles were found, in which 1,816 patients were included in the data synthesis. In the pooled analysis, we found a prevalence of 0.52 (CI 0.38–0.66, p < 0.01, I 2 = 97%), 0.37 (CI 0.28–0.48, p < 0.01, I 2 = 93%), 0.16 (CI 0.10–0.23, p < 0.01, I 2 = 90%) and 0.14 (CI 0.06–0.24, p < 0.01, I 2 = 96%) for fatigue, dyspnoea, chest pain, and cough, respectively. Fatigue, dyspnoea, chest pain, and cough were the most prevalent respiratory symptoms found in 52%, 37%, 16% and 14% of patients between 3 weeks and 3 months, after discharge in survivors of hospital admission by COVID-19, respectively.
      Citation: Chronic Respiratory Disease
      PubDate: 2021-03-17T09:51:21Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14799731211002240
      Issue No: Vol. 18 (2021)
       
  • Fungal bronchitis or allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis …that
           is the question

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      Authors: Inderpaul Singh Sehgal, Valliappan Muthu, Ritesh Agarwal
      Abstract: Chronic Respiratory Disease, Volume 18, Issue , January-December 2021.

      Citation: Chronic Respiratory Disease
      PubDate: 2021-03-15T09:59:21Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14799731211001887
      Issue No: Vol. 18 (2021)
       
  • Fungal Bronchitis and not allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis

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      Authors: Leyla Pur Ozyigit, Catherine Helen Pashley, Andrew John Wardlaw
      Abstract: Chronic Respiratory Disease, Volume 18, Issue , January-December 2021.

      Citation: Chronic Respiratory Disease
      PubDate: 2021-03-15T09:50:56Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14799731211001888
      Issue No: Vol. 18 (2021)
       
  • Towards a better understanding of physical activity in people with COPD:
           predicting physical activity after pulmonary rehabilitation using an
           integrative competence model

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      Authors: Johannes Alexander Carl, Wolfgang Geidl, Michael Schuler, Eriselda Mino, Nicola Lehbert, Michael Wittmann, Konrad Schultz, Klaus Pfeifer
      Abstract: Chronic Respiratory Disease, Volume 18, Issue , January-December 2021.
      The integrative Physical Activity-related Health Competence (PAHCO) model specifies competences (movement competence, control competence, and self-regulation competence) that enable people to lead a physically active lifestyle. This longitudinal study analyses the predictive quality of a multidimensional PAHCO assessment for levels of physical activity (PA) and their relevance for quality of life in COPD patients after pulmonary rehabilitation. At the end of an inpatient pulmonary rehabilitation (T2), 350 COPD patients participating in the Stay Active after Rehabilitation (STAR) study underwent assessments, including a six-factor measurement of PAHCO. PA (triaxial accelerometry) and quality of life (Saint George’s Respiratory Questionnaire) were recorded 6 weeks (T3) and 6 months (T4) after rehabilitation. Structural equation modelling (SEM) was used to regress the PAHCO assessment on PA, which should, in turn, influence quality of life. In univariable analysis, five and six factors of the PAHCO model were related to PA and quality of life, respectively. Multivariate modelling showed that the predictive analyses for the PA level were dominated by the 6-minute walking test representing movement competence (0.562 ≤ β ≤ 0.599). Affect regulation as an indicator of control competence co-predicted quality of life at T3 and levels of PA at T4. The PA level was, in turn, significantly associated with patients’ quality of life (0.306 ≤ β ≤ 0.388). The integrative PAHCO model may be used as a theoretical framework for predicting PA in COPD patients following pulmonary rehabilitation. The results improve our understanding of PA behaviour in COPD patients and bear implications for person-oriented PA promotion.
      Citation: Chronic Respiratory Disease
      PubDate: 2021-03-11T10:09:16Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1479973121994781
      Issue No: Vol. 18 (2021)
       
  • Use of sit-to-stand test to assess the physical capacity and exertional
           desaturation in patients post COVID-19

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      Authors: Rodrigo Núñez-Cortés, Gonzalo Rivera-Lillo, Marisol Arias-Campoverde, Dario Soto-García, Roberto García-Palomera, Rodrigo Torres-Castro
      Abstract: Chronic Respiratory Disease, Volume 18, Issue , January-December 2021.
      We propose the use of the 1-minute sit-to-stand test (1STST) to evaluate the physical capacity and exertional desaturation one month after discharge in a sample of patients who survived COVID-19 pneumonia. This was a cross-sectional study that collected routine data from consecutive patients admitted to the outpatient program in a public hospital in Chile. Patients were asked to complete a 1STST. Data were analyzed according to those with and without a prolonged hospital stay of>10 days. Eighty-three percent of the patients were able to complete the test (N = 50). The median age was 62.7 ± 12.5 years. The average number of repetitions in the 1STST was 20.9 ± 4.8. Thirty-two percent of patients had a decrease in pulse oxygen saturation (SpO2) ≥ 4 points. The prolonged hospital stay subgroup had a significant increase in exertional desaturation (mean difference = 2.6; 95% CI = 1.2 to 3.9; p = 0.001) and dyspnea (mean difference = 1.1; 95% CI = 0.4 to 2.1; p = 0.042) compared to the group of length of stay ≤10 days. In-hospital survivors of COVID-19, the 1STST showed a decrease in physical capacity at one month in those 90% who were able to complete it. The 1STST was able to discriminate between those with and without a prolonged hospital stay and was able to detect exertional desaturation in some patients.
      Citation: Chronic Respiratory Disease
      PubDate: 2021-02-28T06:37:31Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1479973121999205
      Issue No: Vol. 18 (2021)
       
  • Impact of interstitial lung disease on mortality in ANCA-associated
           vasculitis: A systematic literature review and meta-analysis

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      Authors: Peining Zhou, Jing Ma, Guangfa Wang
      Abstract: Chronic Respiratory Disease, Volume 18, Issue , January-December 2021.
      Several retrospectivee described the association of interstitial lung disease (ILD) and ANCA-associated vasculitis (AAV). However, the relationship between the ILD and mortality in AAV patients have not been established so far. This study aims to estimate the relevance of AAV-associated-ILD (AAV-ILD) and mortality risk by conducting a systematic review and meta-analysis.A comprehensive systematic review was conducted in accordance with the guidelines of PRISMA (Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-analyses). PubMed, Embase.com and the Cochrane Library (Wiley) were searched for original observational studies. Summary estimates were derived with a random-effects model and reported as risk ratio (RR), tested for publication bias and heterogeneity. Ten retrospective cohort studies were included, comprising 526 AAV-ILD patients enrolled from 1974 to 2018. Meta-analysis yielded a pooled RR of 2.90 (95% confidence interval 1.77–4.74) for death among those with AAV-ILD compared to control group. UIP pattern was associated with an even poorer prognosis in comparison to non-UIP pattern (RR 4.36, 95% confidence interval 1.14–16.78). Sensitivity analysis suggested that the meta-RR result was not skewed by a single dominant study. ILD might be associated with a higher mortality risk in AAV patients.
      Citation: Chronic Respiratory Disease
      PubDate: 2021-02-19T10:07:44Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1479973121994562
      Issue No: Vol. 18 (2021)
       
  • Muscle and cerebral oxygenation during cycling in chronic obstructive
           pulmonary disease: A scoping review

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      Authors: Melissa Miles, Antenor Rodrigues, Shirin Tajali, Yijun Xiong, Ani Orchanian-Cheff, W Darlene Reid, Dmitry Rozenberg
      Abstract: Chronic Respiratory Disease, Volume 18, Issue , January-December 2021.
      To synthesize evidence for prefrontal cortex (PFC), quadriceps, and respiratory muscle oxygenation using near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) during cycling in individuals with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). A scoping review was performed searching databases (inception-August 2020): Ovid MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane Systematic Reviews, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Clinical Trials, CINAHL, SPORTDiscus and Pedro. The search focused on COPD, cycling, and NIRS outcomes. 29 studies (541 COPD participants) were included. Compared to healthy individuals (8 studies), COPD patients at lower cycling workloads had more rapid increases in vastus lateralis (VL) deoxygenated hemoglobin (HHb); lower increases in VL total hemoglobin (tHb) and blood flow; and lower muscle tissue saturation (StO2). Heliox and bronchodilators were associated with smaller and slower increases in VL HHb. Heliox increased VL and intercostal blood flow compared to room air and supplemental oxygen in COPD patients (1 study). PFC oxygenated hemoglobin (O2Hb) increased in COPD individuals during cycling in 5 of 8 studies. Individuals with COPD and heart failure demonstrated worse VL and PFC NIRS outcomes compared to patients with only COPD—higher or more rapid increase in VL HHb and no change or decrease in PFC O2Hb. Individuals with COPD present with a mismatch between muscle oxygen delivery and utilization, characterized by more rapid increase in VL HHb, lower muscle O2Hb and lower muscle StO2. PFC O2Hb increases or tends to increase in individuals with COPD during exercise, but this relationship warrants further investigation. NIRS can be used to identify key deoxygenation thresholds during exercise to inform PFC and muscle oxygenation.
      Citation: Chronic Respiratory Disease
      PubDate: 2021-02-19T10:06:34Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1479973121993494
      Issue No: Vol. 18 (2021)
       
  • A causal relationship between rheumatoid arthritis and bronchiectasis'
           A systematic review and meta-analysis

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      Authors: Rafal Wiater, Kjell Erik Julius Håkansson, Charlotte Suppli Ulrik
      Abstract: Chronic Respiratory Disease, Volume 18, Issue , January-December 2021.
      Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic autoimmune disease primarily affecting joints but often also associated with lung involvement such as bronchiectasis (BE). The aim of the present systematic review and meta-analysis is to provide an update on the current evidence regarding the prevalence and association between RA and BE. This systematic review and meta-analysis was performed in accordance with the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines with literature search using the terms ‘Bronchiectasis AND Rheumatoid Arthritis’ without a date limitation on PubMed during May 2020. A total of 28 studies fulfilled the predefined criteria and were included in the present review, with 19 being cross-sectional studies. Twenty-three studies were included in the meta-analysis. The pooled prevalence estimate was 2.69% (95% CI 1.63–4.42) in clinically defined BE, and 24.9% (95% CI 19.21–31.67) in radiologic disease. Many inconsistencies exist regarding potential risk factors for BE in RA patients such as gender, RA duration and severity, as both negative and positive associations have been reported. Although very little is known about possible causative mechanisms between RA and BE, potential pathways might be antigenic stimulation from pulmonary mucus and/or systemic inflammation from joint disease affecting the lungs. At present, the available evidence of bronchiectasis in patients with RA is insufficient to identify RA-associated risk factors for the development of BE, possibly apart from duration of RA, and, consequently, also to fully explore a possible causal relationship between the two disease. However, the increased prevalence of BE in RA patients warrants further studies to explore the association between RA and BE.
      Citation: Chronic Respiratory Disease
      PubDate: 2021-02-16T10:04:23Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1479973121994565
      Issue No: Vol. 18 (2021)
       
  • Contribution of pulmonary diseases to COVID-19 mortality in a diverse
           urban community of New York

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      Authors: Jean-Louis Girardin, Azizi Seixas, Jaime Ramos Cejudo, Ricardo S Osorio, George Avirappattu, Marvin Reid, Sairam Parthasarathy
      Abstract: Chronic Respiratory Disease, Volume 18, Issue , January-December 2021.
      We examined the relative contribution of pulmonary diseases (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, asthma and sleep apnea) to mortality risks associated with Coronavirus Disease (COVID-19) independent of other medical conditions, health risks, and sociodemographic factors. Data were derived from a large US-based case series of patients with COVID-19, captured from a quaternary academic health network covering New York City and Long Island. From March 2 to May 24, 2020, 11,512 patients who were hospitalized were tested for COVID-19, with 4,446 (38.62%) receiving a positive diagnosis for COVID-19. Among those who tested positive, 959 (21.57%) died of COVID-19-related complications at the hospital. Multivariate-adjusted Cox proportional hazards modeling showed mortality risks were strongly associated with greater age (HR = 1.05; 95% CI: 1.04–1.05), ethnic minority (Asians, Non-Hispanic blacks, and Hispanics) (HR = 1.26; 95% CI, 1.10–1.44), low household income (HR = 1.29; 95% CI: 1.11, 1.49), and male sex (HR = 0.85; 95% CI: 0.74, 0.97). Higher mortality risks were also associated with a history of COPD (HR = 1.27; 95% CI: 1.02–1.58), obesity (HR = 1.19; 95% CI: 1.04–1.37), and peripheral artery disease (HR = 1.33; 95% CI: 1.05–1.69). Findings indicate patients with COPD had the highest odds of COVID-19 mortality compared with patients with pre-existing metabolic conditions, such as obesity, diabetes and hypertension. Sociodemographic factors including increased age, male sex, low household income, ethnic minority status were also independently associated with greater mortality risks.
      Citation: Chronic Respiratory Disease
      PubDate: 2021-02-08T09:40:50Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1479973120986806
      Issue No: Vol. 18 (2021)
       
  • Patient perceptions of the re-usable Respimatt® Soft Mist™ inhaler in
           current users and those switching to the device: A real-world,
           non-interventional COPD study

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      Authors: Michael Dreher, David Price, Asparuh Gardev, Pascale Peeters, Satish Arora, Simone van der Sar – van der Brugge, Richard Dekhuijzen, Omar S Usmani
      Abstract: Chronic Respiratory Disease, Volume 18, Issue , January-December 2021.
      The Respimat® Soft Mist™ inhaler (SMI) has recently been improved, with a re-usable device replacing the disposable version. Certain countries are currently phasing out the disposable inhaler. This study aimed to assess patient satisfaction with and preference for the re-usable device. This 4–6-week, multicentre, open-label, prospective, real-world, non-interventional study was conducted across six European countries. Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease were enrolled between October and December 2019, in three cohorts: (1) currently using the re-usable Respimat SMI; (2) switched from disposable Respimat SMI at study entry; and (3) naïve to any Respimat SMI. Patients were assessed using the Patient Satisfaction and Preference Questionnaire (PASAPQ) and Ease of Handling Questionnaire. In total, 262 patients were enrolled. At follow-up, the mean PASAPQ score was 83.3/100 overall, with similar results across all three patient cohorts. Most patients were ‘satisfied’ or ‘very satisfied’ with the re-usable device. The overall score for willingness to continue using the device was 87.8/100. In total, 13 adverse events were recorded, none of which was classified as serious. This study provides real-world evidence for practitioners to start patients on Respimat re-usable, irrespective of a patient’s prior experience with this inhaler.Plain language summary:Inhalers are often used to treat patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). However, there are many available, which can lead to confusion and poor inhaler technique. It is important for a patient to be happy with their inhaler. This study looked at how patients liked the re-usable Respimat® Soft Mist™ inhaler vs. their previous inhaler. It also asked whether they would be willing to continue using the device at the end of the study period.After 4–6 weeks of using the re-usable device, patients reported that they were happy with the inhaler and most would be willing to carry on using it.Overall, these results show that doctors can prescribe Respimat re-usable to patients, even if the patient has not used the inhaler before.
      Citation: Chronic Respiratory Disease
      PubDate: 2021-02-01T10:36:24Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1479973120986228
      Issue No: Vol. 18 (2021)
       
  • Fungal bronchitis is a distinct clinical entity which is responsive to
           antifungal therapy

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      Authors: Leyla Pur Ozyigit, Will Monteiro, Eva-Maria Rick, Jack Satchwell, Catherine Helen Pashley, Andrew John Wardlaw
      Abstract: Chronic Respiratory Disease, Volume 18, Issue , January-December 2021.
      Chronic productive cough in the context of exacerbations of airway disease can be associated with positive sputum cultures for fungi, in particular Aspergillus fumigatus and Candida spp., suggesting fungal bronchitis, a condition not widely recognised, as a possible cause for the exacerbation. Our objective was to determine the response to antifungal therapy in patients with suspected fungal bronchitis. Retrospective analysis of data extracted from case records of patients under secondary care respiratory clinics who had been treated with triazole therapy for suspected fungal bronchitis between 2010–2017. Primary outcome was lung function response after 1 month of treatment. Nineteen patients with fungal bronchitis due to A. fumigatus and 12 patients due to Candida spp., were included in the study. Most of the patients, particularly in the Aspergillus group, had allergic fungal airway disease on a background of asthma. All but one of the patients in each group were recorded as showing clinical improvement with antifungal therapy. In the majority of patients this was reflected in an improvement in lung function. Aspergillus group: FEV1 (1.44 ± 0.8 L vs 1.6 ± 0.8 L: p < 0.02), FVC (2.49 ± 1.08 L vs 2.8 ± 1.1 L: p = 0.01), and PEF (260 ± 150L/min vs 297 ± 194ml/min: p < 0.02). Candida group: FEV1 (1.6 ± 0.76 L vs 2.0 ± 0.72 L: p < 0.004), FVC (2.69 ± 0.91 L vs 3.13 ± 0.7 L: p = 0.05), and PEF (271± 139L/min vs 333 ± 156 L/min: p = 0.01). Side effects of treatment were common, but resolved on stopping treatment. This service improvement project supports the idea that fungal bronchitis is a distinct clinical entity which is responsive to treatment. Controlled clinical trials to confirm the clinical impression that this is relatively common and treatable complication of complex airway disease are required.
      Citation: Chronic Respiratory Disease
      PubDate: 2021-01-21T10:01:52Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1479973120964448
      Issue No: Vol. 18 (2021)
       
  • Spotlight on primary care management of COPD: Electronic health records

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      Authors: Timothy H Harries, Patrick White
      Abstract: Chronic Respiratory Disease, Volume 18, Issue , January-December 2021.

      Citation: Chronic Respiratory Disease
      PubDate: 2021-01-18T09:57:17Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1479973120985594
      Issue No: Vol. 18 (2021)
       
 
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