Publisher: Sage Publications   (Total: 1166 journals)

 A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I  J  K  L  M  N  O  P  Q  R  S  T  U  V  W  X  Y  Z  

        1 2 3 4 5 6 | Last   [Sort by number of followers]   [Restore default list]

Showing 1 - 200 of 1166 Journals sorted alphabetically
AADE in Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Abstracts in Anthropology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 29)
Academic Pathology     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Accounting History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18, SJR: 0.527, CiteScore: 1)
Acta Radiologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.754, CiteScore: 2)
Acta Radiologica Open     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Acta Sociologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39, SJR: 0.939, CiteScore: 2)
Action Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 53, SJR: 0.308, CiteScore: 1)
Active Learning in Higher Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 396, SJR: 1.397, CiteScore: 2)
Adaptive Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.288, CiteScore: 1)
Administration & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18, SJR: 0.675, CiteScore: 1)
Adoption & Fostering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25, SJR: 0.313, CiteScore: 0)
Adsorption Science & Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.258, CiteScore: 1)
Adult Education Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 260, SJR: 0.566, CiteScore: 2)
Adult Learning     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 51)
Advances in Dental Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 1.791, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Developing Human Resources     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35, SJR: 0.614, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Mechanical Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 156, SJR: 0.272, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Methods and Practices in Psychological Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20)
Advances in Structural Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 51, SJR: 0.599, CiteScore: 1)
AERA Open     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
Affilia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.496, CiteScore: 1)
Africa Spectrum     Open Access   (Followers: 17)
Agrarian South : J. of Political Economy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Air, Soil & Water Research     Open Access   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.214, CiteScore: 1)
Alexandria : The J. of National and Intl. Library and Information Issues     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 68)
Allergy & Rhinology     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
AlterNative : An Intl. J. of Indigenous Peoples     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 39, SJR: 0.194, CiteScore: 0)
Alternative Law J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.176, CiteScore: 0)
Alternatives : Global, Local, Political     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.351, CiteScore: 1)
Alternatives to Laboratory Animals     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.297, CiteScore: 1)
American Behavioral Scientist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26, SJR: 0.982, CiteScore: 2)
American Economist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
American Educational Research J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 260, SJR: 2.913, CiteScore: 3)
American J. of Alzheimer's Disease and Other Dementias     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23, SJR: 0.67, CiteScore: 2)
American J. of Cosmetic Surgery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
American J. of Evaluation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18, SJR: 0.646, CiteScore: 2)
American J. of Health Promotion     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35, SJR: 0.807, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Hospice and Palliative Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 47, SJR: 0.65, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Law & Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.204, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Lifestyle Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.431, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Medical Quality     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.777, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Men's Health     Open Access   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.595, CiteScore: 2)
American J. of Rhinology and Allergy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.972, CiteScore: 2)
American J. of Sports Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 248, SJR: 3.949, CiteScore: 6)
American Politics Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 36, SJR: 1.313, CiteScore: 1)
American Review of Public Administration     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28, SJR: 2.062, CiteScore: 2)
American Sociological Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 357, SJR: 6.333, CiteScore: 6)
American String Teacher     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Analytical Chemistry Insights     Open Access   (Followers: 26, SJR: 0.224, CiteScore: 1)
Angiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.849, CiteScore: 2)
Animation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.197, CiteScore: 0)
Annals of Clinical Biochemistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.634, CiteScore: 1)
Annals of Otology, Rhinology & Laryngology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20, SJR: 0.807, CiteScore: 1)
Annals of Pharmacotherapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 59, SJR: 1.096, CiteScore: 2)
Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 51, SJR: 1.225, CiteScore: 3)
Annals of the ICRP     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.548, CiteScore: 1)
Anthropocene Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 3.341, CiteScore: 7)
Anthropological Theory     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 48, SJR: 0.739, CiteScore: 1)
Antitrust Bulletin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Antiviral Chemistry and Chemotherapy     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.635, CiteScore: 2)
Antyajaa : Indian J. of Women and Social Change     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Applied Biosafety     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.131, CiteScore: 0)
Applied Psychological Measurement     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21, SJR: 1.17, CiteScore: 1)
Applied Spectroscopy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 27, SJR: 0.489, CiteScore: 2)
Armed Forces & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25, SJR: 0.29, CiteScore: 1)
Arthaniti : J. of Economic Theory and Practice     Full-text available via subscription  
Arts and Humanities in Higher Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 49, SJR: 0.305, CiteScore: 1)
Asia Pacific Media Educator     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.23, CiteScore: 0)
Asia-Pacific J. of Management Research and Innovation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Asia-Pacific J. of Public Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.558, CiteScore: 1)
Asia-Pacific J. of Rural Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Asian and Pacific Migration J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.324, CiteScore: 1)
Asian Cardiovascular and Thoracic Annals     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.305, CiteScore: 0)
Asian J. of Comparative Politics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Asian J. of Legal Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Asian J. of Management Cases     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.101, CiteScore: 0)
ASN Neuro     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 1.534, CiteScore: 3)
Assessment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19, SJR: 1.519, CiteScore: 3)
Assessment for Effective Intervention     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.578, CiteScore: 1)
Australasian J. of Early Childhood     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.535, CiteScore: 1)
Australasian Psychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18, SJR: 0.433, CiteScore: 1)
Australian & New Zealand J. of Psychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30, SJR: 1.801, CiteScore: 2)
Australian and New Zealand J. of Criminology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 545, SJR: 0.612, CiteScore: 1)
Australian J. of Career Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Australian J. of Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 51, SJR: 0.403, CiteScore: 1)
Australian J. of Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.497, CiteScore: 1)
Autism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 356, SJR: 1.739, CiteScore: 4)
Autism & Developmental Language Impairments     Open Access   (Followers: 17)
Avian Biology Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.401, CiteScore: 1)
Behavior Modification     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.877, CiteScore: 2)
Behavioral and Cognitive Neuroscience Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Behavioral Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Beyond Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Bible Translator     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Biblical Theology Bulletin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24, SJR: 0.184, CiteScore: 0)
Big Data & Society     Open Access   (Followers: 55)
Biochemistry Insights     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Bioinformatics and Biology Insights     Open Access   (Followers: 12, SJR: 1.141, CiteScore: 2)
Biological Research for Nursing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.685, CiteScore: 2)
Biomarker Insights     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.81, CiteScore: 2)
Biomarkers in Cancer     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Biomedical Engineering and Computational Biology     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
Biomedical Informatics Insights     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Bioscope: South Asian Screen Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.235, CiteScore: 0)
BMS: Bulletin of Sociological Methodology/Bulletin de Méthodologie Sociologique     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.226, CiteScore: 0)
Body & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29, SJR: 1.531, CiteScore: 3)
Bone and Tissue Regeneration Insights     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Brain and Neuroscience Advances     Open Access  
Brain Science Advances     Open Access  
Breast Cancer : Basic and Clinical Research     Open Access   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.823, CiteScore: 2)
British J. of Music Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
British J. of Occupational Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 253, SJR: 0.323, CiteScore: 1)
British J. of Pain     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31, SJR: 0.579, CiteScore: 2)
British J. of Politics and Intl. Relations     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39, SJR: 0.91, CiteScore: 2)
British J. of Visual Impairment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.337, CiteScore: 1)
British J.ism Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
BRQ Business Review Quarterly     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Building Acoustics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.215, CiteScore: 1)
Building Services Engineering Research & Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.583, CiteScore: 1)
Bulletin of Science, Technology & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Business & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Business and Professional Communication Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.348, CiteScore: 1)
Business Information Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17, SJR: 0.279, CiteScore: 0)
Business Perspectives and Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Cahiers Élisabéthains     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.111, CiteScore: 0)
Calcutta Statistical Association Bulletin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
California Management Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 37, SJR: 2.209, CiteScore: 4)
Canadian Association of Radiologists J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.463, CiteScore: 1)
Canadian J. of Kidney Health and Disease     Open Access   (Followers: 8, SJR: 1.007, CiteScore: 2)
Canadian J. of Nursing Research (CJNR)     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Canadian J. of Occupational Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 167, SJR: 0.626, CiteScore: 1)
Canadian J. of Psychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28, SJR: 1.769, CiteScore: 3)
Canadian J. of School Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.266, CiteScore: 1)
Canadian Pharmacists J. / Revue des Pharmaciens du Canada     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.536, CiteScore: 1)
Cancer Control     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Cancer Growth and Metastasis     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Cancer Informatics     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.64, CiteScore: 1)
Capital and Class     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.282, CiteScore: 1)
Cardiac Cath Lab Director     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Cardiovascular and Thoracic Open     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Career Development and Transition for Exceptional Individuals     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.44, CiteScore: 1)
Cartilage     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.889, CiteScore: 3)
Cell Transplantation     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 1.023, CiteScore: 3)
Cephalalgia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 1.581, CiteScore: 3)
Cephalalgia Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Child Language Teaching and Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34, SJR: 0.501, CiteScore: 1)
Child Maltreatment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 1.22, CiteScore: 3)
Child Neurology Open     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Childhood     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19, SJR: 0.894, CiteScore: 2)
Childhood Obesity and Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
China Information     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.767, CiteScore: 2)
China Report     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.221, CiteScore: 0)
Chinese J. of Sociology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Christian Education J. : Research on Educational Ministry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Chronic Illness     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.672, CiteScore: 2)
Chronic Respiratory Disease     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.808, CiteScore: 2)
Chronic Stress     Open Access  
Citizenship, Social and Economics Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.145, CiteScore: 0)
Cleft Palate-Craniofacial J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.757, CiteScore: 1)
Clin-Alert     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Clinical and Applied Thrombosis/Hemostasis     Open Access   (Followers: 32, SJR: 0.49, CiteScore: 1)
Clinical and Translational Neuroscience     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Clinical Case Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.364, CiteScore: 1)
Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 45, SJR: 0.73, CiteScore: 2)
Clinical EEG and Neuroscience     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.552, CiteScore: 2)
Clinical Ethics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.296, CiteScore: 1)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Arthritis and Musculoskeletal Disorders     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.537, CiteScore: 2)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Blood Disorders     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.314, CiteScore: 2)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Cardiology     Open Access   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.686, CiteScore: 2)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Case Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.283, CiteScore: 1)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Circulatory, Respiratory and Pulmonary Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.425, CiteScore: 2)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Ear, Nose and Throat     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Endocrinology and Diabetes     Open Access   (Followers: 33, SJR: 0.63, CiteScore: 2)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Oncology     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 1.129, CiteScore: 3)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Pediatrics     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Psychiatry     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Reproductive Health     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.776, CiteScore: 0)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Therapeutics     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.172, CiteScore: 0)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Trauma and Intensive Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Women's Health     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Clinical Nursing Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34, SJR: 0.471, CiteScore: 1)
Clinical Pathology     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Clinical Pediatrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25, SJR: 0.487, CiteScore: 1)
Clinical Psychological Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16, SJR: 3.281, CiteScore: 5)
Clinical Rehabilitation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 78, SJR: 1.322, CiteScore: 3)
Clinical Risk     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.133, CiteScore: 0)
Clinical Trials     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22, SJR: 2.399, CiteScore: 2)
Clothing and Textiles Research J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28, SJR: 0.36, CiteScore: 1)
Collections : A J. for Museum and Archives Professionals     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Common Law World Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Communication & Sport     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.385, CiteScore: 1)
Communication and the Public     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Communication Disorders Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.458, CiteScore: 1)
Communication Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24, SJR: 2.171, CiteScore: 3)
Community College Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 1.451, CiteScore: 1)
Comparative Political Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 292, SJR: 3.772, CiteScore: 3)
Compensation & Benefits Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Competition & Change     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.843, CiteScore: 2)

        1 2 3 4 5 6 | Last   [Sort by number of followers]   [Restore default list]

Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Child Maltreatment
Journal Prestige (SJR): 1.22
Citation Impact (citeScore): 3
Number of Followers: 11  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1077-5595 - ISSN (Online) 1552-6119
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1166 journals]
  • Child Maltreatment Announces New Statistical Associate Editor

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Pages: 344 - 344
      Abstract: Child Maltreatment, Volume 26, Issue 3, Page 344-344, August 2021.

      Citation: Child Maltreatment
      PubDate: 2021-08-02T09:09:44Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10775595211025114
      Issue No: Vol. 26, No. 3 (2021)
       
  • Graduate Student/Postdoctoral Fellow Section of Child Maltreatment
           Editorial Board

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Pages: 345 - 345
      Abstract: Child Maltreatment, Volume 26, Issue 3, Page 345-345, August 2021.

      Citation: Child Maltreatment
      PubDate: 2021-08-02T09:10:07Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10775595211017993
      Issue No: Vol. 26, No. 3 (2021)
       
  • Adolescent Neglect and Health Risk

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Julia M. Kobulsky, Miguel Villodas, Dalhee Yoon, Rachel Wildfeuer, Laurence Steinberg, Howard Dubowitz
      Abstract: Child Maltreatment, Ahead of Print.
      This study examined relationships between adolescent neglect and abuse and later health risk in a sample of 1050 youth (53% female, 56% Black, and 24% White) from the Longitudinal Studies of Child Abuse and Neglect. At age 16, the youth reported any adolescent exposure to neglect and physical, sexual, and emotional abuse. At age 18, they reported risk behaviors (delinquency, substance use, and sexual behavior) and emotional and behavioral problems (externalizing and internalizing problems, suicidality). Control variables were childhood maltreatment (self-reports and early childhood child protective services reports), risk behaviors and emotional and behavioral problems at age 16, and demographics. Analysis confirmed a 5-factor model of adolescent neglect (Exposure to Risk, Inadequate Monitoring, Inattention to Basic Needs, Permitting Misbehavior, and Inadequate Support). Inadequate Support and Exposure to Risk were associated with more substances used; Exposure to Risk was also associated with delinquency and suicidality. Adolescent emotional abuse was associated with not using a condom use and internalizing and externalizing problems. Findings underscore the importance of preventing or addressing neglect during adolescence.
      Citation: Child Maltreatment
      PubDate: 2021-10-19T01:09:13Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10775595211049795
       
  • An Exploration of Factors that Mediate the Relationship Between Adverse
           Childhood Experiences and Sexual Assault Victimization Among LGBTQ+
           College Students

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Tara E. Sutton, Katie M. Edwards, Laura Siller, Ryan C. Shorey
      Abstract: Child Maltreatment, Ahead of Print.
      Despite alarming rates of sexual assault on college campuses, little research has examined risk factors for sexual victimization among LGBTQ+ college students. This exploratory study aims to examine adolescent sexual assault, internalized homonegativity, and problematic alcohol use as mediators linking several types of adverse childhood experiences (ACEs; i.e., childhood sexual abuse, parental abuse, and household disorder) to collegiate sexual assault. Utilizing data from 241 LGBTQ+ college students, path analysis findings demonstrated that these proposed mediators increased risk for sexual assault and that various types of ACEs exerted differential impacts on sexual re-victimization, internalized homonegativity, and problematic alcohol use. Practice-based implications are offered, including the need for affirming programming that includes problem drinking prevention components and considers the role of ACEs and internalized homonegativity in increasing risk for sexual assault during college as well as the need for LGBTQ+ resource centers on campus.
      Citation: Child Maltreatment
      PubDate: 2021-09-27T10:11:17Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10775595211041970
       
  • Improving Outcomes for Families of Children With Medical Needs Known to
           Child Welfare: A Nurse Care Coordination Program

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Anne Lilly, Marc Cavella, Arnesha Roper-Lewis, Mary Weglarz, Linda Ayala, Alexandra Cirillo Lilli, Mollie Greene, Nina Colabelli, Anne Duggan
      Abstract: Child Maltreatment, Ahead of Print.
      Children known to child welfare are more likely to have poor health compared to the general population. Most children served by child welfare are served in their own homes. New Jersey implemented the Child and Family Nurse Program (CFNP) to provide nurse care coordination to address the health needs of children who remain in-home. Our study described: 1) families served by CFNP; 2) services provided to these families; and 3) family well-being outcomes. The study focused on the 304 families served by CFNP from 2016 to 2017. We used CFNP data to describe families served and services provided, and family baseline and follow-up surveys to assess change in family well-being over time. Families served by CFNP experienced improvements in family protective factors and health-related quality of life from baseline to follow-up. While more rigorous studies are needed to learn CFNP’s impact, it is a promising approach that merits consideration by state child welfare leaders.
      Citation: Child Maltreatment
      PubDate: 2021-09-25T02:25:46Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10775595211044496
       
  • Modeling the Adverse Childhood Experiences
           Questionnaire–International Version

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Jordan A. Gette, Tre D. Gissandaner, Andrew K. Littlefield, Chelsy S. Simmons, Adam T. Schmidt
      Abstract: Child Maltreatment, Ahead of Print.
      Adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) are related to a host of deleterious physical and mental health outcomes. The ACE–International Questionnaire (ACE-IQ) was developed to assess categories of ACEs (e.g., sexual, emotional, and physical abuse) in internationally representative samples. Though the ACE-IQ has been used world-wide, little work has examined the structure of this measure. Further, much of the modeling techniques implemented lacked theoretical rationale. The present work used two principal components analyses (PCA) to evaluate the ACE-IQ structure using both the identified ACE categories as defined by the World Health Organization (WHO) and using the ACE-IQ items as individual indicators. Using the WHO method, a two-component structure was indicated. Alternatively, a PCA of the individual items yielded a six-component structure. Results highlight the importance of theoretically grounded measure evaluation and the potential distinctions amongst types of ACEs. Implications and future directions for research and practice are discussed.
      Citation: Child Maltreatment
      PubDate: 2021-09-25T02:25:24Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10775595211043122
       
  • Child Abuse Pediatricians Assess a Low Likelihood of Abuse in Half of 2890
           Physical Abuse Consults

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Katie L. Johnson, Emily C. B. Brown, Kenneth W. Feldman, Pingping Qu, Daniel M. Lindberg
      Abstract: Child Maltreatment, Ahead of Print.
      The aim of this study was to examine the frequency with which child abuse pediatricians (CAPs) assess consultations as low versus high likelihood of abuse. In this retrospective secondary analysis of data from the Examining Siblings to Recognize Abuse (ExSTRA) study, the likelihood of abuse score for 2890 consultations at 20 medical centers was collected. Descriptive statistics were used to examine the percentage of cases representing low versus high likelihood of abuse (i.e., score of 1–4 vs. 5–7 on a 7-point scale). Linear and logistic regression analyses were used to examine score variability between medical centers. Overall, fifty-three percent of cases were assessed as low likelihood of abuse, suggesting that CAPs were equally as likely to assess a high versus low likelihood of abuse. The percentage of cases representing low likelihood of abuse differed significantly (P < .001) between medical centers after controlling for patient age, sex, race/ethnicity, twin/triplet status, injury types, and injury severity. The variability between CAP assessments at different medical centers is discussed, along with potential contributors to this variability and directions for future work.
      Citation: Child Maltreatment
      PubDate: 2021-09-24T12:33:53Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10775595211041974
       
  • Next Steps in Untangling the Web of Violence: A Research Agenda

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Sherry Hamby, E. Susana Mariscal
      Abstract: Child Maltreatment, Ahead of Print.
      In this commentary, we outline four key trends in violence and trauma research and describe needed research to advance our ability to understand, prevent, and respond these problems. The trends are the move toward evidence-based policy, the recognition of the importance of trauma dosage, the shift to strengths-based approaches, and increased attention to race, gender, and other personality and community characteristics regarding health disparities and culturally appropriate interventions. For each trend, we have identified needed research areas, taking care to identify low-resource and high-resource studies that can help us reduce the burden of trauma.
      Citation: Child Maltreatment
      PubDate: 2021-09-23T01:20:18Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10775595211034472
       
  • The Co-Occurrence of Child Maltreatment and Intimate Partner Violence: A
           Commentary on the Special Issue

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Lynette M. Renner
      Abstract: Child Maltreatment, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Child Maltreatment
      PubDate: 2021-08-31T10:33:13Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10775595211034430
       
  • Contrasting Methods of Measurement in Spatial Analyses Examining the
           Alcohol Environment and Child Maltreatment

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Holly Thurston, Bridget Freisthler, Jennifer Price Wolf
      Abstract: Child Maltreatment, Ahead of Print.
      Child physical abuse is a major public health issue in the United States. Environmental child welfare research has focused on neighborhood characteristics and the influence of alcohol and marijuana establishments. To our knowledge, child welfare studies have singularly examined the outcome in terms of victims, that is, at the level of child population, and have not considered the parent population. Thus, in this exploratory study, we use spatial scan statistics to analyze patterns of child physical abuse at the child and household level, and we use Bayesian hierarchical spatial conditional autoregressive models to determine the relative influence of alcohol availability and other environmental factors. We find that household clusters are nested in child clusters and that controlling for alcohol establishments reduces cluster size. In the Bayesian regression models, alcohol availability increased risk slightly, while neighborhood diversity (measured using Blau’s Index) elevated risk considerably. Immediate implications for child welfare agencies are discussed.
      Citation: Child Maltreatment
      PubDate: 2021-08-28T03:56:44Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10775595211040756
       
  • Change in Caregivers’ Attitudes and Use of Corporal Punishment Following
           a Legal Ban: A Multi-Country Longitudinal Comparison

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Liane Peña Alampay, Jennifer Godwin, Jennifer E. Lansford, Paul Oburu, Marc H. Bornstein, Lei Chang, Kirby Deater-Deckard, W. Andrew Rothenberg, Patrick S. Malone, Ann T. Skinner, Concetta Pastorelli, Emma Sorbring, Laurence Steinberg, Sombat Tapanya, Lilliana M. Uribe Tirado, Saengduean Yotanyamaneewong, Suha M. Al-Hassan, Dario Bacchini, Laura Di Giunta, Kenneth A. Dodge, Sevtap Gurdal
      Abstract: Child Maltreatment, Ahead of Print.
      We examined whether a policy banning corporal punishment enacted in Kenya in 2010 is associated with changes in Kenyan caregivers’ use of corporal punishment and beliefs in its effectiveness and normativeness, and compared to caregivers in six countries without bans in the same period. Using a longitudinal study with six waves of panel data (2008–2016), mothers (N = 1086) in Colombia, Italy, Jordan, Kenya, Philippines, Thailand, and United States reported household use of corporal punishment and beliefs about its effectiveness and normativeness. Random intercept models and multi-group piecewise growth curve models indicated that the proportion of corporal punishment behaviors used by the Kenyan caregivers decreased post-ban at a significantly different rate compared to the caregivers in other countries in the same period. Beliefs of effectiveness of corporal punishment were declining among the caregivers in all sites, whereas the Kenyan mothers reported increasing perceptions of normativeness of corporal punishment post-ban, different from the other sites. While other contributing factors cannot be ruled out, our natural experiment suggests that corporal punishment decreased after a national ban, a shift that was not evident in sites without bans in the same period.
      Citation: Child Maltreatment
      PubDate: 2021-08-14T09:01:10Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10775595211036401
       
  • Using a Person-Centered Approach to Identify Patterns of Exposure to
           Intimate Partner Violence and Child Abuse in Women: Associations With
           Mental Health

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Bre’Anna L. Free, Alexandra J. Lipinski, Rivian K. Lewin, Rimsha Majeed, Rebecca J. Zakarian, J. Gayle Beck
      Abstract: Child Maltreatment, Ahead of Print.
      Patterns of exposure to intimate partner violence (IPV) and child abuse (CA) were explored in 467 women seeking psychological assistance following IPV. Using latent class analysis, three classes were obtained: women who had experienced physical, sexual, and psychological IPV, along with childhood physical and sexual abuse (IPV + CA; 38.5%); women who had experienced physical, sexual, and psychological IPV only (IPV/no CA; 52.9%); and women who had experienced psychological IPV only (Psych IPV only; 8.6%). Associations of class membership with severity of specific mental health conditions were examined, along with the number of diagnosed conditions. Significant between-class differences were noted on severity of IPV-related posttraumatic stress disorder, depressive disorders, alcohol and substance use disorders, and social phobia. Classes also differed significantly on the number of mental health conditions. Understanding patterns of betrayal-based trauma (e.g., IPV and CA) can inform care within agencies that serve IPV survivors by highlighting individuals at-risk for mental health conditions.
      Citation: Child Maltreatment
      PubDate: 2021-08-02T02:50:55Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10775595211031655
       
  • Introduction to the Special Issue on the Intersection of Intimate Partner
           Violence and Child Maltreatment

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Damion J. Grasso, Carla S. Stover, Daniel J. Whitaker
      Abstract: Child Maltreatment, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Child Maltreatment
      PubDate: 2021-08-02T02:23:16Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10775595211036411
       
  • Injuries Associated With Subsequent Child Maltreatment Diagnosis: By Age,
           Race, Gender, and Medicaid Status

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Sonya Negriff, Mercie J. DiGangi, Adam L. Sharp, Jun Wu
      Abstract: Child Maltreatment, Ahead of Print.
      This study examined injuries that may precede a child maltreatment (CM) diagnosis, by age, race/ethnicity, gender, and Medicaid status using a retrospective case–control design among child members of a large integrated healthcare system (N = 9152 participants, n = 4576 case). Injury categories based on diagnosis codes from medical visits were bruising, fractures, lacerations, head injury, burns, falls, and unspecified injury. Results showed that all injury categories were significant predictors of a subsequent CM diagnosis, but only for children < 3 years old. Specifically, fracture and head injury were the highest risk for a subsequent CM diagnosis. All injury types were significant predictors of maltreatment diagnosis for Hispanic children < 3 years, which was not the case for the other race/ethnicities. Overall, these findings suggest that all types of injury within these specific categories should have a more thorough assessment for possible abuse for children under 3 years. This work can inform the development of clinical decision support tools to aid healthcare providers in detecting abusive injuries.
      Citation: Child Maltreatment
      PubDate: 2021-07-28T03:58:08Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10775595211031385
       
  • Prevalence of Injuries Among Medicaid Enrolled Infants Prior to Child
           Abuse and Neglect

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Meghan E. Shanahan, Anna E. Austin, Molly C. Berkoff
      Abstract: Child Maltreatment, Ahead of Print.
      Prior research has identified common injuries among children who experience child maltreatment; however, most of this work has focused on inpatient settings and has excluded many cases of neglect. This study examines the prevalence of injuries that occur prior to a diagnosis of child maltreatment, as well as the proportion of children with well-child visits prior to the injury and child maltreatment diagnosis. Based on a secondary analysis of Medicaid data from four states, we found that among infants with 12 months of continuous enrollment (N = 4817), 30.6% of those diagnosed with maltreatment were previously diagnosed with an injury. Among infants diagnosed with child maltreatment, 88.4% had at least one well-child visit prior to the maltreatment diagnosis. Among children with a maltreatment diagnosis and a prior injury, 84% had at least one well-child visit preceding the injury. These results indicate that most children had at least one well-child visit prior to being diagnosed with child maltreatment or an injury, indicating opportunities for prevention.
      Citation: Child Maltreatment
      PubDate: 2021-07-28T03:36:36Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10775595211031651
       
  • Connected After Care: Youth Characteristics, Policy, and Programs
           Associated With Postsecondary Education and Employment for Youth With
           Foster Care Histories

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Jennifer M. Geiger, Nathanael J. Okpych
      Abstract: Child Maltreatment, Ahead of Print.
      Recent federal laws and state policies reflect the government’s investment in improving education and employment outcomes for youth with foster care histories. However, little research has assessed the roles of these programs using national data. Drawing on data from the National Youth in Transitions Database (NYTD) (n = 7797), this study examines the roles that state-level policies and programs, youth-level participation in programs and services, and youth characteristics play in youths’ connection to employment and education (“connectedness”) at age 21. Results from multilevel regression analyses find that foster youth in states with widely available tuition waiver programs increases the odds of connectedness to school. The amount of time youth spend in extended foster care, as well as receipt of postsecondary education aid and services, also increases connectedness. Study findings underscore the importance of material and relational supports in supporting foster youths’ connection to employment and education in early adulthood.
      Citation: Child Maltreatment
      PubDate: 2021-07-27T04:55:52Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10775595211034763
       
  • A Review of Screened-Out Families and Child Protective Services
           Involvement: A Missed Opportunity to Prevent Future Maltreatment With
           Community-Based Services

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: James D. Simon, María Gandarilla Ocampo, Brett Drake, Melissa Jonson-Reid
      Abstract: Child Maltreatment, Ahead of Print.
      The objective of this article is to frame, understand, and draw implications from existing research on families screened out by child protective services (CPS) after a referral alleging child maltreatment. We review descriptive and outcome data together with emerging intervention research amidst a developing consensus that the current reactive role of CPS should be supplemented by supportive and preventative services that primarily address poverty. State-level data indicate that screened-out families are at high risk of re-referral and similar to higher-risk families reported to CPS. Intervention research is scant and mixed, but there is indication that providing community-based services may reduce future CPS involvement. Considering that screened-out referrals present an opportunity to prevent future maltreatment, CPS should identify and collaboratively engage screened-out families in community-based services. More research on the outcomes of these community responses is needed to identify best practices related to engagement and service provision.
      Citation: Child Maltreatment
      PubDate: 2021-07-27T04:46:35Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10775595211033597
       
  • The Influence of Authority Role and Victim Gender on Perceptions of
           Female-Perpetrated Child Sexual Abuse

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Caitlyn N. Muniz, Ráchael A. Powers
      Abstract: Child Maltreatment, Ahead of Print.
      Child sexual abuse is often perceived differently based on characteristics of the victim and the perpetrator. However, unknown is whether variations in perceptions occur when the relationship to and gender of the victim are manipulated—particularly when the offender is a woman. The current study sought to explore whether authority role (neighbor, teacher, family, or clergy) and victim gender affect perceived outcomes for the victim. A factorial vignette design was used to randomly assign participants to one of eight conditions, and a series of analyses of variance (ANOVAs) were conducted to assess differences in perceived victim outcomes for the vignettes. Results showed significant differences for authority role, victim gender, and the interactions between authority and victim gender for nearly all dependent variables. Respondents recognized that the scenarios presented were damaging and harmful; however, certain authority positions (i.e., teachers) were sexualized leading to diminished perceptions of negative outcomes, particularly for male victims.
      Citation: Child Maltreatment
      PubDate: 2021-07-27T04:38:55Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10775595211033537
       
  • Risk of Future Maltreatment: Examining Whether Worker Characteristics
           Predict Their Perception

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Kristen Lwin, Joanne Filippelli, Barbara Fallon, Jason King, Nico Trocmé
      Abstract: Child Maltreatment, Ahead of Print.
      Child welfare workers aim to promote the well-being and safety of children and are the link between the child welfare system and families. Families served by the child welfare system should expect similar service based on clinical factors, not based on their caseworker’s characteristics. Using secondary data analyses of the most recent Canadian Incidence Study of Reported Child Abuse and Neglect (CIS-2008) and multilevel modeling, this study examines whether child welfare worker characteristics, such as education level and field, age, and experience predict their perception of the risk of future maltreatment. A total of 1729 case-level investigations and 419 child welfare workers were included in this study. Several one-level logistic regression and two-level logistic regression analyses were run. The best-fit model suggests that caseworkers with a Master’s degree, more than 2 years of experience, and more than 18 cases were significantly more likely to perceive risk of future maltreatment. Further, the interaction between degree level and age also significantly predicted the perception of risk of future maltreatment. Results suggest that the perception of risk of future maltreatment may be influenced by caseworker factors, thus service to families may differ based on caseworker characteristics.
      Citation: Child Maltreatment
      PubDate: 2021-07-27T04:29:11Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10775595211031460
       
  • What Proportion of Foster Care Children Do Not Have Child Protective
           Services Reports' A Preliminary Look

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Brett Drake, John D. Fluke, Hyunil Kim, Rebecca Orsi, Jessica L. Stubblefield
      Abstract: Child Maltreatment, Ahead of Print.
      It is perhaps surprising that we lack complete national information about why children enter foster care. While the annual Adoption and Foster Care Analysis Reporting System (AFCARS) report is informative, it leaves many questions unanswered, particularly “how many children enter foster care by means other than Child Protective Services (CPS) reports'” Drawing from a unique new integrated dataset, we examined foster care data (AFCARS) and CPS report data (National Child Abuse and Neglect Data System Child File). The linked dataset included 210,062 children with foster care placements in 2017 and no placements in the prior 5 years. We categorized each placed child along two dimensions of four levels each: Time since prior CPS report (if any) and stated AFCARS placement reason, ranging from clearly maltreated to clearly not maltreated. We also tracked the siblings of placed children, to see if non-maltreated children entered care because of maltreated siblings. We find that between 8–35% of children enter foster care for reasons other than maltreatment, depending how thresholds are set. These numbers decline somewhat when siblings are considered. A meaningfully large number of children are placed in foster care for reasons other than maltreatment investigated by CPS. Further research into these children is warranted to better inform foster care policy.
      Citation: Child Maltreatment
      PubDate: 2021-07-26T06:04:39Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10775595211033855
       
  • Role of Risk Taking and Inhibitory Control in Alcohol Use Among Maltreated
           Adolescents and Nonmaltreated Adolescents

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Hyoun K. Kim, Jacqueline Bruce
      Abstract: Child Maltreatment, Ahead of Print.
      Exposure to childhood maltreatment is a significant risk factor for the development and persistence of problematic alcohol use. The present study examined the role of risk taking and inhibitory control, key cognitive processes believed to govern behavioral regulation, as mechanisms that underlie the association between childhood maltreatment and the early stages of alcohol use. A sample of 129 maltreated adolescents and 102 socioeconomic status–matched, nonmaltreated adolescents and their parents completed three annual assessments, including computer-administered tasks and adolescent- and parent-report questionnaires, across ages 12–13 through 14–15 years. Childhood maltreatment was not directly associated with alcohol use in middle adolescence but was significantly associated with deficits in inhibitory control in early adolescence, which, in turn, led to significantly increased alcohol use in middle adolescence. Indeed, decreased inhibitory control was significant as a mediator, highlighting the salient role of this cognitive process in the early stages of alcohol use among maltreated adolescents.
      Citation: Child Maltreatment
      PubDate: 2021-07-19T09:28:47Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10775595211031349
       
  • Child Welfare System Involvement Among Children With Medical Complexity

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Corry Azzopardi, Eyal Cohen, Karine Pépin, Kathy Netten, Catherine Birken, Sheri Madigan
      Abstract: Child Maltreatment, Ahead of Print.
      Children with medical complexity may be at elevated risk of experiencing child maltreatment and child welfare system involvement, though empirical data are limited. This study examined the extent of child welfare system involvement among children with medical complexity and investigated associated health and social factors. A retrospective chart review of children with medical complexity (N = 208) followed at a pediatric hospital-based complex care program in Canada was conducted. Descriptive statistics and odds ratios using logistic regression were computed. Results showed that nearly one-quarter (23.6%) had documented contact with the child welfare system, most commonly for neglect; of those, more than one-third (38.8%) were placed in care. Caregiver reported history of mental health problems (aOR = 3.19, 95%CI = 1.55–6.56), chronic medical conditions (aOR = 2.86, 95%CI = 1.09–7.47), and interpersonal violence or trauma (aOR = 17.58, 95%CI = 5.43–56.98) were associated with increased likelihood of child welfare system involvement, while caregiver married/common-law relationship status (aOR = 0.35, 95%CI = 0.16–0.74) and higher number of medical technology supports (aOR = 0.75, 95%CI = 0.57–0.99) were associated with decreased likelihood. Implications for intervention and prevention of maltreatment in children with high healthcare needs are discussed.
      Citation: Child Maltreatment
      PubDate: 2021-07-05T11:44:41Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10775595211029713
       
  • Polyvictimization and Psychosocial Outcomes Among Trauma-Exposed,
           Clinic-Referred Youth Involved in the Juvenile Justice System

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Heather T. Pane Seifert, Angela M. Tunno, Ernestine C. Briggs, Sherika Hill, Damion J. Grasso, Zachary W. Adams, Julian D. Ford
      Abstract: Child Maltreatment, Ahead of Print.
      Polyvictimization is a robust predictor of emotional and behavioral problems and is linked to involvement in juvenile justice and other public sector systems. This study extends prior research by employing person-centered methods for identifying polyvictimization patterns among trauma-exposed, clinic-referred, justice-involved youth (n = 689; ages 12–18 years) and how identified classes differ on psychosocial outcomes and demographic characteristics. Most participants had experienced multiple traumatic event (TE) types. Latent class analyses identified three classes: mixed trauma/bereavement exposure group (55.1%; Mean = 3.0 TE types); maltreatment polyvictimized group (29.3%; Mean = 5.7 TE types); and maltreatment plus extreme violence polyvictimized group (15.7%; Mean = 9.3 TE types). Polyvictimized youth were more likely to be female, in out-of-home placements, and experiencing negative psychosocial outcomes (e.g., Posttraumatic Stress Disorder). Hispanic/Latino youth were overrepresented in the extreme polyvictimized subgroup. Results underscore the need for cross-system coordination of trauma-informed, comprehensive services for clinic-referred, justice-involved youth.
      Citation: Child Maltreatment
      PubDate: 2021-06-25T12:42:26Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10775595211025096
       
  • Higher Levels of Harsh Parenting During the COVID-19 Lockdown in the
           Netherlands

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Novika Purnama Sari, Marinus H. van IJzendoorn, Pauline Jansen, Marian Bakermans-Kranenburg, Madelon M. E. Riem
      Abstract: Child Maltreatment, Ahead of Print.
      Previous studies on the impact of COVID-19 indicate that pandemic-related distress increases risks for child maltreatment, although data on the scope of this problem are still scarce. Here, we assessed whether parents with toddlers (n = 206) more often used harsh discipline during the lockdown in the Netherlands compared to a matched parent sample collected prior to the pandemic (n = 1,030). Parents were matched on background characteristics using propensity score matching. We found that harsh parenting levels were significantly elevated compared to pre-pandemic levels. Harsh parenting behaviors with a low prevalence before COVID-19 increased most strongly: shaking, calling names, and calling the child stupid. These results suggest that parental tolerance for children’s disobedience is lower under the adverse circumstances of COVID-19 and, as a result, abusive parenting responses are more difficult to inhibit. Thus, a lockdown seems to increase risks for child maltreatment, underscoring the need for effective support strategies for at-risk families.
      Citation: Child Maltreatment
      PubDate: 2021-06-17T08:55:10Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10775595211024748
       
  • Patterns of Child Maltreatment and the Development of Conflictual Emerging
           Adult Romantic Relationships: An Examination of Mechanisms and Gender
           Moderation

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Elizabeth D. Handley, Justin Russotti, Jennifer M. Warmingham, Fred A. Rogosch, Jody Todd Manly, Dante Cicchetti
      Abstract: Child Maltreatment, Ahead of Print.
      Individuals who experienced child maltreatment are at heightened risk for involvement in conflictual romantic relationships. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of patterns of child maltreatment on the development of maladaptive romantic relationships in emerging adulthood (EA), as well as to determine whether childhood physical aggression and disinhibition mediate this risk. Utilizing a longitudinal sample of emerging adult participants (N = 398 emerging adults; Mage = 19.67 years) who took part in a summer research camp as children (Mage = 11.27 years), we employed a combination of person-centered and variable-centered methods to test study aims. Significant differences in child behavior and developmental pathways emerged not only between those who experienced maltreatment and those who did not, but also among maltreated individuals with different constellations of maltreatment experiences. Specifically, childhood aggression was a robust mechanism underlying the risk associated with chronic/multi-subtype maltreatment, and the risk associated with neglect only, for involvement in dysfunctional EA romantic relationships. Together, these findings highlight the utility of person-centered methods for conceptualizing maltreatment, identify childhood aggression as a pathway of risk, and the underscore the criticality of prevention and early intervention to interrupt the intergenerational transmission of high conflict and aggression within families.
      Citation: Child Maltreatment
      PubDate: 2021-06-08T08:58:30Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10775595211022837
       
  • Maltreatment Type Classifications and Transitions During Childhood for a
           California Birth Cohort

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: John Prindle, Regan Foust, Emily Putnam-Hornstein
      Abstract: Child Maltreatment, Ahead of Print.
      Childhood maltreatment involves dynamics between the type of maltreatment experienced and the context of maltreatment. Reports of alleged maltreatment to child protective services may overlap and shift over time, complicating understanding of their independent and interacting nature, including how child protection systems respond. Latent class analysis (LCA) and latent transition analysis (LTA) were used to construct data-based models of longitudinal dynamics of alleged maltreatment throughout childhood. We sought to identify patterns leading to system decisions to substantiate allegations of maltreatment and place children in foster care. Using linked birth and child protection records, we defined a cohort of children born in California in 1999, 29.4% of whom had at least one referral for alleged maltreatment before their 18th birthday. Maltreatment and perpetrator indicators were coded, and LCA identified five alleged maltreatment classes and one class of children without referrals. LTA determined consistency of classifications and estimated transitions between classes over age periods. Children with multitype maltreatment patterns or experiences of neglect were most likely to experience future maltreatment allegations. Estimated probabilities of placement indicated children with Multitype Maltreatment allegations were more likely to experience substantiated maltreatment allegations and out-of-home placements. Findings identify a repeatable method for better understanding complex systems.
      Citation: Child Maltreatment
      PubDate: 2021-05-03T09:08:12Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10775595211006784
       
  • Sibling Separation and Placement Instability for Children in Foster Care

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Sarah A. Font, Hyun Woo Kim
      Abstract: Child Maltreatment, Ahead of Print.
      U.S. foster care policy prioritizes keeping siblings together while in foster care. However, prior research on the effects of sibling placement is limited in sample, measures, and research design. In this study, we use data on 2,297 children from an urban county in years 2015–2019 and assess how sibling separation is associated with placement instability. We use multilevel parametric hazard modeling with adjustments for child, sibling, and placement characteristics. Findings indicate that children placed with at least one sibling are less likely to experience a placement move and are specifically less likely to experience a non-progress move (e.g., moves due to problems or negative experiences in their foster home). For larger sibling groups, sibling separation was not consistently associated with placement instability and there was little difference in placement instability for children placed with some versus all siblings. Results were robust to differences in measurement and model specification. Black or Hispanic race/ethnicity was also associated with increased risk of instability, and associations between sibling separation and instability were stronger for Black children, implying enhanced efforts to maintain sibling groups may be especially beneficial for Black children. Overall, findings provide support for the continuation and expansion of policies promoting sibling placement.
      Citation: Child Maltreatment
      PubDate: 2021-04-29T07:06:47Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10775595211012482
       
  • Concurrent Childhood Experiences Impact Underage Substance Use

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Eliza Broadbent, Jacob Read Miller, Aaron Cheung, Elizabeth Mathews Rollins, Lynneth Kirsten B. Novilla, Melissa Stanfill Downing, AliceAnn Crandall
      Abstract: Child Maltreatment, Ahead of Print.
      Adverse and advantageous childhood experiences (ACEs and counter-ACEs) during adolescence are understudied. This study examined how childhood experiences affect youth tobacco/alcohol use. Participants included 489 U.S. adolescents (baseline 10–13 years; 51% female) from the first five waves of the Flourishing Families Project. Results of the cross-lagged model showed ACEs were predictive of early tobacco use only. Counter-ACEs in wave two and wave three predicted, respectively, decreased tobacco and decreased alcohol use in the following wave. Counter-ACEs were also correlated with reduced alcohol and tobacco use in later waves. These findings indicate the salience of counter-ACEs over ACEs in persistent and late adolescent substance use, though ACEs may be important to consider to prevent very early initiation of tobacco.
      Citation: Child Maltreatment
      PubDate: 2021-04-26T08:19:32Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10775595211012480
       
  • The Impact of the COVID-19 Pandemic on Child Protection System Referrals
           and Responses in Colorado, USA

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Samantha M. Brown, Rebecca Orsi, Pang Ching Bobby Chen, Courtney L. Everson, John Fluke
      Abstract: Child Maltreatment, Ahead of Print.
      Although the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has amplified risk factors known to increase children’s vulnerability to abuse and neglect, emerging evidence suggests declines in maltreatment reporting and responding following COVID-19 social distancing protocols in the United States. Using statewide administrative data, this study builds on the current state of knowledge to better understand the volume of child protection system (CPS) referrals and responses in Colorado, USA before and during the early phase of the COVID-19 pandemic and to determine whether there were differences in referral and response rates by case characteristics. Results indicated an overall decline in referrals and responses during COVID-19 when compared to the previous year. Declines were specific to case characteristics, such as reporter and maltreatment type. Implications regarding the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on child maltreatment reporting and CPS response are discussed.
      Citation: Child Maltreatment
      PubDate: 2021-04-26T08:18:44Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10775595211012476
       
  • Intervening With Attachment and Biobehavioral Catch-Up to Reduce Behavior
           Problems Among Children Adopted Internationally: Evidence From a
           Randomized Controlled Trial

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Heather A. Yarger, Teresa Lind, K. Lee Raby, Lindsay Zajac, Allison Wallin, Mary Dozier
      Abstract: Child Maltreatment, Ahead of Print.
      Children who have been adopted internationally often exhibit persistent behavior problems. The current study assessed the efficacy of the Attachment and Biobehavioral Catch-up intervention (ABC; Dozier & Bernard, 2019) for reducing behavior problems in 122 children adopted internationally. Behavior problems were measured via parent-report using the Brief Infant Toddler Social Emotional Assessment at a pre-intervention visit and after the intervention when children were between 18 and 36 months. Children’s behavior problems were also observed using the Disruptive Behavior Diagnostic Observation Schedule (DB-DOS) after the intervention when children were 48 and 60 months. Parents who received ABC reported fewer child behavior problems than parents who received the control intervention immediately after the intervention through 1.5 years post-intervention. Additionally, children whose parents received ABC exhibited fewer behavior problems within the parent context of the DB-DOS when they were 48 months old (2 years post-intervention) than children whose parents received the control intervention. There were no significant intervention effects on children’s observed behavior problems within the examiner contexts. These results support the efficacy of ABC in reducing behavior problems among children adopted internationally. Trial registration: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00816621.
      Citation: Child Maltreatment
      PubDate: 2021-04-22T07:39:57Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10775595211010975
       
  • Child Maltreatment and Substance Use in Emerging Adulthood: Internalizing
           and Externalizing Behaviors at the Transition to Adolescence as Indirect
           Pathways

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Anneke E. Olson, Chad E. Shenk, Jennie G. Noll, Brian Allen
      Abstract: Child Maltreatment, Ahead of Print.
      One well-established outcome of child maltreatment is an increased likelihood of substance use in emerging adulthood. However, research identifying the indirect pathways that explain this relation is lacking, thereby limiting substance use prevention efforts for the child maltreatment population. The present study helped address this gap by accessing data from The Longitudinal Studies on Child Abuse and Neglect (LONGSCAN; n = 1,136), a prospective cohort study of child maltreatment from birth through age eighteen. Internalizing and externalizing problems at age twelve were examined as indirect effects of the relation between child maltreatment prior to age four and substance use at age eighteen. A multiple mediator model tested the total and specific indirect effects of internalizing and externalizing concerns while controlling for demographic risk factors. Results demonstrated that the total indirect effect for internalizing and externalizing behaviors was statistically significant, Standardized Point Estimate = 0.01, 95% CI: 0.00-0.02. Examination of the specific indirect effects revealed that only externalizing behaviors constituted an indirect pathway, Standardized Point Estimate = 0.01, 95% CI: 0.00-0.03. These results suggest that externalizing behaviors at the transition to adolescence are important intervention targets for reducing the risk for substance use in emerging adulthood in the child maltreatment population.
      Citation: Child Maltreatment
      PubDate: 2021-04-22T07:39:26Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10775595211010965
       
  • Patterns of Maternal Childhood Maltreatment and Disrupted Interaction
           Between Mothers and Their 4-Month-Old Infants

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Jennifer E. Khoury, Lina Dimitrov, Michelle Bosquet Enlow, J. D. Haltigan, Elisa Bronfman, Karlen Lyons-Ruth
      Abstract: Child Maltreatment, Ahead of Print.
      Maternal childhood maltreatment (MCM) is associated with parenting disruptions which may contribute to the intergenerational transmission of negative health and social outcomes. Most prior work has used variable-centered approaches to assess MCM. Complementary person-centered approaches can identify groups of participants characterized by similar patterns of maltreatment. The current study assessed both types and patterns of MCM in relation to disrupted parenting among 179 mothers and their 4-month-olds. In variable-centered analyses, physical abuse was related to negative-intrusive maternal behavior and physical neglect to role-confused behavior. Person-centered analyses derived three classes of MCM, which differed in disrupted parenting. For example, mothers who experienced multiple types of maltreatment displayed more withdrawal than mothers in both other classes. Results document the differential effects of particular types and patterns of MCM on aspects of parenting and reveal that mother’s history of maltreatment can affect the quality of mother-child interaction as early as 4 months of age.
      Citation: Child Maltreatment
      PubDate: 2021-04-15T08:04:08Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10775595211007567
       
  • Social Cohesion and Informal Social Control as Mediators Between
           Neighborhood Poverty and Child Maltreatment

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Kathryn Maguire-Jack, Susan Yoon, Sunghyun Hong
      Abstract: Child Maltreatment, Ahead of Print.
      Neighborhoods have profound impacts on children and families. Using structural equation modeling and data from 4,898 children in the Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Study, the current study examines the direct and indirect effects of neighborhood poverty on the likelihood of being maltreated at age 5. Two neighborhood social processes, social cohesion and informal social control, were examined as mediators. The study found that neighborhood poverty was indirectly related to physical assault and psychological aggression through its impact on social cohesion, and indirectly related to neglect through its impact on informal social control. The results highlight the need to reduce poverty across communities and increase social cohesion and social control as potential pathways for interrupting the impact of neighborhood poverty on maltreatment.
      Citation: Child Maltreatment
      PubDate: 2021-04-15T08:03:28Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10775595211007566
       
  • State Child Welfare Policies and the Measurement of Child Maltreatment in
           the United States

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Elizabeth Day, Laura Tach, Brittany Mihalec-Adkins
      Abstract: Child Maltreatment, Ahead of Print.
      State-level child welfare policies and practices affect what can be referred, investigated, and substantiated as child maltreatment, and these institutional factors vary across states and over time. Researchers typically have not accounted for these factors in analyses, confounding institutional features with the underlying construct they seek to study. The present study addresses this limitation by demonstrating how changes in specific state child welfare policies and practices influence reported and substantiated maltreatment in the National Child Abuse and Neglect Data System (NCANDS). Using negative binomial models with state and year fixed-effects to analyze data from 2005 to 2018, we found significant influence of state policy and practice changes on state-level rates of reported and substantiated maltreatment over time. If a state implemented three of the most common policy changes—adding mandated reporters, centralized intake, and staff—its maltreatment reports were an estimated 32% higher than they would have been in the absence of these changes. By contrast, most state policy changes decreased the number of reports that were substantiated—by 24% if they implemented both differential response and higher standards of proof. Implications for future research and policy are discussed.
      Citation: Child Maltreatment
      PubDate: 2021-04-09T07:17:33Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10775595211006464
       
  • Factors Predicting Family Violence Revictimization Among Army Families
           With Child Maltreatment

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Miranda P. Kaye, Keith R. Aronson, Daniel F. Perkins
      Abstract: Child Maltreatment, Ahead of Print.
      The Army Family Advocacy Program (Army FAP) strives to prevent family violence and intervene to reduce the deleterious effects of exposure to family violence. This paper examines the individual, family, community, and treatment factors associated with family violence revictimization. Case files of 134 families with substantiated child maltreatment and associated Army FAP interventions that closed in 2013 were coded across risk and protective factors and intervention characteristics and were matched to Army Central Registry files to identify revictimization rates through 2017. Revictimization, experienced by 23% of families, was predicted by community risk and reduced by intervention dose. With the high rates of relocations, housing or neighborhood issues, and the isolation military families experience and the relationship of these concerns to repeated family violence, identifying the impact of community risk is particularly important. Similarly, research that elucidates the effective treatment components is needed.
      Citation: Child Maltreatment
      PubDate: 2021-04-08T08:30:59Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10775595211008997
       
  • Co-Reporting of Child Maltreatment and Intimate Partner Violence: The
           Likelihood of Substantiations and Foster Care Placements

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Rebecca Rebbe, Andrea Lane Eastman, Avanti Adhia, Regan Foust, Emily Putnam-Hornstein
      Abstract: Child Maltreatment, Ahead of Print.
      Intimate partner violence (IPV) negatively affects children. Although IPV-related reports frequently come to the attention of child protective services (CPS), there is neither a unified standard for how CPS systems should respond, nor sufficient research documenting that reaction. The current study used population-based administrative records from California to assess how CPS responds to reported allegations of IPV, with and without physical abuse and/or neglect allegations. We used multinomial regression to model the likelihood of investigation outcomes. Results indicate that 20.7% of CPS reports had IPV alleged during hotline screening, and of those, just 3.2% were screened out compared to 20.2% for reports where IPV was not alleged. Almost half (45.5%) of IPV-alleged reports came from law enforcement, in contrast to 15.2% of reports that did not allege IPV. IPV-alleged reports were more likely to have allegations substantiated without a case opened for services, but less likely to result in foster care placements. Several statistically significant differences were identified by the type of alleged maltreatment co-reported with IPV. This study contributes to an understanding of how CPS responds to IPV-alleged reports.
      Citation: Child Maltreatment
      PubDate: 2021-03-31T09:07:25Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10775595211007205
       
  • Therapists’ Perceived Competence in Trauma-Focused Cognitive Behavioral
           Therapy and Client Outcomes: Findings From a Community-Based Learning
           Collaborative

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Hannah C. Espeleta, Samuel O. Peer, Funlola Are, Rochelle F. Hanson
      Abstract: Child Maltreatment, Ahead of Print.
      This study examined therapists’ perceived competence in Trauma-Focused Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (TF-CBT) and its association with youth treatment outcomes (posttraumatic stress and depression). Participants included 99 community therapists enrolled in a TF-CBT-focused Learning Collaborative (LC), along with one of their randomly selected TF-CBT training cases. Analyzed data included: 1) caregiver/youth-reported posttraumatic stress and depressive symptoms, pre- and post-treatment, and 2) therapist-perceived competence with TF-CBT components across treatment delivery. Youth- and caregiver-reports indicated large, significant pre- to post-treatment decreases in youth posttraumatic stress (ds = 1.10–1.30, ps < .001) and depressive symptoms (d = 1.01, p < .001). Higher therapist-perceived competence with TF-CBT predicted positive treatment responses for posttraumatic stress (ds = 0.38–0.39, ps = .03) and depression (d = 0.25), though only the former association was significant (ps = .03 vs. p = .15). Findings highlight the need to monitor and improve therapists’ competencies to enhance clinical outcomes for trauma-exposed youth and suggest that LCs may be an effective training/implementation model to help achieve those critical goals.
      Citation: Child Maltreatment
      PubDate: 2021-03-30T09:08:22Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10775595211003673
       
  • Parenting Mediates Associations Between Intimate Partner Violence at
           Different Life Stages and Toddler Social–Emotional Problems

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Jessica L. Riggs, Heather Janisse, Alissa Huth-Bocks
      Abstract: Child Maltreatment, Ahead of Print.
      Background:Researchers have linked parent experiences of intimate partner violence (IPV) to engagement in more negative and less positive parenting behaviors with their own children. This parenting behavior is associated with more negative child social-emotional outcomes. There is little research examining the impact of exposure to IPV during childhood on subsequent parenting and child outcomes in the next generation. This study aimed to better understand the complex relationship between IPV, parenting, and child social-emotional development among mothers of toddler-aged children, using both mothers’ self-reported and observed parenting.Method:This study utilized longitudinal data from an economically disadvantaged, racially diverse sample of 120 women who participated in data collection across the perinatal period, until children were 2 years of age. Measures included self-reported and observed parenting, mother-reported IPV history, and mother-report of toddler social-emotional difficulties.Results:Childhood exposure to IPV predicted observed parenting problems, which in turn predicted greater toddler social-emotional problems. Conversely, adult experiences of IPV predicted self-reported parenting difficulties, which predicted greater toddler social-emotional problems.Summary:Findings suggest that exposure to IPV at different time points may influence parenting in different ways, representing unique pathways between maternal IPV experiences and child social-emotional difficulties
      Citation: Child Maltreatment
      PubDate: 2021-03-30T09:05:36Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10775595211002638
       
  • Public Opinion About Adverse Childhood Experiences: Social Stigma,
           Attribution of Blame, and Government Intervention

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Jonathan Purtle, Katherine L. Nelson, Sarah E. Gollust
      Abstract: Child Maltreatment, Ahead of Print.
      Adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) are receiving increasing attention in academic, policy, and media discourses. However, no public opinion research has focused on ACEs. We conducted a nationally representative survey of U.S. adults to address this knowledge gap. A web-based survey was conducted using the Ipsos KnowledgePanel (N = 503, completion rate = 60.5%) in fall 2019. We found that inter-personal stigma and parental blame related to ACEs were prevalent, with 25.0% of respondents unwilling to have a person with “a lot of ACEs” as a close co-worker and 65.2% believing that parents were very much to blame for the consequences of ACEs. Fifty percent of respondents believed that government intervention to prevent ACEs was very important. After adjustment for demographic characteristics, inter-personal stigma toward people with ACEs and conservative ideology were significantly associated with lower perceived importance of government intervention to prevent ACEs. Black race, Hispanic ethnicity, and female gender were significantly associated with higher perceived importance of government intervention. These findings provide an empirical foundation to inform strategies to communicate ACE science to public and policymaker audiences.
      Citation: Child Maltreatment
      PubDate: 2021-03-26T03:33:39Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10775595211004783
       
  • Child Protective Services Guidelines for Substantiating Exposure to
           Domestic Violence as Maltreatment and Assigning Caregiver Responsibility:
           Policy Analysis and Recommendations

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Bryan G. Victor, Ashley N. Rousson, Colleen Henry, Haresh B. Dalvi, E. Susana Mariscal
      Abstract: Child Maltreatment, Ahead of Print.
      The purpose of this study was to examine the range of policy approaches used by child welfare systems in the United States to guide workers in classifying and substantiating child exposure to domestic violence (CEDV) as an actionable form of maltreatment. To that end, we conducted a qualitative document analysis of child protective services (CPS) policy manuals from all state-administered child welfare systems in the U.S. (N = 41). Our findings indicate that a majority of state-administered systems (71%) have adopted policy requiring workers to demonstrate that children have endured harm or the threat of harm before substantiating CEDV-related maltreatment. Many state systems (51%) also include policy directives that require workers to identify a primary aggressor during CPS investigations involving CEDV, while far fewer (37%) provide language that potentially exonerates survivors of domestic violence from being held accountable for failure to protect on the basis of their own victimization. Based on our findings and identification of policy exemplars, we offer a recommended set of quality policy indicators for states to consider in the formulation of their policy guidelines for substantiating children’s exposure to domestic violence that promotes the safety and wellbeing of both children and adult survivors of domestic violence.
      Citation: Child Maltreatment
      PubDate: 2021-03-24T09:12:57Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10775595211002639
       
  • Reasonable Efforts' Child Maltreatment Investigations and Service
           Referrals of Parents With Ascribed Cognitive Impairments in Canada

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Laura Pacheco, Marjorie Aunos, Maurice Feldman, David McConnell
      Abstract: Child Maltreatment, Ahead of Print.
      Parents with ascribed cognitive impairment (CI) are more likely than parents without CI to have their children removed by child protective services (CPS). Inequitable access to parenting and family supports and services is thought to be a contributing factor. Utilizing data on a 3-month sample of 15,980 child maltreatment investigations across Canada, including 1,244 cases featuring parents with CI, this study investigated service referrals and non-referrals. The results of this secondary data analysis suggest that, relative to need, parents with CI are less likely to be referred for matched services, including home based\reunification services post child removal. It is unclear whether disparate rates of referral are driven by a lack of inclusive services, and/or the conflation of parental CI with perceived parenting deficits. When perceived parenting deficits are attributed to parental CI, CPS may wrongly assume that these are irremediable. The findings highlight the need for building inter-sectoral service pathways in order to render appropriate assistance to parents with CI in the performance of their childrearing responsibilities.
      Citation: Child Maltreatment
      PubDate: 2021-03-17T09:23:16Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10775595211001109
       
  • Cascades of Risk Linking Intimate Partner Violence and Adverse Childhood
           Experiences to Less Sensitive Caregiving During Infancy

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Jesse L. Coe, Lindsay Huffhines, Doris Gonzalez, Ronald Seifer, Stephanie H. Parade
      Abstract: Child Maltreatment, Ahead of Print.
      This study evaluated if maternal intimate partner violence (IPV) had indirect effects on sensitive parenting in infancy through prenatal depressive symptoms and postpartum parenting stress and if maternal adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) moderated these indirect effects. We hypothesized that: (a) IPV would be associated with greater prenatal depressive symptoms, which would predict greater postpartum parenting stress, and ultimately less sensitive parenting and (b) the link between IPV and depressive symptoms would be strongest for mothers with high ACEs. Participants included 295 mothers and their infants who were assessed prenatally and at 12 months postpartum. Path analyses indicated that mothers with higher IPV endorsed greater prenatal depressive symptoms, which was in turn associated with postpartum parenting stress, and ultimately less sensitive parenting behavior. Moderation analyses revealed that these indirect effects varied as a function of maternal ACEs, with the link between IPV and depressive symptoms only present for mothers who reported high ACEs. Because less sensitive caregiving is often an early indicator of child maltreatment risk, understanding precursors to sensitivity is critical to increase precision in parenting interventions designed to reduce risk for maltreatment. Results may inform evidence-based preventive interventions for mothers and infants at high-risk for child abuse and neglect.
      Citation: Child Maltreatment
      PubDate: 2021-03-17T09:15:36Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10775595211000431
       
  • Examining Mothers’ Childhood Maltreatment History, Parental Reflective
           Functioning, and the Long-Term Effects of the Minding the Baby® Home
           Visiting Intervention

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Eileen M. Condon, Amalia Londono Tobon, Margaret L. Holland, Arietta Slade, Linda Mayes, Lois S. Sadler
      Abstract: Child Maltreatment, Ahead of Print.
      Research is needed to better understand how childhood maltreatment history affects parental reflective capacities, and whether early childhood interventions help mitigate these effects. We examined associations between childhood maltreatment and current parenting (parental reflective functioning, parenting behaviors) among mothers who participated in a follow-up study (N = 97) of the Minding the Baby® (MTB) randomized control trial. MTB is a home visiting program that aims to help mothers understand their child’s mental states (feelings, intentions, needs) by promoting parental reflective functioning. Mothers retrospectively reported childhood maltreatment using the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire. Endorsing a higher number of childhood maltreatment subtypes was associated with less supportive/engaged parenting and higher pre-mentalizing modes, or difficulty with appropriately reflecting on the child’s mental states. These relationships were not moderated by participation in the MTB intervention. However, exploratory analyses of individual maltreatment subtypes revealed that participation in MTB may mitigate the harmful effects of childhood emotional abuse on pre-mentalizing modes, specifically. Further research is needed to understand the mechanisms through which early childhood interventions may prevent intergenerational cycles of maltreatment.
      Citation: Child Maltreatment
      PubDate: 2021-03-08T09:15:21Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1077559521999097
       
  • Children With Intellectual Disability and Victimization: A Logistic
           Regression Analysis

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Katherine R. Brendli, Michael D. Broda, Ruth Brown
      Abstract: Child Maltreatment, Ahead of Print.
      It is a common assumption that children with disabilities are more likely to experience victimization than their peers without disabilities. However, there is a paucity of robust research supporting this assumption in the current literature. In response to this need, we conducted a logistic regression analysis using a national dataset of responses from 26,572 parents/caregivers to children with and without disabilities across all 50 states, plus the District of Columbia. The purpose of our study was to acquire a greater understanding of the odds of victimization among children with and without intellectual disability (ID), while controlling for several child and parent/adult demographic correlates. Most notably, our study revealed that children with ID have 2.84 times greater odds of experiencing victimization than children without disabilities, after adjusting for the other predictors in the model. Implications for future research and practice are discussed.
      Citation: Child Maltreatment
      PubDate: 2021-02-10T09:47:50Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1077559521994177
       
  • Do Independent Living Services Protect Youth Aging Out Foster Care From
           Adverse Outcomes' An Evaluation Using National Data

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Hui Huang, Yong Li, John McKinley Campbell
      Abstract: Child Maltreatment, Ahead of Print.
      Objective:Youth aging out foster care are at high risk of experiencing adverse outcomes. Federal funded programs have provided independent living services (ILSs) to these youth. This study evaluated the effectiveness of the continuity of ILSs at ages 17–19 in protecting youth aging out foster care from homelessness and incarceration at ages 19–21.Method:This study used data on 4,853 foster youth from the National Youth in Transition Database and the Adoption and Foster Care Analysis and Reporting System. Logistic regression was used to regress two binary outcomes on seven ILS variables and covariates.Results:The results suggest that remaining in foster care, continuous receipts of academic support, and financial assistance services at ages 17–19 protected foster youth from experiencing homelessness. Remaining in foster care and continuous receipt of financial assistance services at ages 17–19 protected foster youth from incarceration at ages 19–21. But, surprisingly, continuous receipt of housing education and home management training, and health education and risk prevention training at ages 17–19 were each associated with increased risk of homelessness at ages 19–21. The results also showed statistically significant effects of several covariates.Conclusion:Implications are provided based on the importance of financial assistance and academic support services.
      Citation: Child Maltreatment
      PubDate: 2021-02-10T09:41:50Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1077559521992119
       
  • Safely Increasing Connection to Community-Based Services: A Study of
           Multidisciplinary Team Decision Making for Child Welfare Referrals

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Jaclyn E. Chambers, Joseph N. Roscoe, Jill Duerr Berrick, Bridgette Lery, Doug Thompson
      Abstract: Child Maltreatment, Ahead of Print.
      Initial child welfare screening decisions, traditionally made by an individual worker, determine if a family will receive further intervention by child protective services. A multi-disciplinary team (MDT) decision-making approach for child welfare referrals aims to provide a more thorough assessment of needs and strengths and to connect families to appropriate community-based providers. This study examined 159 child welfare referrals handled by MDTs compared to 331 referrals handled via the traditional screening approach. The study used a pseudo randomization procedure to assign referrals to the study conditions: Referrals logged on 2.5 days of the week were assigned to the treatment group; all others were assigned to the comparison group. Referrals handled by an MDT were more than four times as likely as those not handled by an MDT to be referred to community-based organizations (OR = 4.32, p < .001). There were no statistically significant differences in families’ engagement with community-based organizations or child welfare outcomes. MDTs are a promising step in the initial process of connecting families to services, although they did not affect this study’s longer-term outcomes.
      Citation: Child Maltreatment
      PubDate: 2021-02-08T08:42:33Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1077559521992127
       
  • Prenatal Substance Exposure and Child Maltreatment: A Systematic Review

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Anna E. Austin, Caitlin Gest, Alexandra Atkeson, Molly C. Berkoff, Henry T. Puls, Meghan E. Shanahan
      Abstract: Child Maltreatment, Ahead of Print.
      State and federal policies regarding substance use in pregnancy, specifically whether a notification to child protective services is required, continue to evolve. To inform practice, policy, and future research, we sought to synthesize and critically evaluate the existing literature regarding the association of prenatal substance exposure with child maltreatment. We conducted a comprehensive electronic search of PubMed, Web of Science, PsycInfo, CHINAL, Social Work s, Sociological s, and Social Services s. We identified 30 studies that examined the association of exposure to any/multiple substances, cocaine, alcohol, opioids, marijuana, and amphetamine/methamphetamine with child maltreatment. Overall, results indicated that substance exposed infants have an increased likelihood of child protective services involvement, maternal self-reported risk of maltreatment behaviors, hospitalizations and clinic visits for suspected maltreatment, and adolescent retrospective self-report of maltreatment compared to unexposed infants. While study results suggest an association of prenatal substance exposure with child maltreatment, there are several methodological considerations that have implications for results and interpretation, including definitions of prenatal substance exposure and maltreatment, study populations used, and potential unmeasured confounding. As each may bias study results, careful interpretation and further research are warranted to appropriately inform programs and policy.
      Citation: Child Maltreatment
      PubDate: 2021-02-08T08:37:53Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1077559521990116
       
  • Childhood Maltreatment and Eating Disorders: A Prospective Investigation

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Anat Talmon, Cathy Spatz Widom
      Abstract: Child Maltreatment, Ahead of Print.
      Objectives:To determine whether childhood maltreatment is a risk factor for two eating disorders (anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa) using objective and subjective case definitions.Methods:Using a prospective cohorts design, children with documented cases of physical abuse, sexual abuse, and neglect (ages 0–11) from 1967 to 1971 in a Midwestern metropolitan county area were matched on age, race, sex, and approximate family socioeconomic status with non-maltreated children. Both groups were followed up. Retrospective self-reports about childhood maltreatment were collected at age 29. DSM-IV anorexia nervosa (AN) and bulimia nervosa (BN) disorders were assessed at age 41 (N = 807). Logistic and linear regression results are reported.Results:Using documented cases, childhood maltreatment was not a significant risk factor for AN or BN diagnoses or symptoms in adulthood. However, adults who retrospectively reported any maltreatment and physical and sexual abuse reported significantly more symptoms of AN than those who did not.Conclusions:The prediction that childhood maltreatment is a risk factor for anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa was partially supported in this longitudinal study. While misattribution of cases might have occurred, these results suggest that researchers and clinicians should use caution in drawing inferences about these relationships and designing interventions.
      Citation: Child Maltreatment
      PubDate: 2021-02-02T09:17:41Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1077559520988786
       
  • Integrating Animal-Assisted Therapy Into TF-CBT for Abused Youth With
           PTSD: A Randomized Controlled Feasibility Trial

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Brian Allen, Chad E. Shenk, Nancy E. Dreschel, Ming Wang, Ashley M. Bucher, Michelle P. Desir, Michelle J. Chen, Simonie R. Grabowski
      Abstract: Child Maltreatment, Ahead of Print.
      This clinical trial examined animal-assisted therapy (AAT) as an adjunct to Trauma-Focused Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy (TF-CBT) for abused youth with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Youth between the ages of 6 and 17 (M = 11.79, SD = 3.08) were randomized to receive standard TF-CBT or TF-CBT with adjunctive AAT (TF-CBT+AAT) employing retired service dogs. Feasibility metrics evaluating the addition of AAT were collected in addition to common clinical outcomes evaluated in TF-CBT trials. The inclusion of AAT increased the number of potential participants who declined participation and there were no noted benefits for treatment retention or satisfaction with services. Analyses showed that the inclusion of AAT did not enhance improvement of PTSD symptom severity (β = .90, t = .94, p = .351) or a number of other outcomes. On the contrary, there were indications from analyses and clinician feedback that AAT may have attenuated improvement in many cases. This study identified a number of important feasibility considerations in the design of studies testing AAT. However, the results examining clinical outcomes suggest that the inclusion of AAT with TF-CBT in the treatment of maltreated youth with PTSD is not warranted at this time.
      Citation: Child Maltreatment
      PubDate: 2021-01-27T09:29:45Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1077559520988790
       
  • Why Are Men More Likely to Endorse Myths About Child Sexual Abuse Than
           Women' Evidence From Disposition and Situation-Based Approaches

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Eunice Magalhães, João Graça, Carla Antunes, Célia Ferreira, Micaela Pinheiro
      Abstract: Child Maltreatment, Ahead of Print.
      Research on attitudes toward Child Sexual Abuse (CSA) consistently shows that men are more likely to endorse myths about CSA events, victims and perpetrators, compared to women. Here we present two studies that examine why these gender differences occur. Study one (N = 439) followed a dispositional approach to test the mediating role of empathy, social dominance orientation (SDO) and propensity for moral disengagement in the association between gender and the endorsement of CSA myths. Male participants showed higher levels of SDO and propensity for moral disengagement, and lower empathy, which in turn were associated with greater CSA myths acceptance. Study two (N = 360) followed a situational approach to test these processes using a specific case of CSA. Male participants showed higher levels of SDO and lower empathy, which in turn were associated with lower scores of perceived assault seriousness, victim credibility, perpetrator culpability, and greater victim culpability. Overall, the results suggest that men and women may appraise CSA differently, which can be partly explained by differences in SDO, propensity to morally disengage, and empathy. Furthermore, different cognitive mechanisms may be activated with regard to general appraisals of CSA compared to specific cases of CSA.
      Citation: Child Maltreatment
      PubDate: 2021-01-20T09:32:03Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1077559520988353
       
  • Association of State-Level Earned Income Tax Credits With Rates of
           Reported Child Maltreatment, 2004–2017

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Nicole L. Kovski, Heather D. Hill, Stephen J. Mooney, Frederick P. Rivara, Erin R. Morgan, Ali Rowhani-Rahbar
      Abstract: Child Maltreatment, Ahead of Print.
      Poverty is an important predictor of child maltreatment. Social policies that strengthen the economic security of low-income families, such as the Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC), may reduce child maltreatment by impeding the pathways through which poverty leads to it. We used variations in the presence and generosity of supplementary EITCs offered at the state level and administrative child maltreatment data from the National Child Abuse and Neglect Data System (NCANDS) to examine the effect of EITC policies on state-level rates of child maltreatment from 2004 through 2017. Two-way fixed effects models indicated that a 10-percentage point increase in the generosity of refundable state EITC benefits was associated with 241 fewer reports of neglect per 100,000 children (95% Confidence Interval [CI] [−449, −33]). An increase in EITC generosity was associated with fewer reports of neglect both among children ages 0–5 (−324 per 100,000; 95% CI [−582, −65]) and children ages 6–17 (−201 per 100,000; 95% CI [−387, −15]). Findings also suggested associations between the EITC and reductions in other types of maltreatment (physical abuse, emotional abuse); however, those did not gain statistical significance. Economic support policies may reduce the risk of child maltreatment, especially neglect, and improve child wellbeing.
      Citation: Child Maltreatment
      PubDate: 2021-01-19T04:06:40Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1077559520987302
       
  • Associations Between Emotion Dysregulation Dimensions and Parenting
           Behaviors in Trauma-Exposed African American Mothers

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Abigail Powers, Kallio Hunnicutt, Anais Stenson, Tanja Jovanovic, Nadine Kaslow, Bekh Bradley
      Abstract: Child Maltreatment, Ahead of Print.
      Parenting behavior is key to understanding transmission of intergenerational trauma-related risk. Emotion dysregulation (ED) and psychological symptoms are associated with negative parenting behaviors, although their unique roles remain unclear. The current study examined associations of ED dimensions, depression, PTSD, and substance use with parenting behaviors in African American mothers. Participants included 98 mother-child dyads recruited from an urban hospital setting. Trauma exposure, ED, depression, substance use, and parenting behaviors (overreactivity, laxness, demandingness, warmth, corporal punishment) were assessed using self-report measures. PTSD was assessed using a semi-structured interview. Correlational results showed significant positive associations between ED and dysfunctional parenting behavior (p < .001), overreactivity (p < .001), and laxness (p < .01) and negative associations with warmth (p < .01). These associations varied across the dimensions of ED examined. Regression analyses were run to examine the unique effects of ED (separate models for overall and specific dimensions) and psychological symptoms; overall ED and its dimensions accounted for significant variance in parental behaviors (R 2 = .10–.24, p’s < .01), while additional model steps including psychological symptoms were not significant except for the association between depression and lower warmth. In efforts to reduce the intergenerational effects of trauma, parenting interventions that include a direct focus on certain dimensions of ED may be critical.
      Citation: Child Maltreatment
      PubDate: 2021-01-19T04:05:38Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1077559520988352
       
  • Harsh Parenting and Child Brain Morphology: A Population-Based Study

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Andrea P. Cortes Hidalgo, Sandra Thijssen, Scott W. Delaney, Meike W. Vernooij, Pauline W. Jansen, Marian J. Bakermans-Kranenburg, Marinus H. van IJzendoorn, Tonya White, Henning Tiemeier
      Abstract: Child Maltreatment, Ahead of Print.
      Evidence suggests that maltreatment shapes the child’s brain. Little is known, however, about how normal variation in parenting influences the child neurodevelopment. We examined whether harsh parenting is associated with the brain morphology in 2,410 children from a population-based cohort. Mothers and fathers independently reported harsh parenting at child age 3 years. Structural and diffusion-weighted brain morphological measures were acquired with MRI scans at age 10 years. We explored whether associations between parenting and brain morphology were explained by co-occurring adversities, and whether there was a joint effect of both parents’ harsh parenting. Maternal harsh parenting was associated with smaller total gray (β = −0.05 (95%CI = −0.08; −0.01)), cerebral white matter and amygdala volumes (β = −0.04 (95%CI = −0.07; 0)). These associations were also observed with the combined harsh parenting measure and were robust to the adjustment for multiple confounding factors. Similar associations, although non-significant, were found between paternal parenting and these brain outcomes. Maternal and paternal harsh parenting were not associated with the hippocampus or the white matter microstructural metrics. We found a long-term association between harsh parenting and the global brain and amygdala volumes in preadolescents, suggesting that adverse rearing environments common in the general population are related to child brain morphology.
      Citation: Child Maltreatment
      PubDate: 2021-01-18T09:28:56Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1077559520986856
       
  • Spillover and Crossover Effects: Mothers’ and Fathers’ Intimate
           Partner Violence, Parent-Child Aggression Risk, and Child Behavior
           Problems

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Doris F. Pu, Christina M. Rodriguez
      Abstract: Child Maltreatment, Ahead of Print.
      The high co-occurrence of intimate partner violence (IPV) and physical child abuse suggests that studying these forms of aggression simultaneously, bidirectionally, and longitudinally is critical. Guided by family systems theory, this study examined parent-child aggression (PCA) risk, IPV victimization, and child behavior problems as reported by mothers and fathers when their child was 18 months and at 4 years old, to evaluate whether negative processes can transmit across family subsystems (i.e., spillover hypothesis) and/or across individuals (i.e., crossover hypothesis). Results indicated that mothers’ PCA risk predicted their subsequent IPV victimization and their reported child behavior problems (i.e., spillover effects) as well as fathers’ reported IPV victimization (i.e., crossover effect). Maternal reports of child behavior problems also predicted mothers’ reported IPV victimization and fathers’ reported child behavior problems, indicating child-driven effects. Overall, mothers rather than fathers appear more vulnerable to harmful spillover effects. Findings underscore the need for early prevention and intervention given the complex, transactional nature of family violence.
      Citation: Child Maltreatment
      PubDate: 2021-01-13T12:53:30Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1077559520985936
       
  • The Co-Occurrence of Child Maltreatment and Intimate Partner Violence in
           Families: Effects on Children’s Externalizing Behavior Problems

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Samantha M. Brown, Galena K. Rhoades, C. Nathan Marti, Terri Lewis
      Abstract: Child Maltreatment, Ahead of Print.
      Children exposed to maltreatment are at risk of experiencing intimate partner violence (IPV) and behavioral problems. This study examined different forms of family violence that co-occur and their relationship to children’s externalizing behaviors across developmental stages (early childhood, middle childhood, adolescence). Longitudinal data (N = 1,987) at baseline and 18 months and 36 months post-baseline from the NSCAW II were used. Mixture modeling was employed in which latent class models estimated subgroups of children who experienced co-occurring forms of family violence; regression models estimated which subgroups of children were at risk of externalizing behaviors. Three latent classes were identified across developmental stages: high family violence, low family violence, and child physical abuse and psychological aggression. For children in early childhood, a fourth class was identified: partner and child physical abuse and child psychological aggression. Results from regression models revealed differences in externalizing scores by class membership across developmental age groups and over time. That distinct classes of child maltreatment and IPV co-occur and differentially impact children’s behavior suggests a need for strong prevention and intervention responses to address children’s dual maltreatment and IPV exposure.
      Citation: Child Maltreatment
      PubDate: 2021-01-13T12:53:28Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1077559520985934
       
  • Experiences With COVID-19 Stressors and Parents’ Use of Neglectful,
           

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Christian M. Connell, Michael J. Strambler
      First page: 255
      Abstract: Child Maltreatment, Ahead of Print.
      Objectives:To estimate household exposure to COVID-19 related stress and the association with parent report of neglectful, harsh, and positive discipline practices.Methods:Cross sectional survey data was collected from 2,068 parents in the Northeastern US. Parents reported personal and household experiences of COVID-19 stressors, their level of distress, and use of neglectful parenting and discipline practices for a randomly selected child in their home. Analyses estimated rates of COVID-19 related stress and parenting practices. Logistic regression was used to assess the relation of COVID-19 stress to parenting behaviors.Results:Individual and household stressor level, as well as distress were each positively associated with likelihood of neglect. Personal exposure to stressors was minimally related to discipline, but household stressor level and parents’ distress were positively associated with harsh and positive discipline.Discussion:Indicators of COVID-19 stress (e.g., exposure to stressors and distress) each uniquely predicted parents’ use of neglect, particularly physical and family-based sub-types, and use of harsh and positive discipline practices. Results suggest that parents may require additional support to provide appropriate care for their children while coping with the increased rates of stress associated with the pandemic and the resulting public health response.
      Citation: Child Maltreatment
      PubDate: 2021-03-31T09:08:27Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10775595211006465
       
  • On Racial Disparities in Child Abuse Reports: Exploratory Mapping the 2018
           NCANDS

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Amanda Luken, Reshmi Nair, Rebecca L. Fix
      First page: 267
      Abstract: Child Maltreatment, Ahead of Print.
      Research suggests children from non-White and Hispanic/Latinx communities are at higher risk for child maltreatment. This study identified in which states children from specific non-White communities were overrepresented in child protective services reports for child physical, sexual, and emotional/psychological abuse through exploratory mapping. Reports on child maltreatment originated from the 2018 National Child Abuse and Neglect Data System and state-level population estimates from the U.S. Census Bureau. Racial disparities were identified in states with unequal proportions of reported child maltreatment among a non-White child population compared to the proportion among the White child population. We found disparities for children from non-White communities in many states, especially for Black communities (Disparity Ratio [DR]: 15.10 for child physical abuse, DR: 12.77 for child sexual abuse in Washington DC, and DR: 5.25 for child emotional/psychological abuse in California). The ability to identify high disparities among Pacific Islanders highlights one of the study’s strengths, given we separately examined Asian Americans, Pacific Islanders and multiracial communities. Results from our exploratory mapping provide insight into how preventive resources might be differentially allocated to non-White communities with higher child protective services reporting compared with White communities, and manifest states with multiple non-White communities overrepresented across maltreatment types.
      Citation: Child Maltreatment
      PubDate: 2021-03-17T09:21:16Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10775595211001926
       
 
JournalTOCs
School of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
Heriot-Watt University
Edinburgh, EH14 4AS, UK
Email: journaltocs@hw.ac.uk
Tel: +00 44 (0)131 4513762
 


Your IP address: 3.237.16.210
 
Home (Search)
API
About JournalTOCs
News (blog, publications)
JournalTOCs on Twitter   JournalTOCs on Facebook

JournalTOCs © 2009-