Publisher: Sage Publications   (Total: 1166 journals)

 A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I  J  K  L  M  N  O  P  Q  R  S  T  U  V  W  X  Y  Z  

        1 2 3 4 5 6 | Last   [Sort by number of followers]   [Restore default list]

Showing 1 - 200 of 1166 Journals sorted alphabetically
AADE in Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Abstracts in Anthropology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 29)
Academic Pathology     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Accounting History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18, SJR: 0.527, CiteScore: 1)
Acta Radiologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.754, CiteScore: 2)
Acta Radiologica Open     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Acta Sociologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39, SJR: 0.939, CiteScore: 2)
Action Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 53, SJR: 0.308, CiteScore: 1)
Active Learning in Higher Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 396, SJR: 1.397, CiteScore: 2)
Adaptive Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.288, CiteScore: 1)
Administration & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18, SJR: 0.675, CiteScore: 1)
Adoption & Fostering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25, SJR: 0.313, CiteScore: 0)
Adsorption Science & Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.258, CiteScore: 1)
Adult Education Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 260, SJR: 0.566, CiteScore: 2)
Adult Learning     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 51)
Advances in Dental Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 1.791, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Developing Human Resources     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35, SJR: 0.614, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Mechanical Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 156, SJR: 0.272, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Methods and Practices in Psychological Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20)
Advances in Structural Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 51, SJR: 0.599, CiteScore: 1)
AERA Open     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
Affilia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.496, CiteScore: 1)
Africa Spectrum     Open Access   (Followers: 17)
Agrarian South : J. of Political Economy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Air, Soil & Water Research     Open Access   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.214, CiteScore: 1)
Alexandria : The J. of National and Intl. Library and Information Issues     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 68)
Allergy & Rhinology     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
AlterNative : An Intl. J. of Indigenous Peoples     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 39, SJR: 0.194, CiteScore: 0)
Alternative Law J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.176, CiteScore: 0)
Alternatives : Global, Local, Political     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.351, CiteScore: 1)
Alternatives to Laboratory Animals     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.297, CiteScore: 1)
American Behavioral Scientist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26, SJR: 0.982, CiteScore: 2)
American Economist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
American Educational Research J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 260, SJR: 2.913, CiteScore: 3)
American J. of Alzheimer's Disease and Other Dementias     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23, SJR: 0.67, CiteScore: 2)
American J. of Cosmetic Surgery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
American J. of Evaluation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18, SJR: 0.646, CiteScore: 2)
American J. of Health Promotion     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35, SJR: 0.807, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Hospice and Palliative Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 47, SJR: 0.65, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Law & Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.204, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Lifestyle Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.431, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Medical Quality     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.777, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Men's Health     Open Access   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.595, CiteScore: 2)
American J. of Rhinology and Allergy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.972, CiteScore: 2)
American J. of Sports Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 248, SJR: 3.949, CiteScore: 6)
American Politics Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 36, SJR: 1.313, CiteScore: 1)
American Review of Public Administration     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28, SJR: 2.062, CiteScore: 2)
American Sociological Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 357, SJR: 6.333, CiteScore: 6)
American String Teacher     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Analytical Chemistry Insights     Open Access   (Followers: 26, SJR: 0.224, CiteScore: 1)
Angiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.849, CiteScore: 2)
Animation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.197, CiteScore: 0)
Annals of Clinical Biochemistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.634, CiteScore: 1)
Annals of Otology, Rhinology & Laryngology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20, SJR: 0.807, CiteScore: 1)
Annals of Pharmacotherapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 59, SJR: 1.096, CiteScore: 2)
Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 51, SJR: 1.225, CiteScore: 3)
Annals of the ICRP     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.548, CiteScore: 1)
Anthropocene Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 3.341, CiteScore: 7)
Anthropological Theory     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 48, SJR: 0.739, CiteScore: 1)
Antitrust Bulletin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Antiviral Chemistry and Chemotherapy     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.635, CiteScore: 2)
Antyajaa : Indian J. of Women and Social Change     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Applied Biosafety     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.131, CiteScore: 0)
Applied Psychological Measurement     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21, SJR: 1.17, CiteScore: 1)
Applied Spectroscopy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 27, SJR: 0.489, CiteScore: 2)
Armed Forces & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25, SJR: 0.29, CiteScore: 1)
Arthaniti : J. of Economic Theory and Practice     Full-text available via subscription  
Arts and Humanities in Higher Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 49, SJR: 0.305, CiteScore: 1)
Asia Pacific Media Educator     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.23, CiteScore: 0)
Asia-Pacific J. of Management Research and Innovation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Asia-Pacific J. of Public Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.558, CiteScore: 1)
Asia-Pacific J. of Rural Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Asian and Pacific Migration J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.324, CiteScore: 1)
Asian Cardiovascular and Thoracic Annals     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.305, CiteScore: 0)
Asian J. of Comparative Politics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Asian J. of Legal Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Asian J. of Management Cases     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.101, CiteScore: 0)
ASN Neuro     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 1.534, CiteScore: 3)
Assessment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19, SJR: 1.519, CiteScore: 3)
Assessment for Effective Intervention     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.578, CiteScore: 1)
Australasian J. of Early Childhood     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.535, CiteScore: 1)
Australasian Psychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18, SJR: 0.433, CiteScore: 1)
Australian & New Zealand J. of Psychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30, SJR: 1.801, CiteScore: 2)
Australian and New Zealand J. of Criminology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 545, SJR: 0.612, CiteScore: 1)
Australian J. of Career Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Australian J. of Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 51, SJR: 0.403, CiteScore: 1)
Australian J. of Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.497, CiteScore: 1)
Autism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 356, SJR: 1.739, CiteScore: 4)
Autism & Developmental Language Impairments     Open Access   (Followers: 17)
Avian Biology Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.401, CiteScore: 1)
Behavior Modification     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.877, CiteScore: 2)
Behavioral and Cognitive Neuroscience Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Behavioral Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Beyond Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Bible Translator     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Biblical Theology Bulletin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24, SJR: 0.184, CiteScore: 0)
Big Data & Society     Open Access   (Followers: 55)
Biochemistry Insights     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Bioinformatics and Biology Insights     Open Access   (Followers: 12, SJR: 1.141, CiteScore: 2)
Biological Research for Nursing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.685, CiteScore: 2)
Biomarker Insights     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.81, CiteScore: 2)
Biomarkers in Cancer     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Biomedical Engineering and Computational Biology     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
Biomedical Informatics Insights     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Bioscope: South Asian Screen Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.235, CiteScore: 0)
BMS: Bulletin of Sociological Methodology/Bulletin de Méthodologie Sociologique     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.226, CiteScore: 0)
Body & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29, SJR: 1.531, CiteScore: 3)
Bone and Tissue Regeneration Insights     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Brain and Neuroscience Advances     Open Access  
Brain Science Advances     Open Access  
Breast Cancer : Basic and Clinical Research     Open Access   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.823, CiteScore: 2)
British J. of Music Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
British J. of Occupational Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 253, SJR: 0.323, CiteScore: 1)
British J. of Pain     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31, SJR: 0.579, CiteScore: 2)
British J. of Politics and Intl. Relations     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39, SJR: 0.91, CiteScore: 2)
British J. of Visual Impairment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.337, CiteScore: 1)
British J.ism Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
BRQ Business Review Quarterly     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Building Acoustics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.215, CiteScore: 1)
Building Services Engineering Research & Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.583, CiteScore: 1)
Bulletin of Science, Technology & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Business & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Business and Professional Communication Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.348, CiteScore: 1)
Business Information Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17, SJR: 0.279, CiteScore: 0)
Business Perspectives and Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Cahiers Élisabéthains     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.111, CiteScore: 0)
Calcutta Statistical Association Bulletin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
California Management Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 37, SJR: 2.209, CiteScore: 4)
Canadian Association of Radiologists J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.463, CiteScore: 1)
Canadian J. of Kidney Health and Disease     Open Access   (Followers: 8, SJR: 1.007, CiteScore: 2)
Canadian J. of Nursing Research (CJNR)     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Canadian J. of Occupational Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 167, SJR: 0.626, CiteScore: 1)
Canadian J. of Psychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28, SJR: 1.769, CiteScore: 3)
Canadian J. of School Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.266, CiteScore: 1)
Canadian Pharmacists J. / Revue des Pharmaciens du Canada     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.536, CiteScore: 1)
Cancer Control     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Cancer Growth and Metastasis     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Cancer Informatics     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.64, CiteScore: 1)
Capital and Class     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.282, CiteScore: 1)
Cardiac Cath Lab Director     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Cardiovascular and Thoracic Open     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Career Development and Transition for Exceptional Individuals     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.44, CiteScore: 1)
Cartilage     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.889, CiteScore: 3)
Cell Transplantation     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 1.023, CiteScore: 3)
Cephalalgia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 1.581, CiteScore: 3)
Cephalalgia Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Child Language Teaching and Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34, SJR: 0.501, CiteScore: 1)
Child Maltreatment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 1.22, CiteScore: 3)
Child Neurology Open     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Childhood     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19, SJR: 0.894, CiteScore: 2)
Childhood Obesity and Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
China Information     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.767, CiteScore: 2)
China Report     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.221, CiteScore: 0)
Chinese J. of Sociology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Christian Education J. : Research on Educational Ministry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Chronic Illness     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.672, CiteScore: 2)
Chronic Respiratory Disease     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.808, CiteScore: 2)
Chronic Stress     Open Access  
Citizenship, Social and Economics Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.145, CiteScore: 0)
Cleft Palate-Craniofacial J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.757, CiteScore: 1)
Clin-Alert     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Clinical and Applied Thrombosis/Hemostasis     Open Access   (Followers: 32, SJR: 0.49, CiteScore: 1)
Clinical and Translational Neuroscience     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Clinical Case Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.364, CiteScore: 1)
Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 45, SJR: 0.73, CiteScore: 2)
Clinical EEG and Neuroscience     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.552, CiteScore: 2)
Clinical Ethics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.296, CiteScore: 1)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Arthritis and Musculoskeletal Disorders     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.537, CiteScore: 2)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Blood Disorders     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.314, CiteScore: 2)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Cardiology     Open Access   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.686, CiteScore: 2)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Case Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.283, CiteScore: 1)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Circulatory, Respiratory and Pulmonary Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.425, CiteScore: 2)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Ear, Nose and Throat     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Endocrinology and Diabetes     Open Access   (Followers: 33, SJR: 0.63, CiteScore: 2)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Oncology     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 1.129, CiteScore: 3)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Pediatrics     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Psychiatry     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Reproductive Health     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.776, CiteScore: 0)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Therapeutics     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.172, CiteScore: 0)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Trauma and Intensive Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Women's Health     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Clinical Nursing Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34, SJR: 0.471, CiteScore: 1)
Clinical Pathology     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Clinical Pediatrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25, SJR: 0.487, CiteScore: 1)
Clinical Psychological Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16, SJR: 3.281, CiteScore: 5)
Clinical Rehabilitation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 78, SJR: 1.322, CiteScore: 3)
Clinical Risk     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.133, CiteScore: 0)
Clinical Trials     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22, SJR: 2.399, CiteScore: 2)
Clothing and Textiles Research J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28, SJR: 0.36, CiteScore: 1)
Collections : A J. for Museum and Archives Professionals     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Common Law World Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Communication & Sport     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.385, CiteScore: 1)
Communication and the Public     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Communication Disorders Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.458, CiteScore: 1)
Communication Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24, SJR: 2.171, CiteScore: 3)
Community College Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 1.451, CiteScore: 1)
Comparative Political Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 292, SJR: 3.772, CiteScore: 3)
Compensation & Benefits Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Competition & Change     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.843, CiteScore: 2)

        1 2 3 4 5 6 | Last   [Sort by number of followers]   [Restore default list]

Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Cartilage
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.889
Citation Impact (citeScore): 3
Number of Followers: 6  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1947-6035 - ISSN (Online) 1947-6043
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1166 journals]
  • 2020 Reviewer Thank You

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Pages: 263 - 265
      Abstract: CARTILAGE, Volume 12, Issue 2, Page 263-265, April 2021.

      Citation: CARTILAGE
      PubDate: 2021-03-16T06:59:09Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1947603521993248
      Issue No: Vol. 12, No. 2 (2021)
       
  • Treatment of Patellofemoral Chondral Lesions Using Microfractures
           Associated with a Chitosan Scaffold: Mid-Term Clinical and Radiological
           Results

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Rafael Calvo, David Figueroa, Francisco Figueroa, Jose Bravo, Martin Contreras, Nicolas Zilleruelo
      Abstract: CARTILAGE, Ahead of Print.
      ObjectiveTo assess the clinical and radiological results of patellofemoral osteochondral lesions treated with microfractures associated with a chitosan scaffold.DesignA retrospective observational analytical study was performed. Fifteen patients with full-thickness patellofemoral osteochondral lesions were included. Quantity and quality of the reparation cartilage was assessed with the MOCART 2.0 score on a postoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and clinical outcomes were evaluated with pre- and postoperative Kujala score tests. Shapiro-Wilk test for normality was applied as well as Wilcoxon’s signed rank test and Kruskal-Wallis H test for clinical scores within subjects and patella versus trochlea subgroups comparisons. Analysis of variance test was used for imaging subgroups comparison, with P < 0.05 defined as statistical significance.ResultsMean follow-up was 33.36 months (range 24-60 months). Postoperative Kujala scores improved an average of 19 points compared with the preoperative state (SE = 17.6; P < 0.001). No statistical difference was found through the clinical location assessment (P = 0.756), as well as the cartilage imaging assessment (P = 0.756). The mean MOCART 2.0 scale was 67.67 (range 50-85).ConclusionsTreating full-thickness patellofemoral osteochondral lesions with microfractures associated with a chitosan scaffold proved to be effective regarding defect filling and symptomatic improvement.
      Citation: CARTILAGE
      PubDate: 2021-04-28T05:32:30Z
      DOI: 10.1177/19476035211011506
       
  • Medial Opening Wedge Proximal Tibial Osteotomy: Lessons Learned from a
           Series of 175 Consecutive Cases

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Vincent Corbeil, Paul-André Synnott, Fidaa Al-Shakfa, Frédéric Lavoie
      Abstract: CARTILAGE, Ahead of Print.
      IntroductionHigh tibial osteotomy (HTO) is a surgical procedure aimed at inhibiting the progression of osteoarthritis of the knee joint. The aim of this study was to identify factors influencing the functional outcome after opening wedge valgus HTO.MethodsA total of 175 cases (155 patients) of varus-correcting high tibial open-wedge osteotomies using the Tomofix plate were reviewed retrospectively. Patients answered the Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) questionnaire and 4 survey follow-up questions.Results and DiscussionA total of 76 of the 155 patients studied (84 of the 175 knees) completed the KOOS questionnaire, on average 3.1 years (SD 1.8 years) after the surgery. The median scores (with median absolute deviations [MAD]) for the KOOS pain, symptoms, daily activities, sports, and quality of life sections were, respectively, 76.4 (MAD 12.5), 75.0 (MAD 14.3), 85.3 (MAD 11.8), 50.0 (MAD 25.0), and 59.4 (MAD 21.9). No cases of nonunion were observed throughout the length of the study. Identified predictors of worse outcomes were higher weight and body mass index, limited knee flexion, genu varum and tibial varus of small magnitude, active smoking status at the time of surgery, further surgery for plate removal, and some grades of chondropathy in the patellofemoral, medial tibial, and femoral compartments. Patient gender, joint obliquity and over- or undercorrection were not associated with any of the outcomes.ConclusionThis study shows good results following valgus HTO that are comparable to outcomes following total knee arthroplasty, reinforcing the option of HTO as a valid alternative for total knee arthroplasty.
      Citation: CARTILAGE
      PubDate: 2021-04-28T05:30:10Z
      DOI: 10.1177/19476035211011503
       
  • Tissue Engineering of Cartilage Using Collagen Scaffold Enriched with
           Plant Polysaccharides

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: K. Uday Chandrika, Sapna Kacha, Anuja S. Nair, Vijayishwer S. Jamwal, Shruti Sandilya, Shashi Singh
      Abstract: CARTILAGE, Ahead of Print.
      Degenerative diseases associated with articular cartilage pose a huge burden on health care economics. The nature of the tissue involved and the changes therein do not allow self-healing; and most of these problems are progressive. Tissue engineering offers some solutions provided we focus on the right kind of cells and the appropriate surrounding niches created for a particular tissue. The present study deals with the formation of polysaccharide rich stable scaffold of collagen after cross-linking with oxidized gum arabic. The scaffold was tested for its biocompatibility and ability to support cells. The in vitro cytotoxicity of the scaffolds toward induced pluripotent stem cells and chondrocytes was evaluated. Evaluation of expression of lineage specific markers indicates differentiation of induced pluripotent stem cells to chondrogenic lineage and maintenance of chondrocytes per se when grown in the scaffold. Animal studies were carried out to study the efficacy of the scaffold to repair the knee injuries. Cells along with the scaffold appeared to be the best filling, in repair of injured cartilage. These studies show that these scaffolds are potential candidates in applications such as tissue engineering of cartilage.
      Citation: CARTILAGE
      PubDate: 2021-04-28T05:25:52Z
      DOI: 10.1177/19476035211007899
       
  • A Hyperosmolar Saline Solution Fortified with Anti-Inflammatory Components
           Mitigates Articular Cartilage Pro-Inflammatory and Degradative Responses
           in an In Vitro Model of Knee Arthroscopy

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Lasun O. Oladeji, Aaron M. Stoker, James P. Stannard, James L. Cook
      Abstract: CARTILAGE, Ahead of Print.
      ObjectiveTo evaluate differences in pro-inflammatory and degradative mediator production from osteoarthritic knee articular cartilage explants treated with a hyperosmolar saline solution supplemented with anti-inflammatory components (l-glutamine, ascorbic acid, sodium pyruvate, epigallocatechin gallate [EGCG], and dexamethasone) or normal saline using an in vitro model for knee arthroscopy.DesignFull-thickness 6 mm articular cartilage explants (n = 12/patient) were created from femoral condyle and tibial plateau samples collected from patients who received knee arthroplasty. One explant half was treated for 3 hours with hyperosmolar saline (600 mOsm/L) supplemented with anti-inflammatory components and the corresponding half with normal saline (308 mOsm/L). Explants were cultured for 3 days and then collected for biomarker analyses. Media biomarker concentrations were normalized to the wet weight of the tissue (mg) and were analyzed by a paired t test with significance set at P < 0.05.ResultsCartilage was collected from 9 females and 2 males (mean age = 68 years). Concentrations of MCP-1 (P < 0.001), IL-8 (P = 0.03), GRO-α (P = 0.02), MMP-1 (P < 0.001), MMP-2 (P < 0.001), and MMP-3 (P < 0.001) were significantly lower in explant halves treated with the enhanced hyperosmolar solution. When considering only those cartilage explants in the top tercile of tissue metabolism, IL-6 (P = 0.005), IL-8 (P = 0.0001), MCP-1 (P < 0.001), GRO-α (P = 0.0003), MMP-1 (P < 0.001), MMP-2 (P < 0.001), MMP-3 (P < 0.001), and GAG expression (P = 0.0001) was significantly lower in cartilage explant halves treated with the enhanced hyperosmolar solution.ConclusionsTreatment of cartilage explants with a hyperosmolar saline arthroscopic irrigation solution supplemented with anti-inflammatory components was associated with significant decreases in inflammatory and degradative mediator production and mitigation of proteoglycan loss.
      Citation: CARTILAGE
      PubDate: 2021-04-26T09:20:57Z
      DOI: 10.1177/19476035211011521
       
  • Juvenile Osteochondritis Dissecans of the Knee Joint: Midterm Clinical and
           MRI Outcomes of Arthroscopic Retrograde Drilling and Internal Fixation
           with Bioabsorbable Pins

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Georgios Komnos, Michael Iosifidis, Fotios Papageorgiou, Ioannes Melas, Dimitrios Metaxiotis, Michael Hantes
      Abstract: CARTILAGE, Ahead of Print.
      ObjectiveThis study aimed to assess the clinical and radiographic outcomes of juvenile patients who suffered from stage II or III osteochondritis dissecans (OCD) of the knee and underwent arthroscopic retrograde drilling and internal fixation with bioabsorbable pins.DesignMedical and radiological records from patients aged 11 to 16 years, who underwent arthroscopic treatment for OCD lesions of the knee in 2 tertiary hospitals, were retrospectively reviewed. The procedure was indicated by persistent pain and by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). All patients underwent retrograde drilling and arthroscopic fixation of the lesion with bioabsorbable pins. MRI was conducted at least 1 year postoperative in all patients to evaluate healing. Functional outcomes were evaluated through the Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) for pain, Lysholm, and IKDC (International Knee Documentation Committee) scores.ResultsA total of 40 patients, with an average age of 13.1 years (range = 11-16 years) and an average follow-up of 6.6 years (range = 3-13 years) were reviewed. MRI findings confirmed the healing of the lesion in 36 out of the 40 (90%) patients. In particular, the healing rate was 95% (20/21) and 84% (16/19) for stage II and stage III, respectively. Lysholm, IKDC, and VAS scores revealed a statistically significant improvement (P < 0.05) at final follow-up in comparison to preoperative status. No infection, knee stiffness, or other complication was recorded.ConclusionsRetrograde drilling combined with internal fixation with bioabsorbable pins, of stages II and III OCD lesions of the knee provides good to excellent outcomes to juvenile patients, with a high healing rate.
      Citation: CARTILAGE
      PubDate: 2021-04-24T09:31:50Z
      DOI: 10.1177/19476035211003325
       
  • Association of Serum Vitamin D with Serum Cytokine Profile in Patients
           with Knee Osteoarthritis

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Azade Amini Kadijani, Abolfazl Bagherifard, Fatemeh Mohammadi, Abolfazl Akbari, Farshad Zandrahimi, Alireza Mirzaei
      Abstract: CARTILAGE, Ahead of Print.
      ObjectiveThe role of vitamin D in the pathogenesis of osteoarthritis (OA) is not well understood. In this study, we aimed to investigate the association of serum vitamin D with the serum cytokine profile in patients with primary knee OA.DesignIn a cross-sectional study, 116 patients with radiologic diagnosis of grade I to III knee OA were included. The study population included 79 (75.9%) females and 25 (24.1%) males with a mean age of 55.1 ± 9.6 years. The serum concentration of IL-6, IL-8, TNF-α, IL-4, IL-10, IL-13, and vitamin D were assessed using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) was used for the assessment of patient’s reported disability associated with knee OA.ResultsSerum vitamin D status was deficient, insufficient, and sufficient in 18 (15.5%), 63 (54.3%), 35 (30.2%) patients, respectively. Higher levels of serum IL-6 were observed in patients with vitamin D deficiency (P = 0.022). The mean serum vitamin D level was not associated with OA grade (P = 0.88) and WOMAC scores of the patients (P = 0.67). Serum IL-6 level was significantly associated with both OA grade and WOMAC scores of the patients (P < 0.001 and P = 0.001, respectively). The vitamin D status was not significantly associated with the serum levels of other evaluated cytokines.ConclusionVitamin D deficiency in knee OA seems to be associated with a higher release of IL-6. Therefore, vitamin D supplementation could reduce the disease burden by controlling the IL-6 release.
      Citation: CARTILAGE
      PubDate: 2021-04-23T11:37:23Z
      DOI: 10.1177/19476035211010309
       
  • The Relationships between Coronal Plane Alignments and Patient-Reported
           Outcomes Following High Tibial Osteotomy: A Systematic Review

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Gwenllian Tawy, Hamza Shahbaz, Michael McNicholas, Leela Biant
      Abstract: CARTILAGE, Ahead of Print.
      ObjectiveThis systematic review aimed to determine whether coronal angular corrections correlate with patient reported outcomes following valgus-producing high tibial osteotomy (HTO).DesignOvid MEDLINE, Embase, and Web of Science were systematically searched. Studies that reported hip-knee-ankle angles (HKA) or femorotibial angles (FTA), and the Oxford Knee Score (OKS), visual analogue scale (VAS) score, Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS), or EQ-5D before and after valgus-producing HTO were eligible. Correlation analyses were performed where appropriate to investigate the relationships between variables. PROSPERO ID: CRD42019135467.ResultsThis study included 39 articles including 50 cohorts. VAS was reported in 22 studies, OKS in 9, KOOS in 12 and EQ-5D in 2. The HKA angle was corrected from 7.1° ± 1.7° varus to 2.3° ± 1.7° valgus at final follow-up. The FTA changed from 3.0° ± 2.0° varus to 7.7° ± 1.3° valgus. Outcome scores improved with clinical and statistical significance postoperatively. Spearman correlations for nonparametric data revealed greater changes in knee alignment were moderately associated with larger improvements in VAS scores (r = 0.50). Furthermore, those who experienced greater changes in alignment showed larger improvements in the KOOS Activity and Quality of Life domains (r = 0.72 and r = 0.51, respectively).ConclusionOn average, patients did not achieve the “ideal correction” of 3° to 6° valgus postoperatively. Nevertheless, statistical and clinical improvements in patient-reported outcome measure scores were consistently reported. This suggests that the “ideal correction” may be more flexible than 3° to 6°.
      Citation: CARTILAGE
      PubDate: 2021-04-22T09:11:26Z
      DOI: 10.1177/19476035211007903
       
  • High-Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol and Apolipoprotein A1 in Synovial
           Fluid: Potential Predictors of Disease Severity of Primary Knee
           Osteoarthritis

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Kaibin Zhang, Yisheng Ji, Hanhao Dai, Abdul Aleem Khan, Yang Zhou, Ran Chen, Yiqiu Jiang, Jianchao Gui
      Abstract: CARTILAGE, Ahead of Print.
      ObjectivesThe aim of this study was to detect levels of common lipid species in serum and synovial fluid (SF) of primary knee osteoarthritis (OA) patients and investigate their correlations with disease severity.Materials and MethodsThe study enrolled 184 OA patients receiving arthroscopic debridement or total knee arthroplasty and 180 healthy controls between April 2012 and March 2018. Total triglycerides (TG), total cholesterol (TC), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), apolipoprotein A1 (ApoA1), and apolipoprotein B (ApoB) levels were analyzed in serum and SF of OA patients, and in serum of healthy individuals. The Noyes rating criteria, Kellgren-Lawrence (KL) grading system, and Western Ontario McMaster University Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) scores were, respectively, used to assess cartilage damage, radiographic severity, and symptomatic severity of OA.ResultsNo significant differences were found in serum TG and ApoB levels between the 2 groups, while OA patients had higher TC and LDL-C levels and lower HDL-C and ApoA1 levels (P < 0.05). Pearson correlation analysis revealed SF HDL-C and ApoA1 levels were negatively correlated with cartilage damage scores, KL grades as well as WOMAC scores (P < 0.05), which were still significant after adjusting for confounding factors (P < 0.05). Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis revealed SF HDL-C (area under the curve [AUC]: 0.816) and ApoA1 (AUC: 0.793) were also good predictors of advanced-stage OA (P < 0.001).ConclusionSF HDL-C and ApoA1 levels were negatively correlated with cartilage damage, radiographic severity, and symptomatic severity of primary knee OA, emerging as potential biomarkers for radiographic advanced-stage OA, which may serve as predictors of disease severity.
      Citation: CARTILAGE
      PubDate: 2021-04-17T09:04:11Z
      DOI: 10.1177/19476035211007919
       
  • Effects of Exercise Training Alone and in Combination With Kinesio Taping
           on Pain, Functionality, and Biomarkers Related to the Cartilage Metabolism
           in Knee Osteoarthritis

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Ramazan Oğuz, Muaz Belviranlı, Nilsel Okudan
      Abstract: CARTILAGE, Ahead of Print.
      ObjectiveTo investigate the effects of exercise training alone and in combination with kinesio taping on pain, functionality, and circulating cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP), and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-1, and -3 at rest and immediately after walking exercise in knee osteoarthritis (OA).DesignA total of 22 female patients diagnosed with knee OA were randomly divided into the exercise training (ET) or exercise training plus kinesio taping (ET + KT) groups. The patients in the ET performed exercise training for 6 weeks. The patients in the ET + KT group were applied with kinesio tape in addition to the exercise training for 6 weeks. In both groups, 20 minutes of walking exercise were performed before and after the interventions. The pain and functional status of the patients were assessed using visual analogue scale (VAS) and Western Ontario McMasters Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) before and after the intervention at rest, respectively. Blood samples were taken at rest and immediately after the walking exercise before and after the interventions for the analysis of COMP, MMP-1, and MMP-3 levels.ResultsIn both groups, pain and functionality scores were significantly improved after the interventions (P < 0.05). COMP, MMP-1 and MMP-3 levels were higher immediately after walking exercise when compared with rest in both groups before and after the intervention (P < 0.05).ConclusionsExercise training and exercise training plus kinesio taping improved pain and physical function; however, the COMP, MMP-1, and MMP-3 levels did not change.
      Citation: CARTILAGE
      PubDate: 2021-04-17T09:02:32Z
      DOI: 10.1177/19476035211007895
       
  • Scaffold-Free Engineering of Human Cartilage Implants

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Nadine Frerker, Tommy A. Karlsen, Magnus Borstad Lilledahl, Sverre-Henning Brorson, John E. Tibballs, Jan E. Brinchmann
      Abstract: CARTILAGE, Ahead of Print.
      ObjectiveDespite new strategies in tissue engineering, cartilage repair remains a major challenge. Our aim is to treat patients with focal lesions of articular cartilage with autologous hyaline cartilage implants using a scaffold-free approach. In this article, we describe experiments to optimize production of scaffold-free cartilage discs.DesignArticular chondrocytes were expanded in vitro, seeded in transwell inserts and redifferentiated using established chondrogenic components. Experimental variables included testing 2 different expansion media, adding bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP2), insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1), growth/differentiation factor 5 (GDF5), or fibroblast growth factor 18 (FGF18) to the differentiation medium and allowing the disc to float freely in large wells. Cartilage discs were analyzed by weight and thickness, real-time RT-qPCR (reverse transcriptase qualitative polymerase chain reaction), fluorescence immunostaining, transmission electron microscopy, second harmonic generation imaging, and measurement of Young’s modulus.ResultsAddition of BMP2 to the chondrogenic differentiation medium (CDM) was essential for stable disc formation, while IGF1, GDF5, and FGF18 were redundant. Allowing discs to float freely in CDM on a moving platform increased disc thickness compared with discs kept continuously in transwell inserts. Discs cultured for 6 weeks reached a thickness of almost 2 mm and Young’s modulus of >200 kPa. There was abundant type II collagen. Collagen fibrils were 25 nm thick, with a tendency to be organized perpendicular to the disc surface.ConclusionScaffold-free engineering using BMP2 and providing free movement in CDM produced firm, elastic cartilage discs with abundant type II collagen. This approach may potentially be used in clinical trials.
      Citation: CARTILAGE
      PubDate: 2021-04-16T04:52:16Z
      DOI: 10.1177/19476035211007923
       
  • Ideal Donor Site for Osteochondral Autografting of the Distal Femur Using
           Radius of Curvature: A 3-Dimensional High-Resolution Scanner Comparison

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Patrick A. Massey, Michael T. Lowery, Garrett Houk, Kaylan N. McClary, R. Shane Barton, Giovanni F. Solitro
      Abstract: CARTILAGE, Ahead of Print.
      ObjectiveTo compare radius of curvature (RoC) of distal femur osteochondral autograft transfer (OAT) donor sites from the intercondylar notch and trochlear ridge with recipient sites on the distal and posterior condyles and evaluate differences between recipient sites.DesignNineteen cadaveric femurs were scanned with a 3-dimensional high-resolution sensor. Donor regions included the lateral (LTR) and medial trochlear ridges (MTR), and the lateral (LICN) and medial intercondylar notch (MICN). Recipient regions analyzed were the distal medial (DMFC), posterior medial (PMFC), distal lateral (DLFC), and posterior lateral femur condyle (PLFC). Six-millimeter OAT grafts were simulated, and average RoC of all regions was compared using an analysis of variance. Post hoc testing was performed using Fisher’s least significant difference.ResultsWe found no significant differences in RoC of the LICN compared with all 4 recipient sites (P = 0.19, 0.97, 0.11, and 0.75 for DLFC, PLFC, DMFC, and PMFC, respectively) or the LTR and MTR to the posterior condyles (LTR vs. PLFC and PMFC; P = 0.72, 0.47, MTR vs. PLFC and PMFC P = 0.39, 0.22, respectively). Significant differences were found for RoC of the MICN compared with each recipient site (P < 0.001) and between distal and posterior femoral condyles (DLFC vs. PLFC, P = 0.016; DMFC vs. PMFC, P = 0.023).ConclusionThe LICN is the ideal donor option for all recipient sites on the femoral condyles with respect to RoC of 6-mm OAT plugs. The MTR and LTR were acceptable donor sources for the posterior condyles, while the MICN was a poor match for all recipient sites. Additionally, the distal femur condyle and posterior femur condyle have different RoCs.
      Citation: CARTILAGE
      PubDate: 2021-04-15T10:26:11Z
      DOI: 10.1177/19476035211007914
       
  • In Vitro and In Vivo Effects of Light Therapy on Cartilage Regeneration
           for Knee Osteoarthritis: A Systematic Review

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Sofia Oliveira, Renato Andrade, Betina B. Hinckel, Filipe Silva, João Espregueira-Mendes, Óscar Carvalho, Ana Leal
      Abstract: CARTILAGE, Ahead of Print.
      ObjectiveTo analyze the effects of light therapy (LT) on cartilage repair for knee osteoarthritis (OA) treatment.DesignThe PubMed, Embase, Scopus, and Web of Science databases were searched up to August 31, 2020 to identify in vitro and in vivo studies that analyzed the effects of LT on knee cartilage for OA treatment. The study and sample characteristics, LT intervention parameters and posttreatment outcomes were analyzed. Risk of bias was assessed using the Risk of Bias Assessment for Non-randomized Studies (RoBANS) tool.ResultsThree in vitro and 30 in vivo studies were included. Most studies were judged as high risk of performance and detection bias. Biochemical outcomes were analyzed for both in vitro and in vivo studies, and histological and behavioral outcomes were analyzed for in vivo studies. LT reduced extracellular matrix (ECM) degradation, inflammation, and OA progression, promoting ECM synthesis. LT improved pain-like behavior in animal models, having no apparent effect on gait performance. There were conflicting findings of some of the biochemical, histological, and behavioral outcomes.ConclusionThe included studies presented different strategies and LT parameters. LT resulted in positive effects on cartilage repair and may be an adequate therapy for OA treatment.
      Citation: CARTILAGE
      PubDate: 2021-04-15T10:23:11Z
      DOI: 10.1177/19476035211007902
       
  • Identification of Key Genes and Pathways in Osteoarthritis via
           Bioinformatic Tools: An Updated Analysis

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Yijian Zhang, Tianfeng Zhu, Fan He, Angela Carley Chen, Huilin Yang, Xuesong Zhu
      Abstract: CARTILAGE, Ahead of Print.
      ObjectiveOsteoarthritis (OA) is a severe and common degenerative disease; however, the exact pathology of OA is undefined. Our study is designed to investigate the underlying molecular mechanism of OA with bioinformatic tools.DesignThree updated GEO datasets: GSE55235, GSE55457, and GSE82107 were selected for data analyzing. R software was utilized to screen and confirm the candidate differentially expressed genes in the development of OA. Gene Ontology (GO) and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathway were performed to identify the enriched GO terms and signaling pathways. Protein and protein interaction (PPI) models were built to observe the connected relationship among each potential protein.ResultsA total of 113 upregulated genes and 161 downregulated genes were found by integrating 3 datasets. GO enrichment indicated that cell differentiation, cellular response to starvation, and negative regulation of phosphorylation were important biological processes. KEGG enrichment indicated that FoxO, IL-17 signaling pathways, and osteoclast differentiation mainly participated in the progression of OA. Combining the molecular function and PPI results, ubiquitylation was identified as a pivotal bioactive reaction involved in OA.ConclusionOur study provided updated candidate genes and pathways of OA, which may benefit further research and treatment for OA.
      Citation: CARTILAGE
      PubDate: 2021-04-15T10:19:29Z
      DOI: 10.1177/19476035211008975
       
  • Effects of Angular Resolution and b Value on Diffusion Tensor Imaging in
           Knee Joint

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Qi Zhao, Rees P. Ridout, Jikai Shen, Nian Wang
      Abstract: CARTILAGE, Ahead of Print.
      ObjectiveTo investigate the influences of the diffusion gradient directions (angular resolution) and the strength of the diffusion gradient (b value) on diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) metrics and tractography of various connective tissues in knee joint.DesignTwo rat knee joints were scanned on a preclinical 9.4-T system using a 3-dimensional diffusion-weighted spin echo pulse sequence. One protocol with b value of 500, 1500, and 2500 s/mm2 were acquired separately using 43 diffusion gradient directions. The other protocol with b value of 1000 s/mm2 was performed using 147 diffusion gradient directions. The in-plane resolution was 45 µm isotropic. Fractional anisotropy (FA) and mean diffusivity (MD) were compared at different angular resolution. Tractography was quantitatively evaluated at different b values and angular resolutions in cartilage, ligament, meniscus, and growth plate.ResultsThe ligament showed higher FA value compared with growth plate and cartilage. The FA values were largely overestimated at the angular resolution of 6. Compared with FA, MD showed less sensitivity to the angular resolution. The fiber tracking was failed at low angular resolution (6 diffusion gradient directions) or high b value (2500 s/mm2). The quantitative measurements of tract length and track volume were strongly dependent on angular resolution and b value.ConclusionsTo obtain consistent DTI outputs and tractography in knee joint, the scan may require a proper b value (ranging from 500 to 1500 s/mm2) and sufficient angular resolution (>14) with signal-to-noise ratio >10.
      Citation: CARTILAGE
      PubDate: 2021-04-10T09:19:31Z
      DOI: 10.1177/19476035211007909
       
  • FGD5-AS1 Inhibits Osteoarthritis Development by Modulating
           miR-302d-3p/TGFBR2 Axis

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Yue Yang, Zhibo Sun, Feng Liu, Yuanzhang Bai, Fei Wu
      Abstract: CARTILAGE, Ahead of Print.
      ObjectiveOsteoarthritis (OA) is a common joint disorder, accompanied by extracellular matrix (ECM) degradation. Reportedly, long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) are involved in OA pathogenesis. However, the role of lncRNA FYVE, RhoGEF, and PH domain containing 5 antisense RNA 1 (FGD5-AS1) in OA development is still not fully clarified. This study was aimed to clarify the role of FGD5-AS1 in OA.MethodsFGD5-AS1 and miR-302d-3p expression levels were determined in cartilage tissues and chondrocytes by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). Chondrocytes (C20/A4 cells) were stimulated with interleukin 1β (IL-1β) to mimic the inflammatory environment of OA. Cell viability was detected by cell counting kit-8 and 5-ethynyl-2′-deoxyuridine assays. Cell apoptosis was measured by the caspase-3 activity assay and flow cytometry. Transforming growth factor beta receptors II (TGFBR2), matrix metalloproteinase 13 (MMP-13), and ADAM metallopeptidase with thrombospondin type 1 motif 5 expression levels were examined by qRT-PCR or Western blot. The regulatory relationships among FGD5-AS1, miR-302d-3p, and TGFBR2 were predicted by the StarBase v2.0, miRanda, miRDB, and TargetScan databases, and confirmed by dual-luciferase reporter assay and RNA immunoprecipitation assay.ResultsFGD5-AS1 and TGFBR2 expression levels were downregulated while miR-302d-3p expression was increased in cartilage tissues of OA patients. Knocking down FGD5-AS1 inhibited the viability of C20/A4 cells but induced apoptosis and ECM degradation, while FGD5-AS1 overexpression exerted opposite effects. MiR-302d-3p was identified as a target of FGD5-AS1, and TGFBR2 was identified as a target of miR-302d-3p. FGD5-AS1 positively regulated TGFBR2 expression by repressing miR-302d-3p expression, and miR-302d-3p inhibition or TGFBR2 restoration reversed the changes of cell viability, apoptosis, and ECM degradation induced by FGD5-AS1 knockdown.ConclusionFGD5-AS1 can probably inhibit OA progression by regulating miR-302d-3p/TGFBR2 axis.
      Citation: CARTILAGE
      PubDate: 2021-04-09T12:22:36Z
      DOI: 10.1177/19476035211003324
       
  • Macromolecular Interactions in Cartilage Extracellular Matrix Vary
           According to the Cartilage Type and Location

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Manula S. B. Rathnayake, Brooke L. Farrugia, Karyna Kulakova, Colet E. M. ter Voert, Gerjo J. V. M. van Osch, Kathryn S. Stok
      Abstract: CARTILAGE, Ahead of Print.
      ObjectiveTo investigate GAG-ECM (glycosaminoglycan–extracellular matrix) interactions in different cartilage types. To achieve this, we first aimed to determine protocols for consistent calculation of GAG content between cartilage types.DesignAuricular cartilage containing both collagen and elastin was used to determine the effect of lyophilization on GAG depletion activity. Bovine articular, auricular, meniscal, and nasal cartilage plugs were treated using different reagents to selectively remove GAGs. Sulfated glycosaminoglycan (sGAG) remaining in the sample after treatment were measured, and sGAG loss was compared between cartilage types.ResultsThe results indicate that dry weight of cartilage should be measured prior to cartilage treatment in order to provide a more accurate reference for normalization. Articular, meniscal, and nasal cartilage lost significant amounts of sGAG for all reagents used. However, only hyaluronidase was able to remove significant amount of sGAG from auricular cartilage. Furthermore, hyaluronidase was able to remove over 99% of sGAG from all cartilage types except auricular cartilage where it only removed around 76% of sGAG. The results indicate GAG-specific ECM binding for different cartilage types and locations.ConclusionsIn conclusion, lyophilization can be performed to determine native dry weight for normalization without affecting the degree of GAG treatment. To our knowledge, this is the first study to compare GAG-ECM interactions of different cartilage types using different GAG extraction methods. Degree of GAG depletion not only varied with cartilage type but also the same type from different anatomic locations. This suggests specific structure-function roles for GAG populations found in the tissues.
      Citation: CARTILAGE
      PubDate: 2021-03-22T09:58:11Z
      DOI: 10.1177/19476035211000811
       
  • Editorial

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Lisa A. Fortier
      Abstract: CARTILAGE, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: CARTILAGE
      PubDate: 2021-03-20T08:44:46Z
      DOI: 10.1177/19476035211001647
       
  • Algorithm for Treatment of Focal Cartilage Defects of the Knee: Classic
           and New Procedures

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Betina B. Hinckel, Dimitri Thomas, Evan E. Vellios, Kyle John Hancock, Jacob G. Calcei, Seth L. Sherman, Claire D. Eliasberg, Tiago L. Fernandes, Jack Farr, Christian Lattermann, Andreas H. Gomoll
      Abstract: CARTILAGE, Ahead of Print.
      ObjectiveTo create a treatment algorithm for focal grade 3 or 4 cartilage defects of the knee using both classic and novel cartilage restoration techniques.DesignA comprehensive review of the literature was performed highlighting classic as well as novel cartilage restoration techniques supported by clinical and/or basic science research and currently being employed by orthopedic surgeons.ResultsThere is a high level of evidence to support the treatment of small to medium size lesions (4 cm2), OCA or matrix autologous chondrocyte implantation (MACI) may be performed. OCA is preferred over MACI in the setting of subchondral bone involvement while cell-based modalities such as MACI or particulated juvenile allograft cartilage are preferred in the patellofemoral joint.ConclusionsNumerous techniques exist for the orthopedic surgeon treating focal cartilage defects of the knee. Treatment strategies should be based on lesion size, lesion location, subchondral bone involvement, and the level of evidence supporting each technique in the literature.
      Citation: CARTILAGE
      PubDate: 2021-03-20T08:43:08Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1947603521993219
       
  • Short-Term Effect of Lumbar Traction on Intervertebral Discs in Patients
           with Low Back Pain: Correlation between the T2 Value and ODI/VAS Score

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Zhen-zhen Liu, Hui-quan Wen, Ye-qing Zhu, Bin-liang Zhao, Qing-cong Kong, Jian-yu Chen, Ruo-mi Guo
      Abstract: CARTILAGE, Ahead of Print.
      ObjectiveThe effect of lumbar traction on low back pain (LBP) patients is controversial. Our study aims to assess changes in the intervertebral disc water content after lumbar traction using T2 mapping and explore the correlation between changes in the T2 value and Oswestry Disability Index (ODI)/visual analogue scale (VAS) score.DesignLumbar spine magnetic resonance imaging was performed, and the ODI/VAS scores were recorded in all 48 patients. Midsagittal T2-weighted imaging and T2 mapping were performed to determine the Pfirrmann grade and T2 value. Then, the T2 values were compared between pre- and posttraction, and the correlation between changes in the T2 value and ODI/VAS scores were examined.ResultsIn the traction group, the changes in the nucleus pulposus (NP) T2 values for Pfirrmann grades II-IV and the annulus fibrosus (AF) T2 values for Pfirrmann grade II were statistically significant after traction (P < 0.05). Changes in the mean NP T2 value of 5 discs in each patient and in the ODI/VAS score showed a strong correlation (r = 0.822, r = 0.793).ConclusionT2 mapping can be used to evaluate changes in the intervertebral disc water content. Ten sessions of traction resulted in a significant increase in quantitative T2 measurements of the NP in discs for Pfirrmann grade II-IV degeneration and remission of the patients’ clinical symptoms in the following 6 months. Changes in the mean NP T2 value of 5 discs in each patient were strongly correlated with changes in the ODI/VAS score.
      Citation: CARTILAGE
      PubDate: 2021-02-24T06:38:03Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1947603521996793
       
  • Evidence-based Treatment of Failed Primary Osteochondral Lesions of the
           Talus: A Systematic Review on Clinical Outcomes of Bone Marrow Stimulation
           

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Jari Dahmen, Eoghan T. Hurley, Yoshiharu Shimozono, Christopher D. Murawski, Sjoerd A. S. Stufkens, Gino M. M. J. Kerkhoffs, John G. Kennedy
      Abstract: CARTILAGE, Ahead of Print.
      ObjectiveThe purpose of this study is to systematically review the literature and to evaluate the outcomes following bone marrow stimulation (BMS) for nonprimary osteochondral lesions of the talus (OLT).DesignA literature search was performed to identify studies published using PubMed (MEDLINE), EMBASE, CDSR, DARE, and CENTRAL. The review was performed according to the PRISMA guidelines. Two authors separately and independently screened the search results and conducted the quality assessment using the Methodological Index for Non-Randomized Studies (MINORS). Studies were pooled on clinical, sports, work, and imaging outcomes, as well as revision rates and complications. The primary outcome was clinical success rate.ResultsFive studies with 70 patients were included in whom nonprimary OLTs were treated with secondary BMS. The pooled clinical success rate was 61% (95% confidence interval [CI], 50-72). The rate of return to any level of sport was 83% (95% CI, 70-91), while the return to pre-injury level of sport was 55% (95% CI, 34-74). The rate of return to work was 92% (95% CI, 78-97), and the complication rate was assessed to be 10% (95% CI, 4-22). Imaging outcomes were heterogeneous in outcome assessment, though a depressed subchondral bone plate was observed in 91% of the patients. The revision rate was 27% (95% CI, 18-40).ConclusionsThe overall success rate of arthroscopic BMS for nonprimary osteochondral lesions of the talus was 61%, including a revision rate of 27%. Return to sports, work, and complication outcomes yielded fair to good results.
      Citation: CARTILAGE
      PubDate: 2021-02-23T06:31:28Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1947603521996023
       
  • Infrared Fiber-Optic Spectroscopy Detects Bovine Articular Cartilage
           Degeneration

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Vesa Virtanen, Ervin Nippolainen, Rubina Shaikh, Isaac O. Afara, Juha Töyräs, Johanne Solheim, Valeria Tafintseva, Boris Zimmermann, Achim Kohler, Simo Saarakkala, Lassi Rieppo
      Abstract: CARTILAGE, Ahead of Print.
      ObjectiveJoint injuries may lead to degeneration of cartilage tissue and initiate development of posttraumatic osteoarthritis. Arthroscopic surgeries can be used to treat joint injuries, but arthroscopic evaluation of articular cartilage quality is subjective. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy combined with fiber optics and attenuated total reflectance crystal could be used for the assessment of tissue quality during arthroscopy. We hypothesize that fiber-optic mid-infrared spectroscopy can detect enzymatically and mechanically induced damage similar to changes occurring during progression of osteoarthritis.DesignBovine patellar cartilage plugs were extracted and degraded enzymatically and mechanically. Adjacent untreated samples were utilized as controls. Enzymatic degradation was done using collagenase and trypsin enzymes. Mechanical damage was induced by (1) dropping a weight impactor on the cartilage plugs and (2) abrading the cartilage surface with a rotating sandpaper. Fiber-optic mid-infrared spectroscopic measurements were conducted before and after treatments, and spectral changes were assessed with random forest, partial least squares discriminant analysis, and support vector machine classifiers.ResultsAll models had excellent classification performance for detecting the different enzymatic and mechanical damage on cartilage matrix. Random forest models achieved accuracies between 90.3% and 77.8%, while partial least squares model accuracies ranged from 95.8% to 84.7%, and support vector machine accuracies from 91.7% to 80.6%.ConclusionsThe results suggest that fiber-optic Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy attenuated total reflectance spectroscopy is a viable way to detect minor and major degeneration of articular cartilage. Objective measures provided by fiber-optic spectroscopic methods could improve arthroscopic evaluation of cartilage damage.
      Citation: CARTILAGE
      PubDate: 2021-02-20T10:22:41Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1947603521993221
       
  • High-Plex RNA Expression Profiling of Formalin-Fixed Paraffin-Embedded
           Synovial Membrane Indicates Potential Mechanism of Mesenchymal Stromal
           Cells in the Mitigation of Posttraumatic Osteoarthritis

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Laura E. Keller, Lisa A. Fortier, Michelle L. Delco, Mana Okudaira, Liliya Becktell, Marta Cercone
      Abstract: CARTILAGE, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: CARTILAGE
      PubDate: 2021-02-19T09:51:26Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1947603521993521
       
  • Biotribological Tests of Osteochondral Grafts after Treatment with
           Pro-Inflammatory Cytokines

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Christoph Bauer, Hakan Göçerler, Eugenia Niculescu-Morzsa, Vivek Jeyakumar, Christoph Stotter, Thomas Klestil, Friedrich Franek, Stefan Nehrer
      Abstract: CARTILAGE, Ahead of Print.
      ObjectiveDuring osteoarthritis progression, cartilage degrades in a manner that influences its biomechanical and biotribological properties, while chondrocytes reduce the synthesis of extracellular matrix components and become apoptotic. This study investigates the effects of inflammation on cartilage under biomechanical stress using biotribological tests.MethodsBovine osteochondral grafts from five animals were punched out from the medial condyle and treated with or without pro-inflammatory cytokines (interleukin-1β [IL-1β], tumor necrosis factor-α [TNF-α], IL-6) for 2 weeks. After incubation, biotribological tests were performed for 2 hours (alternating 10 minutes test and pause respectively at 39°C, 180 N, 1 Hz, and 2 mm stroke). Before and after testing, the cartilage surface was imaged with a 3-dimensional microscope. During testing, the coefficient of friction (COF) was measured, while gene expression analysis and investigation of metabolic activity of chondrocytes were carried out after testing. Histological sections of the tissue and wear debris from the test fluid were also analyzed.ResultsAfter biotribological tests, surface cracks were found in both treated and untreated osteochondral grafts. In treated grafts, the COF increased, and the proteoglycan content in the cartilage tissue decreased, leading to structural changes. Chondrocytes from treated grafts showed increased expression of genes encoding for degradative enzymes, while cartilage-specific gene expression and metabolic activity exhibited no significant differences between treated and untreated groups. No measurable difference in the wear debris in the test fluid was found.ConclusionsTreatment of osteochondral grafts with cytokines results in a significantly increased COF, while also leading to significant changes in cartilage proteoglycan content and cartilage matrix compression during biotribological tests.
      Citation: CARTILAGE
      PubDate: 2021-02-18T05:48:20Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1947603521994900
       
  • Talar and Subtalar T1ρ Relaxation Times in Limbs with and without
           Chronic Ankle Instability

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Kyeongtak Song, Brian Pietrosimone, Joshua N. Tennant, Daniel B. Nissman, Katherine M. Dederer, Chinmay Paranjape, Erik A. Wikstrom
      Abstract: CARTILAGE, Ahead of Print.
      ObjectiveThe primary aim was to determine differences in talocrural and subtalar joint (STJ) articular cartilage composition, using T1ρ magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) relaxation times, between limbs in individuals with unilateral chronic ankle instability (CAI) and compare with an uninjured control. Our secondary purpose was to determine the association between talocrural and STJ composition in limbs with and without CAI.DesignT1ρ MRI relaxation times were collected on 15 CAI (11 females, 21.13 ± 1.81 years, body mass index [BMI] = 23.96 ± 2.74 kg/m2) and 15 uninjured control individuals (11 females, 21.07 ± 2.55 years, BMI = 24.59 ± 3.44 kg/m2). Talocrural cartilage was segmented manually to identify the overall talar dome. The SJT cartilage was segmented manually to identify the anterior, medial, and posterior regions of interest consistent with STJ anatomical articulations. For each segmented area, a T1ρ relaxation time mean and variability value was calculated. Greater T1ρ relaxation times were interpreted as decreased proteoglycan content.ResultsIndividuals with CAI demonstrated a higher involved limb talocrural T1ρ mean and variability relative to their contralateral limb (P < 0.05) and the healthy control limb (P < 0.05). The CAI-involved limb also had a higher posterior STJ T1ρ mean relative to the healthy control limb (P < 0.05). In healthy controls (P < 0.05), but not the CAI-involved or contralateral limbs (p>0.05), talocrural and posterior STJ composition measures were positively associated.ConclusionsIndividuals with CAI have lower proteoglycan content in both the talocrural and posterior STJ in their involved limbs relative to the contralateral and a healthy control limb. Cartilage composition findings may be consistent with the early development of posttraumatic osteoarthritis.
      Citation: CARTILAGE
      PubDate: 2021-02-16T05:53:57Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1947603521994626
       
  • Autologous Protein Solution Effect on Chondrogenic Differentiation of
           Mesenchymal Stem Cells from Adipose Tissue and Bone Marrow in an
           Osteoarthritic Environment

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Stefania Pagani, Francesca Veronesi, Gianluca Giavaresi, Giuseppe Filardo, Tiziana Papio, Iacopo Romandini, Milena Fini
      Abstract: CARTILAGE, Ahead of Print.
      ObjectiveOsteoarthritis (OA) is an inflammatory and degenerative disease, and the numerous treatments currently used are not fully effective. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and platelet-rich plasma (PRP) are proposed for OA treatment as biologic therapies. The aim of the study was to observe the role of autologous protein solution (APS), a type of PRP, on chondrogenic differentiation of 2 types of MSCs, from bone marrow (BMSCs) and adipose tissue (ADSCs), in an in vitro osteoarthritic microenvironment.DesignInflammatory culture conditions, mimicking OA, were obtained by adding interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα), or synovial fluid from patient osteoarthritic knees (OSF), to the culture medium. MSCs were then treated with APS.ResultsAfter 1 month of culture, both cell types formed mature micromasses, partially altered in the presence of IL-1β and TNFα but quite preserved with OSF. Inflammatory conditions hindered differentiation in terms of gene expression, not counterbalanced by APS. APS triggered type I collagen deposition and above all contributed to decrease the expression of metalloproteinases in the most aggressive conditions (IL-1β and TNFα in the culture medium). ADSCs originated micromasses more mature and less prone toward osteogenic lineage than BMSCs, thus showing to better adapt in an aggressive environment than BMSC.ConclusionsAPS seems to act better on inflammation front and, between cell types, ADSCs respond better to the inflammatory microenvironment of OA and to the treatment with APS than BMSCs.
      Citation: CARTILAGE
      PubDate: 2021-02-15T08:49:18Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1947603521993217
       
  • Sirt5 Deficiency Causes Posttranslational Protein Malonylation and
           

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Shouan Zhu, Albert Batushansky, Anita Jopkiewicz, Dawid Makosa, Kenneth M. Humphries, Holly Van Remmen, Timothy M. Griffin
      Abstract: CARTILAGE, Ahead of Print.
      ObjectiveObesity accelerates the development of osteoarthritis (OA) during aging and is associated with altered chondrocyte cellular metabolism. Protein lysine malonylation (MaK) is a posttranslational modification (PTM) that has been shown to play an important role during aging and obesity. The objective of this study was to investigate the role of sirtuin 5 (Sirt5) in regulating MaK and cellular metabolism in chondrocytes under obesity-related conditions.MethodsMaK and SIRT5 were immunostained in knee articular cartilage of obese db/db mice and different aged C57BL6 mice with or without destabilization of the medial meniscus surgery to induce OA. Primary chondrocytes were isolated from 7-day-old WT and Sirt5−/− mice and treated with varying concentrations of glucose and insulin to mimic obesity. Sirt5-dependent effects on MaK and metabolism were evaluated by western blot, Seahorse Respirometry, and gas/chromatography-mass/spectrometry (GC-MS) metabolic profiling.ResultsMaK was significantly increased in cartilage of db/db mice and in chondrocytes treated with high concentrations of glucose and insulin (GluhiInshi). Sirt5 was increased in an age-dependent manner following joint injury, and Sirt5 deficient primary chondrocytes had increased MaK, decreased glycolysis rate, and reduced basal mitochondrial respiration. GC-MS identified 41 metabolites. Sirt5 deficiency altered 13 distinct metabolites under basal conditions and 18 metabolites under GluhiInshi treatment. Pathway analysis identified a wide range of Sirt5-dependent altered metabolic pathways that include amino acid metabolism, TCA cycle, and glycolysis.ConclusionThis study provides the first evidence that Sirt5 broadly regulates chondrocyte metabolism. We observed changes in SIRT5 and MaK levels in cartilage with obesity and joint injury, suggesting that the Sirt5-MaK pathway may contribute to altered chondrocyte metabolism that occurs during OA development.
      Citation: CARTILAGE
      PubDate: 2021-02-11T09:39:53Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1947603521993209
       
  • Structural Morphology of Rabbit Patella and Suprapatella Cartilage by
           Microscopic MRI and Polarized Light Microscopy

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Hannah Mantebea, Syeda Batool, Mouhamad Hammami, Yang Xia
      Abstract: CARTILAGE, Ahead of Print.
      ObjectiveIn order to appreciate the roles articular cartilage of sesamoid bones and sesamoid fibrocartilage play in anatomy and pathology, the articular cartilage of the patella (n = 4) and suprapatella (n = 4) (a sesamoid fibrocartilage) of 12 to 14 weeks old New Zealand rabbits were studied qualitatively and quantitatively.Design/MethodThe intact knee joints and block specimens from the joints were imaged using microscopic magnetic resonance imaging (µMRI) at a 97.6-µm pixel resolution for the former and 19.5-µm resolution for the latter. Histological sections were made out of the µMRI-imaged specimens, which were imaged using polarized light microscopy (PLM) at 0.25-, 1-, and 4-µm pixel resolutions.ResultsThe patella cartilage varied in thickness across the medial to lateral ends of the sesamoid bone with the central medial aspect slightly thicker than the lateral aspect. The suprapatella fibrocartilage decreased proximally away from the knee joint. Quantitative results of patellar cartilage showed strong dependence of fiber orientation with the tissue depth. Three histological zones can be clearly observed, which are similar to articular cartilage from other large animals. The sesamoid fibrocartilage has one thin surface layer (10 µm thick) of parallel-arranged structured fibers followed immediately by the majority of random fibers in bulk tissue. T2 relaxation time anisotropy was observed in the patellar cartilage but not in the bulk fibrocartilage.ConclusionGiven the different functions of these 2 different types of cartilages in joint motion, these quantitative results will be beneficial to future studies of joint diseases using rabbits as the animal model.
      Citation: CARTILAGE
      PubDate: 2021-02-08T09:58:32Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1947603521990882
       
  • Acetabular Cartilage Thickness Differs Among Cam, Pincer, or Mixed-Type
           Femoroacetabular Impingement: A Descriptive Study Using In Vivo Ultrasonic
           Measurements During Surgical Hip Dislocation

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Simon Damian Steppacher, Malin Kristin Meier, Christoph Emanuel Albers, Moritz Tannast, Klaus Arno Siebenrock
      Abstract: CARTILAGE, Ahead of Print.
      ObjectiveTo investigate acetabular cartilage thickness among (1) 8 measurement locations on the lunate surface and (2) different types of femoroacetabular impingement (FAI).DesignProspective descriptive study comparing in vivo measured acetabular cartilage thickness using a validated ultrasonic device during surgical hip dislocation in 50 hips. Measurement locations included the anterior/posterior horn and 3 locations on each peripheral and central aspect of the acetabulum. The clock system was used for orientation. Thickness was compared among cam (11 hips), pincer (8 hips), and mixed-type (31 hips) of FAI. Mean age was 31 ± 8 (range, 18-49) years. Hips with no degenerative changes were included (Tönnis stage = 0).ResultsAcetabular cartilage thickness ranged from 1.7 mm to 2.7 mm and differed among the 8 locations (P < 0.001). Thicker cartilage was found on the peripheral aspect at 11 and 1 o’clock positions (mean of 2.4 mm and 2.7 mm, respectively). At 5 out of 8 locations of measurement (anterior and posterior horn, 1 o’clock peripheral, 12 and 2 o’clock central), cartilage thickness was thinner in hips with pincer impingement compared to cam and/or mixed-type of FAI (P ranging from
      Citation: CARTILAGE
      PubDate: 2021-02-08T09:48:50Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1947603521990879
       
  • Diagnostic Value of Interleukin-34 as a Novel Biomarker for Severity of
           Knee Osteoarthritis

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Wanvisa Udomsinprasert, Kittaporn Panon, Siraphop Preechanukul, Jiraphun Jittikoon, Artit Jinawath, Sittisak Honsawek
      Abstract: CARTILAGE, Ahead of Print.
      ObjectivesThis study aimed to determine whether plasma and synovial fluid interleukin-34 (IL-34), an inflammatory cytokine reportedly implicated in synovial inflammation-induced joint degeneration, were associated with radiographic severity of knee osteoarthritis (OA) patients and could emerge as knee OA biomarkers.DesignNinety-six knee OA patients and 72 healthy controls were recruited. Plasma and synovial fluid IL-34 levels were quantified using ELISA. IL-34 mRNA and protein expressions in inflamed (n = 15) and noninflamed synovial tissues (n = 15) of knee OA patients were determined using real-time polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemistry, respectively.ResultsSignificant increases in plasma and synovial fluid IL-34 levels were found in knee OA patients—especially those with advanced stage (P < 0.001, P < 0.001, respectively). Both plasma and synovial fluid IL-34 levels were positively associated with radiographic severity (r = 0.64, P < 0.001; r = 0.50, P < 0.001, respectively). There was a direct link between plasma and synovial fluid IL-34 (r = 0.64, P < 0.001). Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis uncovered that the optimal cutoff value of plasma IL-34 as a novel biomarker reflecting knee OA severity was defined at 3750.0 pg/mL (AUC = 0.85), with a sensitivity of 83.1% and a specificity of 74.2%. Further analysis revealed that IL-34 mRNA expression was significantly upregulated in inflamed synovium compared with noninflamed synovium obtained from knee OA patients (P < 0.001), consistent with protein expression analysis demonstrating IL-34 overexpression localized in the lining and sublining layers of inflamed synovium.ConclusionsAll findings suggest that elevated plasma and synovial fluid IL-34 would reflect knee OA severity and might have potential utility as biomarkers for the disease progression.
      Citation: CARTILAGE
      PubDate: 2021-02-08T09:46:51Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1947603521990866
       
  • A Review of the Collagen Orientation in the Articular Cartilage

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Roy D. Bloebaum, Andrew S. Wilson, William N. Martin
      Abstract: CARTILAGE, Ahead of Print.
      ObjectiveThere has been a debate as to the alignment of the collagen fibers. Using a hand lens, Sir William Hunter demonstrated that the collagen fibers ran perpendicular and later aspects were supported by Benninghoff. Despite these 2 historical studies, modern technology has conflicting data on the collagen alignment.DesignTen mature New Zealand rabbits were used to obtain 40 condyle specimens. The specimens were passed through ascending grades of alcohol, subjected to critical point drying (CPD), and viewed in the scanning electron microscope. Specimens revealed splits from the dehydration process. When observing the fibers exposed within the opening of the splits, parallel fibers were observed to run in a radial direction, normal to the surface of the articular cartilage, radiating from the deep zone and arcading as they approach the surface layer. After these observations, the same samples were mechanically fractured and damaged by scalpel.ResultsThe splits in the articular surface created deep fissures, exposing parallel bundles of collagen fibers, radiating from the deep zone and arcading as they approach the surface layer. On higher magnification, individual fibers were observed to run parallel to one another, traversing radially toward the surface of the articular cartilage and arcading. Mechanical fracturing and scalpel damage induced on the same specimens with the splits showed randomly oriented fibers.ConclusionCollagen fiber orientation corroborates aspects of Hunter’s findings and compliments Benninghoff. Investigators must be aware of the limits of their processing and imaging techniques in order to interpret collagen fiber orientation in cartilage.
      Citation: CARTILAGE
      PubDate: 2021-02-02T05:27:33Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1947603520988770
       
  • Integrative Analysis of MicroRNA and mRNA Sequencing Data Identifies Novel
           Candidate Genes and Pathways for Developmental Dysplasia of Hip

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Bolun Cheng, Yumeng Jia, Yan Wen, Weikun Hou, Ke Xu, Chujun Liang, Shiqiang Cheng, Li Liu, Xiaomeng Chu, Jing Ye, Yao Yao, Feng Zhang, Peng Xu
      Abstract: CARTILAGE, Ahead of Print.
      ObjectiveOur aim is to explore the candidate pathogenesis genes and pathways of developmental dysplasia of hip (DDH).DesignProliferating primary chondrocytes from hip cartilage were used for total RNA extraction including 5 DDH patients and 5 neck of femur fracture (NOF) subjects. Genome-wide mRNA and microRNA (miRNA) were then sequenced on the Illumina platform (HiSeq2500). Limma package was used for difference analysis of mRNA expression profiles. edgeR was used for difference analysis of miRNA expression profiles. miRanda was used to predict miRNA-target genes. The overlapped DDH associated genes identified by mRNA and miRNA integrative analysis were further compared with the differently expressed genes in hip osteoarthritis (OA) cartilage.ResultsDifferential expression analysis identified 1,833 differently expressed mRNA and 186 differently expressed miRNA for DDH. Integrative analysis of mRNA and miRNA expression profiles identified 175 overlapped candidate genes (differentially expressed genes, DEGs) for DDH, such as VWA1, TMEM119, and SCUBE3. Further gene ontology enrichment analysis detected 111 candidate terms for DDH, such as skeletal system morphogenesis (P = 4.92 × 10−5) and skeletal system development (P = 8.85 × 10−5). Pathway enrichment analysis identified 14 candidate pathways for DDH, such as Hedgehog signaling pathway (P = 4.29 × 10−5) and Wnt signaling pathway (P = 4.42 × 10−2). Among the identified DDH associated candidate genes, we also found some genes were detected in hip OA including EFNA1 and VWA1.ConclusionsWe identified multiple novel candidate genes and pathways for DDH, providing novel clues for understanding the molecular mechanism of DDH.
      Citation: CARTILAGE
      PubDate: 2021-02-01T12:20:45Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1947603521990859
       
  • Histological Analysis of Cartilage Defects Repaired with an Autologous
           Human Stem Cell Construct 48 Weeks Postimplantation Reveals Structural
           Details Not Detected by T2-Mapping MRI

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Kazunori Shimomura, Hidetoshi Hamada, David A. Hart, Wataru Ando, Takashi Nishii, Siegfried Trattnig, Stefan Nehrer, Norimasa Nakamura
      Abstract: CARTILAGE, Ahead of Print.
      ObjectiveThe aim of this study was to elucidate the efficacy of T2-mapping MRI and correlation with histology for the evaluation of tissue repair quality following the first-in-human implantation of an autologous tissue engineered construct.DesignWe directly compared the results of T2-mapping MRI of cartilage repair tissue with the histology of a biopsy specimen from the corresponding area at 48 weeks postoperatively in 5 patients who underwent the implantation of a scaffold-free tissue-engineered construct generated from autologous synovial mesenchymal stem cells to repair an isolated cartilage lesion. T2 values and histological scores were compared at each of 2 layers of equally divided halves of the repair tissue (upper and lower zones).ResultsHistology showed that the repair tissue in the upper zone was dominated by fibrous tissue and the ratio of hyaline-like matrix increased with the depth of the repair tissue. There were significant differences between upper and lower zones in histological scores. Conversely, there were no detectable statistically significant differences in T2 value detected among zones of the repair tissue, but zonal differences were detected in corresponding healthy cartilage. Accordingly, there were no correlations detected between histological scores and T2 values for each repair cartilage zone.ConclusionDiscrepancies in the findings between T2 mapping and histology suggest that T2 mapping was limited in ability to detect details in the architecture and composition of the repair cartilage.
      Citation: CARTILAGE
      PubDate: 2021-01-29T11:43:10Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1947603521989423
       
  • Combination of a Collagen Scaffold and an Adhesive Hyaluronan-Based
           

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Clara Levinson, Emma Cavalli, Brigitte von Rechenberg, Marcy Zenobi-Wong, Salim E. Darwiche
      Abstract: CARTILAGE, Ahead of Print.
      ObjectiveHyaluronic acid–transglutaminase (HA-TG) is an enzymatically crosslinkable adhesive hydrogel with chondrogenic properties demonstrated in vitro and in an ectopic mouse model. In this study, we investigated the feasibility of using HA-TG in a collagen scaffold to treat chondral lesions in an ovine model, to evaluate cartilage regeneration in a mechanically and biologically challenging joint environment, and the influence of the surgical procedure on the repair process.DesignChondral defects of 6-mm diameter were created in the stifle joint of skeletally mature sheep. In a 3-month study, 6 defects were treated with HA-TG in a collagen scaffold to test the stability and biocompatibility of the defect filling. In a 6-month study, 6 sheep had 12 defects treated with HA-TG and collagen and 2 sheep had 4 untreated defects. Histologically observed quality of repair tissue and adjacent cartilage was semiquantitatively assessed.ResultsHA-TG adhered to the native tissue and did not cause any detectable negative reaction in the surrounding tissue. HA-TG in a collagen scaffold supported infiltration and chondrogenic differentiation of mesenchymal cells, which migrated from the subchondral bone through the calcified cartilage layer. Additionally, HA-TG and collagen treatment led to better adjacent cartilage preservation compared with empty defects (P < 0.05).ConclusionsThis study demonstrates that the adhesive HA-TG hydrogel in a collagen scaffold shows good biocompatibility, supports in situ cartilage regeneration and preserves the surrounding cartilage. This proof-of-concept study shows the potential of this approach, which should be further considered in the treatment of cartilage lesions using a single-step procedure.
      Citation: CARTILAGE
      PubDate: 2021-01-29T11:41:07Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1947603521989417
       
  • Resveratrol and Curcumin Attenuate Ex Vivo Sugar-Induced Cartilage
           Glycation, Stiffening, Senescence, and Degeneration

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Shikhar Mehta, Cameron C. Young, Matthew R. Warren, Sumayyah Akhtar, Sandra J. Shefelbine, Justin D. Crane, Ambika G. Bajpayee
      Abstract: CARTILAGE, Ahead of Print.
      ObjectiveAdvanced glycation end-product (AGE) accumulation is implicated in osteoarthritis (OA) pathogenesis in aging and diabetic populations. Here, we develop a representative nonenzymatic glycation-induced OA cartilage explant culture model and investigate the effectiveness of resveratrol, curcumin, and eugenol in inhibiting AGEs and the structural and biological hallmarks of cartilage degeneration.DesignBovine cartilage explants were treated with AGE–bovine serum albumin, threose, and ribose to determine the optimal conditions that induce physiological levels of AGEs while maintaining chondrocyte viability. AGE crosslinks, tissue stiffness, cell viability, metabolism and senescence, nitrite release and loss of glycosaminoglycans were assessed. Explants were cotreated with resveratrol, curcumin, or eugenol to evaluate their anti-AGE properties. Blind docking analysis was conducted to estimate binding energies of drugs with collagen II.ResultsTreatment with 100 mM ribose significantly increased AGE crosslink formation and tissue stiffness, resulting in reduced chondrocyte metabolism and enhanced senescence. Blind docking analysis revealed stronger binding energies of both resveratrol and curcumin than ribose, with glycation sites along a human collagen II fragment, indicating their increased likelihood of competitively inhibiting ribose activity. Resveratrol and curcumin, but not eugenol, successfully inhibited AGE crosslink formation and its associated downstream biological response.ConclusionsWe establish a cartilage explant model of OA that recapitulates several aspects of aged human cartilage. We find that resveratrol and curcumin are effective anti-AGE therapeutics with the potential to decelerate age-related and diabetes-induced OA. This in vitro nonenzymatic glycation-induced model provides a tool for screening OA drugs, to simultaneously evaluate AGE-induced biological and mechanical changes.
      Citation: CARTILAGE
      PubDate: 2021-01-21T05:57:23Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1947603520988768
       
  • Response

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Margot Rikkers, Koen Dijkstra, Bastiaan F. Terhaard, Jon Admiraal, Riccardo Levato, Jos Malda, Lucienne A. Vonk
      Abstract: CARTILAGE, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: CARTILAGE
      PubDate: 2021-01-20T06:53:32Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1947603521989486
       
  • Platelet-Rich Plasma Is More Than Placebo-Rich Plasma for Early
           Osteoarthritis Knee

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Tungish Bansal, Sandeep Patel
      Abstract: CARTILAGE, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: CARTILAGE
      PubDate: 2021-01-20T06:51:30Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1947603521989485
       
  • Patients with Osteoarthritis and Kashin-Beck Disease Display Distinct CpG
           Methylation Profiles in the DIO2, GPX3, and TXRND1 Promoter Regions

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Rongqiang Zhang, Hao Guo, Xiaoli Yang, Dandan Zhang, Di Zhang, Qiang Li, Chen Wang, Xuena Yang, Yongmin Xiong
      Abstract: CARTILAGE, Ahead of Print.
      ObjectiveWe aimed to analyze deoxycytidine-deoxyguanosine dinucleotide (CpGs) methylation profiles in DIO2, GPX3, and TXNRD1 promoter regions in osteoarthritis (OA) and Kashin-Beck disease (KBD) patients.MethodsBlood samples were collected from 16 primary OA patients and corresponding 16 healthy individuals and analyzed for methylations in the CpGs of DIO2, GPX3, and TXNRD1 promoter regions using MALDI-TOF-MS. The methylation profiles of these regions were then compared between OA and KBD patients.ResultsDIO2-1_CpG_2 and DIO2-1_CpG_3 methylations were significantly lower in OA than KBD patients (P < 0.05). A similar trend was observed for GPX3-1_CpG_4, GPX3-1_CpG_7, GPX3-1_CpG_8.9.10, GPX3-1_CpG_13.14.15 and GPX3-1_CpG_16 (P < 0.05) as well as TXNRD1-1_CpG_1 and TXNRD1-1_CpG_2 methylation between OA and KBD patients (P < 0.05). However, there was no difference in methylation levels of other CpGs between the 2 groups (P > 0.05).ConclusionOA and KBD patients display distinct methylation profiles in the CpG sites of DIO2, GPX3, and TXNRD1 promoter regions. These findings provide a strong background and new perspective for future studies on mechanisms underlying epigenetic regulation of selenoprotein genes associated with OA and KBD diseases.
      Citation: CARTILAGE
      PubDate: 2021-01-16T09:47:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1947603520988165
       
  • Joint Surface Lesions in the Knee Treated with an Acellular
           Aragonite-Based Scaffold: A 3-Year Follow-Up Case Series

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Wouter Van Genechten, Kristien Vuylsteke, Caroline Struijk, Linus Swinnen, Peter Verdonk
      Abstract: CARTILAGE, Ahead of Print.
      ObjectiveThe study aimed to evaluate the clinical outcome and repair capacity of a cell-free aragonite-based scaffold in patients with an isolated symptomatic joint surface lesion (JSL) of the knee.DesignThirteen patients (age 33.5 ± 8.9; female 23%; body mass index 25.3 ± 3.4, K/L [Kellgren-Lawrence] 1.8) with a JSL (2.6 ± 1.7 cm2 [1.0-7.5 cm2]) of the distal femur were enrolled in a single-center prospective case series. Safety and clinical outcome was assessed by the KOOS (Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score), IKDC (International Knee Documentation Committee), Lysholm, and Tegner activity scale at baseline and 6, 12, 18, 24, and 36 months follow-up. The MOCART 2.0 and scaffold integration were evaluated on magnetic resonance imaging at 12, 24, and 36 months postoperatively.ResultsPrimary outcome (KOOS pain) improved with 36.5 ± 14.7 points at 12 months (P = 0.002) and 41.2 ± 14.7 points at 36 months (P = 0.002) follow-up. Similar increasing trends were observed for the other KOOS subscales, IKDC, and Lysholm score, which were significantly better at each follow-up time point relative to baseline (P < 0.05). Activity level increased from 2.75 ± 1.6 to 4.6 ± 2.2 points at final follow-up (P = 0.07). The MOCART was 61.7 ± 12.6 at 12 months and 72.9 ± 13.0 at 36 months postoperatively. Sixty-six to 100% implant integration and remodeling was observed in 73.3% cases at 36 months. No serious adverse events were reported.ConclusionThe study demonstrated that the biphasic aragonite-based scaffold is a safe and clinically effective implant for treating small-medium sized JSLs of the distal femur in a young and active patient cohort. The implant showed satisfying osteointegration and restoration of the osteochondral unit up to 3 years postimplantation.
      Citation: CARTILAGE
      PubDate: 2021-01-15T10:49:50Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1947603520988164
       
  • Infrapatellar Fat Pads–Derived Stem Cell Is a Favorable Cell Source for
           Articular Cartilage Tissue Engineering: An In Vitro and Ex Vivo Study
           Based on 3D Organized Self-Assembled Biomimetic Scaffold

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Chen-Chie Wang, Ing-Ho Chen, Ya-Ting Yang, Yi-Ru Chen, Kai-Chiang Yang
      Abstract: CARTILAGE, Ahead of Print.
      ObjectiveAdipose tissue–derived stem cells (ASCs) are a promising source of cells for articular cartilage regeneration. However, ASCs isolated from different adipose tissue depots have heterogeneous cell characterizations and differentiation potential when cultured in 3-dimensional (3D) niches.DesignWe compared the chondrogenicity of ASCs isolated from infrapatellar fat pads (IPFPs) and subcutaneous fat pads (SCFPs) in 3D gelatin-based biomimetic matrix.ResultsThe IPFP-ASC-differentiated chondrocytes had higher ACAN, COL2A1, COL10, SOX6, SOX9, ChM-1, and MIA-3 mRNA levels and lower COL1A1 and VEGF levels than the SCFP-ASCs in 3D matrix. The difference in mRNA profile may have contributed to activation of the Akt, p38, RhoA, and JNK signaling pathways in the IPFP-ASCs. The chondrocytes differentiated from IPFP-ASCs had pronounced glycosaminoglycan and collagen type II production and a high chondroitin-6-sulfate/chondroitin-4-sulfate ratio with less polymerization of β-actin filaments. In an ex vivo mice model, magnetic resonance imaging revealed a shorter T2 relaxation time, indicating that more abundant extracellular matrix was secreted in the IPFP-ASC–matrix group. Histological examinations revealed that the IPFP-ASC matrix had higher chondrogenic efficacy of new cartilaginous tissue generation as evident in collagen type II and S-100 staining. Conclusion. ASCs isolated from IPFPs may be better candidates for cartilage regeneration, highlighting the translational potential of cartilage tissue engineering using the IPFP-ASC matrix technique.
      Citation: CARTILAGE
      PubDate: 2021-01-13T09:03:17Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1947603520988153
       
  • Osteochondral Lesions of the Talus: A Review on Talus Osteochondral
           Injuries, Including Osteochondritis Dissecans

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Juergen Bruns, Christian Habermann, Mathias Werner
      Abstract: CARTILAGE, Ahead of Print.
      This is a review on talus osteochondritis dissecans and talus osteochondral lesions. A majority of the osteochondral lesions are associated with trauma while the cause of pure osteochondritis dissecans is still much discussed with a possible cause being repetitive microtraumas associated with vascular disturbances causing subchondral bone necrosis and disability. Symptomatic nondisplaced osteochondral lesions can often be treated conservatively in children and adolescents while such treatment is less successful in adults. Surgical treatment is indicated when there is an unstable cartilage fragment. There are a large number of different operative technique options with no number one technique to be recommended. Most techniques have been presented in level II to IV studies with a low number of patients with short follow ups and few randomized comparisons exist. The actual situation in treating osteochondral lesions in the ankle is presented and discussed.
      Citation: CARTILAGE
      PubDate: 2021-01-09T09:34:32Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1947603520985182
       
 
JournalTOCs
School of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
Heriot-Watt University
Edinburgh, EH14 4AS, UK
Email: journaltocs@hw.ac.uk
Tel: +00 44 (0)131 4513762
 


Your IP address: 3.237.16.210
 
Home (Search)
API
About JournalTOCs
News (blog, publications)
JournalTOCs on Twitter   JournalTOCs on Facebook

JournalTOCs © 2009-