Publisher: Sage Publications   (Total: 1166 journals)

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Showing 1 - 200 of 1166 Journals sorted alphabetically
AADE in Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Abstracts in Anthropology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 29)
Academic Pathology     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Accounting History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18, SJR: 0.527, CiteScore: 1)
Acta Radiologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.754, CiteScore: 2)
Acta Radiologica Open     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Acta Sociologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39, SJR: 0.939, CiteScore: 2)
Action Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 53, SJR: 0.308, CiteScore: 1)
Active Learning in Higher Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 396, SJR: 1.397, CiteScore: 2)
Adaptive Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.288, CiteScore: 1)
Administration & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18, SJR: 0.675, CiteScore: 1)
Adoption & Fostering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25, SJR: 0.313, CiteScore: 0)
Adsorption Science & Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.258, CiteScore: 1)
Adult Education Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 258, SJR: 0.566, CiteScore: 2)
Adult Learning     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 51)
Advances in Dental Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 1.791, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Developing Human Resources     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35, SJR: 0.614, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Mechanical Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 156, SJR: 0.272, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Methods and Practices in Psychological Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20)
Advances in Structural Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 51, SJR: 0.599, CiteScore: 1)
AERA Open     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
Affilia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.496, CiteScore: 1)
Africa Spectrum     Open Access   (Followers: 17)
Agrarian South : J. of Political Economy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Air, Soil & Water Research     Open Access   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.214, CiteScore: 1)
Alexandria : The J. of National and Intl. Library and Information Issues     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 68)
Allergy & Rhinology     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
AlterNative : An Intl. J. of Indigenous Peoples     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 39, SJR: 0.194, CiteScore: 0)
Alternative Law J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.176, CiteScore: 0)
Alternatives : Global, Local, Political     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.351, CiteScore: 1)
Alternatives to Laboratory Animals     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.297, CiteScore: 1)
American Behavioral Scientist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26, SJR: 0.982, CiteScore: 2)
American Economist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
American Educational Research J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 259, SJR: 2.913, CiteScore: 3)
American J. of Alzheimer's Disease and Other Dementias     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23, SJR: 0.67, CiteScore: 2)
American J. of Cosmetic Surgery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
American J. of Evaluation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18, SJR: 0.646, CiteScore: 2)
American J. of Health Promotion     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35, SJR: 0.807, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Hospice and Palliative Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 47, SJR: 0.65, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Law & Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.204, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Lifestyle Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.431, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Medical Quality     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.777, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Men's Health     Open Access   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.595, CiteScore: 2)
American J. of Rhinology and Allergy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.972, CiteScore: 2)
American J. of Sports Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 249, SJR: 3.949, CiteScore: 6)
American Politics Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 36, SJR: 1.313, CiteScore: 1)
American Review of Public Administration     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28, SJR: 2.062, CiteScore: 2)
American Sociological Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 356, SJR: 6.333, CiteScore: 6)
American String Teacher     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Analytical Chemistry Insights     Open Access   (Followers: 26, SJR: 0.224, CiteScore: 1)
Angiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.849, CiteScore: 2)
Animation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.197, CiteScore: 0)
Annals of Clinical Biochemistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.634, CiteScore: 1)
Annals of Otology, Rhinology & Laryngology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20, SJR: 0.807, CiteScore: 1)
Annals of Pharmacotherapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 59, SJR: 1.096, CiteScore: 2)
Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 51, SJR: 1.225, CiteScore: 3)
Annals of the ICRP     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.548, CiteScore: 1)
Anthropocene Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 3.341, CiteScore: 7)
Anthropological Theory     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 48, SJR: 0.739, CiteScore: 1)
Antitrust Bulletin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Antiviral Chemistry and Chemotherapy     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.635, CiteScore: 2)
Antyajaa : Indian J. of Women and Social Change     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Applied Biosafety     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.131, CiteScore: 0)
Applied Psychological Measurement     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21, SJR: 1.17, CiteScore: 1)
Applied Spectroscopy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 27, SJR: 0.489, CiteScore: 2)
Armed Forces & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25, SJR: 0.29, CiteScore: 1)
Arthaniti : J. of Economic Theory and Practice     Full-text available via subscription  
Arts and Humanities in Higher Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 49, SJR: 0.305, CiteScore: 1)
Asia Pacific Media Educator     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.23, CiteScore: 0)
Asia-Pacific J. of Management Research and Innovation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Asia-Pacific J. of Public Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.558, CiteScore: 1)
Asia-Pacific J. of Rural Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Asian and Pacific Migration J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.324, CiteScore: 1)
Asian Cardiovascular and Thoracic Annals     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.305, CiteScore: 0)
Asian J. of Comparative Politics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Asian J. of Legal Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Asian J. of Management Cases     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.101, CiteScore: 0)
ASN Neuro     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 1.534, CiteScore: 3)
Assessment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19, SJR: 1.519, CiteScore: 3)
Assessment for Effective Intervention     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.578, CiteScore: 1)
Australasian J. of Early Childhood     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.535, CiteScore: 1)
Australasian Psychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18, SJR: 0.433, CiteScore: 1)
Australian & New Zealand J. of Psychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30, SJR: 1.801, CiteScore: 2)
Australian and New Zealand J. of Criminology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 546, SJR: 0.612, CiteScore: 1)
Australian J. of Career Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Australian J. of Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 51, SJR: 0.403, CiteScore: 1)
Australian J. of Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.497, CiteScore: 1)
Autism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 355, SJR: 1.739, CiteScore: 4)
Autism & Developmental Language Impairments     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
Avian Biology Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.401, CiteScore: 1)
Behavior Modification     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.877, CiteScore: 2)
Behavioral and Cognitive Neuroscience Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Behavioral Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Beyond Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Bible Translator     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Biblical Theology Bulletin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24, SJR: 0.184, CiteScore: 0)
Big Data & Society     Open Access   (Followers: 55)
Biochemistry Insights     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Bioinformatics and Biology Insights     Open Access   (Followers: 12, SJR: 1.141, CiteScore: 2)
Biological Research for Nursing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.685, CiteScore: 2)
Biomarker Insights     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.81, CiteScore: 2)
Biomarkers in Cancer     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Biomedical Engineering and Computational Biology     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Biomedical Informatics Insights     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Bioscope: South Asian Screen Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.235, CiteScore: 0)
BMS: Bulletin of Sociological Methodology/Bulletin de Méthodologie Sociologique     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.226, CiteScore: 0)
Body & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29, SJR: 1.531, CiteScore: 3)
Bone and Tissue Regeneration Insights     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Brain and Neuroscience Advances     Open Access  
Brain Science Advances     Open Access  
Breast Cancer : Basic and Clinical Research     Open Access   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.823, CiteScore: 2)
British J. of Music Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
British J. of Occupational Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 252, SJR: 0.323, CiteScore: 1)
British J. of Pain     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31, SJR: 0.579, CiteScore: 2)
British J. of Politics and Intl. Relations     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39, SJR: 0.91, CiteScore: 2)
British J. of Visual Impairment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.337, CiteScore: 1)
British J.ism Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
BRQ Business Review Quarterly     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Building Acoustics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.215, CiteScore: 1)
Building Services Engineering Research & Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.583, CiteScore: 1)
Bulletin of Science, Technology & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Business & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Business and Professional Communication Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.348, CiteScore: 1)
Business Information Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17, SJR: 0.279, CiteScore: 0)
Business Perspectives and Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Cahiers Élisabéthains     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.111, CiteScore: 0)
Calcutta Statistical Association Bulletin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
California Management Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 37, SJR: 2.209, CiteScore: 4)
Canadian Association of Radiologists J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.463, CiteScore: 1)
Canadian J. of Kidney Health and Disease     Open Access   (Followers: 8, SJR: 1.007, CiteScore: 2)
Canadian J. of Nursing Research (CJNR)     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Canadian J. of Occupational Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 166, SJR: 0.626, CiteScore: 1)
Canadian J. of Psychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28, SJR: 1.769, CiteScore: 3)
Canadian J. of School Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.266, CiteScore: 1)
Canadian Pharmacists J. / Revue des Pharmaciens du Canada     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.536, CiteScore: 1)
Cancer Control     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Cancer Growth and Metastasis     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Cancer Informatics     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.64, CiteScore: 1)
Capital and Class     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.282, CiteScore: 1)
Cardiac Cath Lab Director     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Cardiovascular and Thoracic Open     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Career Development and Transition for Exceptional Individuals     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.44, CiteScore: 1)
Cartilage     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.889, CiteScore: 3)
Cell Transplantation     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 1.023, CiteScore: 3)
Cephalalgia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 1.581, CiteScore: 3)
Cephalalgia Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Child Language Teaching and Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34, SJR: 0.501, CiteScore: 1)
Child Maltreatment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 1.22, CiteScore: 3)
Child Neurology Open     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Childhood     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19, SJR: 0.894, CiteScore: 2)
Childhood Obesity and Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
China Information     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.767, CiteScore: 2)
China Report     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.221, CiteScore: 0)
Chinese J. of Sociology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Christian Education J. : Research on Educational Ministry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Chronic Illness     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.672, CiteScore: 2)
Chronic Respiratory Disease     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.808, CiteScore: 2)
Chronic Stress     Open Access  
Citizenship, Social and Economics Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.145, CiteScore: 0)
Cleft Palate-Craniofacial J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.757, CiteScore: 1)
Clin-Alert     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Clinical and Applied Thrombosis/Hemostasis     Open Access   (Followers: 32, SJR: 0.49, CiteScore: 1)
Clinical and Translational Neuroscience     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Clinical Case Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.364, CiteScore: 1)
Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 45, SJR: 0.73, CiteScore: 2)
Clinical EEG and Neuroscience     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.552, CiteScore: 2)
Clinical Ethics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.296, CiteScore: 1)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Arthritis and Musculoskeletal Disorders     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.537, CiteScore: 2)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Blood Disorders     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.314, CiteScore: 2)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Cardiology     Open Access   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.686, CiteScore: 2)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Case Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.283, CiteScore: 1)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Circulatory, Respiratory and Pulmonary Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.425, CiteScore: 2)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Ear, Nose and Throat     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Endocrinology and Diabetes     Open Access   (Followers: 33, SJR: 0.63, CiteScore: 2)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Oncology     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 1.129, CiteScore: 3)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Pediatrics     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Psychiatry     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Reproductive Health     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.776, CiteScore: 0)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Therapeutics     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.172, CiteScore: 0)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Trauma and Intensive Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Women's Health     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Clinical Nursing Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34, SJR: 0.471, CiteScore: 1)
Clinical Pathology     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Clinical Pediatrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25, SJR: 0.487, CiteScore: 1)
Clinical Psychological Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16, SJR: 3.281, CiteScore: 5)
Clinical Rehabilitation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 78, SJR: 1.322, CiteScore: 3)
Clinical Risk     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.133, CiteScore: 0)
Clinical Trials     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22, SJR: 2.399, CiteScore: 2)
Clothing and Textiles Research J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28, SJR: 0.36, CiteScore: 1)
Collections : A J. for Museum and Archives Professionals     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Common Law World Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Communication & Sport     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.385, CiteScore: 1)
Communication and the Public     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Communication Disorders Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.458, CiteScore: 1)
Communication Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24, SJR: 2.171, CiteScore: 3)
Community College Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 1.451, CiteScore: 1)
Comparative Political Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 291, SJR: 3.772, CiteScore: 3)
Compensation & Benefits Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Competition & Change     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.843, CiteScore: 2)

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Similar Journals
Journal Cover
British Journal of Visual Impairment
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.337
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 14  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0264-6196 - ISSN (Online) 1744-5809
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1166 journals]
  • Research on visual impairment and blindness in German-speaking countries:
           A special path'

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Martin Giese
      Pages: 3 - 5
      Abstract: British Journal of Visual Impairment, Volume 39, Issue 1, Page 3-5, January 2021.

      Citation: British Journal of Visual Impairment
      PubDate: 2021-01-12T04:27:40Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0264619620982391
      Issue No: Vol. 39, No. 1 (2021)
       
  • Touching and hearing the shapes: How auditory angular and curved sounds
           influence proficiency in recognising tactile angle and curve shapes when
           experienced and inexperienced in using haptic touch

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Torø Graven, Clea Desebrock
      Abstract: British Journal of Visual Impairment, Ahead of Print.
      This study investigated whether adding auditory angular and curved sounds to tactile angle and curve shapes – one unspecified sound to one unspecified shape – positively influences the accuracy and exploration time in recognising tactile angles and curves when experienced and inexperienced in using haptic touch. A within-participant experiment was conducted, with two groups of participants: experienced and inexperienced in using haptic touch, and with two conditions: congruous (e.g., angle shape and angular sound) and incongruous (e.g., angle shape and curved sound) tactile and auditory shape information. Adding congruous auditory angular and curved sounds to tactile angle and curve shapes positively influences the accuracy in recognising tactile angles and curves both when experienced and inexperienced in using haptic touch, and the exploration time on correct recognitions when experienced. People integrate tactile and auditory (angle; curve) shape information and this improves their proficiency in recognising tactile angles and curves.
      Citation: British Journal of Visual Impairment
      PubDate: 2021-04-30T09:10:28Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02646196211003114
       
  • Grade 12 national examination assessment practices for learners with
           visual impairments in selected schools in Mwense and Lusaka districts,
           Zambia

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Sarah Muyoma Ndume
      Abstract: British Journal of Visual Impairment, Ahead of Print.
      The study aimed at examining the practices at Grade 12 level with respect to learners with visual impairments. The sample was drawn from Mwense and Lusaka districts of Zambia. The study was guided by the following objective: to establish the current practices of the Grade 12 national examination assessment for learners with visual impairments in selected schools of Mwense and Lusaka districts, Zambia. The study was qualitative, and a case study design was used. The study comprised 22 respondents consisting of four pupils, six school leavers, and six school specialist teachers, two school headmasters, two Education Standard Office (ESO) in charge of special education, and two officials from the Examination Council of Zambia (ECZ). Semi-structured interviews were used to collect data. Thematic analysis was used to analyse data based on the themes that emerged in the study. The study findings revealed that learners who were totally blind wrote their examinations using braille format, and enlarged print was used for those learners who were partially sighted. The findings of study also showed that the examination questions were modified into a descriptive form, and by doing so, learners were able to access the examinations. The study further revealed that learners were given extra time during the examinations, although this was not adequate. It was equally revealed that there were no special provisions that were considered when marking examination scripts for the learners with visual impairments, meaning their scripts were marked just like other scripts for learners without sight challenges. Based on the findings, it was recommended that the Examination Council of Zambia should come up with a marking centre where the scripts for the learners with visual impairments could be marked to solve the problem of missing results, among others.
      Citation: British Journal of Visual Impairment
      PubDate: 2021-03-26T08:01:25Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0264619621995853
       
  • The associations between vision level and early hand use in children aged
           6–36 months with visual impairment: A cross-sectional, historical case
           note review

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Julia Smyth, Jim Richardson, Alison Salt
      Abstract: British Journal of Visual Impairment, Ahead of Print.
      Vision level varies within the population of children born with visual impairment (VI). Children with profound visual impairment (PVI – with light awareness at best) are more developmentally vulnerable than peers born with typical sight or those with severe visual impairment (SVI – basic form vision). Many children with VI are dependent on their hand skills to support their development. However, the impact of vision level on the development of hand use is poorly understood. The aim of the study was to describe the associations between vision level and early hand use in children between 6 and 36 months of age with SVI and PVI. A historical case note review, including video footage of 19 children with SVI ([math] = 19 months) and 12 children with PVI ([math] = 16 months), was completed. Hand use was observed while the children completed the Reynell-Zinkin Scales. Observations were recorded using a data collection tool designed for the study. The tool included a checklist of developmentally appropriate hand skills expected to emerge in the first 3 years of life. The observer marked each skill as present, absent or emerging in the video clips. Children with SVI used 80.2% (95% confidence interval [CI] = [75.0, 87.5]) of the hand skills under observation. Those with PVI used 57.1% (95% CI = [46.4, 67.9]) of these skills. Vision level and hand use were positively correlated: rs = .564 (95% CI = [.263, .765]), p 
      Citation: British Journal of Visual Impairment
      PubDate: 2021-03-03T12:08:23Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0264619621994867
       
  • Readiness of individuals with visual impairments for participation in
           distance education

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Eleni Koustriava
      Abstract: British Journal of Visual Impairment, Ahead of Print.
      Individuals with visual impairments (VI) may face difficulties fitting in a distance education (DE) program mainly because of accessibility issues and a pervading lack of readiness. The main question was which difficulties and, specifically, which specific aspects of participants’ readiness could jeopardize their attendance in a DE program. The aims of this study were to examine the readiness of individuals with VI for participation in DE and the possible relationships between participants’ readiness for participation and their personal characteristics. A 42-item questionnaire has been developed to examine readiness for participation through five sub-scales referring to motivation, skills, self-management, interaction, and access to technological means (including means of assistive technology). The findings revealed a slightly positive degree of readiness as far as participants’ motivation, perception of their skills, and self-management are concerned and an approximate neutral degree of readiness regarding the aspects of interaction and access to technological means in the context of a DE program. The greater the educational level and the frequency of computer usage, the more positive the readiness for participation.
      Citation: British Journal of Visual Impairment
      PubDate: 2021-02-22T11:27:27Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0264619621994865
       
  • The impact of monocular and binocular visual impairment on the quality of
           life of Brazilian children

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Tais Siqueira Venâncio, Bruna Michele Freire de Araújo, João Vitor Ramos de Toledo Negrão, Lívia de Andrade Freire, Niro Kasahara
      Abstract: British Journal of Visual Impairment, Ahead of Print.
      The purpose of this case–control study was to assess the quality of life (QoL) in children with visual impairment from an urban area in Brazil. Participants included children with binocular and monocular visual impairment and normal controls aged between 4 and 15 years. All subjects underwent a basic ophthalmic exam and answered the Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory™ (PedsQL). The score results were compared among the groups with analysis of variance (ANOVA). The sample included 45 children with visual disability (24 binocular and 21 monocular) and 30 age-matched controls. The groups did not differ in age and gender distribution. The child self-report score for the binocular visual impairment group was lower when compared to controls in all four core scales; as compared to monocular children, the binocular group scored lower in physical health and social functioning. The total score of binocular children (67.9 ± 25.2) was lower than that for monocular children (83.0 ± 13.3, p = .01) and controls (84.2 ± 13.6, p 
      Citation: British Journal of Visual Impairment
      PubDate: 2021-02-22T11:26:47Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0264619621994882
       
  • Content/face validity of motor skill perception questionnaires for youth
           with visual impairments: A Delphi method

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Alexandra Stribing, David F Stodden, Eva Monsma, Lauren J Lieberman, Ali S Brian
      Abstract: British Journal of Visual Impairment, Ahead of Print.
      Youth with visual impairments (VIs) tend to have lower levels of motor competence and physical activity with increased sedentary behavior and risk of obesity when compared to their peers without VIs. Knowing the influence that motor competence plays on physical activity behaviors in childhood, it is important to identify factors, such as self and others’ perceptions, that may be supporting/inhibiting motor competence levels for youth with VIs. To rigorously examine self-perceptions, parents’ perceptions, and metaperceptions, it is important to have instruments with appropriate content and face validity. Therefore, the purpose of this Delphi study was to determine the content/face validity of the self-perception, parents’ perception, and metaperception questionnaires for youth with VIs. Participants (N = 13, male = 2; female = 11) included experts from four categories: (1) teachers directly working with students with VIs in schools (teachers of the visually impaired [TVI], orientation and mobility specialists [O and M], adapted and general physical educators [n = 6]); (2) researchers who publish studies in the field of physical education, motor behavior, or VIs (n = 3); (3) parents of children with VIs (n = 2); and (4) individuals with documented VIs (n = 2). After two rounds of completing the Delphi procedure, results showed means above 4.0 out of 5.0 for all three questionnaires. The panel of experts deemed the content/face validity of the instruments acceptable.
      Citation: British Journal of Visual Impairment
      PubDate: 2021-02-22T11:21:08Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0264619621990687
       
  • An examination of Unified English Braille and its efficiency in
           representing print

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      Authors: Mackenzie Savaiano, Devin M Kearns
      Abstract: British Journal of Visual Impairment, Ahead of Print.
      This study considers whether Unified English Braille provides an efficient representation of printed English. Two databases of English words were used to acquire and calculate information about English orthography that was then used to analyze Unified English Braille (UEB) using a computer program developed by the second author. In general, braille groupsigns and wordsigns represent many of the most frequently occurring letter combinations and words in English. However, there were some braille contractions that are so infrequent, they appear fewer than 100 times per million words or did not appear in the database at all. There was good braille representation within the 50 most frequent words, and our efficiency index showed that braille is already extremely efficient, although there is some mismatch between the order of introduction for braille and the frequency of certain words and letter combinations in English. There is a common understanding that we should teach all of the contractions by the end of third grade, but our results show that some contractions, many of which are shortform words, never appear in school texts. It may be possible to approach instruction of shortform words in a different way.
      Citation: British Journal of Visual Impairment
      PubDate: 2021-02-16T09:01:47Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0264619620973710
       
  • Experiences of individuals with blindness or visual impairment during the
           COVID-19 pandemic lockdown in Hungary

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      Authors: Judit Gombas, Judit Csakvari
      Abstract: British Journal of Visual Impairment, Ahead of Print.
      The Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic and the measures of social distancing and national lockdown had a significant impact on everyday life. Individuals with BVI (blindness and visual impairment) are assumed to face increased barriers in numerous domains of their lives. This online survey research investigates, among Hungarian adults with BVI (N = 132), the impact of the lockdown on their access to shopping, daily support needs, access to remote studies of higher education or work, and leisure habits. Respondents accounted for negative impacts of the lockdown on their participation and independence in all research topics. Issues of accessibility were common both concerning shopping for essential goods and access to remote study and work.
      Citation: British Journal of Visual Impairment
      PubDate: 2021-02-15T06:38:39Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0264619621990695
       
  • The functional ability of older adults with visual impairments: A 2-year
           follow-up study

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      Authors: Kaisa-Mari Mirjam Saarela, Ulla Jämsä, Aura Falck, Helvi Kyngäs, Heidi Johanna Siira
      Abstract: British Journal of Visual Impairment, Ahead of Print.
      This study describes the self-estimated functional ability of older adults with visual impairments (VI) living at home prior to and after 24 months of individual low vision rehabilitation (LVR) according to the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) framework. The LVR was carried out according to regular standard of care in Finland. The study provides knowledge that is relevant for improving both LVR as well as other services for older adults living with VI. Thirty-nine older adults with VI initially participated in the study with 28 remaining for the follow-up at 24 months of LVR. Data were collected by an orally administered questionnaire including items from the Oldwellactive Wellness Profile instrument. Data were analyzed using the marginal homogeneity test, and the outcomes were divided into four categories according to the ICF framework. Comparisons between the baseline and 2-year follow-up revealed statistically significant decreases in daily functions, including going outdoors (p = .011), washing oneself (p = .016), taking care for personal hygiene (p = .046), dressing (p = .034), preparing meals (p = .041), and doing heavy housework (p = .046), following 2 years of received LVR. A statistically significant increase in the need for help was also observed during the study period (p = .025). The independence of older adults with VI decreased, and the need for external services or help increased during 24 months after the onset of receiving LVR. Visual problems were shown to widely affect functional ability. Activities and participation dimension together with loneliness are most affected and need attention in individual LVR.
      Citation: British Journal of Visual Impairment
      PubDate: 2021-02-12T05:53:39Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0264619621991886
       
  • Setting research priorities in age-related vision loss: The first step in
           a critical participatory action research approach

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      Authors: Colleen McGrath
      Abstract: British Journal of Visual Impairment, Ahead of Print.
      There are no known examples of studies utilizing a critical participatory action research (CPAR) approach with older adults aging with vision loss, to better understand how environmental factors impact activity engagement. As such, the aim of this article was to share the process of initiating a CPAR approach with older adults with age-related vision loss to identify a set of research and/or rehabilitation priorities related to the influence of physical, social, cultural, political, and institutional environmental factors on activity engagement. This study utilized a CPAR approach. Eight older adults (aged 65 years of age and older) with a diagnosis of age-related vision loss (including macular degeneration, glaucoma, and/or diabetic retinopathy) took part in three half-day meetings as well as a one-on-one interview over a period of 2 months. Through a series of facilitated group discussions, the older adults identified research and/or rehabilitation priorities related to how environmental influences support or limit the participation of older adults with age-related vision loss (ARVL) in everyday activities. Three research and/or rehabilitation priorities were identified including (1) community mobility; (2) assistive technology; and (3) community support and services. For each priority, the older adults, along with the researchers, answered four key questions including (1) What do we need to know more about' (i.e., research question); (2) How could we learn more about this' (i.e., proposed methods of data collection); (3) Who would we need to involve as key stakeholders' (i.e., participants); and (4) What would change look like' (i.e., action potential). This study shared the process of initiating a CPAR process with eight older adults with ARVL to identify research and/or rehabilitation priorities. By doing so, this study will help to provide direction for future ARVL research and rehabilitation that is grounded, methodologically, in a CPAR approach.
      Citation: British Journal of Visual Impairment
      PubDate: 2021-02-10T10:22:06Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0264619620984219
       
  • Exploring the influence of reading medium on braille learning outcomes: A
           case series of six working-age and older adults

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      Authors: Natalina Martiniello, Walter Wittich
      Abstract: British Journal of Visual Impairment, Ahead of Print.
      Tactile sensitivity is known to decline with age. Braille provides a vital method of reading and writing for working-age and older adults with acquired visual impairment. The proliferation of low-cost braille displays raises new possibilities for adult braille learners, with dots of greater height than standard paper braille, potentially benefitting older adults with reduced tactile sensitivity. This study explored the influence of reading medium (paper vs braille display) on the accuracy and speed of six working-age and older adult braille learners and examined differences when transitioning from one reading medium to another. Findings indicate that (1) learning letters on a braille display resulted in better speed and accuracy (time: M = 44.2, SD = 37.3, accuracy: M = 83%, SD = 24.8%) than on paper (time: M = 54.3, SD = 40.4, accuracy: M = 80.6%, SD = 28.1%); (2) transitioning from one medium to another generally resulted in the same or better performance (reading times decreased by 11.2% and accuracy improved by 2.4%); and (3) the advantage of the braille display appears to be greatest when reading letters in combination (reading times decreased by 26.8% and accuracy improved by 6.5% for letter-pairs vs a 1.9% reduction in speed and a 2% improvement in accuracy for single letters). The benefit of the braille display condition was most pronounced for participants with reduced tactile sensitivity. Although preliminary, these findings suggest that the use of braille displays in early braille instruction may decrease frustration for those with reduced tactile sensitivity and should not adversely affect the ability for learners to transition to standard paper braille, assuming that both formats are introduced and reinforced throughout training.
      Citation: British Journal of Visual Impairment
      PubDate: 2021-02-09T08:33:53Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0264619621990702
       
  • ‘We’re on their side, aren’t we'’ Exploring Qualified Teacher
           of Children and Young People with Vision Impairment (QTVI) views on the
           

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      Authors: Anna Pilson
      Abstract: British Journal of Visual Impairment, Ahead of Print.
      Mindful of the assertion that children with vision impairment (VI) are three times more likely than their peers to develop a mental health problem, this study aimed to identify practitioner-perceived priorities in supporting the emotional well-being of visually impaired children, via eliciting self-reported explorations of professional practice and experiences of Qualified Teacher of Children and Young People with Vision Impairment (QTVI). Using a focus group-based interviewing technique with QTVIs from a single peripatetic VI advisory service in England, the study found that despite evident good practice, the QTVIs could feel inhibited by a lack of confidence in their ability to deliver adequate and appropriate intervention. This stems from a perceived lack of knowledge of resources available, a feeling of ‘reinventing the wheel’ and ‘bolting on’ to existing generic materials to try to improve their relevance to VI, and also an uncertainty regarding ownership of delivery of such interventions. QTVIs demonstrated clear willingness to support the emotional well-being of pupils on their caseload, but expressed a desire for more professional training, a clearer understanding of the breadth of the QTVI role, and a centralisation of knowledge and resources pertaining to emotional well-being. Therefore, this article recommends the development of resources for sharing good practice, as well as encouraging the VI educational sector to provide additional continuing professional development opportunities, and also potentially a review of the course specification of the Mandatory Qualification for Vision Impairment Teaching in England.
      Citation: British Journal of Visual Impairment
      PubDate: 2021-02-03T12:49:28Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0264619620984218
       
  • Assessment of eye movements and selected vision function tests in three
           pupils with albinism: A case study in Tanzania

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      Authors: Gunvor B Wilhelmsen, Mads Gjerstad Eide, Marion Felder
      Abstract: British Journal of Visual Impairment, Ahead of Print.
      Albinism is a huge challenge both socially and educationally in Tanzania and many other countries. Pupils with albinism are normally encouraged to read with a fixed gaze due to their nystagmus, and there are doubts about whether refraction improves their reading.The aim is to get more knowledge about their functional vision as a fundament for educating pupils with albinism.The article presents a case study with three pupils from a primary school in Tanzania who went through a functional assessment of vision using standardized methods and a new eye-tracker software measuring smooth pursuits.The assessment reveals large individual differences not only in visual acuity but also in ocular motor functions.There is a need for better understanding of the vision challenges these pupils face so that professionals can develop more suitable methods in school for securing their education.
      Citation: British Journal of Visual Impairment
      PubDate: 2021-01-18T01:09:11Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0264619620986855
       
 
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