Publisher: Sage Publications   (Total: 1166 journals)

 A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I  J  K  L  M  N  O  P  Q  R  S  T  U  V  W  X  Y  Z  

        1 2 3 4 5 6 | Last   [Sort by number of followers]   [Restore default list]

Showing 1 - 200 of 1166 Journals sorted alphabetically
AADE in Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Abstracts in Anthropology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 29)
Academic Pathology     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Accounting History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18, SJR: 0.527, CiteScore: 1)
Acta Radiologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.754, CiteScore: 2)
Acta Radiologica Open     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Acta Sociologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39, SJR: 0.939, CiteScore: 2)
Action Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 53, SJR: 0.308, CiteScore: 1)
Active Learning in Higher Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 396, SJR: 1.397, CiteScore: 2)
Adaptive Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.288, CiteScore: 1)
Administration & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18, SJR: 0.675, CiteScore: 1)
Adoption & Fostering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25, SJR: 0.313, CiteScore: 0)
Adsorption Science & Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.258, CiteScore: 1)
Adult Education Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 258, SJR: 0.566, CiteScore: 2)
Adult Learning     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 51)
Advances in Dental Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 1.791, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Developing Human Resources     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35, SJR: 0.614, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Mechanical Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 156, SJR: 0.272, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Methods and Practices in Psychological Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20)
Advances in Structural Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 51, SJR: 0.599, CiteScore: 1)
AERA Open     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
Affilia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.496, CiteScore: 1)
Africa Spectrum     Open Access   (Followers: 17)
Agrarian South : J. of Political Economy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Air, Soil & Water Research     Open Access   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.214, CiteScore: 1)
Alexandria : The J. of National and Intl. Library and Information Issues     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 68)
Allergy & Rhinology     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
AlterNative : An Intl. J. of Indigenous Peoples     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 39, SJR: 0.194, CiteScore: 0)
Alternative Law J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.176, CiteScore: 0)
Alternatives : Global, Local, Political     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.351, CiteScore: 1)
Alternatives to Laboratory Animals     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.297, CiteScore: 1)
American Behavioral Scientist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26, SJR: 0.982, CiteScore: 2)
American Economist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
American Educational Research J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 259, SJR: 2.913, CiteScore: 3)
American J. of Alzheimer's Disease and Other Dementias     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23, SJR: 0.67, CiteScore: 2)
American J. of Cosmetic Surgery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
American J. of Evaluation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18, SJR: 0.646, CiteScore: 2)
American J. of Health Promotion     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35, SJR: 0.807, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Hospice and Palliative Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 47, SJR: 0.65, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Law & Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.204, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Lifestyle Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.431, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Medical Quality     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.777, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Men's Health     Open Access   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.595, CiteScore: 2)
American J. of Rhinology and Allergy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.972, CiteScore: 2)
American J. of Sports Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 249, SJR: 3.949, CiteScore: 6)
American Politics Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 36, SJR: 1.313, CiteScore: 1)
American Review of Public Administration     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28, SJR: 2.062, CiteScore: 2)
American Sociological Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 356, SJR: 6.333, CiteScore: 6)
American String Teacher     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Analytical Chemistry Insights     Open Access   (Followers: 26, SJR: 0.224, CiteScore: 1)
Angiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.849, CiteScore: 2)
Animation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.197, CiteScore: 0)
Annals of Clinical Biochemistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.634, CiteScore: 1)
Annals of Otology, Rhinology & Laryngology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20, SJR: 0.807, CiteScore: 1)
Annals of Pharmacotherapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 59, SJR: 1.096, CiteScore: 2)
Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 51, SJR: 1.225, CiteScore: 3)
Annals of the ICRP     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.548, CiteScore: 1)
Anthropocene Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 3.341, CiteScore: 7)
Anthropological Theory     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 48, SJR: 0.739, CiteScore: 1)
Antitrust Bulletin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Antiviral Chemistry and Chemotherapy     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.635, CiteScore: 2)
Antyajaa : Indian J. of Women and Social Change     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Applied Biosafety     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.131, CiteScore: 0)
Applied Psychological Measurement     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21, SJR: 1.17, CiteScore: 1)
Applied Spectroscopy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 27, SJR: 0.489, CiteScore: 2)
Armed Forces & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25, SJR: 0.29, CiteScore: 1)
Arthaniti : J. of Economic Theory and Practice     Full-text available via subscription  
Arts and Humanities in Higher Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 49, SJR: 0.305, CiteScore: 1)
Asia Pacific Media Educator     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.23, CiteScore: 0)
Asia-Pacific J. of Management Research and Innovation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Asia-Pacific J. of Public Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.558, CiteScore: 1)
Asia-Pacific J. of Rural Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Asian and Pacific Migration J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.324, CiteScore: 1)
Asian Cardiovascular and Thoracic Annals     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.305, CiteScore: 0)
Asian J. of Comparative Politics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Asian J. of Legal Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Asian J. of Management Cases     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.101, CiteScore: 0)
ASN Neuro     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 1.534, CiteScore: 3)
Assessment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19, SJR: 1.519, CiteScore: 3)
Assessment for Effective Intervention     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.578, CiteScore: 1)
Australasian J. of Early Childhood     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.535, CiteScore: 1)
Australasian Psychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18, SJR: 0.433, CiteScore: 1)
Australian & New Zealand J. of Psychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30, SJR: 1.801, CiteScore: 2)
Australian and New Zealand J. of Criminology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 546, SJR: 0.612, CiteScore: 1)
Australian J. of Career Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Australian J. of Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 51, SJR: 0.403, CiteScore: 1)
Australian J. of Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.497, CiteScore: 1)
Autism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 355, SJR: 1.739, CiteScore: 4)
Autism & Developmental Language Impairments     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
Avian Biology Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.401, CiteScore: 1)
Behavior Modification     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.877, CiteScore: 2)
Behavioral and Cognitive Neuroscience Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Behavioral Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Beyond Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Bible Translator     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Biblical Theology Bulletin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24, SJR: 0.184, CiteScore: 0)
Big Data & Society     Open Access   (Followers: 55)
Biochemistry Insights     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Bioinformatics and Biology Insights     Open Access   (Followers: 12, SJR: 1.141, CiteScore: 2)
Biological Research for Nursing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.685, CiteScore: 2)
Biomarker Insights     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.81, CiteScore: 2)
Biomarkers in Cancer     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Biomedical Engineering and Computational Biology     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Biomedical Informatics Insights     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Bioscope: South Asian Screen Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.235, CiteScore: 0)
BMS: Bulletin of Sociological Methodology/Bulletin de Méthodologie Sociologique     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.226, CiteScore: 0)
Body & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29, SJR: 1.531, CiteScore: 3)
Bone and Tissue Regeneration Insights     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Brain and Neuroscience Advances     Open Access  
Brain Science Advances     Open Access  
Breast Cancer : Basic and Clinical Research     Open Access   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.823, CiteScore: 2)
British J. of Music Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
British J. of Occupational Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 252, SJR: 0.323, CiteScore: 1)
British J. of Pain     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31, SJR: 0.579, CiteScore: 2)
British J. of Politics and Intl. Relations     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39, SJR: 0.91, CiteScore: 2)
British J. of Visual Impairment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.337, CiteScore: 1)
British J.ism Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
BRQ Business Review Quarterly     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Building Acoustics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.215, CiteScore: 1)
Building Services Engineering Research & Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.583, CiteScore: 1)
Bulletin of Science, Technology & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Business & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Business and Professional Communication Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.348, CiteScore: 1)
Business Information Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17, SJR: 0.279, CiteScore: 0)
Business Perspectives and Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Cahiers Élisabéthains     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.111, CiteScore: 0)
Calcutta Statistical Association Bulletin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
California Management Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 37, SJR: 2.209, CiteScore: 4)
Canadian Association of Radiologists J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.463, CiteScore: 1)
Canadian J. of Kidney Health and Disease     Open Access   (Followers: 8, SJR: 1.007, CiteScore: 2)
Canadian J. of Nursing Research (CJNR)     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Canadian J. of Occupational Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 166, SJR: 0.626, CiteScore: 1)
Canadian J. of Psychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28, SJR: 1.769, CiteScore: 3)
Canadian J. of School Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.266, CiteScore: 1)
Canadian Pharmacists J. / Revue des Pharmaciens du Canada     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.536, CiteScore: 1)
Cancer Control     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Cancer Growth and Metastasis     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Cancer Informatics     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.64, CiteScore: 1)
Capital and Class     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.282, CiteScore: 1)
Cardiac Cath Lab Director     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Cardiovascular and Thoracic Open     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Career Development and Transition for Exceptional Individuals     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.44, CiteScore: 1)
Cartilage     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.889, CiteScore: 3)
Cell Transplantation     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 1.023, CiteScore: 3)
Cephalalgia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 1.581, CiteScore: 3)
Cephalalgia Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Child Language Teaching and Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34, SJR: 0.501, CiteScore: 1)
Child Maltreatment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 1.22, CiteScore: 3)
Child Neurology Open     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Childhood     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19, SJR: 0.894, CiteScore: 2)
Childhood Obesity and Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
China Information     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.767, CiteScore: 2)
China Report     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.221, CiteScore: 0)
Chinese J. of Sociology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Christian Education J. : Research on Educational Ministry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Chronic Illness     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.672, CiteScore: 2)
Chronic Respiratory Disease     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.808, CiteScore: 2)
Chronic Stress     Open Access  
Citizenship, Social and Economics Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.145, CiteScore: 0)
Cleft Palate-Craniofacial J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.757, CiteScore: 1)
Clin-Alert     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Clinical and Applied Thrombosis/Hemostasis     Open Access   (Followers: 32, SJR: 0.49, CiteScore: 1)
Clinical and Translational Neuroscience     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Clinical Case Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.364, CiteScore: 1)
Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 45, SJR: 0.73, CiteScore: 2)
Clinical EEG and Neuroscience     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.552, CiteScore: 2)
Clinical Ethics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.296, CiteScore: 1)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Arthritis and Musculoskeletal Disorders     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.537, CiteScore: 2)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Blood Disorders     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.314, CiteScore: 2)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Cardiology     Open Access   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.686, CiteScore: 2)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Case Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.283, CiteScore: 1)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Circulatory, Respiratory and Pulmonary Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.425, CiteScore: 2)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Ear, Nose and Throat     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Endocrinology and Diabetes     Open Access   (Followers: 33, SJR: 0.63, CiteScore: 2)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Oncology     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 1.129, CiteScore: 3)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Pediatrics     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Psychiatry     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Reproductive Health     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.776, CiteScore: 0)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Therapeutics     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.172, CiteScore: 0)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Trauma and Intensive Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Women's Health     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Clinical Nursing Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34, SJR: 0.471, CiteScore: 1)
Clinical Pathology     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Clinical Pediatrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25, SJR: 0.487, CiteScore: 1)
Clinical Psychological Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16, SJR: 3.281, CiteScore: 5)
Clinical Rehabilitation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 78, SJR: 1.322, CiteScore: 3)
Clinical Risk     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.133, CiteScore: 0)
Clinical Trials     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22, SJR: 2.399, CiteScore: 2)
Clothing and Textiles Research J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28, SJR: 0.36, CiteScore: 1)
Collections : A J. for Museum and Archives Professionals     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Common Law World Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Communication & Sport     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.385, CiteScore: 1)
Communication and the Public     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Communication Disorders Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.458, CiteScore: 1)
Communication Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24, SJR: 2.171, CiteScore: 3)
Community College Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 1.451, CiteScore: 1)
Comparative Political Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 291, SJR: 3.772, CiteScore: 3)
Compensation & Benefits Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Competition & Change     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.843, CiteScore: 2)

        1 2 3 4 5 6 | Last   [Sort by number of followers]   [Restore default list]

Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Communication Disorders Quarterly
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.458
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 15  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1525-7401 - ISSN (Online) 1538-4837
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1166 journals]
  • Preliminary Findings on Self-Reported Voice Disorders in Urban Ghana: A
           Qualitative Description Study

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Clement Amponsah, Godwin Tettevi, Leticia Gomado, Alicia Heitzman, Aaron Ziegler
      Pages: 40 - 49
      Abstract: Communication Disorders Quarterly, Volume 42, Issue 1, Page 40-49, November 2020.
      This preliminary qualitative description study explored knowledge from urban Ghanaians about the nature and impact of their self-reported voice problem. Ten Ghanaians were screened for a self-reported voice disorder using the Voice Handicap Index–10 (VHI-10), and they also completed a structured interview with a speech-language therapist. Content analysis was completed from interview responses using quantification of data. Four out of 10 adult Ghanaians demonstrated high VHI-10 scores that indicated a self-reported voice disorder. Themes that emerged included a recurring problem with voice, multiple vocal impairments, limitations with participating in vocal activities, and other health problems. Lack of financial resources and little knowledge about voice disorders were barriers to accessing care. In summary, four adult Ghanaians with a self-reported voice disorder described multiple problems with their voice, limiting their participation in vocal activities. Implications of these preliminary findings include early identification and improving voice care access to avoid handicapping voice problems.
      Citation: Communication Disorders Quarterly
      PubDate: 2020-04-24T08:27:11Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1525740120915642
      Issue No: Vol. 42, No. 1 (2020)
       
  • Examining the Quality of Individualized Education Plan (IEP) Goals for
           Children With Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI)

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Katherine Goodwin, Kelly Farquharson, Christina Yeager Pelatti, Whitney Schneider-Cline, Judy Harvey, Erin Bush
      Abstract: Communication Disorders Quarterly, Ahead of Print.
      The purpose of this descriptive study was to investigate the quality of Individualized Education Plan (IEP) goals for students with traumatic brain injury (TBI) using an empirically based rating instrument. One hundred twenty-five IEP goals for 49 students with TBI were coded using the Revised IEP/IFSP Goals and Objective Rating Instrument (R-GORI; Notari). Using this dichotomous measure, we analyzed the quality of IEP goals across six areas: observability, measurability, functionality, generalizability, application in daily tasks, and clarity of goals. On average, students had three IEP goals (range: 1–8). The average goal quality score was 3.74 (range: 1–6). While most of the goals were measurable, only a few contained details about how the goals could be generalized beyond the specific educational or therapeutic environment. These findings highlight variability in the quality of IEP goals, which may have implications to the therapeutic environment and child outcomes.
      Citation: Communication Disorders Quarterly
      PubDate: 2020-11-30T01:32:43Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1525740120976113
       
  • Directive-Following Based on Graphic Symbol Sentences Involving an
           Animated Verb Symbol: An Exploratory Study

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Nicole Choe, Howard Shane, Ralf W. Schlosser, Charles W. Haynes, Anna Allen
      Abstract: Communication Disorders Quarterly, Ahead of Print.
      Many children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) demonstrate poor comprehension of language at the sentence level in both the spoken modality and the graphic symbol modality. This study explored whether children with ASD are able to follow directives when presented with a graphic symbol sentence that includes an animated symbol for a verb. A total of five participants with moderate-to-severe ASD were presented with 10 graphic symbol sentences and asked to perform the directive using the provided figurines/objects. Results demonstrated that children with ASD can correctly carry out full-sentence directives to varying degrees when the directives represented graphically include an animated verb. Several observations were noted pertaining to participants’ performance and autism severity. The results of this study may have important implications for using animation as a tool to facilitate symbol syntax comprehension.
      Citation: Communication Disorders Quarterly
      PubDate: 2020-11-28T06:52:39Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1525740120976332
       
  • Specific EF-Related Tasks and Reading in Adolescents With Typical Hearing
           or a Cochlear Implant

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Mario Figueroa, Núria Silvestre, Sònia Darbra
      Abstract: Communication Disorders Quarterly, Ahead of Print.
      The acquisition of effective reading comprehension for adolescents with cochlear implant (CI) in inclusive settings is crucial for ensuring the benefit of current traditional reading curricula and instructional practices. Executive functions (EF) are recognized as important cognitive processes during reading by students with typical hearing (TH). This study compared the relationship between EF and reading comprehension in adolescents with TH and CI. Three tests sessions were performed on two groups of adolescents between 12 and 16 years old (36 with CI and 54 with TH). Reading comprehension was assessed by a standardized reading battery and EF by computerized tests. The results indicated that adolescents with CI perform EF tasks with a similar efficiency as the TH group, but the performance of CI group on expository texts was lower than in TH students. Reading comprehension of expository texts was related to inhibition and shifting in adolescents with CI.
      Citation: Communication Disorders Quarterly
      PubDate: 2020-11-28T06:52:19Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1525740120976109
       
  • Social Validity Evaluation of the Hanen Program It Takes Two to Talk®
           in Spain

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Nuria Senent-Capuz, Inmaculada Baixauli Fortea, María J. Perales
      Abstract: Communication Disorders Quarterly, Ahead of Print.
      This study sought to assess the social validity of It Takes Two to Talk (ITTT)®—The Hanen Program for parents, delivered to families of children with language delays in Valencia, Spain. Social validity was assessed using a multi-method approach—questionnaires (filled out by the parents) and a focus group—at different times during the program and at follow-up. The acceptability of the procedures used in ITTT® was positive in terms of the program format and the didactic resources used, such as the video-recordings of the parent–child interactions. Parents also expressed their overall satisfaction with the results, regarding changes in their communication style and the advances observed in their child’s language development. However, some suggestions were made to better meet the families’ needs related to the length of the program and distribution of the contents, the time devoted to individual training, and the adaptation to the context.
      Citation: Communication Disorders Quarterly
      PubDate: 2020-10-28T10:24:11Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1525740120967013
       
  • Written Language Usage With Pen and Technology in Adults Across
           Generations

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Angel L. Ball, Whitney A. Postman
      Abstract: Communication Disorders Quarterly, Ahead of Print.
      Writing formats have expanded beyond the pen to include new technologies, particularly in this era of immediate digital communication. Rehabilitation professionals are not routinely incorporating writing formats using technology, such as texting, keyboard, or tablet interfaces when evaluating and treating adult writing disorders. The purpose of this study was to obtain normative baseline information about the writing behaviors of typical adults across generations. A total of 199 respondents, ages 18–106, provided data on rating importance of format, frequency of use, and ranking of writing activities. Findings indicated that the importance of technology for communication, learning, and work activities exists across the generations (except the centenarian). Written forms of enjoyment, such as crossword puzzles, song lyrics, and story writing were meaningful to younger as well as older generations. Obtaining client perspectives on writing activities and formats that are personally relevant and meaningful can help the clinician create a more client-based program.
      Citation: Communication Disorders Quarterly
      PubDate: 2020-10-09T12:40:48Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1525740120961318
       
  • Investigating the Assessment Procedures for Children With Complex
           Communication Needs

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Elena Theodorou, Eliada Pampoulou
      Abstract: Communication Disorders Quarterly, Ahead of Print.
      Successful intervention outcomes and comprehensive assessment is important, for people who rely on augmentative and alternative communication (AAC). However, the literature surrounding AAC assessment remains sparse. The purposes of this project were to describe the AAC assessment process followed by speech and language pathologists (SLPs) and to suggest areas for a comprehensive assessment. The research questions are (a) to identify the training received and (b) to explore the key elements of the assessment process. A questionnaire was developed based on the Participation Model and completed by 89 SLPs. The findings show that SLPs base their AAC assessment on clinical decisions, taking into consideration a number of elements, such as language, communication, and social skills. However, the process uncovered through this research cannot be characterized neither comprehensive nor systematic. The findings indicate that further training on AAC assessment is warranted, thus ensuring high quality of services for people with complex communication needs.
      Citation: Communication Disorders Quarterly
      PubDate: 2020-09-30T10:44:38Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1525740120960643
       
  • Speech-Language Pathology Graduate Admissions: Implications to Diversify
           the Workforce

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Mark Guiberson, Debra Vigil
      Abstract: Communication Disorders Quarterly, Ahead of Print.
      The purpose of this survey study was to describe screening and admission processes and considerations for graduate speech-language pathology (SLP) programs, with an eye for how programs consider cultural and linguistic diversity (CLD) in these processes. Responses were obtained from 110 graduate SLP programs. In addition to admission processes and decisions, the survey also asked specific questions about how bilingualism was considered, holistic admission processes and outcomes, and barriers to recruiting students from CLD backgrounds into programs. Based on results obtained as well as knowledge from admission considerations for other professional degree programs and trends in the field, the authors present promising undergraduate supports and holistic admission processes to recruit diverse students to graduate programs.
      Citation: Communication Disorders Quarterly
      PubDate: 2020-09-29T07:41:25Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1525740120961049
       
  • Corrigendum to Effects of a Story Grammar Intervention With Repeated
           Retells for English Learners With Language Impairments

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Communication Disorders Quarterly, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Communication Disorders Quarterly
      PubDate: 2020-09-12T05:32:50Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1525740120960327
       
  • SLP Service Delivery Decisions: How Are They Made'

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Jayne Brandel
      Abstract: Communication Disorders Quarterly, Ahead of Print.
      The Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) requires Individualized Education Programs (IEPs) be developed utilizing a team-based model. This study examined how speech-language pathologists (SLPs) make service delivery decisions for students with language disorders. Four hundred thirty-nine SLPs participated in a national online survey regarding how they determined the place and intensity of services for students with language disorders. SLPs most often made service delivery decisions after receiving input from the team, but slightly more than one third made decisions independently. The school teaming model and SLP experiences during graduate school affected how SLPs made service delivery decisions. The results indicate that service delivery decisions in the schools are made primarily by the SLP with varying levels of input from others on the student’s IEP team. The need for changes in practice as well as preprofessional training and professional development to prepare practitioners for interprofessional practice is discussed.
      Citation: Communication Disorders Quarterly
      PubDate: 2020-08-22T10:53:36Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1525740120951185
       
  • Social Support and Student Engagement Among Deaf or Hard-of-Hearing
           Students

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Sanyin Cheng, Meng Deng, Yuqin Yang
      Abstract: Communication Disorders Quarterly, Ahead of Print.
      This study explores how students’ social support are related to their engagement, by administering the Chinese Version of Zimet’s Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support (MSPSS-C) and the Student Engagement Scale to 225 deaf or hard-of-hearing (D/HH) school students in mainland China. Results show that, among all participants, those with higher levels of social support scored higher on student engagement, whereas those with lower levels of social support had lower scores. The contributions, limitations, and implications of the present research are discussed.
      Citation: Communication Disorders Quarterly
      PubDate: 2020-08-21T02:02:36Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1525740120950638
       
  • Adapting a Picture Description Task for Grammatical Analysis in
           English–Spanish Bilingual Preschool Children

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Vanesa P. Smith, Isabel Cano, Lisa Lozada, Connie Summers
      Abstract: Communication Disorders Quarterly, Ahead of Print.
      The purpose of this study was to assess the use of an adapted picture description task described by Eisenberg and Guo to explore the morphosyntactic error patterns of English–Spanish preschool simultaneous bilingual learners. Language samples were collected from 28 bilingual preschool children aged 3 to 5 years. Language samples were elicited in both English and Spanish using a series of pictures and elicitation questions/prompts. Twenty-one participants produced a language sample in only one language (16 in English and 5 in Spanish) and seven participants produced language samples in both languages. Language samples were analyzed for grammaticality and error types. There were a higher number of fragments, tense marker, and grammatical morphemes errors in English. In Spanish, the children demonstrated more argument structure and pronominal form errors than in English. The adapted picture description task demonstrated sensitivity to common errors in English and Spanish and shows promise for use with bilingual populations.
      Citation: Communication Disorders Quarterly
      PubDate: 2020-08-18T09:16:06Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1525740120950274
       
  • Graduate Students’ Clinical Self-Efficacy: Impact of an Intensive Cleft
           Lip and Palate Clinical Practicum

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Miriam Baigorri, Catherine J. Crowley, Chelsea L. Sommer, Jessica Baquero, Gemma Moya-Galé
      Abstract: Communication Disorders Quarterly, Ahead of Print.
      This study aimed to examine self-efficacy as graduate students gained clinical skills during an intensive international cleft lip and palate (CLP) clinical practicum. A total of 17 graduate students in the Communication Sciences and Disorders program at Teachers College (TC), Columbia University, participated in a CLP clinical practicum for 5 days and completed a self-efficacy survey that measured their confidence in evaluation, treatment, and professional behavior at the beginning and end of their CLP clinical practicum. Clinical supervisors answered questions regarding graduate students’ performance at the end of their CLP clinical practicum. A significant pre-to-post-practicum group effect was found for all dependent variables under the self-efficacy evaluation and treatment categories. Supervisors’ perceptions of students’ initial performance and progression were overall consistent with the students’ ratings of self-efficacy. This intensive practicum program for CLP may be an effective way to increase graduate students’ experiences in working with children with CLP.
      Citation: Communication Disorders Quarterly
      PubDate: 2020-07-24T10:37:15Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1525740120942463
       
  • Original Interprofessional Simulations to Train Students in CSD and
           Related Health Professions in Team-Based Health Care

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Naomi Eichorn, Melissa Zarn, Deborah Moncrieff, Caroline Sposto, Shirleatha Lee, Joy E. Hoffman, Marian Levy, Jason Caplan
      Abstract: Communication Disorders Quarterly, Ahead of Print.
      Students in health professions receive extensive training across the scope of practice within their profession; however, most lack experience in performing clinical functions as a member of a coordinated health care team. We describe outcomes of a quasi-experimental study that used simulations to target interprofessional practice competencies. Simulations incorporated clinical knowledge from five professions, and used standardized patients to provide students with a low-stakes opportunity to apply knowledge and skills. Students observed one simulation and participated in another. Post-simulation quantitative and qualitative data were collected by having students, faculty, and standardized patients rate collaboration and decision-making skills for each interprofessional team. Results indicate differences in ratings based on simulation round and rater group. Findings highlight the need for focused training in the use of clear and empathic communication by interprofessional teams. Results also demonstrate the value of feedback from standardized patients who can provide important perspectives regarding the quality of clinical interactions.
      Citation: Communication Disorders Quarterly
      PubDate: 2020-07-17T05:07:52Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1525740120942127
       
  • An Exploration of Mindfulness in Speech-Language Pathology

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Angela M. Medina, Jean S. Mead
      Abstract: Communication Disorders Quarterly, Ahead of Print.
      For decades, mindfulness practices have been studied and applied across professions such as health care, business, education, law, and counseling as a means to reduce workforce stress and improve patient/client outcomes. Literature describing applications and outcomes of mindfulness has been growing in the field of speech-language pathology. While there is an abundance of work on treating fluency disorders as well as adult cognitive and language deficits, reports of the successful application of mindfulness techniques in the service area domain of voice are expanding. The purpose of this article is to describe mindfulness and how mindfulness techniques are currently being applied in the practice of speech-language pathology with clients as well as parents and caregivers of clients. Suggested mindfulness activities and means for measuring change in the context of speech therapy are described.
      Citation: Communication Disorders Quarterly
      PubDate: 2020-07-15T01:21:42Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1525740120942141
       
  • Connective Use in Academic Writing by Students With Language Learning
           Disabilities From Diverse Linguistic Backgrounds

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Carla L. Wood
      Abstract: Communication Disorders Quarterly, Ahead of Print.
      The aims of the current project included to (a) describe the use of connectives in written language samples by fifth grade students, (b) examine differences in connective use between groups who differed in English proficiency and exceptionalities, and (c) examine the predictive relationship between connective measures and writing quality ratings. Investigators utilized written expository responses of 1,128 students in fifth grade who differed in English proficiency and language ability. The sample included 214 English learners and 144 students with language learning disabilities (LLD). Group differences were examined in the use of advanced connective words in academic writing. Regression analysis was used to examine connective measures as predictors of overall writing quality rating. Students with LLD used advanced connectives less frequently than their peers and demonstrated less variety in their connective word use. Two connective measures (total number of advanced connectives and the ratio of connectives) were significant predictors of writing quality. Findings support the need for additional efforts to improve the use of cohesive devices in academic writing for students with LLD to minimize achievement gaps.
      Citation: Communication Disorders Quarterly
      PubDate: 2020-07-03T01:45:06Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1525740120933569
       
  • Phonological Characteristics of Korean-Speaking Children With Phonological
           Disorders: Preliminary Results

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Minjung Kim, Soo-Jin Kim, Carol Stoel-Gammon
      Abstract: Communication Disorders Quarterly, Ahead of Print.
      This study investigates phonological characteristics of Korean monolingual children with phonological disorders (PD), using data from 13 children aged 3.6 to 5.9, and compares the analyses of single-word productions (SW) to those of conversational speech (CS). Phonological analyses include overall percentage of consonants correct (PCC), individual phoneme accuracy, and phonological error patterns. Results indicate that children with PD have persistent difficulty with affricates, fricatives, and the liquid /l/. Overall consonant accuracy tends to be greater in CS than SW. Phonological errors that may be explained by language-specific phonological and phonetic properties of Korean are noted.
      Citation: Communication Disorders Quarterly
      PubDate: 2020-06-30T09:53:43Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1525740120936975
       
  • Peer Mediators’ Use of Prompting to Increase Social Communication in
           Students with Disabilities

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Kera B. Ackerman, Amy D. Spriggs, Alice L. Rhodes
      Abstract: Communication Disorders Quarterly, Ahead of Print.
      Social communication is a key component in building and maintaining friendships. However, students with autism spectrum disorder and intellectual disability often exhibit deficits in communication behaviors. Peer-mediated interventions are an evidence-based practice in increasing social communication skills for elementary and middle school students. Systematic instruction has been used as an intervention for both academic and functional skills. This study utilized a multiple probe design across students to assess the effectiveness of training two high school aged peer mediators to implement a system of least prompts strategy during a leisure activity to elicit social communication behaviors from four same age peers with disabilities. Results showed increases in initiations and independent responses when system of least prompts was used effectively by peer mediators. Future implications are discussed.
      Citation: Communication Disorders Quarterly
      PubDate: 2020-06-27T05:42:53Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1525740120936999
       
  • Word Retrieval and Lexical Organization in Children With Hearing Loss and
           Developmental Language Disorder

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Annette Esbensen, Pia Thomsen
      Abstract: Communication Disorders Quarterly, Ahead of Print.
      Word retrieval and lexical organization were explored in 16 Danish children with slight to severe hearing loss (HL), 11 children with developmental language disorder (DLD), and 25 typically developing (TD) children in the age range of 7 to 12 years. There is a special focus on children with HL with and without language difficulties compared with children with DLD. Word retrieval and lexical organization are assessed with a Semantic Verbal Fluency Task. Background assessment of language comprehension is assessed with Test for Reception of Grammar–Version 2 (TROG-2) and nonverbal IQ is assessed with Block Design from the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children–Fourth Edition (WISC-IV). Main findings show that children with HL without language difficulties did not show any significant word retrieval or lexical organization difficulties compared with TD children. However, there was a resemblance between children with DLD and children with HL with language difficulties in word retrieval and lexical organization.
      Citation: Communication Disorders Quarterly
      PubDate: 2020-06-20T06:15:40Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1525740120932531
       
  • Speech-Language Pathologists’ Perceptions of Pre-Service Knowledge and
           Skill Training in Early Intervention

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Lena G. Caesar
      Abstract: Communication Disorders Quarterly, Ahead of Print.
      Two survey instruments were used to gather information from speech-language pathologists (SLPs) and university personnel (UP) regarding their perceptions of the adequacy of SLP training for providing early intervention (EI) services. In the SLP survey, respondents were asked to rate their perceptions of training adequacy in specific EI Knowledge and Skill Acquisition (KASA) areas. UP were also surveyed regarding their perceptions of the adequacy of their programs’ academic preparation in EI. Results from 189 SLPs employed in EI settings indicated that less than 50% agreed that their academic preparation in the majority of EI knowledge and skill areas was adequate. However, with the exception of service coordination and linguistic diversity, the majority of UP (90%–100%) perceived that their graduate programs provided students with adequate training for serving EI populations. Implications of respondents’ differing perspectives will be discussed.
      Citation: Communication Disorders Quarterly
      PubDate: 2020-06-01T11:17:22Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1525740120924801
       
  • An Exploratory Survey of Priorities in Establishing Telepractice System
           for SLPs and Caregivers in Korea

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Jeewon Yoo, Mi-sun Yoon, Chi Kyou Lee, Gyung-Hun Hong, Seong Jun Choi
      Abstract: Communication Disorders Quarterly, Ahead of Print.
      This study investigated factors prioritized by speech-language pathologists (SLPs) and caregivers for telehealth services involving speech-language assessments and interventions and determined whether the priorities differed between SLPs and caregivers in Korea. The survey data obtained from 23 SLPs and 50 caregivers were analyzed using analytic hierarchical process (AHP) methodology. The results showed that the “SLP” category was the most important high-level category and “building rapport with the child client” in the “SLP” category was of the highest priorities for both SLPs and caregivers across all factors. Furthermore, the rank-order of a few categories and the global priority between SLPs and caregivers varied slightly. These findings suggest that, in addition to important factors associated with SLPs and caregivers, the different expectations of service providers and clients using telepractice in Korea should be addressed.
      Citation: Communication Disorders Quarterly
      PubDate: 2020-05-16T11:24:04Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1525740120916414
       
  • Auditory Intervention in Late-Identified Children With Hearing Loss

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Beatriz de Diego-Lázaro, María Adelaida Restrepo
      Abstract: Communication Disorders Quarterly, Ahead of Print.
      This study examined the effects of a 9-week auditory intervention on the auditory skills of five children with hearing loss who experienced prolonged auditory deprivation before receiving hearing aids. A single-case multiple baseline design across participants was used to examine the effect of the intervention on the children’s auditory skills using a weekly probe. The analyses showed a moderate to high intervention effect for three out of five participants. Children demonstrated gains in detection, discrimination, and identification, and Participant 5 also showed gains in sentence comprehension. Findings provide preliminary support for offering auditory intervention to children with hearing loss who are late identified and aided in the presence of residual hearing.
      Citation: Communication Disorders Quarterly
      PubDate: 2020-05-13T05:55:58Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1525740120915427
       
  • Speech-Language Pathologists’ Perceived Competence in Working With
           Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Clients in the United States

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Sabiha Parveen, Siva priya Santhanam
      Abstract: Communication Disorders Quarterly, Ahead of Print.
      A clinician’s perceived competence determines his or her ability to attain clinical outcomes and persevere through challenging situations. This study examined the perceived competence of 337 speech-language pathologists (SLPs), including monolingual and bilingual, working with culturally and linguistically diverse (CLD) clients within the United States. Results indicated comparable competence levels of both monolingual and bilingual SLPs in their service delivery to monolingual English-speaking clients. However, bilingual SLPs reported significantly higher competency than monolingual SLPs while working with non-English-speaking clients in different areas of service delivery, including speech and language assessment, dealing with challenging clinical situations, and responding to questions regarding intervention outcomes. It is likely that language concordance, awareness, and understanding of linguistic and cultural expectations of non-English-speakers help surpass communication barriers leading to increased perceived competence among bilingual SLPs. This study summarizes persisting challenges in service delivery of CLD populations and possible recommendations for preservice training of SLPs.
      Citation: Communication Disorders Quarterly
      PubDate: 2020-04-29T07:40:19Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1525740120915205
       
  • Oral Expressive Outcomes in Late-Identified Children With Hearing Loss

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Beatriz de Diego-Lázaro, María Adelaida Restrepo
      Abstract: Communication Disorders Quarterly, Ahead of Print.
      This case study described the oral expressive outcomes of five children with hearing loss who experienced prolonged auditory deprivation prior to participating in an auditory intervention. Expressive outcomes were measured by the number of spontaneous words and imitations. Visual analyses revealed that two of the five participants increased their oral expressive skills during the intervention. The results suggest that children with hearing loss who are late identified and aided can still develop some basic oral expressive skills, but they would probably benefit from interventions that directly target the use of words expressively.
      Citation: Communication Disorders Quarterly
      PubDate: 2020-04-29T07:39:04Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1525740120915429
       
  • Factors Influencing Speech-Language Pathologists’ Application of
           Terminology for Describing Pediatric Language Assessments

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Deborah Denman, Nathan J. Wilson, Natalie Munro, Jae-Hyun Kim, Renée Speyer, Reinie Cordier
      Abstract: Communication Disorders Quarterly, Ahead of Print.
      This study investigated speech-language pathologists’ (SLPs) perceptions of factors that influence application of a new taxonomy with terminology for describing child language assessment and identified strategies that may facilitate use of taxonomy terminology to collect data on SLP assessment practice. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 13 SLPs and data were analyzed using thematic analysis. Three main themes were identified in relation to factors that may influence application including applying the taxonomy is arduous, contextual factors may influence application, and SLP experience and knowledge may influence application. Participants identified a number of strategies to facilitate use of taxonomy by SLPs. Findings from this study give insight into the factors that influence SLPs’ application of a taxonomy of assessment terms. These findings are important for all SLPs in the child language field to consider if the profession is to be effective in establishing greater consistency in use of professional terminology.
      Citation: Communication Disorders Quarterly
      PubDate: 2020-04-26T03:16:49Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1525740120915176
       
  • Perspectives of Adults With Autism on Social Communication Intervention

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Siva priya Santhanam, Lynne E. Hewitt
      Abstract: Communication Disorders Quarterly, Ahead of Print.
      Social communication difficulties are part of the core difficulties experienced by individuals with autism. Speech-language pathologists provide intervention and supports for these difficulties. Little is known about the own experiences and views of adults with autism about these services. Using semi-structured ethnographic interviewing, perspectives of eight adults (six currently attending college) with autism on social communication intervention were investigated. Participants articulated strengths and weaknesses in social communication, offering frank views of interventions received. Five themes regarding social communication intervention emerged: belief that intervention was ineffective and unnecessary; preference for one-on-one intervention; need for more real-world practice; friend and peer challenges and successes; and desire for more neurotypical understanding. Participants additionally offered general views on social functioning as well as advice for communication partners and other people with autism. In designing interventions for social communication impairments, the experiences and beliefs of those receiving the interventions should be a central element.
      Citation: Communication Disorders Quarterly
      PubDate: 2020-02-15T06:36:34Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1525740120905501
       
  • Using Qualitative Methodologies in Speech-Language Pathology: An Example
           From Serving Students With Hearing Loss

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Carol E. Westby
      Abstract: Communication Disorders Quarterly, Ahead of Print.
      This article demonstrates the use of qualitative methodologies to provide a description of an intervention framework and goals for students with hearing loss in general education. Because of advances in technology, the majority of students with hearing loss are now educated in general education classrooms. Many of these students are not eligible for special education services although their hearing loss does compromise their functioning in many areas of daily life. This investigation employed two qualitative methods—the biographical narrative interpretive method and ethnography—to provide insight into the personal experiences of a speech-language pathologist with a hearing loss and the way her experiences influenced the nature, rationale for, and content of the intervention program she implemented for students with hearing loss in general education programs. The qualitative methods are described, examples of qualitative analyses are provided, and the components of the program for elementary school students are presented.
      Citation: Communication Disorders Quarterly
      PubDate: 2020-02-10T10:40:09Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1525740120902993
       
 
JournalTOCs
School of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
Heriot-Watt University
Edinburgh, EH14 4AS, UK
Email: journaltocs@hw.ac.uk
Tel: +00 44 (0)131 4513762
 


Your IP address: 3.236.51.151
 
Home (Search)
API
About JournalTOCs
News (blog, publications)
JournalTOCs on Twitter   JournalTOCs on Facebook

JournalTOCs © 2009-