Publisher: Sage Publications   (Total: 1166 journals)

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Showing 1 - 200 of 1166 Journals sorted alphabetically
AADE in Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Abstracts in Anthropology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 29)
Academic Pathology     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Accounting History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18, SJR: 0.527, CiteScore: 1)
Acta Radiologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.754, CiteScore: 2)
Acta Radiologica Open     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Acta Sociologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39, SJR: 0.939, CiteScore: 2)
Action Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 53, SJR: 0.308, CiteScore: 1)
Active Learning in Higher Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 398, SJR: 1.397, CiteScore: 2)
Adaptive Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.288, CiteScore: 1)
Administration & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18, SJR: 0.675, CiteScore: 1)
Adoption & Fostering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25, SJR: 0.313, CiteScore: 0)
Adsorption Science & Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.258, CiteScore: 1)
Adult Education Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 262, SJR: 0.566, CiteScore: 2)
Adult Learning     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 51)
Advances in Dental Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 1.791, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Developing Human Resources     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35, SJR: 0.614, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Mechanical Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 156, SJR: 0.272, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Methods and Practices in Psychological Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20)
Advances in Structural Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 51, SJR: 0.599, CiteScore: 1)
AERA Open     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
Affilia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.496, CiteScore: 1)
Africa Spectrum     Open Access   (Followers: 17)
Agrarian South : J. of Political Economy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Air, Soil & Water Research     Open Access   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.214, CiteScore: 1)
Alexandria : The J. of National and Intl. Library and Information Issues     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 68)
Allergy & Rhinology     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
AlterNative : An Intl. J. of Indigenous Peoples     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 39, SJR: 0.194, CiteScore: 0)
Alternative Law J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.176, CiteScore: 0)
Alternatives : Global, Local, Political     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.351, CiteScore: 1)
Alternatives to Laboratory Animals     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.297, CiteScore: 1)
American Behavioral Scientist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26, SJR: 0.982, CiteScore: 2)
American Economist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
American Educational Research J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 260, SJR: 2.913, CiteScore: 3)
American J. of Alzheimer's Disease and Other Dementias     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23, SJR: 0.67, CiteScore: 2)
American J. of Cosmetic Surgery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
American J. of Evaluation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18, SJR: 0.646, CiteScore: 2)
American J. of Health Promotion     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35, SJR: 0.807, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Hospice and Palliative Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 47, SJR: 0.65, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Law & Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.204, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Lifestyle Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.431, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Medical Quality     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.777, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Men's Health     Open Access   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.595, CiteScore: 2)
American J. of Rhinology and Allergy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.972, CiteScore: 2)
American J. of Sports Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 249, SJR: 3.949, CiteScore: 6)
American Politics Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 36, SJR: 1.313, CiteScore: 1)
American Review of Public Administration     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28, SJR: 2.062, CiteScore: 2)
American Sociological Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 358, SJR: 6.333, CiteScore: 6)
American String Teacher     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Analytical Chemistry Insights     Open Access   (Followers: 26, SJR: 0.224, CiteScore: 1)
Angiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.849, CiteScore: 2)
Animation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.197, CiteScore: 0)
Annals of Clinical Biochemistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.634, CiteScore: 1)
Annals of Otology, Rhinology & Laryngology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20, SJR: 0.807, CiteScore: 1)
Annals of Pharmacotherapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 59, SJR: 1.096, CiteScore: 2)
Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 51, SJR: 1.225, CiteScore: 3)
Annals of the ICRP     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.548, CiteScore: 1)
Anthropocene Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 3.341, CiteScore: 7)
Anthropological Theory     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 48, SJR: 0.739, CiteScore: 1)
Antitrust Bulletin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Antiviral Chemistry and Chemotherapy     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.635, CiteScore: 2)
Antyajaa : Indian J. of Women and Social Change     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Applied Biosafety     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.131, CiteScore: 0)
Applied Psychological Measurement     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21, SJR: 1.17, CiteScore: 1)
Applied Spectroscopy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 27, SJR: 0.489, CiteScore: 2)
Armed Forces & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25, SJR: 0.29, CiteScore: 1)
Arthaniti : J. of Economic Theory and Practice     Full-text available via subscription  
Arts and Humanities in Higher Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 49, SJR: 0.305, CiteScore: 1)
Asia Pacific Media Educator     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.23, CiteScore: 0)
Asia-Pacific J. of Management Research and Innovation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Asia-Pacific J. of Public Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.558, CiteScore: 1)
Asia-Pacific J. of Rural Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Asian and Pacific Migration J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.324, CiteScore: 1)
Asian Cardiovascular and Thoracic Annals     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.305, CiteScore: 0)
Asian J. of Comparative Politics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Asian J. of Legal Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Asian J. of Management Cases     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.101, CiteScore: 0)
ASN Neuro     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 1.534, CiteScore: 3)
Assessment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19, SJR: 1.519, CiteScore: 3)
Assessment for Effective Intervention     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.578, CiteScore: 1)
Australasian J. of Early Childhood     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.535, CiteScore: 1)
Australasian Psychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18, SJR: 0.433, CiteScore: 1)
Australian & New Zealand J. of Psychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30, SJR: 1.801, CiteScore: 2)
Australian and New Zealand J. of Criminology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 547, SJR: 0.612, CiteScore: 1)
Australian J. of Career Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Australian J. of Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 51, SJR: 0.403, CiteScore: 1)
Australian J. of Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.497, CiteScore: 1)
Autism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 358, SJR: 1.739, CiteScore: 4)
Autism & Developmental Language Impairments     Open Access   (Followers: 17)
Avian Biology Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.401, CiteScore: 1)
Behavior Modification     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.877, CiteScore: 2)
Behavioral and Cognitive Neuroscience Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Behavioral Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Beyond Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Bible Translator     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Biblical Theology Bulletin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24, SJR: 0.184, CiteScore: 0)
Big Data & Society     Open Access   (Followers: 55)
Biochemistry Insights     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Bioinformatics and Biology Insights     Open Access   (Followers: 12, SJR: 1.141, CiteScore: 2)
Biological Research for Nursing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.685, CiteScore: 2)
Biomarker Insights     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.81, CiteScore: 2)
Biomarkers in Cancer     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Biomedical Engineering and Computational Biology     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
Biomedical Informatics Insights     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Bioscope: South Asian Screen Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.235, CiteScore: 0)
BMS: Bulletin of Sociological Methodology/Bulletin de Méthodologie Sociologique     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.226, CiteScore: 0)
Body & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29, SJR: 1.531, CiteScore: 3)
Bone and Tissue Regeneration Insights     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Brain and Neuroscience Advances     Open Access  
Brain Science Advances     Open Access  
Breast Cancer : Basic and Clinical Research     Open Access   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.823, CiteScore: 2)
British J. of Music Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
British J. of Occupational Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 253, SJR: 0.323, CiteScore: 1)
British J. of Pain     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31, SJR: 0.579, CiteScore: 2)
British J. of Politics and Intl. Relations     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39, SJR: 0.91, CiteScore: 2)
British J. of Visual Impairment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.337, CiteScore: 1)
British J.ism Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
BRQ Business Review Quarterly     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Building Acoustics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.215, CiteScore: 1)
Building Services Engineering Research & Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.583, CiteScore: 1)
Bulletin of Science, Technology & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Business & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Business and Professional Communication Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.348, CiteScore: 1)
Business Information Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17, SJR: 0.279, CiteScore: 0)
Business Perspectives and Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Cahiers Élisabéthains     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.111, CiteScore: 0)
Calcutta Statistical Association Bulletin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
California Management Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 37, SJR: 2.209, CiteScore: 4)
Canadian Association of Radiologists J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.463, CiteScore: 1)
Canadian J. of Kidney Health and Disease     Open Access   (Followers: 8, SJR: 1.007, CiteScore: 2)
Canadian J. of Nursing Research (CJNR)     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Canadian J. of Occupational Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 168, SJR: 0.626, CiteScore: 1)
Canadian J. of Psychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28, SJR: 1.769, CiteScore: 3)
Canadian J. of School Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.266, CiteScore: 1)
Canadian Pharmacists J. / Revue des Pharmaciens du Canada     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.536, CiteScore: 1)
Cancer Control     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Cancer Growth and Metastasis     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Cancer Informatics     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.64, CiteScore: 1)
Capital and Class     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.282, CiteScore: 1)
Cardiac Cath Lab Director     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Cardiovascular and Thoracic Open     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Career Development and Transition for Exceptional Individuals     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.44, CiteScore: 1)
Cartilage     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.889, CiteScore: 3)
Cell Transplantation     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 1.023, CiteScore: 3)
Cephalalgia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 1.581, CiteScore: 3)
Cephalalgia Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Child Language Teaching and Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34, SJR: 0.501, CiteScore: 1)
Child Maltreatment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 1.22, CiteScore: 3)
Child Neurology Open     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Childhood     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19, SJR: 0.894, CiteScore: 2)
Childhood Obesity and Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
China Information     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.767, CiteScore: 2)
China Report     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.221, CiteScore: 0)
Chinese J. of Sociology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Christian Education J. : Research on Educational Ministry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Chronic Illness     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.672, CiteScore: 2)
Chronic Respiratory Disease     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.808, CiteScore: 2)
Chronic Stress     Open Access  
Citizenship, Social and Economics Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.145, CiteScore: 0)
Cleft Palate-Craniofacial J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.757, CiteScore: 1)
Clin-Alert     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Clinical and Applied Thrombosis/Hemostasis     Open Access   (Followers: 32, SJR: 0.49, CiteScore: 1)
Clinical and Translational Neuroscience     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Clinical Case Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.364, CiteScore: 1)
Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 45, SJR: 0.73, CiteScore: 2)
Clinical EEG and Neuroscience     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.552, CiteScore: 2)
Clinical Ethics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.296, CiteScore: 1)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Arthritis and Musculoskeletal Disorders     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.537, CiteScore: 2)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Blood Disorders     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.314, CiteScore: 2)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Cardiology     Open Access   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.686, CiteScore: 2)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Case Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.283, CiteScore: 1)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Circulatory, Respiratory and Pulmonary Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.425, CiteScore: 2)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Ear, Nose and Throat     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Endocrinology and Diabetes     Open Access   (Followers: 34, SJR: 0.63, CiteScore: 2)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Oncology     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 1.129, CiteScore: 3)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Pediatrics     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Psychiatry     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Reproductive Health     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.776, CiteScore: 0)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Therapeutics     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.172, CiteScore: 0)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Trauma and Intensive Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Women's Health     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Clinical Nursing Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34, SJR: 0.471, CiteScore: 1)
Clinical Pathology     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Clinical Pediatrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25, SJR: 0.487, CiteScore: 1)
Clinical Psychological Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16, SJR: 3.281, CiteScore: 5)
Clinical Rehabilitation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 78, SJR: 1.322, CiteScore: 3)
Clinical Risk     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.133, CiteScore: 0)
Clinical Trials     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22, SJR: 2.399, CiteScore: 2)
Clothing and Textiles Research J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28, SJR: 0.36, CiteScore: 1)
Collections : A J. for Museum and Archives Professionals     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Common Law World Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Communication & Sport     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.385, CiteScore: 1)
Communication and the Public     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Communication Disorders Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.458, CiteScore: 1)
Communication Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24, SJR: 2.171, CiteScore: 3)
Community College Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 1.451, CiteScore: 1)
Comparative Political Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 293, SJR: 3.772, CiteScore: 3)
Compensation & Benefits Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Competition & Change     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.843, CiteScore: 2)

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Similar Journals
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British Journal of Occupational Therapy
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.323
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 253  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0308-0226 - ISSN (Online) 1477-6006
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1166 journals]
  • Mental health – An area of high priority in occupational therapy

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Mona Eklund
      Pages: 529 - 530
      Abstract: British Journal of Occupational Therapy, Volume 84, Issue 9, Page 529-530, September 2021.

      Citation: British Journal of Occupational Therapy
      PubDate: 2021-09-02T02:54:04Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03080226211037864
      Issue No: Vol. 84, No. 9 (2021)
       
  • Mothers’ experience of being involved with the transfer of the CO-OP
           approach: A qualitative study

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      Authors: Soraya Gharebaghy, Mehdi Rassafiani, Roshanak Vameghi, Malahat Akbarfahimi, Debra Cameron, Helene J Polatajko, Narges Shafaroodi
      Abstract: British Journal of Occupational Therapy, Ahead of Print.
      IntroductionSince mothers are the best persons to facilitate transfer in their children, it is important to understand their experience with implementing the cognitive orientation to daily occupational performance approach at home. Therefore, this study aims to explore mothers’ experiences in facilitating transfer during implementing cognitive orientation to daily occupational performance approach at the home in children with specific learning disorder.MethodA semi-structured interview was applied for mothers of children receiving cognitive orientation to daily occupational performance. The interviews were transcribed verbatim and the data were analyzed using a continuous comparison technique and inductive content analysis.ResultsFive themes emerged which described the mothers’ experiences of being involved with the transfer of cognitive orientation to daily occupational performance approach at home including (1) mothers’ feelings toward themselves; (2) supportive therapist; (3) supportive social settings; (4) multidimensional educational content; and (5) educational methods.ConclusionMothers expressed that cognitive orientation to daily occupational performance approach was simple, but they needed deeper information and skills. They provided suggestions for increasing the involvement during cognitive orientation to daily occupational performance intervention to increase transfer.
      Citation: British Journal of Occupational Therapy
      PubDate: 2021-09-26T07:30:38Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03080226211026554
       
  • Designing a trial of early electrical stimulation to the stroke-affected
           arm: Qualitative findings on the barriers and facilitators

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      Authors: Dawn-Marie Walker, Joanna Fletcher-Smith, Nikola Sprigg, Anand Pandyan
      Abstract: British Journal of Occupational Therapy, Ahead of Print.
      Introduction: This study aimed to explore the barriers and facilitators to implementing early therapeutic electrical stimulation (ES) treatment from both the patient and therapist perspectives as part of a feasibility study.MethodsDesign: Interviews were conducted with patients and their carers and focus groups with the therapists post-intervention period.Setting: Interviews were in the patient’s homes and for the focus groups in a specialist stroke unit in Nottinghamshire.Subjects: Fifteen patient participants (34% of sample) were interviewed (intervention n = 9; control group n = 3; carers n = 3). Sixteen therapists (9 occupational therapists; 7 physiotherapists) took part in the three focus groups.Intervention: Participants were randomized to receive usual care or usual care and ES to wrist flexors and extensors for 30 min, twice a day, 5 days a week for 3 months.Findings: The barriers to ES treatment cited by the therapists outweighed the barriers mentioned by patients. Therapists’ barriers included lack of confidence and staff knowledge regarding ES and time pressures of delivering the ES. No patients mentioned time as a barrier and considered the treatment regime to be acceptable; however, lack of staff support was mentioned 14 times by them.Conclusion: Although initially the perceived barrier for therapists was time restrictions, after analysing the data, it appears that confidence/knowledge is the real barrier, and time is the manifestation of this underlying self-doubt. Patients were able to confidently self-manage treatment, and although efficacy was not measured, patients volunteered information regarding its perceived benefit, and no adverse effects were reported.
      Citation: British Journal of Occupational Therapy
      PubDate: 2021-09-26T07:25:27Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03080226211008706
       
  • The relationship between upper limb function and activities of daily
           living without the effects of lower limb function: A cross-sectional study
           

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      Authors: Haruka Yamamoto, Kazuya Takeda, Soichiro Koyama, Keisuke Morishima, Yuichi Hirakawa, Ikuo Motoya, Hiroaki Sakurai, Yoshikiyo Kanada, Nobutoshi Kawamura, Mami Kawamura, Shigeo Tanabe
      Abstract: British Journal of Occupational Therapy, Ahead of Print.
      IntroductionUpper limb motor function and activities of daily living (ADL) are related in chronic stroke patients. This study investigated this relationship after removal of the influence of motor function of the affected lower limb, which until now has remained unclear.MethodsThis retrospective cross-sectional study included 53 patients with chronic stroke. Upper and lower limb motor function and ADL were assessed using the Fugl-Meyer assessment of the upper (FMA-UL) and lower limbs (FMA-LL) and functional independence measure motor score (FIM-M). To clarify the relationship between FMA-UL and total FIM-M before and after removal of the influence of FMA-LL, Spearman’s rank correlation coefficient and partial correlation analysis were used. The relationship between FMA-UL and each item of FIM-M after removal of the influence of FMA-LL was assessed using partial correlation analysis.ResultsBefore the influence of FMA-LL was removed, FMA-UL was moderately to well correlated with total FIM-M. This became weak after the influence was removed. Regarding each item of FIM-M, FMA-UL was correlated with dressing (upper body), toileting, and walking or wheelchair after removal of the influence.ConclusionThe relationship between upper limb motor function and ADL is strongly influenced by lower limb motor function.
      Citation: British Journal of Occupational Therapy
      PubDate: 2021-09-26T07:15:33Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03080226211030088
       
  • Managing post-stroke fatigue: A qualitative study to explore multifaceted
           clinical perspectives

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      Authors: Avril Drummond, Fiona Nouri, Joanne Ablewhite, Laura Condon, Roshan das Nair, Amanda Jones, Fiona Jones, Nikola Sprigg, Shirley Thomas
      Abstract: British Journal of Occupational Therapy, Ahead of Print.
      IntroductionPost-stroke fatigue (PSF) is common and debilitating. However, while its effective management is a priority for clinicians and stroke survivors, there remains little evidence to provide guidance or underpin practice. Our aim, therefore, was to gain insights into the experiences of clinicians who routinely manage patients with fatigue.MethodQualitative interview study. The target was to recruit a purposeful sample of approximately 20 participants with expertise in managing PSF and fatigue arising from other conditions. Maximum variation sampling was used to ensure a balance of participants across different settings. Data were analysed using a framework approach, iteratively developed and refined by including emergent themes.ResultsWe recruited 20 participants: nine occupational therapists (OTs), five physiotherapists, three nurses and three psychologists, which included three ‘fatigue experts’ from Europe and Australia. Analysis generated core themes around management and strategies used; these were similar regardless of professional background, clinical or geographical setting or condition treated. OTs felt a particular responsibility for fatigue management, although multidisciplinary teamwork was stressed by all.ConclusionThere are clear similarities in clinicians’ experiences of managing PSF and fatigue across different conditions and also across professional groups. Clinicians rely predominantly on their own clinical knowledge for guidance.
      Citation: British Journal of Occupational Therapy
      PubDate: 2021-09-21T01:01:22Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03080226211042269
       
  • Doing gender and being gendered through occupation: Transgender and
           non-binary experiences

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      Authors: Rebecca Swenson, Pam Alldred, Lindsey Nicholls
      Abstract: British Journal of Occupational Therapy, Ahead of Print.
      BackgroundTransgender people can face discrimination which can be reflected in and encoded by their occupational experiences. There is emerging research regarding those who are transgender but experiences of non-binary people remain under-explored.PurposeThis study considered the occupational experiences of transgender and non-binary people and how gender expression related to engagement in occupations and space.MethodFive transgender and non-binary people participated in repeat interviews, including a ‘walking interview’. Analysis was informed by new materialism.FindingsOccupational engagement can re-enforce binary understandings of gender or facilitate creative expressions of gender identity. Within normative environments, occupational participation can offer assimilation, particularly for non-binary people. Some occupations provided emancipation from binary gender norms through expression such as clothing and creative activities which provided recognition and belonging. Symbolic and personal meanings of occupations shifted when participants were able to express themselves in a way that felt authentic.Conclusion‘Occupational assimilation’ can bring safety from scrutiny for those who are transgender and non-binary but curtails authentic expression. Occupational therapists have a role in supporting transgender and non-binary people in accessing occupations which facilitate their authentic gender expression and need to improve critical awareness of the culturally encoded binary nature of many occupations and environments.
      Citation: British Journal of Occupational Therapy
      PubDate: 2021-09-10T02:16:43Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03080226211034422
       
  • The reliability of the Danish version of the Canadian Occupational
           Performance Measure

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      Authors: Anette Enemark Larsen, Sonja Wehberg, Jeanette R Christensen
      Abstract: British Journal of Occupational Therapy, Ahead of Print.
      IntroductionThis study aims to assess the reliability of the Danish version of the Canadian Occupational Performance Measure (COPM).Method151 clients, 42.4% male, mean age 66.9 years (SD: 14.4, range: 16–90), from two hospitals and two rehabilitation centres were interviewed twice with the COPM over a ten-day mean interval (SD: 4.9, range: 2–27) either by the same (intra-rater) or two different occupational therapists (inter-rater). Data were analysed with intra-class correlation coefficients, coefficient of repeatability, and Bland–Altman plots.Results823 occupational performance issues were prioritized of which 41%, 338 occupational performance issues (95% CI: 37.7–44.5), were mentioned in both interviews. The intra-class correlation coefficients were 59.8 (95% CI-intra-class correlation coefficients: 49.3–69.5) (COPM), 73.5 (95% CI intra-class correlation coefficients: 65.5-80.2) (COPM-Performance), and 71.8 (95% CI intra-class correlation coefficients: 63.4–78.8) (COPM-Satisfaction). The limits of agreement were −2.83 to 3.05 for the COPM-Performance and −3.50–3.53 for the COPM-Satisfaction. The COPM-Importance scores were highest when obtained by two raters, but opposite for the scores of the COPM-Performance and COPM-Satisfaction. The coefficient of repeatability roughly showed a change in +/- three points (COPM-Importance: 2.67; COPM-Performance: 2.94; and COPM-Satisfaction: 3.52). Correspondingly, Bland–Altman plots showed limits of agreement for the mean values of −2.71 and 3.53, respectively.ConclusionsThe intra-rater and inter-rater reliability of the COPM were moderate across settings, clients and rater experiences.
      Citation: British Journal of Occupational Therapy
      PubDate: 2021-09-10T01:40:56Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03080226211030090
       
  • Exploring the meaning of value-based occupational therapy services from
           the perspectives of managers, therapists and clients

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      Authors: Su Ren Wong, Bi Xia Ngooi, Fang Yin Kwa, Xiang Ting Koh, Rachel J J Chua, Karina M Dancza
      Abstract: British Journal of Occupational Therapy, Ahead of Print.
      IntroductionThere is a worldwide trend towards value-based health care, which strives to control healthcare costs while maximising value for clients. The main concept of value has been defined as health outcomes achieved per US dollar spent. This research explored how clients of occupational therapy services, managers and occupational therapists perceived value in occupational therapy services.MethodA qualitative design was used to explore the perspectives of clients (n = 11), occupational therapists (n = 7) and occupational therapy managers (n = 7). Appreciative inquiry guided the two phases of semi-structured interviews (n = 5) and focus groups (n = 6). Inductive and deductive coding were used to establish themes.FindingsThree themes encompassed the participants’ perceived value of occupational therapy services: (1) outcomes which are meaningful to daily life, (2) a constructive client–therapist relationship and (3) affordable, coordinated and understandable therapy.ConclusionParticipants attributed value to occupational therapy services when they encountered personalised goal setting, focused on meaningful outcomes, managed personal costs and experienced positive therapeutic relationships. Enhancing services could focus on (1) developing skills in collaborative goal setting, (2) determining suitable outcome measures which are meaningful at personal- and service-level reporting, (3) encouraging self-management strategies, and (4) emphasising therapeutic relationships and supporting therapeutic communication skill development.
      Citation: British Journal of Occupational Therapy
      PubDate: 2021-09-10T01:33:10Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03080226211030095
       
  • Development and Validation of Iranian Adolescent’s Participation
           Assessment Tool

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      Authors: Ghodsiyeh Joveini, Afsoon Hasani Mehraban, Armin Zareiyan, Mitra Khalafbeigi, Laleh Lajevardi
      Abstract: British Journal of Occupational Therapy, Ahead of Print.
      BackgroundHealth promotion of children and adolescents through participation in purposeful and meaningful activities is one of the focuses of occupational therapy. In this study, in line with the Iranian culture, a tool for assessment of Iranian adolescents’ participation in daily occupations/activities was developed and validated.MethodAn exploratory sequential mixed method was used to develop and validate the tool. Content and structural validity and reliability of the initial version were estimated.ResultsDuring the validation process, the items were reduced to 54. Data were collected from 481 adolescents to investigate factor analysis. According to principal component analysis, the Kaiser–Meyer–Olkin index was 0.88, and the analysis yielded seven factors explaining 47.2% of the total variance. The tool showed excellent internal consistency and test–retest reliability.ConclusionThis newly developed Participation Assessment Tool for Iranian adolescents is a valid and reliable measure for assessing the participation of this group in daily activities.
      Citation: British Journal of Occupational Therapy
      PubDate: 2021-09-10T01:20:40Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03080226211022956
       
  • Elizabeth Casson Memorial Lecture 2020: Re-engineering truth and certainty
           in occupational therapy

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      Authors: Jenny Preston
      Abstract: British Journal of Occupational Therapy, Ahead of Print.
      The Elizabeth Casson Memorial Lecture is awarded on an annual basis to a member of high standing within the occupational therapy profession. The 2020 lecture was delivered by Dr Jenny Preston MBE who contested the underlying assumptions of truth and certainty by considering how we generate, create and understand knowledge within the occupational therapy profession. Through the principles of process re-engineering, Dr Preston sought to define, analyse and identify how we interpret and apply that knowledge within our broad understanding of truth to capture the impact of occupational therapy. Finally, Dr Preston attempted to design and develop a future state in which evidence and practice are entwined to create the best possible outcomes.
      Citation: British Journal of Occupational Therapy
      PubDate: 2021-09-09T06:27:17Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03080226211035682
       
  • Translation and initial validation of the occupational balance
           questionnaire to Arabic—Occupational Balance Questionnaire-A

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      Authors: Brightlin N Dhas, Petra Wagman, Firas A Marji, Carita Håkansson, Ricardo Carrasco
      Abstract: British Journal of Occupational Therapy, Ahead of Print.
      IntroductionOccupational balance (OB) is related to many health indicators, including quality of life. The Occupational Balance Questionnaire (OBQ11) was developed to measure OB, and to date, no Arabic translations of the questionnaire exist. The aim of the study was to describe the translation process of OBQ11 to Arabic and to evaluate its content validity, internal consistency, construct validity, and convergent validity.MethodsOBQ11 was translated to Arabic (OBQ11-A) following standard guidelines. Content validity feedback was obtained from ten Arabic-speaking occupational therapists and in a cognitive debriefing with seven volunteers. In addition, OBQ11-A and the Family Quality of Life Survey-2006 were administered to 67 Arabic-speaking participants from a larger study about OB among parents.ResultsHigh level of agreement was found on the content of OBQ11-A from the occupational therapists. Cognitive debriefing interviews indicated that OBQ11-A was easy to understand. Cronbach’s alpha for the total OBQ11-A score was 0.864 indicating good internal consistency. Exploratory factor analysis showed acceptable factor loadings for all items. The total scores showed positive statistically significant associations with Family Quality of Life Scores (r = 0.561, p < 0.001).ConclusionsOBQ11-A may prove useful for assessing OB in Arabic-speaking populations. Further research is needed to establish its reliability.
      Citation: British Journal of Occupational Therapy
      PubDate: 2021-09-07T03:50:19Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03080226211039432
       
  • Cross-cultural adaptation, reliability, and validity of the Turkish Adult
           Sensory Processing Scale

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      Authors: Zeynep Bahadir, Orkun Aran, Sedef Şahin
      Abstract: British Journal of Occupational Therapy, Ahead of Print.
      IntroductionSensory processing is crucial to adaptive behavioural responses in occupational therapy. Nevertheless, information on sensory processing in adults is limited. The Adult Sensory Processing Scale (ASPS) measures behavioural responses indicative of sensory processing in different sensory systems. The study aimed to examine the cultural adaptation, reliability and validity of the ASPS-Turkish (ASPS-T).MethodsThe ASPS-T was administered to 405 individuals, who were aged 18 to 64 (38.5 ± 11.4) years. The cross-cultural adaptation and translation procedures were conducted following Beaton’s guidelines. Internal consistency was examined by Cronbach’s alpha. Criterion-related validity of the ASPS was determined by the Adolescent/Adult Sensory Profile using Construct validity and was examined by confirmatory factor analysis using AMOS.ResultsThe study included 405 participants (271 female and 134 male). Exploratory factor analysis with varimax rotation determined 11 factors with 55.15% total variance. In confirmatory factor analysis (CFA), model fit indices showed an acceptable fit. The reliability of the scale was 0.834, and test–retest reliability changed from 0.94 to 0.99, illustrating high internal consistency and excellent reliability of the scale.ConclusionsThe ASPS-T is reliable and valid for analysing sensory processing patterns of adults in the Turkish population.
      Citation: British Journal of Occupational Therapy
      PubDate: 2021-09-07T03:43:17Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03080226211034413
       
  • The impact of a power mobility device on occupational participation and
           quality of life for people with chronic diseases: A scoping review

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      Authors: Emma Kemmis, Samantha Ashby, Lesley MacDonald-Wicks
      Abstract: British Journal of Occupational Therapy, Ahead of Print.
      IntroductionThe aim was to explore occupational participation and quality of life (QoL) for power mobility device users with chronic disease.MethodsArksey and O’Malley’s framework for scoping reviews was used. Six data bases were searched using keywords: wheelchair, scooter, QoL and participation. Data were extracted with coding and thematic analysis performed.ResultsForty-one articles met the inclusion criteria. An overarching theme of enhanced QoL was identified with subthemes of (i) independence, (ii) enabling participation in instrumental activities of daily living, (iii) enhanced social participation and leisure, (iv) environmental barriers to occupational participation, (vi) power mobility device (PMD) performance concerns impacting occupational participation and (vii) overcoming risk of harm through PMD training.ConclusionThe scoping review identified a heterogeneity of study designs and outcome measures, which makes comparison between studies difficult. For people with chronic diseases, PMDs improve independence in occupational participation, particularly in IADL, social participation and leisure. Unfortunately, improved QoL was often inferred, without the use of an outcome measure. Areas which impacted occupational participation for PMD users were environmental barriers and a lack of PMD training. Further research is needed to understand the impact of a PMD on QoL and occupational participation for those with chronic disease.
      Citation: British Journal of Occupational Therapy
      PubDate: 2021-09-02T03:54:26Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03080226211034420
       
  • Working in disability employment: An interpretative phenomenological study
           of experiences of people with a diagnosis of schizophrenia

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      Authors: Namino Ottewell
      Abstract: British Journal of Occupational Therapy, Ahead of Print.
      AimTo understand how employees with schizophrenia in disability employment interpret their work experience.MethodNine people with schizophrenia were interviewed. Data were analysed with the interpretative phenomenological analysis.ResultsAll participants regarded themselves as ‘persons with mental illness’. Some participants developed their mental illness identity by realising that working without accommodations is difficult. Although participants found working in the current company comfortable because the supervisors provided appropriate accommodations, they were dissatisfied with low salary. A proportion of the participants felt dissatisfaction with the menial work, which led to low levels of self-esteem as they viewed non-disability employment of higher value. In addition, the present study noted a difference between self-labelling and labelling by others; although participants regarded themselves as ‘persons with mental illness’, they felt reluctant to be viewed as such by others. Most of the participants wanted to work in non-disability employment in future for financial and personal reasons, such as to increase self-esteem.ConclusionIt is imperative that benefits and other issues in disability employment for people with psychosocial disability relating to mental illness are explored more broadly in future research. Further, employers must create healthy workplaces, for all employees regardless of disability can benefit from it.
      Citation: British Journal of Occupational Therapy
      PubDate: 2021-08-23T04:01:34Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03080226211039429
       
  • Making a difference: Belonging, diversity and inclusion in occupational
           therapy

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      Authors: Anita Atwal, Vimal Sriram, Elizabeth A McKay
      Abstract: British Journal of Occupational Therapy, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: British Journal of Occupational Therapy
      PubDate: 2021-08-09T03:51:08Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03080226211031797
       
  • Participation experience for persons with oculomotor impairments after
           acquired brain injury

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      Authors: Sharon G Wagener
      Abstract: British Journal of Occupational Therapy, Ahead of Print.
      IntroductionWhile individuals with acquired brain injury (ABI) often receive occupational therapy, relatively little is known about how those with related oculomotor problems characterize their ability to participate in everyday activities and life roles. This study describes the difficulties experienced by this population.MethodThis study is a thematic analysis of qualitative responses to open-ended questions based on answers to a standardized assessment. Thirty rehabilitation outpatients with ABI-related oculomotor impairments participated in semi-structured interviews to describe their experiences of difficulties in everyday activities.ResultsDifficulties were associated with three themes: challenges of the activities and environments (activity requirements, physical and socioeconomic environments, and time), self-identified personal difficulties (physical, cognitive, and socioemotional), and changes in habits/roles/priorities (modifications to activities and environments, loss and negative consequences, and life management changes).ConclusionHow people with ABI-related oculomotor impairments experience difficulties while participating in activities is dynamic and complex. Challenging activity requirements and environments often led to personal difficulties, which limited participation. Activity modifications, changes in priorities, and managing energy budget enhanced participation. A model of the experience is proposed. Findings suggest using activity analysis and teaching compensatory methods and life management strategies with individuals may assist in ability to participate.
      Citation: British Journal of Occupational Therapy
      PubDate: 2021-08-05T03:38:10Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03080226211031804
       
  • Play of children living with HIV/AIDS in a low-resourced setting:
           Perspectives of caregivers

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      Authors: Nyaradzai Munambah, Elelwani L Ramugondo, Reinie Cordier
      Abstract: British Journal of Occupational Therapy, Ahead of Print.
      BackgroundAlthough play is viewed as a childhood occupation that is spontaneous, it can be limited in children with HIV/AIDS. This study explored the perspectives of caregivers from Zimbabwe on the play of children with HIV/AIDS.MethodologyA descriptive qualitative research approach was used to explore the perceptions of caregivers on play of children living with HIV/AIDS. Fifteen caregivers of children aged 4–9 years diagnosed with HIV/AIDS were purposively sampled. Two interviews were carried out with each of the caregivers. Findings were analysed thematically.FindingsFour major themes were generated from the study: ‘Ubuntu is no more’, ‘Survival is primary (chikuru kurarama)’, ‘Play affirms that my child is still like other children’ and ‘More is required for this child’. Although issues of survival were paramount, caregivers were able to highlight the importance of play in affirming childhood, identifying the specific needs for play of children with HIV/AIDS.Conclusion and SignificancePlay, like all other human occupation, is contextually situated. Poverty and health status are key in shaping how families prioritise play. However, the ability to play for a child with HIV/AIDS also seems to mitigate stigma and may disrupt the ‘HIV is death’ narrative.
      Citation: British Journal of Occupational Therapy
      PubDate: 2021-08-05T03:25:28Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03080226211026556
       
  • Participation patterns and predictors of participation in preschool
           children with developmental disability

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      Authors: Agne Stelmokaite, Audrone Prasauskiene, Indre Bakaniene
      Abstract: British Journal of Occupational Therapy, Ahead of Print.
      IntroductionThe research was aimed to evaluate patterns and clinical and environmental predictors of participation in preschool children with developmental disability.MethodCross-sectional design was employed. Caregivers (n = 98) of children aged 9–70 months (mean = 48, SD = 1.5) with developmental disability completed a health questionnaire and the Lithuanian Young Children’s Participation and Environment Measure (YC-PEM). Descriptive statistics and multiple linear regressions were performed to identify patterns and predictors of participation at home, daycare/preschool, and the community.ResultsParticipation restrictions, based on frequency and variety of activities, were mostly observed in the community setting. Both clinical and environmental factors explained at least two dimensions of participation across all settings. Of the clinical factors, the predictors of participation were found to be the severity but not the number of impairments of body structures and functions and/or activity limitations.ConclusionsThis study emphasizes the role of the environment and activity limitations in explaining participation of preschool children with developmental disability. Findings can re-direct practitioners’ attention towards context-based assessments and interventions to promote health through participation.
      Citation: British Journal of Occupational Therapy
      PubDate: 2021-07-31T02:26:33Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03080226211034415
       
  • The association between sensory traits and daily parenting challenges of
           typical mothers and their children

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      Authors: Liat Gafni-Lachter, Joanna Kailkian, Vered Korngold-Dvir, Gil Dahan, Ayelett Ben-Sasson
      Abstract: British Journal of Occupational Therapy, Ahead of Print.
      IntroductionSensory modulation impacts daily family life; however, parents’ sensory traits are rarely considered and analysed together with their child’s. This study aimed to: (1) determine the association between healthy child and mother sensory modulation traits and (2) examine how these traits interact in predicting daily parenting challenges.MethodSeventy-three healthy mothers of typically developing 3–6-year-old children completed the Short Sensory Profile, Adult/Adolescent Sensory Profile and Parenting Daily Hassles questionnaires. Mother and child sensory over-responsivity (SOR), under-responsivity (SUR) and seeking traits were entered as predictors of frequency of daily hassles.ResultsMother and child’s SOR and SUR traits were significantly associated (r = .33 and .25, respectively). The frequency of parenting challenges was significantly associated with both mother and child’s sensory seeking (r = .25 and .26, respectively). A mediation model demonstrated a significant indirect effect of mother SOR on the frequency of daily hassles (β = .26, p < .05), with the child’s SOR (β = .33, p < .01), and seeking behaviours (β = .48, p < .001) mediating this effect.ConclusionMothers with elevated sensory traits of children with elevated sensory traits are likely to experience higher frequencies of daily parenting burden, even within the typical population. Therapists who wish to practice a developmental and family-centred approach should assess how the mother–child sensory traits interact and how this interaction can influence the family’s well-being.
      Citation: British Journal of Occupational Therapy
      PubDate: 2021-07-17T04:47:18Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03080226211031800
       
  • Physical and emotional development of adolescents with low motor
           competence: Mothers’ perspectives

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      Authors: Amanda Timler, Caroline Bulsara, Beth Hands
      Abstract: British Journal of Occupational Therapy, Ahead of Print.
      BackgroundParent support influences adolescent’s social-emotional well-being. One factor that may influence parent’s perception of support is their child’s level of motor competence.AimThe purpose of this study was to explore mothers’ experience of providing support for the health of adolescents with low motor competence physical and emotional development.MethodsA phenomenological approach was used to guide this study. After initial screening, five one-on-one interviews with mothers of adolescents aged 12–16 years were conducted.ResultsAnalysis of the interviews identified five themes of ‘supportive building blocks’, ‘building achievement and commitment,’ ‘building mechanisms for future support’ ‘building stability in relationships’ and ‘building confidence and a sense of autonomy’. Mother’s awareness of their child’s motor difficulties resulted in their active provision of alternative strategies for their child by building self-confidence and seeking support from health professionals.ConclusionMothers were aware of their child’s inadequacies and actively sought support to help with their development. Support services that recognise low motor competence could better help mothers support their adolescent’s development. One implication arising from this study is the importance of using multi-disciplinarian teams such as occupational therapist, exercise physiologist and parents to help children with low motor competence.
      Citation: British Journal of Occupational Therapy
      PubDate: 2021-07-17T04:39:40Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03080226211031805
       
  • Functional status in postural tachycardia syndrome

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      Authors: Emily M Rich, Asha Vas, Thomas D Parsons, Ryan Krone, Brent P Goodman
      Abstract: British Journal of Occupational Therapy, Ahead of Print.
      IntroductionPostural tachycardia syndrome is a form of orthostatic intolerance that often leads to functional impairment.MethodsThis survey explored functional status and impact of symptoms in adults (n = 958) ages 18 to 60 (M = 32.63 ± 10.52 years, 96.7% female) with postural tachycardia syndrome.ResultsIndividuals reported an average of 11 daily life activities impacted by postural tachycardia syndrome with high levels of self-perceived disability. Additionally, 93.4% reported some degree of cognitive impairment and falls occurred in 55.3% of participants annually. Despite frequent falls and functional impairment, participants infrequently (26.9%) utilized therapy services.ConclusionIndividuals with postural tachycardia syndrome are at an increased risk of experiencing disability and often require assistance with daily activities. Further research is necessary to understand the potential role of therapy in improving function and quality of life.
      Citation: British Journal of Occupational Therapy
      PubDate: 2021-07-15T11:26:12Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03080226211031807
       
  • Development and preliminary feasibility evaluation of occupation-centered
           diabetes self-management intervention

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      Authors: Maryam Binesh, Afsoon H Mehraban, Farahnaz M Shahboulaghi, Rokhsareh Aghili, Narges Shafaroodi
      Abstract: British Journal of Occupational Therapy, Ahead of Print.
      IntroductionOccupational therapy practice framework provides a valuable structure for guiding clinical practice in occupational therapy based on the profession’s philosophical assumptions and areas of concern. This study aims to address the development and preliminary feasibility and acceptability evaluation of diabetes self-management intervention based on the framework and available literature.MethodThe research consisted of two phases. During the first phase, the research team conducted the relevant literature review, analyzed it deductively, and classified it in accordance with the concepts of the occupational therapy practice framework. Then, they modeled the intervention and formulated its components. In the second phase, they undertook the developed intervention on seven people with type-2 diabetes. The participants' attendance and their satisfaction with the program were evaluated to investigate its feasibility and acceptability.ResultsThe research team developed an intervention named Occupational Therapy Diabetes Self-Management which focuses on the occupational nature of self-management and addresses various factors of its integrations with individuals’ daily lives. Feasibility and acceptability evaluation of the Occupational Therapy Diabetes Self-Management indicated that the participants' attendance and satisfaction with the program were 92.86% and 9.43 out of 10, respectively.ConclusionThe Occupational Therapy Diabetes Self-Management is evidence-based, feasible, and an acceptable intervention to guide future research and clinical practice on occupational therapy.
      Citation: British Journal of Occupational Therapy
      PubDate: 2021-07-06T05:32:11Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03080226211030100
       
  • Identifying research priorities for occupational therapy in the UK: A
           James Lind Alliance Priority Setting Partnership

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      Authors: Jo Watson, Katherine Cowan, Hannah Spring, Jenny Mac Donnell, Ruth Unstead-Joss
      Abstract: British Journal of Occupational Therapy, Ahead of Print.
      IntroductionAs the scope and nature of practice evolves in an ever-changing health and social care landscape, it is imperative the profession continues to expand the evidence base underpinning interventions. The Royal College of Occupational Therapists partnered with the James Lind Alliance to bring together people with lived experience, occupational therapists and other people working in the health and care sector to identify contemporary research priorities for the profession in the United Kingdom.MethodThe JLA’s well-established methodology was adopted. An opening consultation survey gathered unanswered questions. Analysis of responses and evidence checking preceded an initial prioritisation survey. The final prioritisation workshop drew on nominal group technique.Findings927 respondents submitted 2193 questions. Those within the project’s scope were captured in 66 overarching summary questions using thematic analysis. These were initially ranked by 1140 respondents. 18 questions comprising the 10 most highly ranked by people with lived experience and by those with professional experience were considered by 19 participants in the final workshop. Together, they reached consensus on the Top 10 priorities.ConclusionThese research priorities provide a contemporary framework influencing and guiding future research, ensuring it addresses the issues of greatest importance to people accessing and delivering services.
      Citation: British Journal of Occupational Therapy
      PubDate: 2021-06-30T03:11:10Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03080226211026557
       
  • The experience of type 2 diabetes: Application of the Model of Human
           Occupation

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      Authors: Tara C Klinedinst, Laura A Swink, Karen E Atler, Christine A Chard, Matt P Malcolm
      Abstract: British Journal of Occupational Therapy, Ahead of Print.
      IntroductionIntegrating type 2 diabetes (T2DM) self-care behaviors into daily life is complex and poorly understood. Occupational therapists, as experts in life context, habits, roles, and routines, can foster new ways of understanding and promoting daily engagement in T2DM self-care. The Model of Human Occupation (MOHO), a conceptual practice model, may have applicability to better understanding the experience of living with T2DM and engaging in necessary self-care behaviors.MethodsWe conducted focus group interviews with individuals with T2DM (n = 10). We applied the MOHO to understand the experience of living with T2DM and engaging in related self-care behaviors.FindingsParticipants discussed each element of MOHO and how it related to living with and managing type 2 diabetes. Participants identified obtaining skills for self-advocacy with family, individualized/adapted exercise, stable health-promoting environments and routines, and problem-solving skills for disruptions to routine as critical needs for managing T2DM. These intervention strategies are well-aligned with MOHO and occupational therapy practice.ConclusionWe found that MOHO was a useful tool for exploring the experience and daily management of T2DM.
      Citation: British Journal of Occupational Therapy
      PubDate: 2021-06-22T02:45:40Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03080226211026545
       
  • The effectiveness of a combination of Occupational Therapy and Social
           Skills Training in people with schizophrenia: A rater-blinded randomized
           controlled trial

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      Authors: Selma Ercan Doğu, Hülya Kayıhan, Ahmet Kokurcan, Sibel Örsel
      Abstract: British Journal of Occupational Therapy, Ahead of Print.
      IntroductionThis study aimed to assess the impact of a holistic combination of Occupational Therapy and Social Skills Training on occupational performance, social participation, and clinical symptoms in people with schizophrenia.Method60 people with schizophrenia were randomly assigned to two groups. One group received standardized Social Skills Training once a week for a total of 10 sessions, while the other group received a combination of Occupational Therapy and Social Skills Training once a week for a total of 16 sessions.ResultsA greater increase was determined in the scores of COPM total performance/satisfaction and the Community Integration Questionnaire in the Occupational Therapy and Social Skills Training group. Furthermore, these achievements were sustained in the Occupational Therapy and Social Skills Training group compared to the Social Skills Training group at the 6-month follow-up.ConclusionThe clients received the combination of Occupational Therapy and Social Skills Training showed a better improvement compared to the Social Skills Training group in terms of occupational performance, social participation, and severity of clinical symptoms. The use of Occupational Therapy in a holistic approach in psychosocial rehabilitation of people with schizophrenia can increase their functionality and social participation. Further studies are needed to assess long-term effects of Occupational Therapy in schizophrenia.
      Citation: British Journal of Occupational Therapy
      PubDate: 2021-06-16T03:23:50Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03080226211022953
       
  • Remote home visits: Exploring the concept and applications of remote home
           visits within health and social care settings

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      Authors: Natalie Louise Jones, Jennifer Read, Becky Field, Colette Fegan, Emma Simpson, Claire Revitt, Vita Lanfranchi, Fabio Ciranvenga
      Abstract: British Journal of Occupational Therapy, Ahead of Print.
      IntroductionThis study consulted intended users and adopters of technology about a remote home visit application called Virtual Visit Approach. Participants were shown a video of a ‘mock’ remote home visit and asked to discuss the potential benefits, barriers and uses they could envisage.MethodsPurposive sampling brought together stakeholders, patients and public representatives to capture thoughts, feelings and views in co-design workshops. Primary qualitative data were collected in real time. Post workshop, they were analysed and categorised into key themes and subthemes.FindingsThe opportunity to conduct remote home visits was regarded as a positive adjunct to usual practice. However, concerns about the quality of remote assessments were expressed by participants in the workshops.ConclusionThe NHS response to COVID-19 sparked a national roll out of the use of video conferencing technology. The opportunity to access technology to conduct remote visits and consultations, has instigated a seismic change in the way healthcare is delivered now and for the future. However, there is much we do not yet know about the impact on the intended adopters and users of remote visits and consultations. This study demonstrated the importance of involving intended adopters and users in the co-design of technology to explore potential benefits, barriers and uses providing valuable insights to inform future design and development.
      Citation: British Journal of Occupational Therapy
      PubDate: 2021-06-05T03:22:51Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03080226211000265
       
  • The Indonesian sociocultural contexts related to daily occupations of
           children with cancer during hospitalisation: The parents’ perspective

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      Authors: Cahya Buwana, Yuko Ito, E Sharon Brintnell
      Abstract: British Journal of Occupational Therapy, Ahead of Print.
      BackgroundThe sociocultural phenomenon affecting daily occupations of hospitalised children with cancer in a diverse country like Indonesia is thought-provoking and requires exploration.ObjectiveThis study aims to explore the sociocultural contexts related to daily occupations of children with cancer during hospital admittance from the parents' perspective.MethodsSemi-structured interviews were conducted with parents of children with cancer who had been hospitalised for two weeks or more. The data were collected at the paediatric ward of “Dharmais” National Cancer Center Hospital, Jakarta. The study uses interpretative phenomenological analysis (IPA).ResultsNine parents of children with cancer consented to the study. Three interconnected themes emerged as necessary to the sociocultural context among participants. These involve ‘The surrounding human environment as primary encouragement’, ‘Culture and spirituality as the basic standard’ and ‘Activity adjustments as new habits’.ConclusionsThe themes revealed that the daily occupations of hospitalised children with cancer are strongly encouraged by family and social systems in Indonesia, spiritual aspects of the parents and the occupational changes due to the new settings.
      Citation: British Journal of Occupational Therapy
      PubDate: 2021-06-05T03:13:26Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03080226211008716
       
  • A descriptive video analysis of interactions during inpatient brain injury
           rehabilitation groups

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      Authors: Freyr Patterson, Emmah Doig, Kathryn Marshall, Jennifer Fleming
      Abstract: British Journal of Occupational Therapy, Ahead of Print.
      IntroductionAn advantage of using groups in rehabilitation is the opportunity for peer learning and support. This study aimed to describe and understand the nature of interactions occurring in inpatient occupational therapy brain injury rehabilitation groups, using video-recorded group interactions, to inform recommendations for group facilitation.MethodVideo recordings of four occupational therapy rehabilitation groups were taken. Twelve adults with brain injury who participated in the groups and four facilitators consented to the study. The data were analysed using a qualitative descriptive approach.ResultsInteractions were predominantly facilitated by facilitators and shaped by the nature of the group activities. Facilitators used a number of strategies to encourage interaction including knowledge of group participants, activity choice and physical positioning of group members.ConclusionGroup facilitators utilise a number of strategies to encourage peer interactions. However, during structured activity-based rehabilitation groups, participants with a brain injury may focus predominantly on achieving the goal of the group rather than initiating peer interactions.
      Citation: British Journal of Occupational Therapy
      PubDate: 2021-06-05T03:07:24Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03080226211008723
       
  • An exploration of the role of occupational therapists in addressing
           sexuality with service users post stroke

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      Authors: Jessica Heron, Bethan Owen-Booth
      Abstract: British Journal of Occupational Therapy, Ahead of Print.
      IntroductionResearch suggests stroke negatively affects sexuality yet is rarely addressed by healthcare professionals. This study aims to explore occupational therapists’ perceptions of addressing sexuality post stroke with service users and whether they perceive it to fit into their scope of practice.MethodA qualitative study was undertaken following an inductive reasoning approach. Three occupational therapists working within stroke rehabilitation were purposively recruited. Data were gathered through semi-structured interviews and analysed using inductive thematic analysis to generate four significant themes.FindingsFindings generated the following themes: (1) Acknowledging the impact stroke has on sexuality. (2) Consideration of the appropriate stage of the stroke journey to address sexuality; identifying home/community environments to be more appropriate, utilising a multi-disciplinary approach to facilitate this. (3) Barriers to addressing sexuality, including staff’s personal feelings, inexperience, limited resources and ageism. (4) Facilitators to addressing sexuality, including approaching the topic appropriately and utilising the role of occupational therapy and resources.ConclusionThis study highlights the gap in the stroke journey where sexuality lies and the role occupational therapists can play in closing this gap. Utilising facilitators such as resources and a multi-disciplinary approach can overcome barriers to practice including embarrassment, prejudice and inexperience.
      Citation: British Journal of Occupational Therapy
      PubDate: 2021-06-05T03:00:44Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0308022621993026
       
  • Exploring the process of health in mothers of children with cerebral
           palsy: Changing “clinical reasoning”

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      Authors: Leila Dehghan, Hamid Dalvand, Mohammad Reza Hadian Rasanani, Greg Kelly
      Abstract: British Journal of Occupational Therapy, Ahead of Print.
      IntroductionThe issue of the health status of mothers of children with disability is one that is beginning to be addressed more fully. This study aimed to explore the process of health in mothers during caregiving of children with cerebral palsy (CP).MethodA qualitative research method with a grounded theory approach was used, including purposive and theoretical sampling. A constant comparative analysis method was adopted, and data were gathered from 15 mothers with CP children through interviews.ResultsThe results were grouped into six main categories: Self-neglecting of their health, facing challenges in caring their children, physical and psychosocial damages, perceiving threat of health problems from concern to action, trying to regain their health, and caring in a complex context. “Facing challenges in caring” was extracted as a core concept.ConclusionResults showed an urgent need to establish family-centered services in clinical settings and change the “way of thinking” of the health provider system.
      Citation: British Journal of Occupational Therapy
      PubDate: 2021-06-05T02:54:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03080226211020659
       
  • Adult attachment, stress-coping, and resilience in first-generation
           immigrants in the United States

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      Authors: Chiao-Ju Fang, Nenette Tong, Rosely J Villa, Ana M Flores, Elaine Lim, Alexandria Tu
      Abstract: British Journal of Occupational Therapy, Ahead of Print.
      IntroductionPrevious studies have shown correlations between adult attachment, stress-coping, and resilience, but little is known about how attachment and stress-coping affect resilience, particularly among first-generation immigrants. This study explored relationships among adult attachment, stress-coping, and resilience for first-generation immigrants.MethodA quantitative cross-sectional design was used to assess associations between adult attachment and stress-coping with resilience among first-generation immigrants. Thirty-five participants answered an online Qualtrics survey. A simple linear regression analysis was conducted to analyze the results.ResultsThe results indicated statistically significant correlations between avoidance scores and annual household income but not between resilience and education, resilience and income, and stress-coping scores and education and income. Positive reinterpretation growth was positively correlated with resilience, while denial and behavioral disengagement were negatively correlated. Adult attachment and number of years in the United States were not significantly statistically related to resilience.ConclusionThe findings indicate high income may be associated with attachment avoidance, and increases in positive coping strategies and decreases in negative coping strategies are associated with resilience among first-generation immigrants. Understanding influences on first-generation immigrants to engage in stress-coping skills may inform the development and implementation of occupational therapy, including programs and interventions for successful client-centered outcomes.
      Citation: British Journal of Occupational Therapy
      PubDate: 2021-05-29T12:07:11Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03080226211022962
       
  • Living with myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome:
           Experiences of occupational disruption for adults in Australia

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      Authors: Chelsea Bartlett, Julie L Hughes, Laura Miller
      Abstract: British Journal of Occupational Therapy, Ahead of Print.
      IntroductionMyalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS) is a poorly understood, highly stigmatised health condition that has widespread impacts on the individual. Currently, there is limited understanding of the ME/CFS experience from an occupational perspective within Australia. This study aimed to explore the lived experience of ME/CFS and subsequent disruption to occupational participation for adults living in Australia.MethodsUsing descriptive case study design, five participants with ME/CFS in Australia completed semi-structured interviews. Reflexive thematic analysis was used to analyse the qualitative data.FindingsThemes identified were organised using the Person-Environment-Occupation model. Participants reported systemic changes to previous levels of physical, cognitive and affective functioning, resulting in significant occupational disruption and poor well-being. Occupational prioritisation was followed by a loss of occupations starting with leisure, then productivity and eventually self-care. Environmental barriers to participation included stigma and misunderstanding of ME/CFS, financial hardship, lack of appropriate health services and strains on personal support networks and relationships.ConclusionChanges to occupational performance following the onset of ME/CFS caused significant occupational disruption and resulted in limited participation which narrowed over time. There is a clear role for occupational therapy to intervene early to prevent significant negative impacts on occupational participation for people with ME/CFS.
      Citation: British Journal of Occupational Therapy
      PubDate: 2021-05-27T03:36:22Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03080226211020656
       
  • An exploratory study of the relationship between typically-developing
           school-age children’s sensory processing and their activity
           participation

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      Authors: Hannah RG Sleeman, Ted Brown
      Abstract: British Journal of Occupational Therapy, Ahead of Print.
      IntroductionChildren encounter several types of sensory input from their daily living environments and take in and process this information using their sensory systems. Few studies have considered the impact of children’s sensory preferences on their activity participation. This study investigated the relationship between children’s sensory processing factors and the daily activities they chose to participate in.MethodTwenty-three parents of typically developing school-aged children completed the Sensory Processing Measure Home Form and Children Participation Questionnaire-School. Spearman correlations were conducted between sensory preferences and participation, as measured by frequency, intensity, independence level, children’s enjoyment and parental satisfaction. Regression models were also completed between each of the participation measures and sensory processing factors.ResultsSensory processing accounted for 69.8% (p = 0.001) of participation diversity’s total variance with unique contributions made by body awareness (proprioception) and planning and ideas (p = 0.040); 45.9% (p = 0.024) of participation intensity’s variance with touch made a unique contribution (p = 0.030) and 42.4% (p = 0.034) of participation independence’s variance with body awareness (proprioception) made a unique contribution (p = 0.038).ConclusionConsiderations should be made for sensory processing screening for typically developing children and the impacts this could potentially have on their daily participation.
      Citation: British Journal of Occupational Therapy
      PubDate: 2021-05-27T03:25:33Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03080226211020651
       
  • Barriers and enablers to providing community-based occupational therapy to
           people with functional neurological disorder: An interview study with
           occupational therapists in the United Kingdom

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      Authors: Clare Nicholson, Jill Francis, Glenn Nielsen, Fabiana Lorencatto
      Abstract: British Journal of Occupational Therapy, Ahead of Print.
      IntroductionOccupational therapists have an integral role in the treatment of people with functional neurological disorder, yet there is evidence of variable implementation of occupational therapy in community settings. This study explored the barriers and enablers to delivering community-based occupational therapy to people with functional neurological disorder in the United Kingdom.MethodsCommunity-based neurological occupational therapists (n = 10) with experience in functional neurological disorder were invited to complete semi-structured qualitative interviews. The interview schedule and analysis were based on the Theoretical Domains Framework, a behavioural science tool for investigating barriers and enablers to clinical practice. Data were analysed using a combined content and framework analysis approach.FindingsImportant barriers to treatment included limited published information to guide practice, lack of professional role clarity and restricted multidisciplinary team working. Enablers included occupational therapists’ dual training in physical and mental health and focus on activity engagement. Service provision, quality and access varied across geographical locations.ConclusionOccupational therapists are uniquely placed to help people with functional neurological disorder; however, findings suggest that existing community service structures in many regions in the United Kingdom are inadequate and limit the quality of treatment that can be provided. Additional resources are required to support occupational therapy service provision in community settings.
      Citation: British Journal of Occupational Therapy
      PubDate: 2021-05-27T03:14:58Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03080226211020658
       
  • Corrigendum to ‘The impact of surviving bowel cancer on occupation:
           A scoping review’

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      Abstract: British Journal of Occupational Therapy, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: British Journal of Occupational Therapy
      PubDate: 2021-05-24T02:20:46Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03080226211014046
       
  • Perceived occupational competence and value among university students with
           premenstrual dysphoric disorder

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      Authors: Serkan Pekçetin, Sevgi Özdinç, Hilal Ata, Hilal Başak Can, Nimet Sermenli Aydın, Pelin Taş Dürmüş, Okan Çalıyurt
      Abstract: British Journal of Occupational Therapy, Ahead of Print.
      IntroductionPremenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD) is defined as a mental health issue and is assessed using DSM-V diagnostic criteria. Premenstrual dysphoric disorder comprises emotional, behavioral, and physical symptoms that occur in the premenstrual phase and resolve shortly after the start of menstruation. These symptoms and functional impairment may negatively affect occupational competence and value. This study investigated perceived occupational competence and value in university students with premenstrual dysphoric disorder.MethodsThis cross-sectional study was performed at a public university with 35 students with PMDD and 35 age-matched students without PMDD. Occupational competence and value were evaluated using the Occupational Self-Assessment (OSA).ResultsThere was a significant difference between the groups in OSA competence score (p < 0.05), while there was no significant difference in OSA value score (p> 0.05).ConclusionThis study demonstrated that university students with PMDD experience more occupational competence challenges than peers without PMDD. Further studies should be performed to determine the role of occupational therapy in the rehabilitation of PMDD.
      Citation: British Journal of Occupational Therapy
      PubDate: 2021-05-24T02:13:45Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03080226211020991
       
  • Understanding the occupational identity of care-givers for people with
           mental health problems

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      Authors: Megan L Howes, Diane Ellison
      Abstract: British Journal of Occupational Therapy, Ahead of Print.
      IntroductionThere is recognition within the literature that the role of care-giving can have a negative impact on care-givers’ general well-being. Less is understood about the role of care-giving on an individual’s occupational participation and in turn occupational identity. Occupational therapists have a unique understanding of the interplay between occupational participation and health, though this is an area that has been under researched in relation to mental health care-givers. Therefore, the current research aims to understand how the role of care-giving for an individual with a mental illness impacts on occupational participation and identity.MethodA qualitative semi-structured interview the Occupational Performance and History Interview–Version 2 was utilised to understand life experiences. Six mental health care-givers were interviewed, and these interviews were transcribed for thematic analysis.FindingsThree main themes were identified: being me, roles and responsibilities associated with care-giving and services.ConclusionThe findings suggest being a mental health care-giver does have a detrimental impact on occupational participation and therefore occupational identity. As care-givers gained more experience in their role, they used occupational adaption as a positive coping mechanism that helped them achieve occupational balance. Using their unique understanding of occupational participation and occupational identity, occupational therapists are well placed to utilise their knowledge and skills to work in a systemic way supporting both the person with mental illness and their care-giver.
      Citation: British Journal of Occupational Therapy
      PubDate: 2021-05-18T03:15:11Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03080226211018153
       
  • Evolution of professional identity in Iranian occupational therapy
           students and new graduates: A comparative study

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      Authors: Seyed Alireza Derakhshanrad, Emily F Piven, Bahareh Zeynalzadeh Ghoochani
      Abstract: British Journal of Occupational Therapy, Ahead of Print.
      IntroductionThe development of professional attitude evolves over time and contributes to the formation of professional identity. This study tracked formation of professional identity by comparing professional attitudes of three cohorts: new graduates, final-year, and first-year students of occupational therapy.MethodThe online survey, including a 5-point Likert scale 17-item questionnaire and one qualitative inquiry using an incomplete statement, revealed the perception and future career prospects of 144 novice practitioners and students of occupational therapy. Written statements were compared to each other to provide insight about the participants’ perspectives during the three time periods.FindingsOne-way ANOVA indicated that there were significant differences in professional attitudes among the three cohorts (F (2, 141) = 14.32, p < 0.0001), demonstrating a downward trend in professional identity formation. The comparison analysis of statements confirmed the quantitative results and highlighted an issue of negative professional identity through indicating great concerns over the future career prospects.ConclusionDespite increased awareness of occupational therapy over time, these participants seemed to have had trouble developing a sound sense of professional identity. Possible sources and solutions for this issue were discussed, to better facilitate a clear sense of professional identity in occupational therapy students and practitioners.
      Citation: British Journal of Occupational Therapy
      PubDate: 2021-05-15T02:00:53Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03080226211017752
       
  • Critical perspectives on implementation of evidence-based practice in
           occupational therapy – Exemplified by Lifestyle Redesign® in a Danish
           context

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      Authors: Stinne Glasdam, Jeppe Oute, Sigrid Stjernswärd
      Abstract: British Journal of Occupational Therapy, Ahead of Print.
      IntroductionEvidence-based practice is an increasing demand in occupational therapy (OT), although multiple barriers can hinder the translation of research knowledge into practice. The article illuminates the transformation of results from a randomised controlled trial into a practice development project with future practice implementation in mind.MethodA case study was carried out, consisting of a comparison of the US randomised controlled trials (RCTs) Lifestyle Redesign® and the derived Danish practice development project.ResultsThe study showed how results from RCTs of Lifestyle Redesign® were transformed into a practice development project with intentions to implement the programme in a Danish context. The modifications of the US RCT into a practice development project in Denmark compromised the study’s scientific execution. The practice development project was used to legitimise the intervention within OT locally by testing an evidence-based intervention, without using associated scientific tools and without considering barriers and facilitators for implementing the project in clinical practice.ConclusionResearch design compromises in practice development projects may have implications for the internal and external dynamics of professionalisation processes regarding OT and the recognition of OT as a scientific discipline and an autonomous profession, nationally and internationally.
      Citation: British Journal of Occupational Therapy
      PubDate: 2021-05-11T01:09:14Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03080226211011401
       
  • Study of environmental factors and quality of life in children with
           cerebral palsy based on international classification of functioning,
           disability and health

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      Authors: Amin Rezaei, Parvin Raji, Seyedeh Tahmineh Mousavi, Mahmoud Mahmoodian, Ahmad Reza Baghestani
      Abstract: British Journal of Occupational Therapy, Ahead of Print.
      IntroductionIdentification of environmental barriers is an important factor for improving quality of life. The aim was to investigate the relationship between environmental factors and quality of life of children with cerebral palsy and to prioritize environmental factors affecting the quality of life.MethodIn this cross-sectional study, participants were children with cerebral palsy (n = 67) 8–12 years. The European Child Environment Questionnaire and cerebral palsy quality of life questionnaire were used. In order to prioritize environmental codes, each of the items in the European Child Environment Questionnaire was linked to environmental codes of the cerebral palsy ICF Core Set. Data were analyzed using SPSS and Pearson correlation and regression tests.ResultsThere was a significant negative relationship between quality of life and environmental barriers (p < 0.05, r = −0.36). The European Child Environment Questionnaire covered 75% of the environmental codes of cerebral palsy ICF Core Set. Also, e5 (services, systems and policies) was identified as the main priority of environmental factors affecting the quality of life.ConclusionOccupational Therapists should devote part of the interventional plan to reduce environmental barriers. On the other hand, decision-making organizations have to make supportive laws to improve the physical environment of the home, community, school, and work.
      Citation: British Journal of Occupational Therapy
      PubDate: 2021-05-07T02:25:42Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03080226211008724
       
  • Occupations creating joy for people living with advanced cancer: A
           qualitative descriptive study

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      Authors: Hannah Holt Bentz, Stine Hviid Madsen, Marc Sampedro Pilegaard, Lisa Gregersen Østergaard, Åse Brandt, Sara Marie Hebsgaard Offersen, Karen la Cour
      Abstract: British Journal of Occupational Therapy, Ahead of Print.
      IntroductionFor people living with advanced cancer, the possibilities for experiences of joy are seriously influenced by the consequences of the illness. Due to the limited expected lifetime, the need to support such experiences that may entail joy and contribute to quality of life are of importance. Research shows that people with advanced cancer experience quality of life through occupations they are able to perform and enjoy. The aim of this study was to describe which occupations contribute to joy for people living with advanced cancer and explore how they reflect upon these occupations during an occupational therapy intervention.MethodsIn total, 111 people with advanced cancer from the intervention group in a randomised controlled trial participated in the present study. Thirty-six of these participants were interviewed, and for 10 participants, this was combined with participant observations. A directed and a conventional content analysis were applied.Results148 occupations contributing to joy were categorised into self-care, leisure and productivity. Most occupations were placed into leisure (89%). Participants had three distinct approaches to occupations contributing to joy: Finding solutions to maintain occupations contributing to joy; having an all or nothing approach; and hoping to resume occupations contributing to joy.ConclusionThis study found a wide range of occupations contributing to joy and shows the importance of focusing on enabling leisure occupations for people living with advanced cancer. The wide range of occupations as well as participants’ approaches to occupations may be useful to inform future interventions to enable enjoyment for people living with advanced cancer.
      Citation: British Journal of Occupational Therapy
      PubDate: 2021-05-05T04:15:23Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03080226211009419
       
  • Exploring how occupational therapists and physiotherapists evaluate
           rehabilitation potential of older people in acute care

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      Authors: Gemma Bradley, Katherine Baker, Catherine Bailey
      Abstract: British Journal of Occupational Therapy, Ahead of Print.
      IntroductionEvaluations of rehabilitation potential are an everyday occurrence, yet the concept is poorly understood and there is a lack of understanding about the reasoning process. This study aimed to explore how occupational therapists and physiotherapists evaluated the rehabilitation potential of older people following an acute hospital admission.MethodFocused ethnography was utilised, primarily using observation, interviewing and review of records within one acute medical ward in a general hospital in the United Kingdom. Five patient participants gave consent for their episode of care to be studied, for interactions with professionals to be observed and for their clinical records to be reviewed. Three occupational therapists and two physiotherapists then participated in individual interviews.FindingsThematic analysis of data led to the identification of a four-stage reasoning process. The four stages are as follows: gathering baseline information; provision of curative and supportive interventions; provision and monitoring of rehabilitative interventions; the evaluation of rehabilitation potential and decision about the subsequent pathway.ConclusionsThe reasoning process illustrates the professional reasoning of occupational therapists and physiotherapists when evaluating rehabilitation potential for older adults in acute care. However, it also highlights vulnerabilities to professional reasoning which may contribute to subjectivity, inconsistency or risk to patients.
      Citation: British Journal of Occupational Therapy
      PubDate: 2021-05-05T04:11:12Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03080226211011386
       
  • Occupational balance and quality of life in mothers of children with
           crebral palsy

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      Authors: Ayla Günal, Serkan Pekçetin, Petra Wagman, Carita Håkansson, Hülya Kayıhan
      Abstract: British Journal of Occupational Therapy, Ahead of Print.
      IntroductionOccupational balance (OB) is an important concept in occupational therapy and is considered as an essential component of health and well-being. The aim of this study was to show differences in OB and quality of life (QoL) between mothers of children with cerebral palsy (CP) and typically developing children.MethodsThirty-six mothers of children with CP and 36 mothers of typically developing children participated in the study. The mothers’ OB was evaluated using the Turkish Occupational Balance Questionnaire-11 (OBQ11-T), and their QoL was evaluated with the Nottingham Health Profile (NHP).ResultsThe OBQ11-T, total score, and the item ‘balance between obligatory and voluntary occupations’ score differed significantly between the groups (p < 0.05). There were also significant differences in NHP’s aspects of emotional reaction, social isolation, and sleep scores between the groups (p < 0.05). A negative correlation was detected between OBQ11-T total and NHP total scores in mothers of children with CP (p < 0.01).ConclusionThis study demonstrates that occupational therapists should pay attention to balance between obligatory and voluntary occupations to promote occupational balance. Also, QoL in mothers of children with CP should be evaluated. Therefore, occupational therapists should implement interventions to increase them when necessary for mothers of children with CP.
      Citation: British Journal of Occupational Therapy
      PubDate: 2021-05-05T03:56:45Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0308022621995112
       
  • Proposing a new short screening test for upper limb apraxia

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      Authors: Mai Yamada, Masahiko Koyanagi, Miyo Kawaguchi, Yuki Sato, Mitsuhiro Tsujihata, Toshio Higashi
      Abstract: British Journal of Occupational Therapy, Ahead of Print.
      BackgroundApraxia has a major impact on activities of daily living in stroke patients. The proper assessment and treatment of apraxia is important for maintaining a good quality of life. We developed a short evaluation test for upper limb apraxia.Patients and MethodsThe present Screening Test of Gestures for Stroke consists of 10 items for each verbal instruction and imitation. Each item includes three meaningless gestures, three meaningful gestures and four pantomimes. The Screening Test of Gestures for Stroke is scored based on a 3-point system: 10, 5 or 0 (maximum score: 200). The test took approximately 2–5 min to complete. We recruited 65 patients admitted to our hospital with left hemisphere stroke and 50 healthy subjects.ResultsThe reliability of the Screening Test of Gestures for Stroke was as follows: the intraclass correlation coefficient of intra-rater reliability was 0.93 for both verbal instructions and imitations, and the intraclass correlation coefficient total scores for inter-rater reliability for verbal instructions and for imitations were 0.97 and 0.95, respectively. The alpha coefficient was ≥0.80.ConclusionsThe Screening Test of Gestures for Stroke is a reliable and valid bedside test that has a short assessment time, does not require special equipment and can evaluate upper limb apraxia in stroke patients from the acute to the chronic phase.
      Citation: British Journal of Occupational Therapy
      PubDate: 2021-05-05T03:51:56Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0308022621998564
       
  • The relationship between cognitive function and performance in
           instrumental activities of daily living in older adults

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      Authors: Cheryl Toth, Nikki Tulliani, Michelle Bissett, Karen PY Liu
      Abstract: British Journal of Occupational Therapy, Ahead of Print.
      IntroductionDeficits in cognition have been found to be associated with problems in performing daily activities; however, it is unknown what specific domains of cognition are related to each daily activity.MethodThirty-six occupational therapists identified the 20 most important instrumental activities of daily living for older adults and the cognitive demands required. Thirty-two older adults rated the perceived mental effort when performing these activities. They were assessed on their cognitive functions.Descriptive statistics were used to report the results. The Pearson correlation coefficient was used to identify relationships between cognitive functions and perceived mental effort.ResultsActivities relating to ‘communication’, ‘financial management’, ‘health management’ and ‘safety and emergency management’ require more cognitive demands. Results from the older adults showed the highest significant correlations in immediate memory and ‘paying bills’ (r = 0.54), delayed memory and ‘following emergency procedures’ and ‘paying bills’ (rs = 0.52), and executive functioning and ‘making and keeping medical appointments’ (r = −0.49).ConclusionFindings contribute to the emerging understanding of specific cognitive domains related to the instrumental activities of daily living. The results can be used to reframe and improve intervention strategies for individuals with cognitive decline to maintain or improve performance in daily activities.
      Citation: British Journal of Occupational Therapy
      PubDate: 2021-05-04T03:49:32Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03080226211008722
       
  • Impacts of therapeutic horticulture on happiness and loneliness in
           institutionalized clients with mental health conditions

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      Authors: Isabel Mourão, Cláudia V Mouro, Luís Miguel Brito, Sofia R Costa, Telma C Almeida
      Abstract: British Journal of Occupational Therapy, Ahead of Print.
      IntroductionTherapeutic horticulture (TH) can be considered a non-pharmacological approach to support psychiatric treatments for the improvement of physical and mental health, but information is lacking on whether it has advantages as compared to more conventional occupational therapies (OTs).MethodThe study focused on institutionalized 25 clients attending TH among other OTs and 15 clients attending OT other than TH. The measures used were the ‘Subjective Happiness Scale’ (SHS) and the ‘Social and Emotional Loneliness Scale for Adults’ (SELSA-S), along with sociodemographic and clinical data. The study design was descriptive, observational and cross-sectional.ResultsScores obtained from the SHS and SELSA-S were generally similar for both groups, although 40% of clients in the TH group perceived relaxation. These are in agreement with previous studies performed with chronic schizophrenia clients reporting that TH might effectively decrease depression/anxiety symptoms, but the feeling of hopelessness and quality of life did not change, probably due to long-term institutionalization and required medication that may limit other effects. Within the TH group, clients preferred specific horticultural tasks and more days/week attending activities decreased loneliness and increased happiness.ConclusionTH interventions as an integrative treatment option merits further study on both process and outcome evaluation, to maximize its effectiveness.
      Citation: British Journal of Occupational Therapy
      PubDate: 2021-05-04T03:40:25Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03080226211008719
       
  • Cognitive orientation to daily occupation group in the adult day
           rehabilitation setting: A feasibility study Cognitive Orientation to daily
           Occupational Performance in day rehabilitation

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      Authors: Sarah M Zera, Kathy Preissner, Heidi Fischer, Ashley Stoffel
      Abstract: British Journal of Occupational Therapy, Ahead of Print.
      IntroductionThe Cognitive Orientation to daily Occupational Performance (CO-OP) ApproachTM is a leading approach in occupational therapy. Implementing the CO-OP ApproachTM in a group format in day rehabilitation has not yet been explored.MethodIn day rehabilitation, a barrier to implementing the CO-OP ApproachTM is the group model. To address these challenges, this feasibility study involved the development, implementation, and evaluation of a CO-OP group for adults. Four patients participated in six group sessions. Pre- and post-measures included the Canadian Occupational Performance Measure (COPM) and the Assessment of Motor and Process Skills (AMPS). Subjective data were collected to reflect the participant’s experiences during the group.Results80% of participants recruited completed the group. All participants demonstrated improvement in goals addressed within the group and goals not addressed within the group on the COPM. AMPS findings were inconclusive. Subjective findings indicated participants appreciated the group learning environment, valued the CO-OP process, were motivated to participate, and would have liked more groups.ConclusionTo our knowledge, this is the first adult CO-OP group in a clinical setting. Results support the feasibility of a CO-OP group in day rehabilitation and the need for further examination of the effectiveness of this intervention.
      Citation: British Journal of Occupational Therapy
      PubDate: 2021-05-04T03:26:52Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03080226211008713
       
  • Validity and reliability of Persian version of the Arm Function in
           Multiple Sclerosis Questionnaire

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      Authors: Sara Afshar, Nazila Akbarfahimi, Mehdi Rassafiani, Mohsen Vahedi, Mojtaba Azimian, Shaghayegh Pashang, Masoud Etemadifar
      Abstract: British Journal of Occupational Therapy, Ahead of Print.
      IntroductionThis study aimed to determine the validity and reliability of the Persian version of the Arm Function in Multiple Sclerosis Questionnaire which is a self-report questionnaire for persons with multiple sclerosis (MS).MethodThis methodological study was performed in the following stages: translation, validity, internal consistency, and test–retest reliability of Persian-AMSQ. The Nine-Hole Peg Test (9HPT), Coin Rotation Task (CRT), and Functional Independence Measure (FIM) for construct validity were used. Psychometric testing was done to ascertain the validity and reliability of the questionnaire.ResultsIn this study, 155 people with MS participated. There were no major linguistic or cultural difficulties in the translation of AMSQ. Face and content validity confirmed by experts and people with MS. The internal consistency was high (Cronbach’s α = 0.99). Test–retest reliability, as measured with intra-class coefficient, was 0.98. Correlations with 9HPT (r = 0.54), CRT (r = 0.16), and FIM (r = −0.54) were significant (p < 0.05).ConclusionThe Persian-AMSQ appears to be a valid and reliable questionnaire for measuring upper extremity dysfunction in MS.
      Citation: British Journal of Occupational Therapy
      PubDate: 2021-05-04T03:23:17Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03080226211008710
       
  • Patterns of occupational engagement among community-dwelling older adults
           in Singapore: An exploratory mixed method study

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      Authors: Wei Qi Koh, Yuan Lin Chia, Wen Xu Ng, Fiona Y Q Lim, Therma W C Cheung
      Abstract: British Journal of Occupational Therapy, Ahead of Print.
      IntroductionThe aim of this study is to understand the patterns of occupations among community-dwelling older adults in Singapore. The objectives are to describe their occupational engagement using the Activity Card Sort Singapore, understand their occupational preferences and perceived barriers and facilitators to engagement.MethodsA convergent parallel mixed-method study was conducted over a 5-month period in 2018. Purposive and snowball sampling were used to recruit the participants. Individual 1-h interviews were conducted at participants’ homes. Quantitative data collected include demographic information, Modified Barthel Index scores and activity engagement based on the Activity Card Sort Singapore. Qualitative data was collected using semi-structured interviews.Results105 participants were enrolled in the study. Overall, older adults engaged mostly in instrumental and social activities. However, leisure and social activities were most preferred. Gender, educational level and age were found to influence occupational engagement. Overall, six main themes relating to perceived barriers and facilitators to occupational engagement were identified: cognition and physical status, self-efficacy, resources, affect and meaningfulness, social influence and environmental factors.ConclusionThe findings from this study provided insights into the occupational patterns of community-dwelling older adults in Singapore and their perceived barriers and facilitators to engagement. Recommendations for practice were identified.
      Citation: British Journal of Occupational Therapy
      PubDate: 2021-05-04T03:09:38Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03080226211008048
       
  • Determination of the optimal cutoff values and validity of the Purdue
           Pegboard Test

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      Authors: Ilkem Ceren Sigirtmac, Cigdem Oksuz
      Abstract: British Journal of Occupational Therapy, Ahead of Print.
      IntroductionThe Purdue Pegboard Test (PPT) is crucial for assessing fine dexterity of patients with hand injury. Determining the PPT cutoff value is needed to distinguish patients with impaired hand dexterity from those with unimpaired hand dexterity. The aim of this article is to examine the construct validity of PPT and to determine its cutoff values for patients with hand injuries.MethodThe PPT and Disabilities of Arm Shoulder and Hand Questionnaire Turkish version (DASH-T) were used to measure hand dexterity. To examine construct validity, we measured the correlation between PPT and DASH-T. The cutoff values were determined using the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve generated with sensitivity and 1-specificity. We recruited 101 patients with hand injury and 162 healthy participants.ResultsCorrelation between all subtests of PPT and DASH-T were weak (r = −0.282; −0.473: p
      Citation: British Journal of Occupational Therapy
      PubDate: 2021-05-04T03:02:26Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03080226211008046
       
  • A 20-year review of National Health Service Resolution Occupational
           Therapy litigation data in the United Kingdom

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      Authors: Veronica Soderberg Garcia, Sara Heritage, Rebecca Ellen Winter, Pamela Furness, Ken Wong
      Abstract: British Journal of Occupational Therapy, Ahead of Print.
      As with any other healthcare professional in today’s medicolegal climate, the Occupational Therapist is at a risk of litigious claims being made against them. Through a Freedom of Information request, litigation claims data between 2000 and 2020 against National Health Service Occupational Therapists in the United Kingdom were obtained from National Health Service (NHS) Resolution. We perform a descriptive analysis of the results and review the literature around litigation involving Occupational Therapists. 79 claims were registered over this period, of which 37 were settled with damages. The most common primary injury for successful claims was fracture. The most common primary causes for successful claims were equipment malfunction and lack of assistance/care. The total cost for successful claims was £1,655,771. These data demonstrate that Occupational Therapy is a trusted profession, with a low rate of claims. We frame these findings in context and discuss lessons behind the data.
      Citation: British Journal of Occupational Therapy
      PubDate: 2021-05-04T02:51:45Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03080226211009423
       
  • Test–retest reliability and criterion-related validity of Shih–Hsu
           test of attention between people with and without schizophrenia

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      Authors: Yi-Nuo Shih, Jia-Lien Hsu, Yi-Ching Wang, Chia-Chun Wu, Yin-huang Liao
      Abstract: British Journal of Occupational Therapy, Ahead of Print.
      IntroductionThe “Shih–Hsu Test of Attention” (SHTA) is an iPad-based attention assessment tool developed in recent years by occupational therapists and has acceptable criterion-related validity and high test–retest reliability in preliminary application. This research project explores the criterion-related validity and test–retest reliability of SHTA between people with and without schizophrenia.MethodThe participants were 76 adults with schizophrenia aged 20–64 years, and 66 adults without diagnosed mental illness aged 20–64 years were recruited in this study on a voluntary basis. Each participant was assessed twice. The participants completed both the SHTA and Chu’s Attention Test (CAT) in the first test and the SHTA after 3 weeks.FindingsAnalytical results indicate that the SHTA has satisfactory test–retest reliability (ICC = 0.67) and criterion-related validity (γ = 0.29, p < 0.05*) for adults with schizophrenia and has high test–retest reliability (ICC = 0.90) and criterion-related validity (γ = 0.25, p < 0.05*) for adults without diagnosed mental illness. The MDC% value for the subjects without diagnosed mental illness was 12.1%, indicating acceptable random measurement error.ConclusionOur preliminary findings show that the iPad-based attention assessment tool, SHTA, has satisfactory criterion-related validity and test–retest reliability, supporting the future application of SHTA as an attention assessment tool.
      Citation: British Journal of Occupational Therapy
      PubDate: 2021-04-23T04:58:28Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0308022621991774
       
  • Translation and cultural adaptation of the Sensory Profile 2 to the
           Persian language

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      Authors: Marjan Shahbazi, Navid Mirzakhany, Mehdi Alizadeh Zarei, Farid Zayeri, Aliyeh Daryabor
      Abstract: British Journal of Occupational Therapy, Ahead of Print.
      IntroductionThe purpose of this study was to translate and cross-culturally adapt the original Sensory Profile 2 questionnaires to Persian and access the psychometric properties of the adapted questionnaires.MethodThe translation and cultural adaptation of the original questionnaires were carried out under the published guidelines. Furthermore, we employed the multiple methods to establish the validity and reliability of the Sensory Profile 2 questionnaires. We calculated the content validity, internal consistency, and test–retest, along with the standard error of measurement. The study included 1272 children, between 0 and 14 years old, without any disabilities. They were selected from child developmental centers and elementary and middle schools of Tehran, the capital of the Islamic Republic of Iran.ResultsThe item-level content validity index and the scale-level were satisfactory for all the items, quadrant, section, and factor of the Sensory Profile 2. The values of alpha for all questionnaires were ranged from 0.67 to 0.91. Furthermore, the test–retest reliability values for all questionnaires ranged from 0.72 to 0.95.ConclusionsThe Sensory Profile 2-Persian version can considered as a valid and reliable tool for utilization in Persian-speaking children between 0 and 14 years old.
      Citation: British Journal of Occupational Therapy
      PubDate: 2021-04-22T07:38:29Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0308022621991768
       
  • The effect of occupation-based postural stability training on postural
           stability and occupational performance in visually impaired individuals: A
           randomised controlled trial

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      Authors: Esma Özkan, Esra Akı
      Abstract: British Journal of Occupational Therapy, Ahead of Print.
      IntroductionThe purpose of this research was to examine the effect of occupation-based postural stability training on occupational performance and postural stability in visually impaired individuals.MethodThe research was designed as pre-test/post-test, with two groups (study group and control group). A total of 34 individuals with visual impairment were randomly assigned to the two groups. Participants were evaluated using a sociodemographic information form, the Biodex Balance System for postural stability, the Canadian Occupational Performance Measurement for assessing performance and satisfaction of occupations and the semi-structured interview form. The control group received only postural stability training with the Biodex Balance System and the study group received individualised occupation-based postural stability training with the Biodex Balance System BBS during a 12-week intervention (24 sessions).ResultsA statistically significant difference was found between the postural stability values of the study group and the control group when looking at pre and post-training measurements (p 
      Citation: British Journal of Occupational Therapy
      PubDate: 2021-03-05T04:29:24Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0308022620988468
       
  • Participant-perceived occupational outcomes after two years of yoga for
           chronic pain

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      Authors: Caroline M Rose, Karen E Atler, Jennifer Dickman Portz, Alexandra P Andrews, Arlene A Schmid
      Abstract: British Journal of Occupational Therapy, Ahead of Print.
      IntroductionThe study aim was to investigate the perceived impact and experience of long-term involvement in community-based group yoga for people with chronic pain.MethodsEleven participants, who previously completed an 8-week yoga intervention and continued attending yoga at a community pain clinic for 2 years, participated in the study. A mixed-methods approach was employed. Canadian Occupational Performance Measure data were collected during the 8-week yoga study (baseline) and after 2 years of yoga (follow-up). Baseline and follow-up Canadian Occupational Performance Measure data were compared to measure change in perceived occupational performance and satisfaction. Individual qualitative interviews were conducted to explore participants’ perceived impact and experience of long-term yoga involvement. Canadian Occupational Performance Measure data were analyzed using Wilcoxon signed-rank tests, and qualitative interviews were analyzed using an inductive approach.FindingsCanadian Occupational Performance Measure scores significantly improved between baseline and follow-up. Three main themes emerged from qualitative interviews: (a) Occupational shift from “existing” to “living,” (b) The change process is “progressive,” and (c) Yoga is “a positive thing I do in my life.”ConclusionLong-term involvement in community-based group yoga may improve and sustain occupational performance and satisfaction. Occupational therapists may consider yoga as a tool to promote occupational gains in people with chronic pain.
      Citation: British Journal of Occupational Therapy
      PubDate: 2021-01-22T06:13:24Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0308022620985779
       
  • Impact of a sensory activity schedule intervention on cognitive strategy
           use in autistic students: A school-based pilot study

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      Authors: Caroline J Mills, Christine Chapparo, Joanne Hinitt
      Abstract: British Journal of Occupational Therapy, Ahead of Print.
      IntroductionAutistic students may experience difficulty performing classroom tasks due to atypical sensory processing and inefficient use of higher-order cognitive strategies. Limited research has investigated the influence of in-class sensory activities to enhance the thinking strategies required for task performance. This study evaluated a classroom-based sensory activity schedule and its impact on cognitive strategy use.MethodsA quasi-experimental, non-equivalent groups design was used. Students (n = 30, mean age 7.4 years) with atypical sensory processing negatively impacting classroom performance, and their teachers (n = 23), from six autism-specific schools were grouped into intervention (Sensory Activity Schedule and usual teaching) and control (usual teaching only) groups. Students’ cognitive strategy use during the performance of classroom tasks was evaluated at baseline and post-intervention using Perceive, Recall, Plan, Perform Stage Two Cognitive Task Analysis.ResultsStatistical analysis (Mann–Whitney U test) indicated that students who received the Sensory Activity Schedule intervention improved significantly more than control group students in overall cognitive strategy use (Z = –2.32, p = 0.02), and with strategy items involving attention and sensory perception (perceive, Z = –2.26, p = 0.02), and planning and organisation (Plan, Z = –.254, p = 0.01).ConclusionThe Sensory Activity Schedule may enhance autistic students’ capacity to apply cognitive strategies more effectively during performance of classroom tasks.
      Citation: British Journal of Occupational Therapy
      PubDate: 2021-01-11T04:36:32Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0308022620982888
       
  • Occupational therapy and psychosis: POINTER feasibility study for a
           pragmatic clinical trial

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      Authors: Joanne Inman, Katrina Bannigan, Jacqueline Akhurst
      First page: 541
      Abstract: British Journal of Occupational Therapy, Ahead of Print.
      IntroductionThe dearth of clinical trials of individualised occupational therapy with people with a diagnosis of psychosis limits the evidence base globally for occupational therapy practice. This study evaluated the feasibility of conducting a pragmatic clinical trial.MethodMixed methods design using a pragmatic perspective; two-centre, one-group pretest-posttest study, at six months. POINTER Occupational Intervention Specification captured routine individualised occupational therapy. Process evaluation included recruitment, retention, intervention delivery, fidelity, adherence and outcome measurement. The primary outcome was participation in activities of everyday life, measured by Time Use Survey, Participation Scale and Utrecht Scale for Evaluation of Rehabilitation-Participation. The Canadian Occupational Performance Measure measured self-reported experience of and satisfaction with occupational performance. The Short Form-36v2 Health Survey measured health-related quality of life, a secondary outcome. Participants’ experiences were explored using a questionnaire. Intervention providers’ perspectives were investigated via the POINTER occupational intervention log and focus groups.ResultsRecruitment was (20/36) and drop-out 20% (4/20). Fidelity was 77%, and adherence was good; POINTER had validity and utility. Outcome measurement was acceptable to participants, indicating increased participation in activities of everyday life.ConclusionA larger clinical trial is merited; recruitment processes need further exploration, and outcome measurement needs refining.
      Citation: British Journal of Occupational Therapy
      PubDate: 2021-05-04T02:45:36Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03080226211000257
       
  • Views about sensory modulation from people with schizophrenia and treating
           staff: A multisite qualitative study

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      Authors: Tawanda Machingura, Chris Lloyd, Karen Murphy, Sarah Goulder, David Shum, and Heather Green
      First page: 550
      Abstract: British Journal of Occupational Therapy, Ahead of Print.
      IntroductionCurrent non-pharmacological treatment options for people with schizophrenia are limited. There is, however, emerging evidence that sensory modulation can be beneficial for this population. This study aimed to gain insight into sensory modulation from the user’s and the treating staff’s perspectives.MethodA qualitative content analysis design was used. Transcripts from occupational therapists (n=11) and patients with schizophrenia (n=13) derived from in-depth semi-structured interviews were analysed for themes using content analysis.ResultsFive themes emerged from this study: Service user education on the sensory approach is the key; A variety of tools should be tried; Sensory modulation provides a valued treatment option; There are challenges of managing perceived risk at an organisational level; and There is a shortage of accessible and effective training.ConclusionPeople with schizophrenia and treating staff had congruent perceptions regarding the use of sensory modulation as a treatment option. The findings suggest that sensory modulation can be a valued addition to treatment options for people with schizophrenia. We suggest further research on sensory modulation intervention effectiveness using quantitative methods so these results can be further explored.
      Citation: British Journal of Occupational Therapy
      PubDate: 2021-02-12T05:43:39Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0308022620988470
       
  • Virtual reality in social skills training programs for people with
           schizophrenia: A systematic review and focus group

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      Authors: Catarina Oliveira, Raquel Simões de Almeida, António Marques
      First page: 571
      Abstract: British Journal of Occupational Therapy, Ahead of Print.
      IntroductionThis study aims to determine the guidelines for the design of a social skills training programme for people with schizophrenia using virtual reality.MethodsThis article encompasses two studies: Study 1, a systematic review of five articles indexed in the databases B-on, PubMed, Clinical trials and Cochrane Library (2010–2020); Study 2, a focus group of occupational therapists trained in mental health and multimedia professionals, in which they discussed the outline of such a programme.ResultsA set of guidelines were identified as central and consensual which should be included in the programme. It must have multilevel logic and gradual learning, with simulations of everyday situations, in which it is possible to practise the skills of conversation and communication. Virtual reality provides people with schizophrenia with unlimited opportunities, enhancing a personalized intervention.ConclusionSocial skills training could be part of the treatment for people with schizophrenia, and virtual reality is a promising tool to complement traditional training, although still little implemented in mental health services. Occupational therapists have a prominent role in the development and application of this because of their knowledge of activity analysis and their ability to facilitate the generalization of skills in different contexts.
      Citation: British Journal of Occupational Therapy
      PubDate: 2021-05-05T04:07:11Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03080226211011391
       
  • Exploring the ideal practice for occupational therapists on assertive
           community treatment teams

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      Authors: Tenzin C Lama, Yumeng Fu, Jane A Davis
      First page: 582
      Abstract: British Journal of Occupational Therapy, Ahead of Print.
      IntroductionCanadian occupational therapists are employed as case managers on assertive community treatment (ACT) teams to support community living for individuals with severe and persistent mental illnesses. In this position, occupational therapists act primarily as generalists, typically attending appointments with clients, supervising medication adherence, supporting basic living needs, and managing client crises. Occupational therapists may also provide psychotherapy and coping skill groups, as well as profession-specific practices, such as skills training. Exploring how ACT occupational therapists describe their perceived ideal practice may support transformation in long-standing, occupational therapy practices on ACT teams.MethodThis qualitative, interpretive description study involved 11 Canadian ACT team occupational therapists in one individual, semi-structured in-depth interview using an interview guide containing open-ended questions. Interview transcripts were analyzed to identify themes pertaining to therapists’ descriptions of their perceived ideal occupational therapy practice on ACT teams.ResultsThree themes emerged: (a) Engaging in practice “with intention”; (b) Finding the space for occupational therapy practice; and (c) Supporting clients in their recovery to find their best occupational self.ConclusionsThe findings highlight practice possibilities for occupational therapist working on ACT teams and provide a foundation for advocating for better use of specific occupational therapy practices within community mental health settings.
      Citation: British Journal of Occupational Therapy
      PubDate: 2021-06-26T03:27:41Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03080226211026558
       
  • Living with disability in a COVID-19 world

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      Authors: Paul Boyle, Graham Stew, Kathleen T Galvin, Pirjo Vuoskoski
      First page: 603
      Abstract: British Journal of Occupational Therapy, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: British Journal of Occupational Therapy
      PubDate: 2021-05-18T04:43:57Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03080226211020993
       
  • Employment programmes for schizophrenia and other severe mental illness in
           psychosocial rehabilitation: a systematic review

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      Authors: Muhammad Zairul Rezal Zainol Abidin, Farahiyah Wan Yunus, Hanif Farhan Mohd Rasdi, Masne Kadar
      First page: 605
      Abstract: British Journal of Occupational Therapy, Ahead of Print.
      IntroductionEmployment programmes for people with mental illness vary widely in range, but nonetheless all share the same objectives of restoring or initiating vocational roles to promote recovery in psychosocial rehabilitation. The current interventions available usually focus on the specific vocational outcomes of the intervention rather than focusing holistically on the client’s needs.MethodThis review aimed to examine the effectiveness of intervention programmes and determine the best intervention for schizophrenia and other severe mental illness, considering both vocational and non-vocational outcomes. Searching five databases – CINAHL, Medline via Ovid, Scopus, OT Seeker and Web of Science – a total of 3108 studies was identified; 24 met the selection criteria and were reviewed. Interventions were categorised into five major programmes of supported employment, integrated supported employment, vocational rehabilitation, cognitive intervention and virtual reality-based vocational training.ResultsIntegrated supported employment was found to be the most effective approach for a vocational outcome. However, evidence concerning non-vocational outcomes of employment programmes and the use of cognitive training remains unclear.ConclusionClinicians are advised to consider the needs and preferences of the client before selecting the best intervention programme. More research is needed to determine the applicability and the efficacy of intervention programmes.
      Citation: British Journal of Occupational Therapy
      PubDate: 2021-01-11T04:36:31Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0308022620980683
       
  • Effects of a nurse–occupational therapist meeting on function and
           motivation in hospitalized elderly patients: A pilot randomized control
           trial

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      Authors: Ken Kondo, Naoto Noguchi, Ryoto Teshima, Koji Tanaka, Bumsuk Lee
      First page: 620
      Abstract: British Journal of Occupational Therapy, Ahead of Print.
      IntroductionThis pilot randomized controlled trial assessed the effectiveness of a nurse–occupational therapist meeting on improving motor and social-cognitive functions, as well as motivation, in a subacute hospital setting.MethodsParticipants were randomized to a weekly multidisciplinary team meeting group (‘control’, n = 20) or a nurse–occupational therapist meeting group (‘intervention’, n = 18). Medical care plans in both groups were discussed in the weekly meeting. In addition, the details of daily life problems for the intervention patients were discussed in the nurse–occupational therapist meeting. Outcome measures included motor and social-cognitive functions assessed by the Functional Independence Measure and motivation assessed by the Vitality Index. Assessment time points were at admission and discharge.ResultsIn the intervention group, additional improvements were found in the Functional Independence Measure cognitive (p = 0.048, r = 0.32) and the Vitality Index (p = 0.027, r = 0.36), whereas the Functional Independence Measure motor was improved in both groups (p ≤ 0.018, r ≥ 0.52).ConclusionWe found significant improvement in motor function in both groups and additional improvements in social-cognitive function and motivation in the intervention group. These observations suggest that collaborative practice between nurses and occupational therapists could improve functions underlying independent daily life in hospitalized elderly patients.
      Citation: British Journal of Occupational Therapy
      PubDate: 2021-05-04T03:44:47Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03080226211008720
       
 
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