Publisher: Sage Publications   (Total: 1166 journals)

 A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I  J  K  L  M  N  O  P  Q  R  S  T  U  V  W  X  Y  Z  

        1 2 3 4 5 6 | Last   [Sort by number of followers]   [Restore default list]

Showing 1 - 200 of 1166 Journals sorted alphabetically
AADE in Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Abstracts in Anthropology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 29)
Academic Pathology     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Accounting History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18, SJR: 0.527, CiteScore: 1)
Acta Radiologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.754, CiteScore: 2)
Acta Radiologica Open     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Acta Sociologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39, SJR: 0.939, CiteScore: 2)
Action Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 53, SJR: 0.308, CiteScore: 1)
Active Learning in Higher Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 398, SJR: 1.397, CiteScore: 2)
Adaptive Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.288, CiteScore: 1)
Administration & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18, SJR: 0.675, CiteScore: 1)
Adoption & Fostering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25, SJR: 0.313, CiteScore: 0)
Adsorption Science & Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.258, CiteScore: 1)
Adult Education Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 262, SJR: 0.566, CiteScore: 2)
Adult Learning     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 51)
Advances in Dental Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 1.791, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Developing Human Resources     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35, SJR: 0.614, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Mechanical Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 156, SJR: 0.272, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Methods and Practices in Psychological Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20)
Advances in Structural Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 51, SJR: 0.599, CiteScore: 1)
AERA Open     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
Affilia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.496, CiteScore: 1)
Africa Spectrum     Open Access   (Followers: 17)
Agrarian South : J. of Political Economy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Air, Soil & Water Research     Open Access   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.214, CiteScore: 1)
Alexandria : The J. of National and Intl. Library and Information Issues     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 68)
Allergy & Rhinology     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
AlterNative : An Intl. J. of Indigenous Peoples     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 39, SJR: 0.194, CiteScore: 0)
Alternative Law J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.176, CiteScore: 0)
Alternatives : Global, Local, Political     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.351, CiteScore: 1)
Alternatives to Laboratory Animals     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.297, CiteScore: 1)
American Behavioral Scientist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26, SJR: 0.982, CiteScore: 2)
American Economist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
American Educational Research J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 260, SJR: 2.913, CiteScore: 3)
American J. of Alzheimer's Disease and Other Dementias     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23, SJR: 0.67, CiteScore: 2)
American J. of Cosmetic Surgery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
American J. of Evaluation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18, SJR: 0.646, CiteScore: 2)
American J. of Health Promotion     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35, SJR: 0.807, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Hospice and Palliative Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 47, SJR: 0.65, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Law & Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.204, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Lifestyle Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.431, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Medical Quality     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.777, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Men's Health     Open Access   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.595, CiteScore: 2)
American J. of Rhinology and Allergy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.972, CiteScore: 2)
American J. of Sports Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 249, SJR: 3.949, CiteScore: 6)
American Politics Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 36, SJR: 1.313, CiteScore: 1)
American Review of Public Administration     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28, SJR: 2.062, CiteScore: 2)
American Sociological Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 358, SJR: 6.333, CiteScore: 6)
American String Teacher     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Analytical Chemistry Insights     Open Access   (Followers: 26, SJR: 0.224, CiteScore: 1)
Angiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.849, CiteScore: 2)
Animation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.197, CiteScore: 0)
Annals of Clinical Biochemistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.634, CiteScore: 1)
Annals of Otology, Rhinology & Laryngology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20, SJR: 0.807, CiteScore: 1)
Annals of Pharmacotherapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 59, SJR: 1.096, CiteScore: 2)
Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 52, SJR: 1.225, CiteScore: 3)
Annals of the ICRP     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.548, CiteScore: 1)
Anthropocene Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 3.341, CiteScore: 7)
Anthropological Theory     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 48, SJR: 0.739, CiteScore: 1)
Antitrust Bulletin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Antiviral Chemistry and Chemotherapy     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.635, CiteScore: 2)
Antyajaa : Indian J. of Women and Social Change     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Applied Biosafety     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.131, CiteScore: 0)
Applied Psychological Measurement     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21, SJR: 1.17, CiteScore: 1)
Applied Spectroscopy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 27, SJR: 0.489, CiteScore: 2)
Armed Forces & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25, SJR: 0.29, CiteScore: 1)
Arthaniti : J. of Economic Theory and Practice     Full-text available via subscription  
Arts and Humanities in Higher Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 49, SJR: 0.305, CiteScore: 1)
Asia Pacific Media Educator     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.23, CiteScore: 0)
Asia-Pacific J. of Management Research and Innovation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Asia-Pacific J. of Public Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.558, CiteScore: 1)
Asia-Pacific J. of Rural Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Asian and Pacific Migration J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.324, CiteScore: 1)
Asian Cardiovascular and Thoracic Annals     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.305, CiteScore: 0)
Asian J. of Comparative Politics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Asian J. of Legal Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Asian J. of Management Cases     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.101, CiteScore: 0)
ASN Neuro     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 1.534, CiteScore: 3)
Assessment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19, SJR: 1.519, CiteScore: 3)
Assessment for Effective Intervention     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.578, CiteScore: 1)
Australasian J. of Early Childhood     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.535, CiteScore: 1)
Australasian Psychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18, SJR: 0.433, CiteScore: 1)
Australian & New Zealand J. of Psychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30, SJR: 1.801, CiteScore: 2)
Australian and New Zealand J. of Criminology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 547, SJR: 0.612, CiteScore: 1)
Australian J. of Career Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Australian J. of Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 51, SJR: 0.403, CiteScore: 1)
Australian J. of Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.497, CiteScore: 1)
Autism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 358, SJR: 1.739, CiteScore: 4)
Autism & Developmental Language Impairments     Open Access   (Followers: 17)
Avian Biology Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.401, CiteScore: 1)
Behavior Modification     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.877, CiteScore: 2)
Behavioral and Cognitive Neuroscience Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Behavioral Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Beyond Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Bible Translator     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Biblical Theology Bulletin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24, SJR: 0.184, CiteScore: 0)
Big Data & Society     Open Access   (Followers: 56)
Biochemistry Insights     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Bioinformatics and Biology Insights     Open Access   (Followers: 12, SJR: 1.141, CiteScore: 2)
Biological Research for Nursing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.685, CiteScore: 2)
Biomarker Insights     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.81, CiteScore: 2)
Biomarkers in Cancer     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Biomedical Engineering and Computational Biology     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
Biomedical Informatics Insights     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Bioscope: South Asian Screen Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.235, CiteScore: 0)
BMS: Bulletin of Sociological Methodology/Bulletin de Méthodologie Sociologique     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.226, CiteScore: 0)
Body & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29, SJR: 1.531, CiteScore: 3)
Bone and Tissue Regeneration Insights     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Brain and Neuroscience Advances     Open Access  
Brain Science Advances     Open Access  
Breast Cancer : Basic and Clinical Research     Open Access   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.823, CiteScore: 2)
British J. of Music Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
British J. of Occupational Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 254, SJR: 0.323, CiteScore: 1)
British J. of Pain     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31, SJR: 0.579, CiteScore: 2)
British J. of Politics and Intl. Relations     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39, SJR: 0.91, CiteScore: 2)
British J. of Visual Impairment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.337, CiteScore: 1)
British J.ism Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
BRQ Business Review Quarterly     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Building Acoustics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.215, CiteScore: 1)
Building Services Engineering Research & Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.583, CiteScore: 1)
Bulletin of Science, Technology & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Business & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Business and Professional Communication Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.348, CiteScore: 1)
Business Information Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17, SJR: 0.279, CiteScore: 0)
Business Perspectives and Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Cahiers Élisabéthains     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.111, CiteScore: 0)
Calcutta Statistical Association Bulletin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
California Management Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 37, SJR: 2.209, CiteScore: 4)
Canadian Association of Radiologists J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.463, CiteScore: 1)
Canadian J. of Kidney Health and Disease     Open Access   (Followers: 8, SJR: 1.007, CiteScore: 2)
Canadian J. of Nursing Research (CJNR)     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Canadian J. of Occupational Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 168, SJR: 0.626, CiteScore: 1)
Canadian J. of Psychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28, SJR: 1.769, CiteScore: 3)
Canadian J. of School Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.266, CiteScore: 1)
Canadian Pharmacists J. / Revue des Pharmaciens du Canada     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.536, CiteScore: 1)
Cancer Control     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Cancer Growth and Metastasis     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Cancer Informatics     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.64, CiteScore: 1)
Capital and Class     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.282, CiteScore: 1)
Cardiac Cath Lab Director     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Cardiovascular and Thoracic Open     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Career Development and Transition for Exceptional Individuals     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.44, CiteScore: 1)
Cartilage     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.889, CiteScore: 3)
Cell Transplantation     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 1.023, CiteScore: 3)
Cephalalgia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 1.581, CiteScore: 3)
Cephalalgia Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Child Language Teaching and Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34, SJR: 0.501, CiteScore: 1)
Child Maltreatment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 1.22, CiteScore: 3)
Child Neurology Open     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Childhood     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19, SJR: 0.894, CiteScore: 2)
Childhood Obesity and Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
China Information     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.767, CiteScore: 2)
China Report     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.221, CiteScore: 0)
Chinese J. of Sociology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Christian Education J. : Research on Educational Ministry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Chronic Illness     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.672, CiteScore: 2)
Chronic Respiratory Disease     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.808, CiteScore: 2)
Chronic Stress     Open Access  
Citizenship, Social and Economics Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.145, CiteScore: 0)
Cleft Palate-Craniofacial J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.757, CiteScore: 1)
Clin-Alert     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Clinical and Applied Thrombosis/Hemostasis     Open Access   (Followers: 32, SJR: 0.49, CiteScore: 1)
Clinical and Translational Neuroscience     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Clinical Case Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.364, CiteScore: 1)
Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 45, SJR: 0.73, CiteScore: 2)
Clinical EEG and Neuroscience     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.552, CiteScore: 2)
Clinical Ethics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.296, CiteScore: 1)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Arthritis and Musculoskeletal Disorders     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.537, CiteScore: 2)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Blood Disorders     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.314, CiteScore: 2)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Cardiology     Open Access   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.686, CiteScore: 2)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Case Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.283, CiteScore: 1)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Circulatory, Respiratory and Pulmonary Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.425, CiteScore: 2)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Ear, Nose and Throat     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Endocrinology and Diabetes     Open Access   (Followers: 34, SJR: 0.63, CiteScore: 2)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Oncology     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 1.129, CiteScore: 3)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Pediatrics     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Psychiatry     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Reproductive Health     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.776, CiteScore: 0)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Therapeutics     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.172, CiteScore: 0)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Trauma and Intensive Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Women's Health     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Clinical Nursing Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34, SJR: 0.471, CiteScore: 1)
Clinical Pathology     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Clinical Pediatrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25, SJR: 0.487, CiteScore: 1)
Clinical Psychological Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16, SJR: 3.281, CiteScore: 5)
Clinical Rehabilitation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 78, SJR: 1.322, CiteScore: 3)
Clinical Risk     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.133, CiteScore: 0)
Clinical Trials     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22, SJR: 2.399, CiteScore: 2)
Clothing and Textiles Research J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28, SJR: 0.36, CiteScore: 1)
Collections : A J. for Museum and Archives Professionals     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Common Law World Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Communication & Sport     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.385, CiteScore: 1)
Communication and the Public     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Communication Disorders Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.458, CiteScore: 1)
Communication Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24, SJR: 2.171, CiteScore: 3)
Community College Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 1.451, CiteScore: 1)
Comparative Political Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 293, SJR: 3.772, CiteScore: 3)
Compensation & Benefits Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Competition & Change     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.843, CiteScore: 2)

        1 2 3 4 5 6 | Last   [Sort by number of followers]   [Restore default list]

Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Biological Research for Nursing
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.685
Citation Impact (citeScore): 2
Number of Followers: 7  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1099-8004 - ISSN (Online) 1552-4175
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1166 journals]
  • Investigating the Associations of Everyday Discrimination and Inflammation
           in Latina Women: A Pilot Study

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Billy A. Caceres, Veronica Barcelona, Danny Vo, Niurka Suero-Tejeda, Kasey Jackman, Jacquelyn Taylor, Elizabeth Corwin
      Pages: 311 - 317
      Abstract: Biological Research For Nursing, Volume 23, Issue 3, Page 311-317, July 2021.
      Introduction:Discrimination is associated with negative health outcomes among Latinos. Research on the link between discrimination and inflammation in adults has focused on pro-inflammatory markers rather than characterizing the more informative balance of pro- and anti-inflammatory markers. The purpose of this cross-sectional study was to examine the associations of everyday discrimination with inflammation ratio (defined as the ratio of pro- to anti-inflammatory cytokines) in a sample of middle-aged and older Latinas.Methods:Latinas were recruited from an existing study in New York City. Participants reported frequency and count of everyday discrimination. Peripheral blood was used to analyze pro- (IL-1B and IL-6) and anti-inflammatory (IL-4 and IL-10) cytokines. The inflammation ratio was calculated by dividing the sum of pro-inflammatory cytokines by the sum of anti-inflammatory cytokines. We used linear regression to assess the link between everyday discrimination and inflammation ratio.Results:The final sample included 40 Latinas (mean age = 63.2 years). Approximately 68% had household incomes less than $15,000. More than half (53%) reported experiencing some form of everyday discrimination. Regression models showed everyday discrimination was not associated with individual pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines. In adjusted regression models, the frequency of everyday discrimination was not associated with inflammation ratios (B[SE] = 0.57[0.30], p = .07). However, a higher count of everyday discrimination was associated with inflammation ratios (B[SE] = 1.15[0.55], p = .04).Conclusions:The count of everyday discrimination was positively associated with inflammation in Latina women. Future studies should replicate these findings using longitudinal assessment of discrimination and inflammatory markers.
      Citation: Biological Research For Nursing
      PubDate: 2021-02-25T09:21:32Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1099800421995901
      Issue No: Vol. 23, No. 3 (2021)
       
  • Accelerated Epigenetic Age in Normal Cognitive Aging of Korean
           Community-Dwelling Older Adults

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Jongmin Park, Chang Won Won, Leorey N. Saligan, Youn-Jung Kim, Yoonju Kim, Nada Lukkahatai
      Pages: 464 - 470
      Abstract: Biological Research For Nursing, Volume 23, Issue 3, Page 464-470, July 2021.
      Background:Epigenetic age acceleration has been studied as a promising biomarker of age-related conditions, including cognitive aging. This pilot study aims to explore potential cognitive aging-related biomarkers by investigating the relationship of epigenetic age acceleration and cognitive function and by examining the epigenetic age acceleration differences between successful cognitive aging (SCA) and normal cognitive aging (NCA) among Korean community-dwelling older adults (CDOAs).Methods:We used data and blood samples of Korean CDOAs from the Korean Frailty and Aging Cohort Study. The participants were classified into two groups, SCA (above the 50th percentile in all domains of cognitive function) and NCA. The genome-wide DNA methylation profiling array using Illumina Infinium MethylationEPIC BeadChip was used to calculate the following: the DNA methylation age, universal epigenetic age acceleration, intrinsic epigenetic age acceleration (IEAA), and extrinsic epigenetic age acceleration (EEAA). We also used Pearson correlation analysis and independent t-tests to analyze the data.Results:Universal age acceleration correlated with the Frontal Assessment Battery test results (r = −0.42, p = 0.025); the EEAA correlated with the Word List Recognition test results (r = −0.41, p = 0.027). There was a significant difference between SCA and NCA groups in IEAA (p = 0.041, Cohen’s d = 0.82) and EEAA (p = 0.042, Cohen’s d = 0.78).Conclusions:Epigenetic age acceleration can be used as a biomarker for early detection of cognitive decline in Korean community-dwelling older adults. Large longitudinal studies are warranted.
      Citation: Biological Research For Nursing
      PubDate: 2021-01-07T09:31:16Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1099800420983896
      Issue No: Vol. 23, No. 3 (2021)
       
  • A Comprehensive Self-Management Program With Diet Education Does Not Alter
           Microbiome Characteristics in Women With Irritable Bowel Syndrome

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Kendra J. Kamp, Anna M. Plantinga, Kevin C. Cain, Robert L. Burr, Pamela Barney, Monica Jarrett, Ruth Ann Luna, Tor Savidge, Robert Shulman, Margaret M. Heitkemper
      Pages: 471 - 480
      Abstract: Biological Research For Nursing, Volume 23, Issue 3, Page 471-480, July 2021.
      Background and Purpose:Changes in diet and lifestyle factors are frequently recommended for persons with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). It is unknown whether these recommendations alter the gut microbiome and/or whether baseline microbiome predicts improvement in symptoms and quality of life following treatment. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to explore if baseline gut microbiome composition predicted response to a Comprehensive Self-Management (CSM) intervention and if the intervention resulted in a different gut microbiome composition compared to usual care.Methods:Individuals aged 18–70 years with IBS symptoms ≥6 months were recruited using convenience sampling. Individuals were excluded if medication use or comorbidities would influence symptoms or microbiome. Participants completed a baseline assessment and were randomized into the eight-session CSM intervention which included dietary education and cognitive behavioral therapy versus usual care. Questionnaires included demographics, quality of life, and symptom diaries. Fecal samples were collected at baseline and 3-month post-randomization for 16S rRNA-based microbiome analysis.Results:Within the CSM intervention group (n = 30), Shannon diversity, richness, and beta diversity measures at baseline did not predict benefit from the CSM intervention at 3 months, as measured by change in abdominal pain and quality of life. Based on both alpha and beta diversity, the change from baseline to follow-up microbiome bacterial taxa did not differ between CSM (n = 25) and usual care (n = 25).Conclusions and Inferences:Baseline microbiome does not predict symptom improvement with CSM intervention. We do not find evidence that the CSM intervention influences gut microbiome diversity or composition over the course of 3 months.
      Citation: Biological Research For Nursing
      PubDate: 2021-01-08T09:53:49Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1099800420984543
      Issue No: Vol. 23, No. 3 (2021)
       
  • Longitudinal Assessment of Relationships Between Health Behaviors and IL-6
           in Overweight and Obese Pregnancy

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: McKenzie K. Wallace, Nitin Shivappa, Michael D. Wirth, James R. Hébert, Larraine Huston-Gordesky, Fernanda Alvarado, Sylvie Hauguel-de Mouzon, Patrick M. Catalano
      Pages: 481 - 487
      Abstract: Biological Research For Nursing, Volume 23, Issue 3, Page 481-487, July 2021.
      Background:Inflammation is a common factor in adverse pregnancy outcomes (APOs). Behavioral factors influence inflammatory markers and APOs but rarely have been investigated simultaneously in pregnancy. Our purpose was to determine how diet, physical activity, and obesity are associated with interleukin (IL)-6 in early and late pregnancy.Methods:We conducted a secondary analysis of 49 overweight/obese pregnant women. Health behavior data, including diet quality using the Dietary Inflammatory Index (DII®); physical activity (Leisure Time Physical Activity scale); body mass index (BMI); and plasma IL-6 concentrations were collected at 13–16 weeks (early pregnancy) and 34–36 weeks (late pregnancy) gestation. Multiple linear regression analyses were used to determine the amount of variance explained in early and late pregnancy IL-6 concentrations by early and late pregnancy diet, physical activity, and BMI.Results:Early diet and early BMI were the strongest predictors of early IL-6 concentrations (R2 = 0.43; p < .001) and late IL-6 concentrations (R2 = 0.30; p < .001). Late BMI predicted late IL-6 (R2 = .11; p = .02). Change in diet over pregnancy predicted late IL-6 (R2 = 0.17; p = .03).Conclusion:These findings suggest that maternal diet and BMI in early pregnancy, which likely reflects prepregnancy status, may have a greater impact on inflammatory processes than factors later in pregnancy. Future work should assess if behavioral factors before pregnancy produce similar relationships to those reported here, which may clarify the timing and type of lifestyle interventions to effectively reduce APOs.
      Citation: Biological Research For Nursing
      PubDate: 2021-01-29T10:06:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1099800420985615
      Issue No: Vol. 23, No. 3 (2021)
       
  • Weight Loss and Improvement of Metabolic Alterations in Overweight and
           Obese Children Through the I2AO2 Family Program: A Randomized Controlled
           Clinical Trial

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Virginia E. Fernández-Ruiz, Maria Solé-Agustí, David Armero-Barranco, Omar Cauli
      Pages: 488 - 503
      Abstract: Biological Research For Nursing, Volume 23, Issue 3, Page 488-503, July 2021.
      Childhood obesity is a major public health concern. We wanted to evaluate the effectiveness of a multidisciplinary program based on healthy eating, exercise, cognitive-behavioral therapy, and health education to achieve weight loss and improve metabolic parameters in overweight and obese children. A randomized, controlled clinical trial with long-term follow-up (24 months) was conducted at a community care center in overweight and obese individuals aged 6–12 years. A sample of 108 children was divided into an experimental and a control group receiving a standard care program. The experimental groups received a 12-month interdisciplinary program; the results were evaluated at 4 months, the end of the intervention, and at follow-up 12 months later. Anthropometric and biological marker measurements related to metabolic alterations, dyslipidemia (based on total cholesterol), hyperglycemia, fasting glycaemia, triglycerides, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol in blood were recorded. The intervention had a significant effect (p < 0.001) in terms of decreased body mass index, skinfolds, and waist and arm circumferences. These changes were accompanied by biochemical changes underlying an improvement in metabolic parameters, such as a significant reduction in total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol, triglycerides, and hyperglycemia and a significant increase in high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol. These effects were still significant for markers of excess weight or obesity in the experimental group 12 months after the end of the intervention, suggesting that an enduring change in healthy lifestyles had been maintained period. This interdisciplinary, nurse-led program helped to reduce childhood and adolescent excess weight and obesity and had long-lasting effects.
      Citation: Biological Research For Nursing
      PubDate: 2021-02-01T09:53:45Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1099800420987303
      Issue No: Vol. 23, No. 3 (2021)
       
  • The Effect of Unsupervised Home-Based Exercise Training on Physical
           Functioning Outcomes in Older Adults: A Systematic Review and
           Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Mahdi Mahjur, Ali Asghar Norasteh
      Pages: 504 - 512
      Abstract: Biological Research For Nursing, Volume 23, Issue 3, Page 504-512, July 2021.
      Background:Exercise training such as balance, aerobic, and resistance training is able to improve physical functioning of older adults. Delivering such exercise regimes at home without supervision may be useful for older adults because they do not have to leave their homes.Objective:This systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials aimed to establish the effect of unsupervised home-based exercise training regimes on physical functioning (balance and muscle strength) in older adults.Data sources:PubMed, CINAHL, Medline, Google Scholar, and Scopus databases and reference lists of included investigations were searched.Study selection:Thirteen randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of exercise training impact on balance and upper body strength with concurrent control groups were included in the analysis.Results:Our analyses revealed that in older adults, unsupervised home-based various exercise training was effective in improving measures of proactive balance (mean difference (MD) = −1.37 s; 95% confidence interval (CI), −2.24, −0.51 s; p = 0.002) and balance test battery (MD: 1.80; 95% CI, 0.46, 3.14 s; p = 0.009). There were no significant differences between the experimental and control groups for upper body strength (p> 0.05).Conclusion:Unsupervised home-based exercise training improves balance in older adults. Future investigations are needed to clarify the mechanisms underlying unsupervised home-based exercise training’s effect on this population’s physical functioning outcomes.
      Citation: Biological Research For Nursing
      PubDate: 2021-02-02T09:24:58Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1099800421989439
      Issue No: Vol. 23, No. 3 (2021)
       
  • Co-Occurrence of Symptoms and Gut Microbiota Composition Before
           Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy and Radiation Therapy for Rectal Cancer: A Proof
           of Concept

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Velda J. González-Mercado, Jean Lim, Gary Yu, Frank Penedo, Elsa Pedro, Raul Bernabe, Maribel Tirado-Gómez, Bradley Aouizerat
      Pages: 513 - 523
      Abstract: Biological Research For Nursing, Volume 23, Issue 3, Page 513-523, July 2021.
      Purpose:To examine a) whether there are significant differences in gut microbial diversity and in the abundance of gut microbial taxa; and b) differences in predicted functional pathways of the gut microbiome between those participants with high co-occurring symptoms and those with low co-occurring symptoms, prior to neoadjuvant chemotherapy and radiation therapy (CRT) for rectal cancer.Methods:Rectal cancer patients (n = 41) provided stool samples for 16 S rRNA gene sequencing and symptom ratings for fatigue, sleep disturbance, and depressive symptoms prior to CRT. Descriptive statistics were computed for symptoms. Gut microbiome data were analyzed using QIIME2, LEfSe, and the R statistical package.Results:Participants with high co-occurring symptoms (n = 19) had significantly higher bacterial abundances of Ezakiella, Clostridium sensu stricto, Porphyromonas, Barnesiella, Coriobacteriales Incertae Sedis, Synergistiaceae, Echerichia-Shigella, and Turicibacter compared to those with low co-occurring symptoms before CRT (n = 22). Biosynthesis pathways for lipopolysaccharide, L-tryptophan, and colanic acid building blocks were enriched in participants with high co-occurring symptoms. Participants with low co-occurring symptoms showed enriched abundances of Enterococcus and Lachnospiraceae, as well as pathways for β-D-glucoronosides, hexuronide/hexuronate, and nicotinate degradation, methanogenesis, and L-lysine biosynthesis.Conclusion:A number of bacterial taxa and predicted functional pathways were differentially abundant in patients with high co-occurring symptoms compared to those with low co-occurring symptoms before CRT for rectal cancer. Detailed examination of bacterial taxa and pathways mediating co-occurring symptoms is warranted.
      Citation: Biological Research For Nursing
      PubDate: 2021-02-05T09:41:38Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1099800421991656
      Issue No: Vol. 23, No. 3 (2021)
       
  • Elevated Intestinal Inflammation in Preterm Infants With Signs and
           Symptoms of Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Colleen E. Shelly, Evgenia J. Filatava, Julie Thai, Britt F. Pados, Sara E. Rostas, Hidemi Yamamoto, Raina Fichorova, Katherine E. Gregory
      Pages: 524 - 532
      Abstract: Biological Research For Nursing, Volume 23, Issue 3, Page 524-532, July 2021.
      Objectives:Reflux is common in infancy; however, persistent signs and symptoms of gastrointestinal distress are often attributed to gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). In this pilot study, we aimed to characterize associations between signs and symptoms of suspected GERD and noninvasive markers of intestinal inflammation in preterm infants.Methods:We reviewed Electronic Medical Record (EMR) data to identify clinical signs and symptoms among case patients (n = 16). Controls (n = 16) were matched on gestational age. Univariate and multivariate regression analyses were used to compare fecal calprotectin and urinary intestinal fatty acid binding protein (I-FABP) levels between cases and controls.Results:We found no differences in baseline characteristics between cases and controls. In the multivariate regression analysis controlling for the proportion of mother’s milk, cases had higher fecal calprotectin levels than controls, with no differences in I-FABP levels between cases and controls.Conclusion:Our findings suggest that preterm infants with signs and symptoms of GERD have higher levels of intestinal inflammation as indicated by fecal calprotectin compared to their controls. Further studies are needed to evaluate the role of intestinal inflammation in signs and symptoms of gastrointestinal distress and whether fecal calprotectin might have predictive value in diagnosing GERD.
      Citation: Biological Research For Nursing
      PubDate: 2021-02-05T09:35:22Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1099800420987888
      Issue No: Vol. 23, No. 3 (2021)
       
  • Enhancing Research Through the Use of the Genotype-Tissue Expression
           (GTEx) Database

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Ansley Grimes Stanfill, Xueyuan Cao
      Pages: 533 - 540
      Abstract: Biological Research For Nursing, Volume 23, Issue 3, Page 533-540, July 2021.
      Despite a growing interest in multi-omic research, individual investigators may struggle to collect large-scale omic data, particularly from human subjects. Publicly available datasets can help to address this problem, including those sponsored by the NIH Common Fund, such as the Genotype-Tissue Expression (GTEx) database. This database contains genotype and expression data obtained from 54 non-diseased tissues in human subjects. But these data are often underutilized, because users may find the browsing tools to be counterintuitive or have difficulty navigating the procedures to request controlled data access. Furthermore, there is limited knowledge of these resources among nurse scientists interested in incorporating such information into their programs of research. This article outlines the procedures for using the GTEx database. Next, we provide one exemplar of using this resource to enhance existing research by investigating expression of dopamine receptor type 2 (DRD2) across brain tissues in human subjects.
      Citation: Biological Research For Nursing
      PubDate: 2021-02-18T09:16:02Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1099800421994186
      Issue No: Vol. 23, No. 3 (2021)
       
  • Increased Systolic Blood Pressure Mediates the Relationship Between Urate
           and Gout Risk in Indonesia: A Novel Application of a Partial Least
           Squares-Structural Equation Model

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Maria Dyah Kurniasari, Ferry Fredy Karwur, Rosiana Eva Rayanti, Andrian Dolfriandra Huruta, Yu Huei Lin, Shuen Fu Weng, Hsiu Ting Tsai
      Abstract: Biological Research For Nursing, Ahead of Print.
      Background:Most Indonesians with hyperuricemia are less than 40 years old, which suggests an increasing gout risk in the country. Meanwhile, untreated hyperuricemia was also suggested to lead to hypertension. Yet, it is unclear whether blood pressure (BP) plays a mediating role between urate and gout.Objective:We investigated the mediating effect of BP between urate and gout risk in Indonesians using a partial least squares-structural equation model.Method:A community-based retrospective case-control study was conducted between July 1 and August 31, 2019 in Indonesia. We randomly recruited 397 participants, including 86 patients with gout and 311 healthy controls from seven community health service centers. Multivariate logistic regression was employed to analyze the adjusted odds ratios of the association between risk factors, such as urate level and BP, and gout risk after controlling for other covariates. A path analysis was utilized to analyze the mediating effect of systolic BP between urate and gout. The STROBE reporting guideline for the observational study is adopted in our reporting.Result:We found that a 1 mg/dL increase of urate level significantly increased gout risk with an OR of 4.97 (95% CI: 3.48–7.09) and an AOR of 4.44 (95% CI: 3.07–6.42) after adjusting for covariates. The association between urate and gout was also significantly mediated by systolic BP (β = 0.05; 95% CI Bias Corrected [0.02–0.08], p < 0.001).Conclusion:Urate was significantly associated with gout risk and was possibly mediated by increased systolic BP in Indonesians. Controlling systolic BP could be one of the strategies to decrease the risk of gout for individuals with hyperuricemia. Health education can be carried out by community health nurses to individuals on controlling their urate level and systolic BP to decrease the gout risk among Indonesian.
      Citation: Biological Research For Nursing
      PubDate: 2021-08-03T09:00:16Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10998004211029044
       
  • Effects of Home-Based Exercise on Frailty in Patients With End-Stage Renal
           Disease: Systematic Review

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Jongwon Yoo, Todd Ruppar, JoEllen Wilbur, Arlene Miller, Jennifer C. Westrick
      Abstract: Biological Research For Nursing, Ahead of Print.
      Background:New or worsening frailty is a common problem in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) during the prolonged time awaiting kidney transplantation. Structured physical activity in the dialysis setting has been shown to mitigate frailty, but little is known about the benefits of home-based exercise. The purpose of this systematic review was to summarize the effects of home-based exercise interventions on indicators of frailty (weakness, slowness, low physical activity, perceived exhaustion, and shrinking) among patients diagnosed with ESRD.Methods:We searched PubMed, MEDLINE, Scopus, CINAHL, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, and Google Scholar using Medical Subject Heading terms and free text keywords including kidney failure, exercise, and frailty. We identified 13 relevant articles (eight randomized controlled trials, five quasi-experimental studies).Results:Our review found potential effectiveness of home-based exercise interventions on mitigating or preventing selected indicators of frailty (e.g., weakness, slowness, low physical activity, perceived exhaustion), particularly when the interventions combined aerobic walking, resistance exercise, and behavioral components and were delivered for at least 6 months. However, no published studies measured the effect of home-based exercise interventions on frailty as a whole.Conclusions:While existing studies suggest likely benefits of home-based exercise interventions among patients with ESRD, future research is warranted to develop and test home-based physical activity interventions that address all indicators of frailty.
      Citation: Biological Research For Nursing
      PubDate: 2021-07-23T09:07:02Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10998004211033031
       
  • A Systematic Review of Effectiveness of Omega-3 Fatty Acid Supplementation
           on Symptoms, Social Functions, and Neurobiological Variables in
           Schizophrenia

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Mei-Chi Hsu, Wen-Chen Ouyang
      Abstract: Biological Research For Nursing, Ahead of Print.
      Background:Disturbance of lipid, particularly omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA), metabolism is associated with the etiology and symptoms of schizophrenia. Numerous clinical studies have tried to evaluate whether omega-3 PUFA supplementation can ameliorate the disorder, but the results are inconclusive.Objectives:This systematic review integrates and refines the research evidence of the effectiveness of omega-3 PUFA nutritional supplementation on schizophrenia during the different developmental phases of the disease (prodromal, first-episode, and chronic phases) and examines whether different developmental stages modulate the efficacy of omega-3 PUFA supplementation.Data Sources:Scientific articles from 2000 to 2020 in PubMed/Medline, Allied Health Literature, PsychINFO, and SCOPUS following the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews guidelines.Methods:A systematic review was performed. We reviewed electronic databases and identified 1,266 clinical studies. Of these, 26 met the inclusion criteria.Results:The effectiveness of omega-3 dietary supplementation on symptoms varies among different phases of illness. Omega-3 supplementation significantly improves positive and negative symptoms at the prodromal phase, improves mainly the negative symptoms in patients with the first-episode, and effects symptoms partly in patients with chronic schizophrenia.Discussion:The effectiveness of omega-3 PUFA dietary supplementation is modulated by age, duration of untreated psychosis and illness, baseline levels of omega-3 fatty acids, and status of antioxidant capacity of patients. The important implications for psychiatric research and clinical practice developments as well as nursing care are presented and discussed.
      Citation: Biological Research For Nursing
      PubDate: 2021-07-20T08:58:50Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10998004211020121
       
  • The Effect of Exercise Interventions to Improve Psychosocial Aspects and
           Glycemic Control in Type 2 Diabetic Patients: A Systematic Review and
           Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Gholam Rasul Mohammad Rahimi, Reza Aminzadeh, Amin Azimkhani, Vahid Saatchian
      Abstract: Biological Research For Nursing, Ahead of Print.
      Background:Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) patients have a raised risk of developing depression compared with non-diabetic people.Objective:The objective of this meta-analysis was to investigate the impacts of exercise training interventions to improve psychosocial aspects and glycemic control in T2DM patients.Data sources:PubMed, CINAHL, Medline, Google Scholar, and Scopus databases and reference lists of included studies were searched.Study selection:The selection criteria were randomized controlled trials (RCTs) using an exercise intervention with or without dietary advice on psychological aspects and glycemic control in T2DM patients, up to January 2021. Meta-analyses were performed using the random-effects model. The analysis included 17 RCTs with 2,127 participants.Results:In the pooled analysis, improvements were seen in depression, standard mean difference (SMD) −0.65 (95% confidence interval (CI) −1.03 to −0.28, p = 0.0006), mental health SMD: 0.53 (95% CI 0.31 to 0.76, p < 0.00001), and HbA1c, weighted mean difference (WMD) −0.51% (95% CI −0.97 to −0.04, p = 0.03). There were no significant differences between the intervention and control groups for bodily pain, social functioning, and fasting glucose (all p> 0.05).Conclusion:Our systematic review and meta-analysis displayed that exercise training interventions decreased depression and HbA1c and increased mental health in individuals with T2DM. Further longer-term and high-quality clinical trials are required to additional assess and confirm the findings presented here.
      Citation: Biological Research For Nursing
      PubDate: 2021-07-08T09:09:17Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10998004211022849
       
  • Contribution of the ACE (rs1799752) and CYP11B2 (rs1799998) Gene
           Polymorphisms to Atrial Fibrillation in the Tunisian Population

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Ilhem Gouissem, Fatma Midani, Hayet Soualmia, Meryem Bouchemi, Sana Ouali, Ameni Kallele, Neila Ben Romdhane, Mohamed Sami Mourali, Moncef Feki
      Abstract: Biological Research For Nursing, Ahead of Print.
      Background:This study investigated the association of angiotensin–converting enzyme (ACE I/D) and aldosterone synthase (CYP11B2-344C/T) gene polymorphisms in the renin–angiotensin–aldosterone system (RAAS) with atrial fibrillation (AF) in the Tunisian population.Materials and Methods:The study population included 120 patients with AF and 123 age-matched controls. Genotyping of the I/D polymorphism in the ACE gene and the -344C/T polymorphism in the CYP11B2 gene was performed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and PCR-RFLP methods, respectively.Results:The genotype distribution of the ACE I/D and CYP11B2-344C/T polymorphisms was significantly different between AF patients and control participants (p < 0.01 and p < 0.006 respectively). In addition, ACE I/D increased the risk of AF significantly by 3.41-fold for the DD genotype (OR = 3.41; 95% CI [1.39–8.34]; p < 0.007), and after adjusting for confounding factors (age, diabetes, hypertension, and dyslipidemia), the risk was higher (OR = 5.71; 95% CI [1.48–21.98]; p < 0.01). Likewise, the CYP11B2-344C/T polymorphism increased the incidence of AF for the TT genotype (OR = 3.66; 95% CI [1.62–8.27]; p < 0.002) and the CT genotype (OR = 2.68; 95% CI [1.22–5.86]; p < 0.01). After adjusting for confounding factors (age, diabetes, hypertension and dyslipidemia), the risk remained higher for the TT genotype (OR = 3.58; 95% CI [1.08–11.77]; p < 0.03). Furthermore, the haplotype–based association of the ACE I/D and CYP11B2-344C/T polymorphisms showed that the D-T haplotype increased the risk for AF.Conclusion:Our study suggests a significant association of the ACE (I/D) and CYP11B2-344C/T polymorphisms with AF in the Tunisian population.
      Citation: Biological Research For Nursing
      PubDate: 2021-07-06T09:05:35Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10998004211029376
       
  • Severe Persistent Pain and Inflammatory Biomarkers in Sickle Cell Disease:
           An Exploratory Study

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Mitchell R. Knisely, Paula J. Tanabe, Julia K. L. Walker, Qing Yang, Nirmish R. Shah
      Abstract: Biological Research For Nursing, Ahead of Print.
      Background:Severe pain is among the most common and deleterious symptoms experienced by individuals with sickle cell disease (SCD), of whom more than 50% report chronic pain. Despite this, the understanding of the biological contributors to persistent severe SCD pain is limited. This exploratory study sought to describe pain phenotypes based on frequency of severe pain experienced over 6 months and identify inflammatory biomarkers associated with pain phenotypes among individuals with SCD.Methods:This study used self-report and electronic health record data collected from 74 individuals enrolled in the Duke Sickle Cell Disease Implementation Consortium Registry. Plasma from previously collected blood specimens was used to generate inflammatory biomarker data using the Inflammation 20-plex ProcartaPlexTM panel. Descriptive statistics were used to describe the occurrence of severe pain over the past 6 months, and bi-variate analyses were used to evaluate the relationship between inflammatory biomarkers and pain phenotypes.Results:Among the 74 participants included in this study, 33.8% reported severe pain occurring never or rarely, 40.5% reported severe pain occurring sometimes, and 25.7% reported severe pain occurring often or always. Soluble E-selectin (sE-selectin) was the only inflammatory biomarker significantly associated with the pain phenotype groups (p = 0.049). Post hoc comparisons identified that participants in the often/always severe pain group had significantly higher plasma concentrations of sE-selectin compared to those in the sometimes severe pain group (p = 0.040).Conclusions:Our findings provide preliminary evidence of the frequent occurrence of severe pain and that sE-selectin may be an objective biomarker for the frequent occurrence of severe pain in this population.
      Citation: Biological Research For Nursing
      PubDate: 2021-06-30T09:33:37Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10998004211027220
       
  • Systematic Review of Prediction Models for Preterm Birth Using CHARMS

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Jeung-Im Kim, Joo Yun Lee
      Abstract: Biological Research For Nursing, Ahead of Print.
      Objective:This study sought to evaluate prediction models for preterm birth (PTB) and to explore predictors frequently used in PTB prediction models.Methods:A systematic review was conducted. We selected studies according to the PRISMA, classified studies according to TRIPOD, appraised studies according to the PROBAST, and extracted and synthesized the data narratively according to the CHARMS. We classified the predictors in the models into socio-economic factors with demographic, psychosocial, biomedical, and health behavioral factors.Results:Twenty-one studies with 27 prediction models were selected for the analysis. Only 16 models (59.3%) defined PTB outcomes as 37 weeks or less, and seven models (25.9%) defined PTB as 32 weeks or less. The PTB rates varied according to whether high-risk pregnant women were included and according to the outcome definition used. The most frequently included predictors were age (among demographic factors), height, weight, body mass index, and chronic disease (among biomedical factors), and smoking (among behavioral factors).Conclusion:When using the PTB prediction model, one must pay attention to the outcome definition and inclusion criteria to select a model that fits the case. Many studies use the sub-categories of PTB; however, some of these sub-categories are not correctly indicated, and they can be misunderstood as PTB (≤ 37 weeks). To develop further PTB prediction models, it is necessary to set the target population and identify the outcomes to predict.
      Citation: Biological Research For Nursing
      PubDate: 2021-06-23T10:51:11Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10998004211025641
       
  • Analysis of RAGE Proteome and Interactome in Lung Adenocarcinoma Using
           PANTHER and STRING Databases

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Charles A. Downs
      Abstract: Biological Research For Nursing, Ahead of Print.
      Adenocarcinoma accounts for about 40% of all lung cancers. Histological studies indicate a loss of expression of the Receptor for Advanced Glycation End-products (RAGE) in lung adenocarcinoma cells compared to neighboring non-malignant tissue. Gene silencing of RAGE in human lung adenocarcinoma cells was performed and then cells were subjected to LC-MS/MS (n = 3, FDR < 1%). Differentially expressed proteins were analyzed using the PANTHER Classification System and STRING Interactome, identifying functions and protein-protein interaction networks. We observed expression of dominant-negative (DN−) RAGE, an isoform lacking the critical intracellular signaling tail observed in the full length (FL−) RAGE. Proteomic analysis suggests DN-RAGE likely plays a crucial role in cell polarity, metastases, and in cell-cell or cell-matrix complexes through focal adhesion or adherens junction formation. DN-RAGE may also regulate the expression of FL-RAGE and may provide a “switch” that could transition from a pro-inflammatory to a migratory cell as vimentin expression increased along with a reduction in cell polarity proteins. STRING interactome analysis identified seven protein–protein interaction networks involved in the regulation of gene expression, cell organization, cytoskeletal changes, sub-membrane plaque formation, as well as cytokinesis, cell shape, and motility. Suggesting expression of DN-RAGE may contribute to metastases and the development of advanced cancer.
      Citation: Biological Research For Nursing
      PubDate: 2021-06-07T09:13:16Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10998004211021496
       
  • Disseminated Intravascular Coagulopathy in Critically Ill Patients in
           Amman, Jordan

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Eman Mahmoud Qasim Emleek, Amani Anwar Khalil
      Abstract: Biological Research For Nursing, Ahead of Print.
      Background:The disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) is under-recognized in critically ill patients. The International Society of Thrombosis and Haemostasis (ISTH; DIC) provides a useful scoring system for accurate DIC identification. The study investigated the period prevalence of ISTH DIC from 2015 to 2017 in critically ill patients.Methods:In this multi-center, retrospective observational study, we included all patients identified with a DIC code or medically diagnosed with DIC during all admissions. Based on ISTH DIC scores ≥ 5, patients were classified with overt DIC.Results:A total of 220 patients were included in this study. The period prevalence of DIC was 4.45%. The point prevalence of DIC has increased from 3.49% to 5.58% from 2015 to 2017 (27.7% female; median age 61.6 years). Based on the ISTH-Overt DIC criteria, 45.2% of the sample had sepsis. Overt DIC patients had significantly lower baseline hemoglobin (HB; t = 2.137, df = 193, p = 0.034), platelet count (t = 3.591, df = 193, p < 0.001) and elevated serum creatinine level (M = 2.1, SD = 1.5, t = 2.203, df = 193, p = 0.029) compared to non–Overt DIC. There was a statistically significant elevation in FDPs among Overt DIC compared to non–Overt DIC (χ2 = 30.381, df = 1, p < 0.001). Overt DIC patients had significantly prolonged PT (U = 2,298, z = 5.7, p < 0.001), PTT (U = 2,334, z = 2.0, p = 0.045) and INR (U = 2,541, z = 5.1, p < 0.001) compared to those with non–Overt DIC.Conclusion:The ISTH overt-DIC score can be used in critically ill patients regardless of the underlying disease. Efforts are required to predict and identify overt DIC using a valid scoring system on admission and follow-up of adult patients admitted to ICU.
      Citation: Biological Research For Nursing
      PubDate: 2021-05-25T08:45:38Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10998004211017241
       
  • Inflammation-Related Factors Identified as Biomarkers of Dehydration and
           Subsequent Acute Kidney Injury in Agricultural Workers

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Madelyn C. Houser, Valerie Mac, Daniel J. Smith, Roxana C. Chicas, Nezahualcoyotl Xiuhtecutli, Joan D. Flocks, Lisa Elon, Malú Gámez Tansey, Jeff M. Sands, Linda McCauley, Vicki S. Hertzberg
      Abstract: Biological Research For Nursing, Ahead of Print.
      Globally, there is increasing recognition that agricultural workers are at risk for chronic kidney disease of unknown etiology (CKDu). Recurrent heat exposure, physical exertion, dehydration, muscle damage, and inflammation are hypothesized to contribute to the development of CKDu, but the relative importance of these processes and the interactions among them remain unclear. Moreover, there is a need to identify biomarkers that could distinguish individuals who are at greatest risk for kidney damage to target preventative interventions for CKDu. In this study, we evaluated dehydration and markers of inflammation, muscle damage, and renal function in agricultural workers at a non-workday baseline assessment. Urine specific gravity and kidney function were measured before and after work shifts on three subsequent days, and heat index, core body temperature, and heart rate were monitored during the work shifts. A combination of direct comparisons and machine learning algorithms revealed that reduced levels of uromodulin and sodium in urine and increased levels of interleukin-6 and C-reactive protein in serum were indicative of dehydration at baseline, and that dehydration, high body mass index, reduced urine uromodulin, and increased serum interleukin-6, C-reactive protein, and lipopolysaccharide-binding protein at baseline were predictive of acute kidney injury on subsequent workdays. Our findings suggest a method for identifying agricultural workers at greatest risk for kidney injury and reveal potential mechanisms responsible for this process, including pathways overlapping in dehydration and kidney injury. These results will guide future studies confirming these mechanisms and introducing interventions to protect kidney health in this vulnerable population.
      Citation: Biological Research For Nursing
      PubDate: 2021-05-21T09:28:29Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10998004211016070
       
  • What Types of Exercise Are More Effective in Reducing Obesity and Blood
           Pressure for Middle-Aged Women' A Systematic Review With Meta-Analysis
           

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Seong-Hi Park, Chul-Gyu Kim
      Abstract: Biological Research For Nursing, Ahead of Print.
      Background:A systematic review was performed to identify the types of physical activities effective as interventions in preventing metabolic syndrome in middle-aged women.Methods:Electronic databases (MEDLINE, EMBASE, the Cochrane Library, and CINAHL) served as the data sources. Cochrane’s Risk of Bias 2 was applied to assess the risk of bias of the randomized controlled trials. Meta-analyses were performed on selected studies using Review Manager 5.3. Thirty-one trials enrolling 2,202 participants were included.Results:Compared to controls, the effects of physical activity were indicated by pooled mean differences, which were −0.57 kg for body weight, −0.43 kg/m2 for body mass index, −1.63 cm for waist circumference, −4.89 mmHg for systolic blood pressure (BP), and −2.71 mmHg for diastolic BP. The effects were greater on the measurements of waist circumference and BP than on body weight and BMI. The types of physical activities were further analyzed according to sub-groups. Only aerobic exercise did not affect body weight and resistance exercise did not significantly change any results. Contrarily, combined exercises significantly reduced measurements of waist circumference and BP.Conclusion:This review can provide valuable information for research and implementation of measures to prevent metabolic syndrome in middle-aged women.
      Citation: Biological Research For Nursing
      PubDate: 2021-05-20T09:01:38Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10998004211015424
       
  • The Variability and Determinants of Testosterone Measurements in Children:
           A Critical Review

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Jessa Rose Li, Xan Goodman, June Cho, Diane Holditch-Davis
      Abstract: Biological Research For Nursing, Ahead of Print.
      Aims:This critical review aimed to summarize: (1) the variability and determinants of testosterone (T) measurements; and (2) reference values for the variability and determinants of T measurements in children.Background:As T is a representative androgen, it has been widely used to explain male vulnerability to child health and developmental problems. T measurements in children, however, have been challenging because of low levels, diurnal and episodic secretion patterns, limited quantity and quality of the samples, and inconsistent study findings.Methods:The search strategy used PubMed, CINAHL, Cochrane Library, Embase, Scopus, and Google Scholar. Studies published between 2008 through 2020 that examined factors influencing T measurement were included. The final 30 studies were selected using two appraisal forms. We extracted five categories of data from the reports.Findings:Variability and determinants of T measurement included assay methods, the source of samples, and child demographic and environmental characteristics. T levels were higher 1–3 months after birth and in males up to 1 year; fewer sex differences were found up to 10–12 years. Serum T levels measured by using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry were most reliable because immunoassays overestimated the levels, especially in neonates. T levels were stable at different temperatures and durations of storage, although sample collection remained an ongoing challenge for researchers.Conclusion:Depending on the study aims and feasibility, mass-spectrometry, multi-methods, and multi-materials are the recent trends in T measurement. Immunoassays may be an option if the study aims for relative rather than absolute comparisons.
      Citation: Biological Research For Nursing
      PubDate: 2021-05-18T08:58:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10998004211017323
       
  • Ambient Stimuli Perpetuate Nighttime Sleep Disturbances in Hospital
           Patients With TBI

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Ellita T. Williams, Omonigho M. Bubu, Azizi Seixas, Daniel F. Sarpong, Girardin Jean-Louis
      Abstract: Biological Research For Nursing, Ahead of Print.
      Background and Objectives:The effect of the ambient environment, sound, light, and movement, on the nighttime rest-activity of patients hospitalized with moderate-severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) is poorly understood. The purpose of this study was to examine how sound, light, and movement in these patients’ hospital rooms may contribute to nighttime awakenings.Methods:An observational design was used with 18 adult participants on a neuroscience step-down unit diagnosed with moderate-severe TBI. For up to five consecutive nights, actigraphy was used to capture nighttime awakenings while a custom-made multisensory device captured sound, light, and movement exposures in the participant’s room.Results:Participants were awake for 24% (or about 3 hr) of the time during the designated nighttime period of 8 pm to 8 am. Average nighttime exposures of sound was 52 dB, light was nine lumens, and movement, measured as a proportion, was 0.28% or 28%. With each stimuli exposure set at its average, there was a 20% probability of participant nighttime awakenings. Clinically meaningful reductions of movement in and out the participant’s room and elevated sound significantly decreases the participant’s probability of nighttime awakenings (p < .05), but reductions in light did not.Conclusion:The ambient environment seems to impede restful sleep in immediate post-injury phase of patients with moderate-severe TBI.
      Citation: Biological Research For Nursing
      PubDate: 2021-05-13T09:18:37Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10998004211016060
       
  • The Relationship Between Plasma BDNF and Pain in Older Adults With Knee
           Osteoarthritis

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Setor K. Sorkpor, Kelli Galle, Antonio L. Teixeira, Gabriela D. Colpo, Brian Ahn, Natalie Jackson, Hongyu Miao, Hyochol Ahn
      Abstract: Biological Research For Nursing, Ahead of Print.
      Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most prevalent cause of chronic pain and disability in people aged ≥45 years, with the knee being the most affected joint. Neurotrophic factors like brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), which promotes neurogenesis and neuroplasticity, have been shown to significantly affect chronic pain. This study aimed to investigate the relationship between resting plasma BDNF levels and clinical pain and quantitative sensory testing measures in older adults with knee OA pain. For this secondary analysis, a previously reported dataset was used comprised of older adults with knee OA who underwent quantitative sensory testing. A comprehensive generalized linear model (GLM) was built to understand the relationships between BDNF and important covariates, followed by the elastic net (EN) method for variable selection. GLM was then performed to regress BDNF levels against only the variables selected by EN. The mean age of the sample was 60.4 years (SD = 9.1). Approximately half of the participants were female (53%). Plasma BDNF levels were positively associated with heat pain threshold and the numeric rating scale of pain. Future mechanistic studies are needed to replicate and extend these findings to advance our knowledge of the underlying mechanisms of BDNF in knee OA and other chronic pain conditions.
      Citation: Biological Research For Nursing
      PubDate: 2021-04-29T07:06:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10998004211012479
       
  • The Impact of Self-Stigma, Role Strain, and Diabetes Distress on Quality
           of Life and Glycemic Control in Women With Diabetes: A 6-Month Prospective
           Study

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Ruey-Hsia Wang, Chia-Chin Lin, Shi-Yu Chen, Hui-Chun Hsu, Chiu-Ling Huang
      Abstract: Biological Research For Nursing, Ahead of Print.
      Purposes:Women with diabetes (WD) are more severely impacted by the consequence of suboptimal diabetes control. This study aims to examine the impact of demographic and disease characteristics, baseline self-stigma, role strain, diabetes distress on Hemoglobin A1C (A1C) levels, quality of life (D-QoL) and 6-month A1C levels in younger WD.Methods:This study was a 6-month prospective study. In total, 193 WD aged 20–64 years were selected by convenience sampling from three outpatient clinics in Taiwan. Demographic and disease characteristics, self-stigma, role strain, diabetes distress, A1C levels, and D-QoL were collected at baseline. A1C levels were further collected 6 months later. Structural equation modeling was conducted to test the hypothesized model.Results:The final model supported that higher baseline D-QoL directly associated with lower concurrent A1C levels and indirectly associated with lower 6-month A1C levels through baseline A1C levels. Higher baseline self-stigma, role strain, and diabetes distress directly associated with lower baseline D-QoL, and indirectly associated with higher 6-month A1C levels through D-QoL.Conclusion:Improving self-stigma, role strain, and diabetes distress should be considered as promising strategies to improve D-QoL in young WD. D-QoL plays a mediation role between baseline self-stigma, role strain, diabetes distress and subsequent glycemic control in younger WD. Enhancing baseline D-QoL is fundamental to improve subsequent glycemic control.
      Citation: Biological Research For Nursing
      PubDate: 2021-04-20T07:26:30Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10998004211009606
       
  • Association of Vitamin D Receptor Gene Polymorphisms With the Evolution of
           MODY Diabetes: Study in Tunisian Patients

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Amal Guesmi, Manel Zouaoui, Emna Haouat, Sabrine Oueslati, Malek Dabboussi, Chaima Kassmi, Rahma Mahjoub, Ines Kammoun, Amina Bibi
      Abstract: Biological Research For Nursing, Ahead of Print.
      Vitamin D (VD) cannot be considered as a true vitamin, but rather as a hormone, which exerts its action via a vitamin D receptor (VDR). Many genes have been shown to be involved in the evolution of diabetes in various populations, such as the vitamin D receptor gene. The aim of our study was to investigate if BsmI, TaqI, ApaI, FokI, and Tru9I, polymorphisms of VDR gene have an impact on MODY diabetes and its clinical aspects in a Tunisian population. A total of 95 patients and 153 controls were genotyped using PCR-RFLP. The comparison of the allelic and genotypic frequencies of the five polymorphisms between MODY subjects and control groups revealed the association of MODY diabetes with TaqI, Tru9I and BsmI polymorphisms and no significant differences were observed in the distributions for the ApaI and FokI polymorphisms. After stratification with biochemical and clinical parameters and TaqI, Tru9I and BsmI polymorphisms, we found an association between the three SNPs and different parameters such as age of diagnosis, therapy, hsCRP and HDL-C levels. Our results revealed that TaqI, Tru9I and BsmI polymorphisms may be more related to the progression of MODY diabetes. The possible role of vitamin D in the pathogenesis of MODY is far from being completely understood. Further knowledge on this issue may identify new candidate targets in the treatment and prevention of the disease. Our findings suggest that the TaqI, Tru9I and BsmI polymorphisms may be more related to the progression of MODY diabetes.
      Citation: Biological Research For Nursing
      PubDate: 2021-04-08T07:53:12Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10998004211004770
       
  • Multi-Staged Data-Integrated Multi-Omics Analysis for Symptom Science
           Research

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Carolyn S. Harris, Christine A. Miaskowski, Anand A. Dhruva, Janine Cataldo, Kord M. Kober
      Abstract: Biological Research For Nursing, Ahead of Print.
      The incorporation of omics approaches into symptom science research can provide researchers with information about the molecular mechanisms that underlie symptoms. Most of the omics analyses in symptom science have used a single omics approach. Therefore, these analyses are limited by the information contained within a specific omics domain (e.g., genomics and inherited variations, transcriptomics and gene function). A multi-staged data-integrated multi-omics (MS-DIMO) analysis integrates multiple types of omics data in a single study. With this integration, a MS-DIMO analysis can provide a more comprehensive picture of the complex biological mechanisms that underlie symptoms. The results of a MS-DIMO analysis can be used to refine mechanistic hypotheses and/or discover therapeutic targets for specific symptoms. The purposes of this paper are to: (1) describe a MS-DIMO analysis using “Symptom X” as an example; (2) discuss a number of challenges associated with specific omics analyses and how a MS-DIMO analysis can address them; (3) describe the various orders of omics data that can be used in a MS-DIMO analysis; (4) describe omics analysis tools; and (5) review case exemplars of MS-DIMO analyses in symptom science. This paper provides information on how a MS-DIMO analysis can strengthen symptom science research through the prioritization of functional genes and biological processes associated with a specific symptom.
      Citation: Biological Research For Nursing
      PubDate: 2021-04-08T07:52:17Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10998004211003980
       
  • Olanzapine Administration Reduces Chemotherapy-Induced Nausea Behavior in
           Rats

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Rosario B. Jaime-Lara, Tito Borner, Ruby A. Holland, Evan Shaulson, Brianna Brooks, Bart C. De Jonghe
      Abstract: Biological Research For Nursing, Ahead of Print.
      Nausea and vomiting are consistently identified among the most distressing side effects of chemotherapy. In recent years, Olanzapine (OLZ) treatment was added to anti-emetic guidelines as a treatment for chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV), despite little available data supporting a mechanism behind the positive benefits of the drug. Here, we examine whether OLZ reduces cisplatin chemotherapy-induced side effects on food intake and pica behavior in rats (i.e., kaolin intake, a proxy for nausea/emesis). Behavioral experiments tested whether systemic or hindbrain administration of OLZ ameliorated cisplatin-induced pica, anorexia, and body weight loss in rats. We also tested whether systemic OLZ reduces cisplatin-induced neuronal activation in the dorsal vagal complex (DVC), a hindbrain region controlling emesis. Lastly, given their role in regulating feeding and emesis, circulating ghrelin levels and central mRNA expression levels of serotonin (HT) receptor subunits, including 5-HT2C, were measured in brain regions that regulate CINV and energy balance in an exploratory analysis to investigate potential mediators of OLZ action. Our results show that both systemic and hindbrain administration of OLZ attenuated cisplatin-induced kaolin intake and body weight loss, but not anorexia. Systemic OLZ decreased cisplatin-induced c-Fos immunofluorescence in the DVC and prevented cisplatin-induced reductions in circulating ghrelin levels. IP OLZ also blocked cisplatin-induced increases in Htr2c expression in DVC and hypothalamic micropunches. These data suggest hindbrain exposure to OLZ is sufficient to induce reductions in cisplatin-induced pica and that central serotonergic signaling, via 5-HT2C, and changes in circulating ghrelin may be potential mediators of olanzapine anti-emetic action.
      Citation: Biological Research For Nursing
      PubDate: 2021-04-01T08:57:02Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10998004211000443
       
  • Disease Damage Accrual and Low Bone Mineral Density in Female Patients
           with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: María Correa-Rodríguez, Gabriela Pocovi-Gerardino, José-Luis Callejas-Rubio, Raquel Ríos-Fernández, Blanca Rueda-Medina, Norberto Ortego-Centeno
      Abstract: Biological Research For Nursing, Ahead of Print.
      Osteoporosis is a common comorbidity in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), but the potential contribution of disease-associated factors to bone status in SLE is not well known because the reported risk factors from different studies differ greatly. We aimed to examine frequency of reduced bone mass in women with SLE, and determine their potential associations with disease activity, damage accrual and SLE-related clinical markers. A cross-sectional study including 121 Caucasian pre-menopausal and postmenopausal women was conducted (mean age 49.2 ± 12.4 years). The SLE Disease Activity Index (SLEDAI-2 K) and the SDI Damage Index were used to assess disease activity and disease-related damage, respectively. Bone mineral density (BMD) of the left femoral neck and lumbar spine (L2–L4) were measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Ten patients (8.3%) had osteoporosis, 63 (52.1%) patients had osteopenia and 6.8% of women had history of previous fracture. Patients with low bone mass had a significantly higher mean SDI (1.3 ± 1.2 versus 0.7 ± 1.0 p = 0.003). T-score at lumbar spine was inversely correlated with SDI score (r = -0.222, p = 0.014) and complement C3 level (r = −0.206, p = .024). SDI scores were significantly different between patients with osteoporosis, osteopenia, and normal BMD after adjusting for covariates (p = .004). There is a high prevalence of low BMD in Caucasian women with SLE, and this status was associated with higher damage accrual scores, supporting that disease damage may itself be a major contributor to the low BMD. Women with SLE with organ damage require regular bone status monitoring to prevent further musculoskeletal damage.
      Citation: Biological Research For Nursing
      PubDate: 2021-03-31T09:06:19Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10998004211005550
       
  • Does Short-Term and Low-Dose N-Acetylcysteine Affect Oxidative Stress and
           Inflammation in The Liver Tissues of Diabetic Rats'

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Fatma Genç, Emine Gülçeri GÜLEÇ Peker
      Abstract: Biological Research For Nursing, Ahead of Print.
      Diabetes mellitus is a serious chronic disease in which the oxidant-antioxidant balance is impaired, causing many complications, including hepatopathy. In this study, the effects of short-term and low-dose N-acetylcysteine (NAC) administration on the biochemical, proinflammatory, and oxidative stress parameters in the liver tissue of diabetic rats were investigated. Twenty-four adult male Wistar albino rats weighing approximately 250–300 g were divided into 4 groups (n = 6): Control, Streptozotosin (STZ)-induced diabetes (DM), NAC treatment (60 mg/kg), and STZ-induced diabetes treated with NAC (DM+NAC; 60 mg/kg). NAC treatment was administered intraperitoneally as a single daily dose for 7 days. At the end of the experiment (3 weeks), blood and liver samples were collected for biochemical parameter analysis. Lipid peroxidation, antioxidant parameters, and nitric oxide (NOx) levels were determined by spectrophotometric method. Tissue inflammation parameters were evaluated by ELISA. Lipid peroxidation, proinflammatory cytokines, alanine aminotransferase (ALT), and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) values increased significantly with diabetes. NAC treatment significantly decreased serum ALT and AST levels and proinflammatory cytokines in the diabetic group. Liver glutathione (GSH) and NOx levels increased significantly in the DM+NAC group (p < 0.05). While NAC treatment reduced lipid peroxidation in the liver, it improved the inflammatory response and antioxidant status. The beneficial effect of NAC treatment may be due to its antioxidant activity and the resulting increased level of GSH. The results show that low-dose and short-term NAC treatment had a positive effect on oxidative damage and inflammation in liver tissue. NAC can be used as a potential antioxidant in diabetes to prevent hepatopathy.
      Citation: Biological Research For Nursing
      PubDate: 2021-03-19T09:27:23Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10998004211003668
       
  • Relationships Between Oral-Mucosal Pressure Ulcers, Mechanical Conditions,
           and Individual Susceptibility in Intubated Patients Under Intensive Care:
           A PCR-Based Observational Study

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Soo Hyun Kim, Hee Sam Nah, Jin Bom Kim, Chul Hoon Kim, Myoung Soo Kim
      Abstract: Biological Research For Nursing, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose:This study was performed to determine the relationship between oral-mucosal pressure ulcer (PU) stage and mechanical conditions and individual susceptibility in intubated patients.Methods:We collected 80 patient-days data from an intensive care unit of a 700-bed hospital in Korea. We analyzed oral-mucosal PUs, medical records, amount of saliva, and oral mucosal swabs. Bacterial abundance was enumerated by real-time polymerase chain reaction. The χ2 or Fisher’s exact test, t-test or Mann-Whitney U test, and Spearman’s rho correlation analysis were performed.Results:The incidence of overall oral-mucosal PUs was 31.3%, and in the maxillary and mandibular sites were 16.3% and 26.3%, respectively. There were significant correlations between the maxillary site PU stage and restraint use (r = .43, p < .001), albumin level (r = −.22, p = .046), and relative abundance of P. aeruginosa (r = .45, p < .001) and S. aureus (r = −.24, p = .033). In the mandibular sites, there were significant correlations between PU stage and restraint use (r = .30, p = .008), level of consciousness (r = .31, p = .005), and relative abundance of P. aeruginosa (r = .25, p = .028) and S. pneumoniae (r = .22, p = .046).Conclusions:Frequent monitoring and repositioning the mechanical pressure on the oral-mucosa could be an effective preventive strategy against the development and advancement of oral-mucosal PUs. Additionally, monitoring the oral microorganisms can prevent advanced stage oral-mucosal PUs in intubated patients.
      Citation: Biological Research For Nursing
      PubDate: 2021-03-11T09:29:56Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1099800421998071
       
  • Corrigendum to Associations Between Dysmenorrhea Symptom-Based Phenotypes
           and Vaginal Microbiome: A Pilot Study

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Biological Research For Nursing, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Biological Research For Nursing
      PubDate: 2021-01-06T05:19:49Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1099800420988144
       
 
JournalTOCs
School of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
Heriot-Watt University
Edinburgh, EH14 4AS, UK
Email: journaltocs@hw.ac.uk
Tel: +00 44 (0)131 4513762
 


Your IP address: 3.236.232.99
 
Home (Search)
API
About JournalTOCs
News (blog, publications)
JournalTOCs on Twitter   JournalTOCs on Facebook

JournalTOCs © 2009-