Publisher: Sage Publications   (Total: 1166 journals)

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Showing 1 - 200 of 1166 Journals sorted alphabetically
AADE in Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Abstracts in Anthropology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 29)
Academic Pathology     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Accounting History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18, SJR: 0.527, CiteScore: 1)
Acta Radiologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.754, CiteScore: 2)
Acta Radiologica Open     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Acta Sociologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39, SJR: 0.939, CiteScore: 2)
Action Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 53, SJR: 0.308, CiteScore: 1)
Active Learning in Higher Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 395, SJR: 1.397, CiteScore: 2)
Adaptive Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.288, CiteScore: 1)
Administration & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18, SJR: 0.675, CiteScore: 1)
Adoption & Fostering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25, SJR: 0.313, CiteScore: 0)
Adsorption Science & Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.258, CiteScore: 1)
Adult Education Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 259, SJR: 0.566, CiteScore: 2)
Adult Learning     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 51)
Advances in Dental Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 1.791, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Developing Human Resources     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35, SJR: 0.614, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Mechanical Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 156, SJR: 0.272, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Methods and Practices in Psychological Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20)
Advances in Structural Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 51, SJR: 0.599, CiteScore: 1)
AERA Open     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
Affilia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.496, CiteScore: 1)
Africa Spectrum     Open Access   (Followers: 17)
Agrarian South : J. of Political Economy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Air, Soil & Water Research     Open Access   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.214, CiteScore: 1)
Alexandria : The J. of National and Intl. Library and Information Issues     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 68)
Allergy & Rhinology     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
AlterNative : An Intl. J. of Indigenous Peoples     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 39, SJR: 0.194, CiteScore: 0)
Alternative Law J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.176, CiteScore: 0)
Alternatives : Global, Local, Political     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.351, CiteScore: 1)
Alternatives to Laboratory Animals     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.297, CiteScore: 1)
American Behavioral Scientist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26, SJR: 0.982, CiteScore: 2)
American Economist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
American Educational Research J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 260, SJR: 2.913, CiteScore: 3)
American J. of Alzheimer's Disease and Other Dementias     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23, SJR: 0.67, CiteScore: 2)
American J. of Cosmetic Surgery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
American J. of Evaluation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18, SJR: 0.646, CiteScore: 2)
American J. of Health Promotion     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35, SJR: 0.807, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Hospice and Palliative Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 47, SJR: 0.65, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Law & Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.204, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Lifestyle Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.431, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Medical Quality     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.777, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Men's Health     Open Access   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.595, CiteScore: 2)
American J. of Rhinology and Allergy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.972, CiteScore: 2)
American J. of Sports Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 248, SJR: 3.949, CiteScore: 6)
American Politics Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 36, SJR: 1.313, CiteScore: 1)
American Review of Public Administration     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28, SJR: 2.062, CiteScore: 2)
American Sociological Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 357, SJR: 6.333, CiteScore: 6)
American String Teacher     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Analytical Chemistry Insights     Open Access   (Followers: 26, SJR: 0.224, CiteScore: 1)
Angiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.849, CiteScore: 2)
Animation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.197, CiteScore: 0)
Annals of Clinical Biochemistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.634, CiteScore: 1)
Annals of Otology, Rhinology & Laryngology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20, SJR: 0.807, CiteScore: 1)
Annals of Pharmacotherapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 59, SJR: 1.096, CiteScore: 2)
Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 51, SJR: 1.225, CiteScore: 3)
Annals of the ICRP     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.548, CiteScore: 1)
Anthropocene Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 3.341, CiteScore: 7)
Anthropological Theory     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 48, SJR: 0.739, CiteScore: 1)
Antitrust Bulletin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Antiviral Chemistry and Chemotherapy     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.635, CiteScore: 2)
Antyajaa : Indian J. of Women and Social Change     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Applied Biosafety     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.131, CiteScore: 0)
Applied Psychological Measurement     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21, SJR: 1.17, CiteScore: 1)
Applied Spectroscopy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 27, SJR: 0.489, CiteScore: 2)
Armed Forces & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25, SJR: 0.29, CiteScore: 1)
Arthaniti : J. of Economic Theory and Practice     Full-text available via subscription  
Arts and Humanities in Higher Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 49, SJR: 0.305, CiteScore: 1)
Asia Pacific Media Educator     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.23, CiteScore: 0)
Asia-Pacific J. of Management Research and Innovation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Asia-Pacific J. of Public Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.558, CiteScore: 1)
Asia-Pacific J. of Rural Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Asian and Pacific Migration J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.324, CiteScore: 1)
Asian Cardiovascular and Thoracic Annals     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.305, CiteScore: 0)
Asian J. of Comparative Politics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Asian J. of Legal Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Asian J. of Management Cases     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.101, CiteScore: 0)
ASN Neuro     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 1.534, CiteScore: 3)
Assessment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19, SJR: 1.519, CiteScore: 3)
Assessment for Effective Intervention     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.578, CiteScore: 1)
Australasian J. of Early Childhood     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.535, CiteScore: 1)
Australasian Psychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18, SJR: 0.433, CiteScore: 1)
Australian & New Zealand J. of Psychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30, SJR: 1.801, CiteScore: 2)
Australian and New Zealand J. of Criminology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 545, SJR: 0.612, CiteScore: 1)
Australian J. of Career Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Australian J. of Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 51, SJR: 0.403, CiteScore: 1)
Australian J. of Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.497, CiteScore: 1)
Autism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 356, SJR: 1.739, CiteScore: 4)
Autism & Developmental Language Impairments     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
Avian Biology Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.401, CiteScore: 1)
Behavior Modification     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.877, CiteScore: 2)
Behavioral and Cognitive Neuroscience Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Behavioral Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Beyond Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Bible Translator     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Biblical Theology Bulletin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24, SJR: 0.184, CiteScore: 0)
Big Data & Society     Open Access   (Followers: 55)
Biochemistry Insights     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Bioinformatics and Biology Insights     Open Access   (Followers: 12, SJR: 1.141, CiteScore: 2)
Biological Research for Nursing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.685, CiteScore: 2)
Biomarker Insights     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.81, CiteScore: 2)
Biomarkers in Cancer     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Biomedical Engineering and Computational Biology     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Biomedical Informatics Insights     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Bioscope: South Asian Screen Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.235, CiteScore: 0)
BMS: Bulletin of Sociological Methodology/Bulletin de Méthodologie Sociologique     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.226, CiteScore: 0)
Body & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29, SJR: 1.531, CiteScore: 3)
Bone and Tissue Regeneration Insights     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Brain and Neuroscience Advances     Open Access  
Brain Science Advances     Open Access  
Breast Cancer : Basic and Clinical Research     Open Access   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.823, CiteScore: 2)
British J. of Music Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
British J. of Occupational Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 252, SJR: 0.323, CiteScore: 1)
British J. of Pain     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31, SJR: 0.579, CiteScore: 2)
British J. of Politics and Intl. Relations     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39, SJR: 0.91, CiteScore: 2)
British J. of Visual Impairment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.337, CiteScore: 1)
British J.ism Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
BRQ Business Review Quarterly     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Building Acoustics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.215, CiteScore: 1)
Building Services Engineering Research & Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.583, CiteScore: 1)
Bulletin of Science, Technology & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Business & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Business and Professional Communication Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.348, CiteScore: 1)
Business Information Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17, SJR: 0.279, CiteScore: 0)
Business Perspectives and Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Cahiers Élisabéthains     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.111, CiteScore: 0)
Calcutta Statistical Association Bulletin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
California Management Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 37, SJR: 2.209, CiteScore: 4)
Canadian Association of Radiologists J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.463, CiteScore: 1)
Canadian J. of Kidney Health and Disease     Open Access   (Followers: 8, SJR: 1.007, CiteScore: 2)
Canadian J. of Nursing Research (CJNR)     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Canadian J. of Occupational Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 167, SJR: 0.626, CiteScore: 1)
Canadian J. of Psychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28, SJR: 1.769, CiteScore: 3)
Canadian J. of School Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.266, CiteScore: 1)
Canadian Pharmacists J. / Revue des Pharmaciens du Canada     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.536, CiteScore: 1)
Cancer Control     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Cancer Growth and Metastasis     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Cancer Informatics     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.64, CiteScore: 1)
Capital and Class     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.282, CiteScore: 1)
Cardiac Cath Lab Director     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Cardiovascular and Thoracic Open     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Career Development and Transition for Exceptional Individuals     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.44, CiteScore: 1)
Cartilage     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.889, CiteScore: 3)
Cell Transplantation     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 1.023, CiteScore: 3)
Cephalalgia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 1.581, CiteScore: 3)
Cephalalgia Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Child Language Teaching and Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34, SJR: 0.501, CiteScore: 1)
Child Maltreatment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 1.22, CiteScore: 3)
Child Neurology Open     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Childhood     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19, SJR: 0.894, CiteScore: 2)
Childhood Obesity and Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
China Information     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.767, CiteScore: 2)
China Report     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.221, CiteScore: 0)
Chinese J. of Sociology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Christian Education J. : Research on Educational Ministry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Chronic Illness     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.672, CiteScore: 2)
Chronic Respiratory Disease     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.808, CiteScore: 2)
Chronic Stress     Open Access  
Citizenship, Social and Economics Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.145, CiteScore: 0)
Cleft Palate-Craniofacial J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.757, CiteScore: 1)
Clin-Alert     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Clinical and Applied Thrombosis/Hemostasis     Open Access   (Followers: 32, SJR: 0.49, CiteScore: 1)
Clinical and Translational Neuroscience     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Clinical Case Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.364, CiteScore: 1)
Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 45, SJR: 0.73, CiteScore: 2)
Clinical EEG and Neuroscience     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.552, CiteScore: 2)
Clinical Ethics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.296, CiteScore: 1)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Arthritis and Musculoskeletal Disorders     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.537, CiteScore: 2)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Blood Disorders     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.314, CiteScore: 2)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Cardiology     Open Access   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.686, CiteScore: 2)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Case Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.283, CiteScore: 1)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Circulatory, Respiratory and Pulmonary Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.425, CiteScore: 2)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Ear, Nose and Throat     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Endocrinology and Diabetes     Open Access   (Followers: 33, SJR: 0.63, CiteScore: 2)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Oncology     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 1.129, CiteScore: 3)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Pediatrics     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Psychiatry     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Reproductive Health     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.776, CiteScore: 0)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Therapeutics     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.172, CiteScore: 0)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Trauma and Intensive Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Women's Health     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Clinical Nursing Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34, SJR: 0.471, CiteScore: 1)
Clinical Pathology     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Clinical Pediatrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25, SJR: 0.487, CiteScore: 1)
Clinical Psychological Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16, SJR: 3.281, CiteScore: 5)
Clinical Rehabilitation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 78, SJR: 1.322, CiteScore: 3)
Clinical Risk     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.133, CiteScore: 0)
Clinical Trials     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22, SJR: 2.399, CiteScore: 2)
Clothing and Textiles Research J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28, SJR: 0.36, CiteScore: 1)
Collections : A J. for Museum and Archives Professionals     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Common Law World Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Communication & Sport     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.385, CiteScore: 1)
Communication and the Public     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Communication Disorders Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.458, CiteScore: 1)
Communication Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24, SJR: 2.171, CiteScore: 3)
Community College Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 1.451, CiteScore: 1)
Comparative Political Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 292, SJR: 3.772, CiteScore: 3)
Compensation & Benefits Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Competition & Change     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.843, CiteScore: 2)

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Asia-Pacific Journal of Public Health
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.558
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 15  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1010-5395 - ISSN (Online) 1941-2479
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1166 journals]
  • Nutrient and Food Intake of Indonesian Children Under 5 Years of Age: A
           Systematic Review

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Hesti Retno Budi Arini, Veni Hadju, Preetha Thomas, Megan Ferguson
      Abstract: Asia Pacific Journal of Public Health, Ahead of Print.
      The Indonesian Government’s targets to reduce the prevalence of child malnutrition are unlikely to be met based on current progress. Adequate dietary intake is key to meeting these targets. This systematic review aimed to provide a comprehensive overview of the nutrient and food intake of Indonesian children under 5 years of age. Peer-reviewed and gray literature published between 2007 and 2019 were collected. Of 1500 records, 38 articles met the study inclusion criteria and a narrative analysis was conducted. Children under 5 years were reported to have ranging energy and macronutrient intakes, some with adequate protein intake. Micronutrient deficiencies, particularly iron, zinc, calcium, and vitamin C, were reported. Animal-source foods, fruits, and vegetables were consumed by children, but frequency and/or volume of consumption was low, and it is among the probable causes of micronutrient deficiency among children under 5 years. The absence of reporting micronutrient intake in the national survey limited evidence to inform nutrition-related policies. The implementation of a national micronutrient survey will be beneficial in informing policy and practice aimed at reducing the prevalence of child malnutrition in line with national targets, through improvement in dietary intake.
      Citation: Asia Pacific Journal of Public Health
      PubDate: 2021-10-12T12:25:11Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10105395211041001
       
  • Health Care Infrastructure Limits the Ability of the Poor to Utilize
           National Health Insurance: The Case of Indonesia

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Lusie Wardani, Yohanna M. L. Gultom
      Abstract: Asia Pacific Journal of Public Health, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Asia Pacific Journal of Public Health
      PubDate: 2021-09-30T12:42:03Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10105395211046503
       
  • Waist-to-Height Ratio Is a Good Predictor of Metabolic Syndrome in
           Adolescents: A Report From the Thai National Health Examination Survey V,
           2014

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Sirinapa Siwarom, Kwanchai Pirojsakul, Wichai Aekplakorn, Witchuri Paksi, Pattapong Kessomboon, Nareemarn Neelapaichit, Suwat Chariyalertsak, Savitree Assanangkornchai, Surasak Taneepanichskul
      Abstract: Asia Pacific Journal of Public Health, Ahead of Print.
      This study aimed to assess the performance of waist-to-height ratio (WHtR) in the prediction of metabolic syndrome and to determine the appropriate cutoff value in Thai adolescents. Demographic data, blood pressure, fasting blood glucose, and lipid profile were obtained from the Thai National Health Examination Survey V database. The performances of WHtR, waist circumference, body mass index (BMI), and BMI z-score were analyzed by the receiver operating characteristics. Among 2644 adolescents, metabolic syndrome was identified in 4.27%. The areas under the receiver operating characteristic curves of WHtR, waist circumference, BMI, and BMI z-score were comparable (0.924-0.960). Performance of WHtR was more constant across age groups compared with other parameters. Using the cutoff value of WHtR at 0.5 resulted in the sensitivity and specificity of 98.5%/83.4% and 88.9%/86.0% in males and females, respectively. In conclusion, the cutoff value of WHtR at 0.5 provided good sensitivity and specificity for identifying metabolic syndrome in both genders. However, the other clinical risk factors or more definite scores should be considered when further assessment.
      Citation: Asia Pacific Journal of Public Health
      PubDate: 2021-09-30T12:41:46Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10105395211046474
       
  • Developing a Predictive Model for Plasmodium knowlesi–Susceptible Areas
           in Malaysia Using Geospatial Data and Artificial Neural Networks

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Rozita Hod, Siti Aisah Mokhtar, Farrah Melissa Muharam, Ummi Kalthom Shamsudin, Jamal Hisham Hashim
      Abstract: Asia Pacific Journal of Public Health, Ahead of Print.
      Plasmodium knowlesi is an emerging species for malaria in Malaysia, particularly in East Malaysia. This infection contributes to almost half of all malaria cases and deaths in Malaysia and poses a challenge in eradicating malaria. The aim of this study was to develop a predictive model for P. knowlesi susceptibility areas in Sabah, Malaysia, using geospatial data and artificial neural networks (ANNs). Weekly malaria cases from 2013 to 2014 were used to identify the malaria hotspot areas. The association of malaria cases with environmental factors (elevation, water bodies, and population density, and satellite images providing rainfall, land surface temperature, and normalized difference vegetation indices) were statistically determined. The significant environmental factors were used as input for the ANN analysis to predict malaria cases. Finally, the malaria susceptibility index and zones were mapped out. The results suggested integrating geospatial data and ANNs to predict malaria cases, with overall correlation coefficient of 0.70 and overall accuracy of 91.04%. From the malaria susceptibility index and zoning analyses, it was found that areas located along the Crocker Range of Sabah and the East part of Sabah were highly susceptible to P. knowlesi infections. Following this analysis, targetted entomological mapping and malaria control programs can be initiated.
      Citation: Asia Pacific Journal of Public Health
      PubDate: 2021-09-27T12:33:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10105395211048620
       
  • Impact of COVID-19 Pandemic on Delayed/Missed Routine Immunization in
           Children (0-24 Months) in Islamabad, Pakistan

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Sabeen Abid Khan, Muhammad Imran, Rabia Tabassum, Fatima Maroof, Shahzad Munir, Ejaz Ahmad Khan, Munir Iqbal Malik
      Abstract: Asia Pacific Journal of Public Health, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Asia Pacific Journal of Public Health
      PubDate: 2021-09-25T11:25:38Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10105395211048617
       
  • Birth Weight and Adolescent Health Indicators in Rarotonga, Cook Islands

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Siobhan Tu’akoi, Jacquie L. Bay, Yin Yin May Aung, Neti Tamarua-Herman, Celeste Barrett-Watson, Karen Tairea, Mark H. Vickers
      Abstract: Asia Pacific Journal of Public Health, Ahead of Print.
      While research into the developmental origins of health and disease (DOHaD) has highlighted the potential of healthy early-life environments for later noncommunicable disease risk reduction, such research is lacking in developing contexts. This study is set in Rarotonga, Cook Islands, a small island developing state in the Pacific—population 17 434. Adult overweight/obesity rates are 89.5%/69.8% and raised blood glucose affects 23.5%. This study investigates early-life associations with later-life health by matching birth weight and adolescent health indicators in Rarotongan-born students from 2016 to 2018. Of 195 students, median age 13 years, 67.7% were overweight/obese, 45.7% had central obesity, and 42.7% had raised blood pressure. A significant inverse association was found between birth weight and central obesity (P = .043). This is the first DOHaD study in a Pacific Island country and demonstrates the importance of prioritizing investment in the early-life environment to optimize later-life health and contribute to reducing the global noncommunicable disease burden.
      Citation: Asia Pacific Journal of Public Health
      PubDate: 2021-09-22T12:54:46Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10105395211046763
       
  • Does TikTok Open Gates for Sexual Violence Against Young Girls in
           Bangladesh Amid COVID-19'

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Md Insiat Islam Rabby, Md Badiuzzaman, Israt Jahan Akhi
      Abstract: Asia Pacific Journal of Public Health, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Asia Pacific Journal of Public Health
      PubDate: 2021-09-22T09:04:46Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10105395211046479
       
  • Association of Risk Factors for Early Childhood Disability in Rural
           Pakistan

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Shahnaz H. Ibrahim, Arjumand Rizvi, Anjum M. Ahmed, Zulfiqar A. Bhutta
      Abstract: Asia Pacific Journal of Public Health, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Asia Pacific Journal of Public Health
      PubDate: 2021-09-22T01:10:33Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10105395211048318
       
  • Coronavirus Vaccination for Rohingya Refugees: A Call to Action

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Md Insiat Islam Rabby, Farzad Hossain, Israt Jahan Akhi, Syed Nazmul Huda
      Abstract: Asia Pacific Journal of Public Health, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Asia Pacific Journal of Public Health
      PubDate: 2021-09-22T01:09:13Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10105395211048327
       
  • Mediating Effect of Chronic Illnesses in the Relationship Between
           Psychological Distress and COVID-19 Vaccine Acceptance

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      Authors: Won Sun Chen, Ching Sin Siau, Suzanna Awang Bono, Wah Yun Low
      Abstract: Asia Pacific Journal of Public Health, Ahead of Print.
      The impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on mental health is an emerging problem globally. This study aimed to examine the mediating effect of chronic illnesses in the relationship between psychological health and the acceptance of the COVID-19 vaccine, prior to the national vaccine rollout in Malaysia. An online cross-sectional study was conducted in Malaysia between December 10, 2020, and February 9, 2021. In addition to the descriptive analyses, a mediation analysis was performed to examine the mediating effect of chronic illnesses in the relationship between psychological distress and the willingness to accept the vaccine. A total of 1738 participants completed the survey. The psychological distress levels were found to be significantly different across demographic factors such as age, gender, and social economic status. This study demonstrated a partial mediating effect of chronic illnesses in the relationship between psychological distress and vaccine acceptance.
      Citation: Asia Pacific Journal of Public Health
      PubDate: 2021-09-22T01:07:34Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10105395211047868
       
  • Call for Emergency Action to Limit Global Temperature Increases, Restore
           Biodiversity, and Protect Health: Wealthy Nations Must Do Much More, Much
           Faster

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      Authors: Lukoye Atwoli, Abdullah H. Baqui, Thomas Benfield, Raffaella Bosurgi, Fiona Godlee, Stephen Hancocks, Richard Horton, Laurie Laybourn-Langton, Carlos Augusto Monteiro, Ian Norman, Kirsten Patrick, Nigel Praities, Marcel G. M. Olde Rikkert, Eric J. Rubin, Peush Sahni, Richard Smith, Nicholas J. Talley, Sue Turale, Damián Vázquez
      Abstract: Asia Pacific Journal of Public Health, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Asia Pacific Journal of Public Health
      PubDate: 2021-09-16T11:38:36Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10105395211043959
       
  • Internet Plus Health Care’s Role in Reducing the Inequality of
           High-Quality Medical Resources in China

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      Authors: Anqichen Shi, Xinfa Zhou, Zhiwei Xie, Hongyu Mou, Qin Ouyang, Dongni Wang
      Abstract: Asia Pacific Journal of Public Health, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Asia Pacific Journal of Public Health
      PubDate: 2021-09-11T02:02:54Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10105395211044954
       
  • Adolescents’ Marijuana Use Following Recreational Marijuana
           Legalization in Alaska and Hawaii

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      Authors: Meen Hye Lee, Yeoun Soo Kim-Godwin, Hyungjo Hur
      Abstract: Asia Pacific Journal of Public Health, Ahead of Print.
      Alaska and Hawaii, the only 2 noncontiguous states in the United States, have different marijuana policy environments. Alaska enacted recreational marijuana legalization (RML) in 2014, whereas recreational marijuana is still illegal in Hawaii. This study analyzed how RML affects adolescents’ marijuana use (MU) by comparing 2 states. We used data from 2 states (Alaska and Hawaii) from the Youth Risk Behavior Survey, 2009 to 2019 years (N = 35 467). The trends of lifetime MU and current MU were examined. Using difference-in-differences analysis models, this study investigated whether RML increased lifetime and current MU in Alaska compared with Hawaii after adjusting for socioeconomic characteristics. Both lifetime and current MU prevalence among adolescents in Alaska increased after RML, while both rates in Hawaii gradually decreased. The rate of lifetime MU in Alaska was significantly increased after RML (odds ratio [OR] = 1.29) compared with Hawaii. Similarly, the current MU among adolescents in Alaska was significantly increased compared with that in Hawaii (OR = 1.34). Both lifetime and current MU were increased following RML in Alaska, suggesting that RML may affect the increase of MU among adolescents.
      Citation: Asia Pacific Journal of Public Health
      PubDate: 2021-09-11T02:02:16Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10105395211044917
       
  • COVID Vaccination and the Resurge in Cases in Afghanistan: A Call for
           Coordinated Action

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      Authors: Mohammad Yasir Essar, Arash Nemat, Hujjatullah Ghaffari, Mohammad Mehedi Hasan, Shoaib Ahmad, Sayed Hamid Mousavi
      Abstract: Asia Pacific Journal of Public Health, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Asia Pacific Journal of Public Health
      PubDate: 2021-09-11T02:01:37Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10105395211045810
       
  • Physiological Predictors of Mental Disorders Among Police Officers in
           Indonesia

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      Authors: Asnawi Abdullah, Hamidah Muhammad Amin, Faisal Abdurrahman, Jamaluddin Idris, Marthoenis Marthoenis
      Abstract: Asia Pacific Journal of Public Health, Ahead of Print.
      Police officers may be at a higher risk of suffering from mental disorders (MDs) compared with other occupations. This study aimed to examine the physiological predictors of MDs among police officers in Indonesia. The mental health status of each participant was examined using a standardized Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI) tool and underwent several laboratory examinations including hematology, urine, serology, and electrocardiogram tests. A logistic regression was performed to calculate the odds ratio. Of the 4590 participants, 2.14% were diagnosed with MDs. The study found 19 physiological variables are potential predictors of MDs. In multivariate analysis adjusted for body mass index, sex, and age, the concentration of ketones, protein, and specific gravity in urine and the amount of lymphocyte in the blood are among important predictors of MDs. This suggests that carefully examining the results of urinalysis and hematology tests can help us detect early cases of MDs among police officers.
      Citation: Asia Pacific Journal of Public Health
      PubDate: 2021-09-07T04:53:47Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10105395211027752
       
  • Health Services Utilization Among Older Adults in Vietnam: Evidence From
           the National Household Living Standard Survey 2016

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      Authors: Mai P. Nguyen
      Abstract: Asia Pacific Journal of Public Health, Ahead of Print.
      This study—using multinomial logistic regressions—analyzed a national sample of 2977 older adults to examine factors associated with their health services utilization in 4 types of health providers—namely, commune health stations (CHSs), private clinics, private hospitals, and public hospitals in Vietnam. Older Vietnamese favored using public hospitals for their health consultancies, even for regular health checkups. For nonsevere illness, the relative risk ratio of choosing private clinics was 3 times (95% CI: 2.2-4.1) that of CHSs. Possession of public health insurance was a key enabling factor that influenced the older adults’ choice of CHSs over private clinics. Older adults of ethnic minority and living in rural areas were more likely to use CHSs than other health facilities. This study suggests a substantial quality improvement of services at CHSs, an innovative reform toward a diversified structure of private and public clinics to address diverse needs and to strengthen primary care for older adults.
      Citation: Asia Pacific Journal of Public Health
      PubDate: 2021-09-04T09:10:57Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10105395211044616
       
  • Validation of the Malay, English, and Chinese Translations of the 9-Item
           Shared Decision Making Questionnaire (SDM-Q-9) in Breast Cancer Patients
           Making Treatment Decisions

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      Authors: Bairave Shunnmugam, Chirk Jenn Ng, Nur Aishah Mohd Taib, Karuthan Chinna
      Abstract: Asia Pacific Journal of Public Health, Ahead of Print.
      This study aims to test the psychometric properties of the Malay, English, and Chinese 9-Item Shared Decision Making Questionnaire (SDM-Q-9) in breast cancer patients making treatment decisions. The original German SDM-Q-9 was translated to Malay using the back-translation method. A total of 222 newly diagnosed breast cancer patients making treatment decisions were sampled conveniently from three breast clinics between August 2015 and February 2016. A total of 66 patients answered the SDM-Q-9 in Malay, 87 in English, and 69 in Chinese. Data were analyzed using SPSS and AMOS software. SDM-Q-9 demonstrated good reliability in the three translations. All the items correlated well except for Item 1 in English. The factor loadings were within acceptable range except for Item 1 in Malay, Items 1 and 2 in English, and Items 7 and 9 in Chinese SDM-Q-9. However, no items were deleted in accordance with experts’ opinions and the previous SDM-Q-9 validation studies. The Malay, English, and Chinese SDM-Q-9 demonstrated good reliability and validity.
      Citation: Asia Pacific Journal of Public Health
      PubDate: 2021-09-01T09:17:48Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10105395211036625
       
  • Pre-Teen Gang Involvement Is Associated With Teenage Gambling Behavior:
           Exploratory Findings From a Longitudinal Cohort Study of Pacific Youth in
           New Zealand

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      Authors: Maria E. Bellringer, Janet Pearson, Leon Iusitini
      Abstract: Asia Pacific Journal of Public Health, Ahead of Print.
      Pacific youth in New Zealand have a disproportionately high risk for gambling and gang involvement compared with New Zealand European youth. Limited evidence indicates that youth gang involvement is associated with problem gambling; no research shows if it is associated with gambling. We conducted exploratory secondary analyses of data from 1063 Pacific youth and their mothers using data from 2 time points (age 9 and 14 years) from a longitudinal cohort study. Gang involvement at age 9 years was significantly associated with gambling at age 14 years, with adjusted odds of 2.25 (95% CI = 1.16-4.37). Of confounders, having a mother with a partner and Cook Islands ethnicity appeared protective against gambling at age 14 years. Despite some study limitations, as youth gambling can lead to subsequent adult problem gambling, our findings highlight the importance of understanding why Pacific youth join gangs, to inform public health policies to reduce the potential for future development of harmful behaviors.
      Citation: Asia Pacific Journal of Public Health
      PubDate: 2021-08-21T04:39:32Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10105395211041183
       
  • International Comparison of Depression During the COVID-19 Pandemic Among
           University Students in 13 Countries: A Web-Based Cross-Sectional Survey

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      Authors: Hocheol Lee, Sung Jong Park, Ji Eon Kim, Fanlei Kong, Bo Zhao, Haekweun Nam, Sang Baek Koh, Sanggon Nam, Motoyuki Yuasa, Myo Nyein Aung, John Robert C. Medina, Sukri Palutturi, Hafutu Berhe, Emnet Terefe, Seungwoo Nam, Yanghee Kang, Nadia Rönnebeck, Ji Ho Lee, Ga Ram Lee, Yeseul Jung, Chavez Rosemary Cosme, Dong Eun Shin, Maybin Herrera, Grace Ossak Ndombi, Paul Mansiangi, Seok Jun Moon, Hyejin Yoon, Min Ah Chung, Su Been Lim, Yu Lim Lee, Dohyeong Kim, Eun Woo Nam
      Abstract: Asia Pacific Journal of Public Health, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Asia Pacific Journal of Public Health
      PubDate: 2021-08-05T11:49:42Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10105395211034062
       
  • Behaviors and Attitudes Toward Smoking Among Health Care Workers at Health
           Facilities in 4 Provinces of Vietnam: A Representative Cross-Sectional
           Survey

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      Authors: Pham Ngoc Yen, Mary Jo Obeid, Ngo Quy Chau, Vu Van Giap, Nguyen Viet Nhung, Nguyen Ha Yen, Bui Thi Ha, Nguyen Thu Anh, Guy Barrington Marks, Becky Freeman, Joel Negin, Greg James Fox
      Abstract: Asia Pacific Journal of Public Health, Ahead of Print.
      Tobacco smoking is a leading cause of premature death. Smoking prevalence in Vietnam ranks among the highest in Southeast Asia. Given the important role of health care workers (HCWs) in promoting and supporting smoking cessation, this project aimed to characterize the prevalence of smoking among HCWs in Vietnam, and their attitudes toward smoking cessation interventions. A cross-sectional survey was conducted among care workers in 4 levels of the health system, within 4 provinces of Vietnam. Descriptive statistics evaluated participant attitudes, perception, behaviors, and knowledge about smoking. Multivariable logistic regression models evaluated risk factors for smoking. Among 3343 HCWs, 7.5% identified as current smokers, comprising 22.2% males and 0.5% of females. Males had substantially greater odds (adjusted odds ratio = 55.3; 95% confidence interval = 29.0-105.6) of identifying as current smokers compared with females. HCWs in urban settings had higher odds of identifying as smokers compared with rural workers (adjusted odds ratio = 1.72; 95% confidence interval = 1.23-2.24). Strong support for smoking cessation policies and interventions were identified, even among staff who smoked. HCWs play an integral role in identifying smokers and supporting smoking cessation interventions for their patients. Efforts to support affordable smoking cessation interventions within health facilities are likely to contribute to a reduction in smoking prevalence in Vietnam.
      Citation: Asia Pacific Journal of Public Health
      PubDate: 2021-07-31T04:44:08Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10105395211036275
       
  • Doctors-in-Training and COVID-19 Misinformation on Social Media

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      Authors: Colleen Lok Kum Ma, Asim Soomro, Yue Yi Deng
      Abstract: Asia Pacific Journal of Public Health, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Asia Pacific Journal of Public Health
      PubDate: 2021-07-31T04:41:53Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10105395211032420
       
  • The Importance of Structural Factors in COVID-19 Response in Western
           Pacific

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      Authors: Anton Pak, Oyelola A. Adegboye
      Abstract: Asia Pacific Journal of Public Health, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Asia Pacific Journal of Public Health
      PubDate: 2021-07-28T05:12:29Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10105395211035932
       
  • Is Adherence to the Provisional Institute of Medicine Guidelines of Weight
           Gain Associated With Better Perinatal Outcomes' A Retrospective Cohort
           Study of Twin Pregnancies in Southwest China

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      Authors: Jie Yan, Li Tang, Min Xu
      Abstract: Asia Pacific Journal of Public Health, Ahead of Print.
      The applicability of the Institute of Medicine (IOM) recommendations of gestational weight gain (GWG) for Chinese twin gestations is uncertain. In this article, we aimed to investigate the associations between GWG among twin gestations, as categorized according to the 2009 IOM guidelines and perinatal outcomes in Chengdu, China. A retrospective cohort study of pregnant women delivering live twins ≥28 weeks at a tertiary maternal and child hospital was conducted. The incidences of perinatal outcomes were compared across 3 groups—that is, women with low, adequate, and excessive GWG. Logistic regression analyses were next performed to confirm the associations while taking into account potential confounders. Results showed that low GWG was associated with a higher risk of preterm birth, low and very low birthweight, neonatal intensive care unit admission, and gestational diabetes, whereas preeclampsia was more frequent among excessive GWG women. In conclusion, adherence to the 2009 IOM guidelines for twin pregnancies are associated with improved perinatal outcomes. This has the potential to improve short- and long-term public health outcomes.
      Citation: Asia Pacific Journal of Public Health
      PubDate: 2021-07-26T10:52:31Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10105395211026071
       
  • Mental Health and COVID-19: Policies, Guidelines, and Initiatives from the
           Asia-Pacific Region

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      Authors: Alexander Lourdes Samy, Suzanna Awang Bono, Shu Leed Tan, Wah-Yun Low
      Abstract: Asia Pacific Journal of Public Health, Ahead of Print.
      The COVID-19 outbreak was declared a pandemic by the World Health Organization in March 2020 due to rapid intercontinental spread and high morbidity and mortality. Globally, the disease has had a major impact on human lives, including health, economic, employment, psychological, and overall well-being. The COVID-19, besides causing respiratory, neurological, and cardiovascular diseases, has had significant impact on mental health. Major mental health disorders, including depression, anxiety, and stress, have risen in parallel with increasing prevalence of COVID-19. Many population groups, including children, the elderly, those with chronic illnesses, and health care workers, have been affected. This review gives an overall assessment of the prevalence of COVID-19-associated psychological morbidity. In countries in the Asia-Pacific region, prevalence of depression ranged between 4.9% and 43.1%, anxiety from 7.0 to 43.0%, and stress from 3.4% to 35.7%. As COVID-19 continues to severely affect the psychosocial well-being of the population at large, countries have developed and revised policies, guidelines, and introduced new initiatives to curb mental health issues among their citizens. In the long run, pre-disaster preparedness is important to alleviate long-term post-pandemic psychiatric morbidity and to develop psychological resilience toward disasters and pandemic, alongside investment for better mental health coverage.
      Citation: Asia Pacific Journal of Public Health
      PubDate: 2021-07-26T10:50:40Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10105395211025901
       
  • Relationship Between Changes in Sedentary Time, Physical Activity, and
           Body Mass Index During the COVID-19 Pandemic in Korea

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      Authors: Guen Hui Kim, Hye Won Yun, Wonhee Cho, Heejin Kimm, Keum Ji Jung, Sun Ha Jee
      Abstract: Asia Pacific Journal of Public Health, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Asia Pacific Journal of Public Health
      PubDate: 2021-07-24T05:08:15Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10105395211032817
       
  • Food Security Challenges for Pakistan During the COVID-19 Pandemic

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      Authors: Hafiz Ubaid-ur-Rahman, Waqas Asghar, Nauman Khalid
      Abstract: Asia Pacific Journal of Public Health, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Asia Pacific Journal of Public Health
      PubDate: 2021-07-24T05:05:19Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10105395211031359
       
  • Inclusion and Participation of Young People Who Experienced Distress
           During Social Unrest: A Community-based Inclusive Development Approach

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      Authors: Eva Yin-han Chung
      Abstract: Asia Pacific Journal of Public Health, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Asia Pacific Journal of Public Health
      PubDate: 2021-07-22T11:07:29Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10105395211033486
       
  • Analysis of Periodontal Conditions in the Provinces of Vietnam: Results
           From the National Dental Survey

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      Authors: Nguyen Thi Hong Minh, Tran Cao Binh, Trinh Dinh Hai, Nguyen Thuy Duong, Quang-Thanh Bui
      Abstract: Asia Pacific Journal of Public Health, Ahead of Print.
      Nationwide dental health surveys are crucial for providing essential information on dental health and dental condition–related problems in the community. However, the relationship between periodontal conditions and sociodemographic data has not been well investigated in Vietnam. With data from the National Oral Health Survey in 2019, we performed several machine learning methods on this dataset to investigate the impacts of sociodemographic features on gingival bleeding, periodontal pockets, and Community Periodontal Index. From the experiments, LightGBM produced a maximum AUC (area under the curve) value of 0.744. The other models in descending order were logistic regression (0.705), logiboost (0.704), and random forest (0.684). All methods resulted in significantly high overall accuracies, all exceeding 90%. The results show that the gradient boosting model can predict well the relationship between periodontal conditions and sociodemographic data. The investigated model also reveals that the geographic region has the most significant influence on dental health, while the consumption of sweet foods/drinks is the second most crucial. These findings advocate for a region-specific approach for the dental care program and the implementation of a sugar-risk food reduction program.
      Citation: Asia Pacific Journal of Public Health
      PubDate: 2021-07-20T10:15:27Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10105395211029803
       
  • Syndemic of Tuberculosis and COVID-19 in Bangladesh

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      Authors: Mohammad Jahid Hasan, Ayesha Akther, Jannatul Fardous, Md. Abdullah Saeed Khan
      Abstract: Asia Pacific Journal of Public Health, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Asia Pacific Journal of Public Health
      PubDate: 2021-07-17T04:51:56Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10105395211034073
       
  • Psychological Effects of COVID-19 Pandemic Among Postsecondary Students in
           Hong Kong: A Mixed Methods Research

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      Authors: Tommy K. C. Ng, Ben Y. F. Fong, Hilary H. L. Yee, Vincent T. S. Law
      Abstract: Asia Pacific Journal of Public Health, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Asia Pacific Journal of Public Health
      PubDate: 2021-07-17T04:49:42Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10105395211032820
       
  • COVID-19 Infection Epidemic in the South Pacific Island of New Caledonia
           and in the Greater Paris: Where Is the Highest Wave'

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      Authors: Elisabeth Merlin, Laurent Goix, Caroline Moret, Tomislav Petrovic, Frédéric Langeron, Erick Chanzy, Elise Aguadisch, Frédéric Adnet, Paul-Georges Reuter, Nicolas Delvau, Frédéric Lapostolle
      Abstract: Asia Pacific Journal of Public Health, Ahead of Print.
      IntroductionNew-Caledonia, an island located in the South-Pacific, was the first (overseas) French country hit by the coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19) pandemic to come out of lockdown. The epidemic was rapidly controlled. Analyzing the impact of an epidemic only makes sense if it is compared with a zone with a similar health care system.ObjectiveTo compare epidemic evolution in New-Caledonia and Paris suburb.MethodsHealth care organization is similar in New-Caledonia and Seine-Saint-Denis, based on an Emergency Medical System call center. We recorded the numbers of patients managed by SAMU (Service d’Aide Médicale Urgente)-Emergency Medical System, transferred to the emergency department and managed in prehospital setting by mobile intensive care unit. We compared these parameters during the reference (February 1-23, 2020) and the COVID-19 (February 24, 2020, to April 19, 2020) periods. Primary end-point: number of days over the 95th percentile of the reference period.ResultsNumber of patients managed was over the 95th percentile during 27 and 47 days in New-Caledonia and Seine-Saint-Denis, respectively. Number of emergency department transfers was more than the 95th percentile during 4 and 31 days, respectively. Number of mobile intensive care unit sent was over the 95th percentile during 3 and 14 days, respectively. Peaks were similar.ConclusionThe duration of the critical period rather than its spread affected the health care system.
      Citation: Asia Pacific Journal of Public Health
      PubDate: 2021-07-14T10:14:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10105395211014636
       
  • Large-Scale Rapid Antigen Testing of Migrants for Detection of SARS-CoV-2
           Virus by Dental Interns at Various Checkpoints of Ahmedabad City, India: A
           Short Communication Report

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      Authors: Akshay K. Langalia, Dolly Patel, Dhaval Prajapati, Vipul Munia, Dhairya Shah, Yash Lalwani, Drashti Panchal
      Abstract: Asia Pacific Journal of Public Health, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Asia Pacific Journal of Public Health
      PubDate: 2021-07-13T05:26:53Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10105395211012914
       
  • Associations Between Ambient Particulate Air Pollution and Cognitive
           Function in Indonesian Children Living in Forest Fire–Prone Provinces

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      Authors: Bin Jalaludin, Frances L. Garden, Agata Chrzanowska, Budi Haryanto, Christine T. Cowie, Fatma Lestari, Geoffrey Morgan, Soumya Mazumdar, Kasey Metcalf, Guy B. Marks
      Abstract: Asia Pacific Journal of Public Health, Ahead of Print.
      Smoke from forest fires can reach hazardous levels for extended periods of time. We aimed to determine if there is an association between particulate matter ≤2.5 µm in aerodynamic diameter (PM2.5) and living in a forest fire–prone province and cognitive function. We used data from the Indonesian Family and Life Survey. Cognitive function was assessed by the Ravens Colored Progressive Matrices (RCPM). We used regression models to estimate associations between PM2.5 and living in a forest fire–prone province and cognitive function. In multivariable models, we found very small positive relationships between PM2.5 levels and RCPM scores (PM2.5 level at year of survey: β = 0.1%; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.01% to 0.19%). There were no differences in RCPM scores for children living in forest fire–prone provinces compared with children living in non-forest fire–prone provinces (mean difference = −1.16%, 95% CI = −2.53% to 0.21%). RCPM scores were lower for children who had lived in a forest fire–prone province all their lives compared with children who lived in a non-forest fire–prone province all their life (β = −1.50%; 95% CI = −2.94% to −0.07%). Living in a forest fire–prone province for a prolonged period of time negatively affected cognitive scores after adjusting for individual factors.
      Citation: Asia Pacific Journal of Public Health
      PubDate: 2021-07-10T06:34:19Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10105395211031735
       
  • Public Awareness as a Line of Defense Against COVID-19 in Taiwan

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      Authors: Philip Tseng, Feng-Jen Tsai, Jason C. Hsu, Yung-Chun Chang, Kai-Hsun Wang, Ming-Ken Wu, Mingchih Chen, Chih-Hsiung Su, Ben-Chang Shia, James S. Miser
      Abstract: Asia Pacific Journal of Public Health, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Asia Pacific Journal of Public Health
      PubDate: 2021-07-10T06:32:58Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10105395211030126
       
  • Mental Health Correlates Among Older Persons Residing in Malaysian Nursing
           Homes During the COVID-19 Pandemic

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      Authors: Pritiss Nair, Jesjeet Singh Gill, Ahmad Hatim Sulaiman, Ong Hui Koh, Benedict Francis
      Abstract: Asia Pacific Journal of Public Health, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Asia Pacific Journal of Public Health
      PubDate: 2021-07-10T06:31:39Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10105395211032094
       
  • Behavioral Responses in Korean Non-COVID-19 Patients With Neurological
           Disorders During the COVID-19 Outbreak

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      Authors: Juyeon Oh, Eun Joo Chung, Jung Hwa Seo, Mi-Ri Kang, Sukyoon Lee, Jin-Sung Park, Seong-il Oh
      Abstract: Asia Pacific Journal of Public Health, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Asia Pacific Journal of Public Health
      PubDate: 2021-07-10T06:29:38Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10105395211031689
       
  • The Vulnerability of Migrant Workers in Global COVID-19 Pandemic:
           Highlights from Malaysia and Hong Kong

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      Authors: Olivia M. Y. Ngan, Suhaila Sanip
      Abstract: Asia Pacific Journal of Public Health, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Asia Pacific Journal of Public Health
      PubDate: 2021-07-10T06:28:27Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10105395211031367
       
  • Health-Related Symptoms and Working Conditions on Vulnerability to
           Presenteeism Among Nurses in South Korea

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      Authors: Jee-Seon Yi, Eungyung Kim, Hyeoneui Kim
      Abstract: Asia Pacific Journal of Public Health, Ahead of Print.
      Presenteeism among nurses is reported to be higher than that of other professional workers, and affects one’s health and the safety of their patients. Therefore, study on correlation between complex working condition and presenteeism is needed among nurses. This study aimed to predict characteristics of high-risk groups for presenteeism among nurses. The analysis used data which generated 478 nurses who participated in the fifth Korean Working Conditions Survey (2017). This study built a complex samples logistic regression model and decision tree analysis. Presenteeism was significantly higher among those who experienced musculoskeletal pain, high emotional demands, discrimination, and psychological adverse social behavior at the workplace. Combined presence of psychological adverse social behavior and musculoskeletal pain was predicted presenteeism, and should be treated as groups with a high risk of presenteeism. Nurses should be aware of high-risk group for presenteeism and treat them as a priority group to manage.
      Citation: Asia Pacific Journal of Public Health
      PubDate: 2021-06-15T07:13:51Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10105395211008692
       
  • Caste Exclusion and Health Discrimination in South Asia: A Systematic
           Review

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      Authors: Raksha Thapa, Edwin van Teijlingen, Pramod Raj Regmi, Vanessa Heaslip
      Abstract: Asia Pacific Journal of Public Health, Ahead of Print.
      The caste system is social stratification system that has been used over the last 3 millennia. This review aims to investigate caste-based inequity in health care utilization in South Asia, particularly focusing those at the bottom of the caste hierarchy, commonly known as Dalit communities. A systematic methodology was followed; key databases (including CINAHL, Medline, SocINDEX, PubMed, Nepjol, JSTOR, and ASSIA) were searched for relevant articles published before October 2019, using comprehensive search strategy in accordance with the PRISMA guidelines. In total 15,109 papers were found, and from these, 9 selected papers were included in the review. The papers focused on studies in both India (n = 7) and Nepal (n = 2) and utilized a range of methods including qualitative (n = 2), quantitative (n = 3), and mixed methods (n = 4) approaches. The review identified 4 main themes: stigma, poverty, cultures and beliefs, and health care. Caste-based inequity impacts upon all aspects of an individual’s well-being including violence and everyday life risks. Caste also impacts upon individuals’ opportunities to access education, employment, and health care. Dalits appear to experience this more significantly due to both poverty and their caste status, which increases their vulnerability to health risks.
      Citation: Asia Pacific Journal of Public Health
      PubDate: 2021-05-24T07:41:26Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10105395211014648
       
  • A Systematic Review of the Recent Consumption Levels of Sugar-Sweetened
           Beverages in Children and Adolescents From the World Health Organization
           Regions With High Dietary–Related Burden of Disease

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      Authors: Jia Ying Ooi, Luke Wolfenden, Rachel Sutherland, Nicole Nathan, Christopher Oldmeadow, Matthew Mclaughlin, Courtney Barnes, Alix Hall, Lana Vanderlee, Sze Lin Yoong
      Abstract: Asia Pacific Journal of Public Health, Ahead of Print.
      This review aimed to investigate national estimates of sugar-sweetened beverage (SSB) consumption in children and adolescents aged 2 to 18 years, from countries in regions particularly burdened by dietary-related chronic illnesses. The most recent studies or reports from included countries (n = 73) with national-level consumption data of SSBs in children and adolescents, collected between January 2010 and October 2019, were considered for inclusion. A random effects meta-analysis was used to calculate pooled estimates of the mean consumption of SSB in millimeters per day. Heterogeneity between national estimates was assessed using the I2 statistic and explored via subgroup analyses by the World Health Organization region, age groups, and country-level income. Forty-eight studies were included in the review reporting national estimates of consumption for 51 countries. The highest estimate of daily consumption was in China at 710.0 mL (95% confidence interval [CI] = 698.8-721.2), while the lowest was in Australia at 115.1 mL (95% CI = 111.2-119.1). Pooled synthesis of daily SSB consumption of the 51 countries was 326.0 mL (95% CI = 288.3-363.8), although heterogeneity was high, and was not explained by subgroup analyses. While there is considerable variability between countries, intake of SSB remains high among children and adolescents internationally underscoring the need for public health efforts to reduce SSBs consumption.
      Citation: Asia Pacific Journal of Public Health
      PubDate: 2021-05-20T11:04:52Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10105395211014642
       
  • Perceptions About Mask Use Among Australians Amid the COVID-19 Outbreak:
           Initial Results From the COLLATE Study

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      Authors: Wei Lin Toh, Andrea Phillipou, Eric J. Tan, Tamsyn E. Van Rheenen, Denny Meyer, Erica Neill, Susan L. Rossell
      Abstract: Asia Pacific Journal of Public Health, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Asia Pacific Journal of Public Health
      PubDate: 2021-04-24T09:25:29Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10105395211007640
       
  • An Implementation Framework for Telemedicine to Address Noncommunicable
           Diseases in Thailand

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      Authors: Pairoj Chattranukulchai, Nuntakorn Thongtang, Vuddhidej Ophascharoensuk, Sombat Muengtaweepongsa, Chaisiri Angkurawaranon, Kittiphan Chalom, Somruethai Supungul, Jadej Thammatacharee, Suneerat Kittikhun, Prapimporn Ch Shantavasinkul, Pattara Leelahavarong, Petch Rawdaree, Sasithorn Tangsawad, Siriwan Pitayarangsarit, Chanikarn Kanaderm, Anunchai Assawamakin, Weranuj Roubsanthisuk, Apichard Sukonthasarn
      Abstract: Asia Pacific Journal of Public Health, Ahead of Print.
      To maintain the continuity of noncommunicable disease (NCD) services and ascertain the health outcomes of patients with NCDs during the COVID-19 (coronavirus disease 2019) outbreak in Thailand, various telemedicine services have been developed. To achieve this determination, the implementation framework has been constructed based on recommendations from multidisciplinary experts (Thai NCD Collaboration Group). Within the framework, all key elements are illustrated with their priority and expected collaborations. Ultimately, active collaborations from multi-stakeholders are vitally important to ensure that telemedicine services for NCDs will finally become practical, successful, and sustainable.
      Citation: Asia Pacific Journal of Public Health
      PubDate: 2021-04-19T11:58:38Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10105395211008754
       
  • Do Japan’s Health Care Personnel Meet the Personal Health Goals of the
           “National Health Promotion Program”'

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      Authors: Nobutaka Hirooka, Takeshi Sano, Reiko Yasumura, Yuji Maeyama, Nakamoto Hidetomo
      Abstract: Asia Pacific Journal of Public Health, Ahead of Print.
      To improve health among the population and reduce the societal burden of care and health-related costs in a rapidly aging environment, the Japanese government launched the “National Health Promotion Program in the 21st Century” (HJ21), which contains goals concerning areas such as lifestyle behavior and the use of preventive medicine. While health care personnel are responsible for guiding others’ health choices, they may not maintain healthy lifestyles themselves. Whether these individuals are meeting the HJ21 goals has not yet been examined. This study aims to determine whether certified specialists in health management are meeting such goals, and to compare their performance with the national average. This is a cross-sectional survey study. Study participants, sourced from all prefectures in Japan, were specialists certified in health management. We measured data concerning demographic information, lifestyle (physical activity, nutrition, diet, sleep, rest, smoking, and alcohol use), and the use of preventive medicine. The study participants exhibited many characteristics of high health literacy. They had an overall healthy lifestyle and met most of the HJ21 goals of healthy lifestyle, and a high proportion underwent health maintenance examinations and cancer screenings. These practices and behaviors maybe associated with high health literacy and social engagement activities.
      Citation: Asia Pacific Journal of Public Health
      PubDate: 2021-04-19T11:58:19Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10105395211008749
       
  • Private Health Insurance in Malaysia: Who Is Left Behind'

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      Authors: Nur Zahirah Balqis-Ali, Jailani Anis-Syakira, Weng Hong Fun, Sondi Sararaks
      Abstract: Asia Pacific Journal of Public Health, Ahead of Print.
      Despite various efforts introduced, private health insurance coverage is still low in Malaysia. The objective of this article is to find the factors associated with not having a private health insurance in Malaysia. We analyze data involving 19 959 respondents from the 2015 National Health Morbidity Survey. In this article, we describe the prevalence of not having health insurance and conducted binary logistic regression to identify determinants of uninsured status. A total of 56.6% of the study population was uninsured. After adjusting for other variables, the likelihood of being uninsured was higher among those aged 50 years and above, females, Malay/other Bumiputra ethnicities, rural, government/semigovernment, self-employed, unpaid workers and retirees, unemployed, lower education level, without home ownership and single/widowed/divorced, daily smoker, underweight body mass index, and current drinker. The likelihood of being uninsured also increased with increasing household size while the inversed trend was seen for household income. A substantial proportion of population in Malaysia did not have private health insurance, and these subgroups have limited preferential choices for provider, facility, and care.
      Citation: Asia Pacific Journal of Public Health
      PubDate: 2021-04-15T05:21:29Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10105395211000913
       
  • Are There Ethnic Disparities in Exposure to Workplace Hazards Among New
           Zealand Migrants to Australia'

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      Authors: Renee N. Carey, Sonia El-Zaemey, Alison Daly, Lin Fritschi, Deborah C. Glass, Alison Reid
      Abstract: Asia Pacific Journal of Public Health, Ahead of Print.
      Disparities in exposure to workplace hazards exist between Māori and non-Māori workers in New Zealand, with Māori workers generally incurring poorer conditions. This study aimed to determine if these ethnic disparities are similar after migration to Australia. A national cross-sectional telephone survey asked participants what tasks they undertook in their job to assess exposure to carcinogens as well as whether they experienced ethnic discrimination, bullying, job precariousness, or job strain. A total of 389 New Zealand Caucasians and 152 Māori/Pasifika workers were recruited. After adjustment, 79% of Māori/Pasifika compared with 67% of New Zealand Caucasian workers were assessed as being exposed to at least one carcinogen at work (adjusted prevalence ratio [aPR] = 1.2, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.1-1.4). Māori/Pasifika workers were also more likely to report ethnic discrimination (aPR = 6.9, 95% CI = 2.6-18.3) and fair or poor current health (aPR = 1.9, 95% CI = 1.1-3.2) than New Zealand Caucasians. Some ethnic disparities in exposure to workplace hazards in New Zealand are apparent after migration to Australia.
      Citation: Asia Pacific Journal of Public Health
      PubDate: 2021-04-13T09:40:33Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10105395211007648
       
  • Antimicrobial Practices and Geriatrics: Need for Periodic Surveillance
           Studies in Turkey

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      Authors: Zakir Khan, Yusuf Karataş, Hazir Rahman
      Abstract: Asia Pacific Journal of Public Health, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Asia Pacific Journal of Public Health
      PubDate: 2021-04-08T11:41:05Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10105395211007643
       
  • Chikungunya and Zika Viruses Not Detected Among Patients With Dengue-Like
           Illness, Sarawak, Malaysia

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      Authors: Emily R. Robie, Juliana N. Zemke, Teck-Hock Toh, Jeffrey Soon-Yit Lee, King-Ching Hii, Johnny D. Callahan, Randal J. Schoepp, Gregory C. Gray
      Abstract: Asia Pacific Journal of Public Health, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Asia Pacific Journal of Public Health
      PubDate: 2021-04-08T11:39:02Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10105395211007631
       
  • Challenges and Response to the Second Major Local Outbreak of COVID-19 in
           Bhutan

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      Authors: Saran Tenzin Tamang, Thinley Dorji
      Abstract: Asia Pacific Journal of Public Health, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Asia Pacific Journal of Public Health
      PubDate: 2021-04-08T11:33:20Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10105395211007607
       
  • Cervical Cancer Screening Among Immigrant Women Residing in Australia: A
           Systematic Review

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      Authors: Zufishan Alam, Leila Shafiee Hanjani, Judith Dean, Monika Janda
      Abstract: Asia Pacific Journal of Public Health, Ahead of Print.
      Since the introduction of systematic population-based cervical cancer screening in Australia in 1991, age-standardized incidence of cervical cancer has halved. Given recent advances in human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination and screening, cervical cancer may be eliminated nationally within 20 years. However, immigrant women are not equitably reached by screening efforts. This study systematically reviewed evidence on cervical cancer screening practices among immigrant women in Australia. A systematic search of MEDLINE, Embase, PubMed, CINAHL, and PsycINFO and gray literature for English language studies published till March 1, 2019, was conducted. Observational and qualitative studies evaluating cervical cancer screening awareness and participation of immigrant women were screened. Of 125 potentially relevant studies, 25 were eligible: 16 quantitative (4 cohort, 12 cross-sectional), 6 qualitative, and 3 mixed-methods studies. Quantitative studies indicated 1% to 16% lower screening rates among migrant women compared with Australian-born women, with participation of South Asian women being significantly lower (odds ratio = 0.54, 95% confidence interval = 0.48-0.61). Qualitative studies illustrated factors affecting women’s willingness to participate in screening, including insufficient knowledge, low-risk perception, and unavailability of a female health professionals being key barriers. Future studies should focus on South Asian women, due to recent increase in their immigration.
      Citation: Asia Pacific Journal of Public Health
      PubDate: 2021-04-08T11:31:40Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10105395211006600
       
  • “Coronaphobia” Among Undergraduate Students: A Pilot Survey
           Study

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      Authors: N. A. Uvais
      Abstract: Asia Pacific Journal of Public Health, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Asia Pacific Journal of Public Health
      PubDate: 2021-04-08T11:29:48Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10105395211007645
       
  • Even Global Pandemic Cannot Stop Rapist: Alarming Rate of Rape Cases in
           Bangladesh Amid COVID-19 Pandemic

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      Authors: Md Insiat Islam Rabby, Farzad Hossain, Israt Jahan Akhi, Syed Nazmul Huda, S. K. Mahafujur Rahaman
      Abstract: Asia Pacific Journal of Public Health, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Asia Pacific Journal of Public Health
      PubDate: 2021-04-08T11:28:17Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10105395211007620
       
  • Association Between Adherence to Healthy Lifestyles and Depressive
           Symptoms Among Japanese Hospital Workers During the COVID-19 Pandemic

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      Authors: Ami Fukunaga, Yosuke Inoue, Shohei Yamamoto, Takako Miki, Akiko Nanri, Hironori Ishiwari, Masamichi Ishii, Kengo Miyo, Maki Konishi, Norio Ohmagari, Tetsuya Mizoue
      Abstract: Asia Pacific Journal of Public Health, Ahead of Print.
      The objective of this study was to investigate the association between adherence to healthy lifestyles (as measured by the healthy lifestyle index [HLI]) and depressive symptoms among staff members at a large national medical institution in Tokyo, Japan, during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. The study sample consisted of 1228 staff members aged between 21 and 73 years who participated in a cross-sectional survey conducted in July 2020. We constructed the HLI by assigning 1 point to each healthy lifestyle factor: normal body mass index, sufficient physical activity, non-smoking status, non-to-moderate alcohol consumption, and sufficient sleep duration. The multivariate adjusted odds ratios (95% confidence interval) for depressive symptoms were 1.00 (reference), 0.71 (0.46-1.11), 0.66 (0.43-1.01), and 0.56 (0.33-0.94) for participants with HLI scores of 0 to 2, 3, 4, and 5, respectively (P for trend = 0.032). The present study suggests the role of healthy lifestyles in mental health among hospital staff working during the pandemic.
      Citation: Asia Pacific Journal of Public Health
      PubDate: 2021-04-08T11:26:58Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10105395211007604
       
  • Status and Determinants of Treatment Outcomes Among New Tuberculosis
           Patients in South Korea: A Retrospective Cohort Study

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      Authors: Hyunjin Son, Jeongha Mok, Miyoung Lee, Wonseo Park, Seungjin Kim, Joosun Lee, Bo Youl Choi, Changhoon Kim
      Abstract: Asia Pacific Journal of Public Health, Ahead of Print.
      This is a retrospective cohort study using notification data in South Korea. We evaluated the nationwide status, regional differences, and the determinants of treatment outcomes among tuberculosis patients. Treatment success rate improved from 77.0% in 2012 to 86.0% in 2015. The lost to follow-up rate was higher among older people, males, and foreign nationals. Health care facilities designated for the Public-Private Mix (PPM) project showed higher success rate and lower rate of lost to follow-up. Moreover, municipalities with low regional deprivation index had higher PPM project coverage. Since there is a large regional difference in the coverage of the PPM project, an additional community-based support program should be implemented, especially for tuberculosis patients residing in region with low PPM project coverage.
      Citation: Asia Pacific Journal of Public Health
      PubDate: 2021-04-02T09:10:36Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10105395211000529
       
  • Applying Public Health Principles to Better Manage the COVID-19 Pandemic:
           “Community Participation,” “Equity,” and “Cultural
           Sensitivity”

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      Authors: Mohammad Afzal Mahmood, Kausar Saeed Khan, John Robert Moss
      Abstract: Asia Pacific Journal of Public Health, Ahead of Print.
      Although coronavirus vaccine roll-out is beginning, standard public health practices will, for most people, remain their first line of protection for some time. Three principles guiding the pandemic control process, namely community participation, promotion of equity, and cultural sensitivity, can help people adhere to public health advice. These three principles can enhance intervention effectiveness, decreasing the rate of infection and protecting human rights, promoting social harmony and preventing unrest.
      Citation: Asia Pacific Journal of Public Health
      PubDate: 2021-03-27T05:29:56Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10105395211001223
       
  • Cost-Effectiveness of Population-Based Tobacco Control Interventions on
           the Health Burden of Cardiovascular Diseases in Vietnam

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      Authors: Duyen Thuy Nguyen, Khue Ngoc Luong, Hai Thi Phan, Anh Tuan Tran, Son The Dao, Ak Narayan Poudel, Thang Manh Hoang, Vuong Van Do, Dat Minh Le, Giang Huong Pham, Linh Thuy Nguyen, Anh Tu Duong, Minh Van Hoang
      Abstract: Asia Pacific Journal of Public Health, Ahead of Print.
      This study seeks to assess the cost-effectiveness of population-based tobacco control interventions, which include health promotion and education, smoke-free models, cessation programs, warning on package, marketing bans, and raising tax. Standardized activity-based costing ingredient approach was applied with the provider perspective to calculate interventions cost from 2013 to 2017. The potential health impacts of the aforementioned interventions were calculated through a Microsoft Excel-based modeling adapted from Higashi et al and Ngalesoni et al. All 6 population-based tobacco control interventions were highly cost-effective with ranges from 1405 VND (Vietnamese Dong) to 135 560 VND per DALY (disability-adjusted life year) averted. It was identified that raising cigarette taxes and applying health warnings on tobacco packages are the most favorable, cost-effective interventions. The results from this study provide a robust message that calls for increased attention and efforts in developing an appropriate policy agenda, which jointly integrates both political and community-based interventions, to maximize intervention impact on tobacco use.
      Citation: Asia Pacific Journal of Public Health
      PubDate: 2021-03-25T11:41:36Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1010539521999873
       
  • COVID-19 Pandemic Prevalence and Risk Factors for Depression Among Health
           Care Workers in South Asia

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      Authors: Rabeeya Saeed, Faridah Amin, Muhammad Talha, Sankha Randenikumara, Idris Shariff, Noureen Durrani, Shaheena Salman
      Abstract: Asia Pacific Journal of Public Health, Ahead of Print.
      Health care workers (HCW) are especially vulnerable to developing mental health problems in pandemic situations. The impact may be much devastating in developing countries due to fragmented health care system. Our study aims to explore the underlying burden of depression and its related factors among health care workers in South Asian countries. Data was collected through an online survey. A total of 476 health care workers including doctors, nurses, and paramedical staff participated from Pakistan, India, and Sri Lanka. A validated WHO Self Reporting Questionnaire (SRQ-20) was used to screen for Depression. A 25.7% prevalence of depression was reported among health care workers. Almost 70% of them were either not satisfied or partially satisfied with the provided personal protective equipment. On multivariable analysis, females gender (aOR=1.80, 95% CI: 1.11 – 2.90), fear of unprotection (aOR=1.80, 95% CI: 1.11 – 2.90), confirmed COVID-19 case in workplace (aOR=1.98, 95% CI= 1.18 - 3.33) and family (aOR=2.98, 95% CI: 1.02 – 8.70) were found to be independent predictors of depression among healthcare workers. Depression among HCW in South-Asian countries is quite alarming. This may jeopardize attention to other non-COVID health problems which are still on a priority in developing countries.
      Citation: Asia Pacific Journal of Public Health
      PubDate: 2021-03-23T09:51:08Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10105395211002324
       
  • Digital Warfare Against COVID-19: Global Use of Contact-Tracing Apps

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      Authors: Yatika Chaudhary, Nikita Sandhu, Abhishek Singh, Pradeep Aggarwal, Manisha Naithani
      Abstract: Asia Pacific Journal of Public Health, Ahead of Print.
      The current COVID-19 (coronavirus disease 2019) pandemic has perpetuated a worldwide tussle to control this infection and minimizing death toll and economic damages. The year 2020 would always be remembered as a year of war against a virus, but it would also be marked as a year showing upsurge of technology evolution to deal with infections. Contact tracing has emerged as a new buzzword. Contact tracing digital tools have been introduced worldwide to prevent transmission. In this article, we have outlined various contact tracing apps being used globally, which are rated according to their safety, privacy, and efficacy.
      Citation: Asia Pacific Journal of Public Health
      PubDate: 2021-03-15T04:34:53Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1010539521999895
       
  • Is Population Density a Risk Factor for Communicable Diseases Like
           COVID-19' A Case of Bangladesh

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      Authors: Md. Zakiul Alam
      Abstract: Asia Pacific Journal of Public Health, Ahead of Print.
      Bangladesh is one of the most densely populated countries in the world struggling to prevent COVID-19 (coronavirus disease 2019). This study employed correlation, cluster analysis, and multiple linear regression analyses using district-wise COVID-19 infection and socioeconomic data. It is observed that there is a strong positive correlation (r = 0.876, P < .001) between population density and COVID-19, explaining a 60% variation in Bangladesh. The relationship between urbanization and COVID-19 is also positively strong (r = 0.802, P < .001). Urban settlements have a higher risk of spreading diseases due to the enormous population density. For future planning to prevent COVID-19 and other related infectious diseases, population density should be considered a risk factor.
      Citation: Asia Pacific Journal of Public Health
      PubDate: 2021-03-06T10:16:43Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1010539521998858
       
  • Keeping Island Communities Healthy

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      Authors: Colin Binns, Wah Yun Low
      First page: 697
      Abstract: Asia Pacific Journal of Public Health, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Asia Pacific Journal of Public Health
      PubDate: 2021-08-27T10:15:17Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10105395211041790
       
  • Growing Pacific Research and Leadership

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      Authors: Jemaima Tiatia-Seath, Judith McCool, Vili Nosa
      First page: 698
      Abstract: Asia Pacific Journal of Public Health, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Asia Pacific Journal of Public Health
      PubDate: 2021-09-04T09:09:15Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10105395211043314
       
  • Delays in the Pathway to Cancer Diagnosis in Samoa: A Qualitative Study of
           Patients’ Experiences

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      Authors: Beatriz Cuesta-Briand, Dyxon Hansell, Shelley Burich, Terri Loimata
      First page: 707
      Abstract: Asia Pacific Journal of Public Health, Ahead of Print.
      Cancer is a leading cause of death in Samoa, with cancer patients presenting late and experiencing poor outcomes. Barriers to early diagnosis are complex, and cultural factors play an important part. This qualitative study explored the barriers to cancer diagnosis in Samoa through semistructured interviews conducted with 19 Samoan patients. Thematic data analysis was informed by socioecological theory and yielded 4 themes: knowledge and beliefs about cancer; pain as a trigger for health care–seeking behavior; follow-up issues; and communication and trust. Cancer knowledge and attitudes toward pain were strongly influenced by culture and community beliefs. Lack of follow-up resulted in significant delays, and ineffective patient-doctor communication triggered feelings of uncertainty and mistrust in the health care system. Efforts to address knowledge gaps will not be effective unless they are accompanied by broader strategies addressing local health care capacity issues. Adopting a socioecological framework lens within a regional collaborative approach provides a way forward.
      Citation: Asia Pacific Journal of Public Health
      PubDate: 2021-06-02T09:19:14Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10105395211019857
       
  • Takore i te Kai Ava’ava, a mCessation Program Adapted for the Cook
           Islands: Indicators of Potential for Tobacco Control

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      Authors: Teinatangi Ringi, Josephine Aumea Herman, Maina Tairi, Rosie Dobson, Vili Nosa, Robyn Whittaker, Judith McCool
      First page: 714
      Abstract: Asia Pacific Journal of Public Health, Ahead of Print.
      Mobile phone–based smoking cessation interventions (mCessation) are an established evidence-based intervention designed to support smokers to quit. Evidence of impact to date is modestly positive but skewed in favor of high-resourced countries, with less evidence of value added to low-resourced settings. Takore i te Kai Ava’ava, a text message–based smoking cessation program, was delivered to smokers living on the island of Rarotonga in 2019. Eighty-eight smokers consented to take part. Participants completed a baseline questionnaire about current smoking behavior and previous quit attempts; follow-up measures at 2 months assess quit attempts feedback on the program. Thirty-two people completed the follow-up interviews; 10 (31%) had not smoked in the past 7 days, 23 (72%) reported a serious quit attempt, and 29 (91%) felt the program was effective for the Cook Islands. Takore i te Kai Ava’ava was deemed to be highly acceptable and potentially cost-effective.
      Citation: Asia Pacific Journal of Public Health
      PubDate: 2021-09-04T09:06:21Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10105395211036267
       
  • I Keep Looking at What I’m Doing to My Organs: Samoans’ Responses to
           Adapted Anti-Tobacco Television Advertisements

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      Authors: Elaine Umali, Helen Tanielu, Robyn Whittaker, Cam Sugden, Judith McCool
      First page: 721
      Abstract: Asia Pacific Journal of Public Health, Ahead of Print.
      There has been an increase of adapted tobacco control media campaigns in low- and middle-income countries. Adapting existing material offers many benefits especially to countries with limited resources. We adapted 3 television advertisements for the Tu’u Nei Loa Le Ulaula Tapa’a (Stop Smoking Now) campaign in Samoa. Adaption included rigorous efforts to ensure advertisements were culturally appropriate. To determine audiences’ perception of anti-tobacco television advertisements to promote smoking cessation, we conducted 8 talanoa, a Pacific Islands research methodology, among 54 smokers and nonsmokers in Apia, Samoa. The talanoa were transcribed, translated, and thematically coded. Results suggest that the advertisements raised awareness on the negative health impacts of tobacco use, especially to the internal organs. Graphic and emotionally evocative advertisements, especially those that have an impact on the family, have greater potential to motivate Samoans to quit.
      Citation: Asia Pacific Journal of Public Health
      PubDate: 2021-06-02T09:19:08Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10105395211020920
       
  • Gamification and Sugar: A School-Based Pilot Study of Social Marketing and
           Gamification Approaches to Reduce Sugary Drink Intake in Pasifika School
           Students

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      Authors: Gerhard Sundborn, Simon Thornley, Corina Grey, Dudley Gentles, Rod T. Jackson, Boyd Swinburn, Loma Veatupu, Bodo Lang
      First page: 727
      Abstract: Asia Pacific Journal of Public Health, Ahead of Print.
      The aim of this study was to investigate a social marketing–gamification intervention to reduce sugary drink intake drawing on popular culture of Pasifika secondary school students in Auckland, New Zealand. Students aged 11 to 14 years from one coeducational high school participated in the 11-week pilot study. The 9-week intervention was undertaken in assemblies and classrooms. Baseline and follow-up measures were completed by 227 and 220 students, respectively, of 298 enrolled students. Retention of the “3-6-9” teaching related to maximum daily sugar intake increased from 9% at baseline to 97% at follow-up (P < .0001). Significant increases were observed of students who correctly answered sugar content of drinks. Overall consumption of sugary drink decreased at follow-up by 0.46 glasses per day. The main conclusion from this study was that this school-based gamification educational package to convey messages about sugar content of drinks using popular modes of engagement is a promising intervention that was acceptable and well supported by school staff and students.
      Citation: Asia Pacific Journal of Public Health
      PubDate: 2021-07-05T07:18:16Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10105395211030133
       
  • Community Perceptions of the Determinants of Diabetes in Peri-Urban
           Vanuatu

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      Authors: Lana M. Elliott, John Taylor
      First page: 734
      Abstract: Asia Pacific Journal of Public Health, Ahead of Print.
      Health promotion is a core component of the Pacific region’s response to noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) prevention and control. However, while health promotion should build on and be informed by contextually specific norms and social discourse, there remains a paucity in research that seeks to understand how people in the Pacific region comprehend chronic conditions and their determinants. Based in peri-urban Vanuatu, this codesigned study utilized an open-ended survey to investigate community perceptions of factors contributing to the development of type 2 diabetes. Results demonstrate a complex picture of diabetes-specific health literacy, with 22 distinct causes identified by 308 respondents. Dietary factors were commonly acknowledged; however, dietary complexity was not well understood. Limited recognition of the role of tobacco and alcohol consumption in disease development was also noted. Overall, findings demonstrate mixed successes in NCD-related health promotion. Moving away from more universalized approaches commonly advocated by donors, this research identifies the need for locally designed and driven health promotion that focuses on more nuanced, culturally sensitive, and contextually grounded messaging.
      Citation: Asia Pacific Journal of Public Health
      PubDate: 2021-04-02T09:13:16Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10105395211005924
       
  • Cultural Determinants of Fruits and Vegetable Consumption in Indigenous
           (iTaukei) Fijian Children: A Qualitative Study of Caregivers

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      Authors: Salanieta M. C. Hawea, Pragya Singh, Susan J. Whiting
      First page: 747
      Abstract: Asia Pacific Journal of Public Health, Ahead of Print.
      The consumption of fruits and vegetables (F&V) has many health benefits, yet the majority of the world’s population, including young children, consume less than recommended. This article provides caregivers’ perspectives on cultural determinants of F&V consumption in children in Fiji. A qualitative study design using focus group discussions with caregivers of children aged 6 months to 5 years old in Suva was used. Thematic content analysis was undertaken to identify common issues using 4 main themes. Subthemes were further analyzed from the broad themes to understand caregiver’s perceptions. Caregivers perceived that meal components lacked F&V and food preparation and cooking methods of F&V did not stimulate children’s appetite. Non-vegetable products such as meat and fish were perceived as more valued and privileged for those consuming them. Understanding cultural determinants as perceived by caregivers is important to inform strategies to increase F&V consumption in children.
      Citation: Asia Pacific Journal of Public Health
      PubDate: 2021-08-14T06:52:32Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10105395211038458
       
  • Perspectives of Nurses About Factors Affecting Quality of Care at the
           Solomon Islands National Referral Hospital During the 2016-2017 Dengue
           Outbreak: A Qualitative Study

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      Authors: Norma Denty Goulolo, Hugo Bugoro, Maxine Whittaker, Sarah Larkins, Humpress Harrington, Karen Carlisle, David MacLaren, Rebecca Evans
      First page: 761
      Abstract: Asia Pacific Journal of Public Health, Ahead of Print.
      During the 2016-2017 Solomon Islands dengue outbreak, the National Referral Hospital (NRH) in Honiara was the epicenter for the national response. High-quality nursing care is critical for successful management and this study investigated the factors affecting the quality of nursing care for patients admitted to NRH with dengue. Data were collected using 2 methods: (a) Focus group discussions with nurses who cared for dengue patients and (b) a self-administered questionnaire completed by a senior manager. Analysis of qualitative data using a thematic technique found 2 key factors affected care: (a) training on protocols and guidelines for clinical management and (b) planning and preparedness of NRH. Quality of care was influenced by lack of basic equipment, transport provided for nursing staff to attend shifts, and confusion between allowances for regular salaried staff and extra staff assisting with the outbreak. Specific attention is needed in future outbreaks to ensure staff understand protocols, follow guidelines, and that adequate equipment is provided.
      Citation: Asia Pacific Journal of Public Health
      PubDate: 2021-08-02T04:40:27Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10105395211036266
       
  • Urban-Rural Compliance Variability to COVID-19 Restrictions of Indigenous
           Fijian (iTaukei) Funerals in Fiji

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      Authors: Ron Vave
      First page: 767
      Abstract: Asia Pacific Journal of Public Health, Ahead of Print.
      Research on coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has focused primarily on impacts in Western societies despite emerging evidence of increased vulnerability among indigenous peoples such as Pacific Islanders. Using Facebook public posts, this research assessed compliance to COVID-19 restrictions such as social gatherings (SG) and social distancing (SD) in non-COVID-19, indigenous Fijian (iTaukei) funerals in Fiji. Results showed 95% of the 20 funerals exceeding SG limits with greater, and highly variable crowd sizes in rural than urban communities. Additionally, 75% of the 20 funerals did not adhere to the 2-m SD requirement of which 80% were in rural areas. Higher SG and SD compliance in urban funerals could be partially explained by the presence of a recognized authority who enforced crowd size limits, and the heterogeneous urban community who were more likely to flag breaches than their collectivistic, homogeneous, close-knit, rural counterparts. Ultimately, health authorities need to utilize a social lens that incorporates etic and emic differences in culture to ensure maximum compliance.
      Citation: Asia Pacific Journal of Public Health
      PubDate: 2021-04-15T05:10:49Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10105395211005921
       
  • Structural Racism and Micronesians in Hawaii: The COVID-19 Syndemic

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      Authors: Kalei R. J. Hosaka, Max P. Castanera, Seiji Yamada
      First page: 775
      Abstract: Asia Pacific Journal of Public Health, Ahead of Print.
      By August 2020, non-Hawaiian Pacific Islanders—4% of Hawaii’s population—accounted for 30% of the cumulative COVID-19 cases in the state. Micronesians, mostly Chuukese and Marshallese, were the most severely affected. Disproportionate COVID-19 infection in racial or ethnic groups in the US occur because of socioeconomic factors. The COVID-19 pandemic can be thought of as a syndemic–where cases cluster “on a background of social and economic disparity”. In this brief report, we describe factors that put Chuukese and Marshallese at increased risk for COVID-19 in Hawaii. We show that Micronesians had increased risk for COVID-19 due to limited employment opportunities, housing insecurity, and underlying comorbid conditions in the context of rescinded federal health insurance and broken government promises. We also highlight the resiliency that many community members demonstrated in preventing new infections and supporting those infected. We conclude that COVID-19 in Hawaii should be understood as a syndemic, where Micronesians were disproportionately affected due to disparities in housing, employment, and health access. Our work supports efforts to continue addressing underlying socioeconomic disparities in creating a more equitable future for our Micronesian community in Hawaii.
      Citation: Asia Pacific Journal of Public Health
      PubDate: 2021-05-03T10:38:52Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10105395211012188
       
  • The COVID-19 Pandemic and Sexual and Reproductive Health and Rights in the
           Pacific

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      Authors: Angela Dawson, Alec Ekeroma, Avelina Rokoduru, Donald Wilson, Nguyen Toan Tran, Deborah Bateson
      First page: 777
      Abstract: Asia Pacific Journal of Public Health, Ahead of Print.
      This short communication explores the challenges and ways forward for the delivery of sexual and reproductive health care in Pacific Island countries during the pandemic and the responses in relation to contraception, the management of unintended pregnancies, and gender-based violence.
      Citation: Asia Pacific Journal of Public Health
      PubDate: 2021-03-20T08:40:26Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1010539521998854
       
  • Fertility Preferences, Contraceptive Use, and the Unmet Need for
           Contraception in Papua New Guinea: Key Findings From 1996 to 2016

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      Authors: Sarika Gupta, Kevin McGeechan, Sarah Bernays, Glen Mola, Angela Kelly-Hanku, John W. Bolnga, Kirsten I. Black
      First page: 780
      Abstract: Asia Pacific Journal of Public Health, Ahead of Print.
      Expanding access to reliable contraception is a global priority in the fight to lower maternal morbidity and mortality. Papua New Guinea (PNG) continues to face significant challenges in enhancing contraceptive services for women. PNG Demographic Health Survey (DHS) has been undertaken every 10 years since 1996 and describes the major trends in crude birth rates, fertility rates and preferences, contraceptive use, and the unmet needs for contraception. The latest survey in 2016 means that there are now 20 years of data available. Between 1996 and 2016, modern contraceptive prevalence increased from 14% to 29% with a preference for longer acting reversible contraception, though the unmet need for contraception persisted at 32% with minimal change since 1996. Rurally dwelling women as well as those with low literacy, who make up the majority of reproductive age women in PNG, were consistently the least likely to use contraception. Expanding access to reliable contraception should therefore be prioritized for these women.
      Citation: Asia Pacific Journal of Public Health
      PubDate: 2021-08-07T07:03:29Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10105395211034299
       
  • Implementation of the Mental Health Gap Action Programme (mhGAP) in Kosrae
           State in the Federated States of Micronesia

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      Authors: Caitlin Engelhard, Sara Haack, Tholman Alik
      First page: 784
      Abstract: Asia Pacific Journal of Public Health, Ahead of Print.
      Improving access to mental health care is a global health priority, and a significant treatment gap exists in Pacific Island Countries. One strategy to bridge the gap is the World Health Organization’s Mental Health Gap Action Programme (mhGAP), which provides evidence-based guidance for managing mental, neurological, and substance abuse conditions. mhGAP has been implemented in more than 90 countries, but there has been limited training within many Pacific Island countries. We describe implementation of mhGAP training in Kosrae, a state within the Federated States of Micronesia. mhGAP training was conducted with 18 members of the Kosrae Community Health Center (KCHC). Our training model included 2 helpful modifications: (1) participants attended a combination of online sessions and a 1-week in-person training, which allowed for more time and flexibility in delivering training; and (2) longitudinal support posttraining, which has been identified as an important factor in successful implementation of mhGAP.
      Citation: Asia Pacific Journal of Public Health
      PubDate: 2021-06-17T09:52:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10105395211024825
       
  • An Analysis of the Sustainability of a Collaborative Care Program Used to
           Deliver Integrated Mental Health Care Within a Micronesian Island State

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      Authors: Sara A. Haack, Caitlin Engelhard, Tiffinie Kiyota, Tholman Ph. Alik
      First page: 786
      Abstract: Asia Pacific Journal of Public Health, Ahead of Print.
      Adequate access to mental health care is a global problem, including in the Federated States of Micronesia (FSM). The Collaborative Care Model (CoCM) offers an opportunity to deliver improved access to mental health services in primary care centers, and key factors to program sustainability have been investigated in high-income country settings. This study’s objective was to evaluate how well factors associated with sustainability have been incorporated into a CoCM in Kosrae, Federated States of Micronesia. The Kosraean CoCM’s strengths included its supportive leadership, team member training, and having a strong care manager and engaged primary care provider champion. Opportunities for growth included further development of its financial viability, information technology systems, change readiness, and operational procedures. Our program found that having a stable and invested staff and leveraging its current strengths were important to its viability. In an international partnership, it is also critical to develop strong relationships among team members and to have stable internet connectivity to facilitate regular communication. These lessons learned can be applicable to other integrated care programs in similar Pacific Island countries.
      Citation: Asia Pacific Journal of Public Health
      PubDate: 2021-06-05T05:51:27Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10105395211020898
       
  • Young Pacific Male Athletes’ Attitudes Toward Mental Health Help-Seeking
           in Aotearoa New Zealand

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      Authors: Caleb Panapa Edward Marsters, Jemaima Tiatia-Seath, Lisa Uperesa
      First page: 789
      Abstract: Asia Pacific Journal of Public Health, Ahead of Print.
      Mental health is a pressing issue among Pacific communities in Aotearoa New Zealand, particularly among young Pacific men who have a high incidence of suicide deaths and reduced access to mental health services. Young Pacific men are heavily represented in professional sports, and despite limited empirical evidence, anecdotal evidence suggests that young Pacific male athletes face numerous factors that deter help-seeking behavior. In response, a mixed-methods study was carried out with young Pacific male athletes (n = 123) and key stakeholders (n = 12) to explore athletes’ views and experiences of mental health help-seeking. The results revealed that athletes held low levels of “personal stigma” and were supportive of other athletes seeking help for mental distress, but also held high levels of “perceived stigma” and negative views toward seeking help for their own mental distress. These findings extend the literature and provide tailored strategies to facilitate help-seeking among young Pacific male athletes.
      Citation: Asia Pacific Journal of Public Health
      PubDate: 2021-06-30T09:43:39Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10105395211022944
       
  • ‘Tausi Feagaiga: Impacting Health Care in an Island Nation

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      Authors: Ritabelle Fernandes, Kathryn M. McCutchan, Nancy E. Allen
      First page: 792
      Abstract: Asia Pacific Journal of Public Health, Ahead of Print.
      The ‘Tausi Feagaiga (Covenant Keeper) project was a partnership between community organization Pacific Youth and Community Development, faith-based organization Roman Catholic Diocese of Samoa-Pago Pago, and higher learning institute University of Hawaii John A. Burns School of Medicine. Over the course of 5 years from 2016 – 2020, 125 caregivers were trained in family caregiving. Fa’a Samoa, or the Samoan way supports traditional values of tausi matua encouraging caring for your elders. Training was conducted through an intensive workshop followed by practicum at Hope House, Catholic Diocese home for the aged. Confidence in caregiving increased following the training and feedback was extremely positive. Competence in geriatric syndromes was improved after attending the workshop (p
      Citation: Asia Pacific Journal of Public Health
      PubDate: 2021-05-22T10:45:30Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10105395211016593
       
  • Patient Experiences of the Community Phase of the Directly Observed
           Treatment Short-Course for Tuberculosis in Malaita Province, Solomon
           Islands

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      Authors: Leon Manehoua, Karen Carlisle, Maxine Whittaker, Sarah Larkins, Humpress Harrington, Peter D. Massey, Freda Pitakaka, David MacLaren
      First page: 794
      Abstract: Asia Pacific Journal of Public Health, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Asia Pacific Journal of Public Health
      PubDate: 2021-08-02T04:39:12Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10105395211035255
       
 
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