Publisher: Sage Publications   (Total: 1166 journals)

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Showing 1 - 200 of 1166 Journals sorted alphabetically
AADE in Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Abstracts in Anthropology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 29)
Academic Pathology     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Accounting History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18, SJR: 0.527, CiteScore: 1)
Acta Radiologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.754, CiteScore: 2)
Acta Radiologica Open     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Acta Sociologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39, SJR: 0.939, CiteScore: 2)
Action Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 53, SJR: 0.308, CiteScore: 1)
Active Learning in Higher Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 396, SJR: 1.397, CiteScore: 2)
Adaptive Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.288, CiteScore: 1)
Administration & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18, SJR: 0.675, CiteScore: 1)
Adoption & Fostering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25, SJR: 0.313, CiteScore: 0)
Adsorption Science & Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.258, CiteScore: 1)
Adult Education Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 260, SJR: 0.566, CiteScore: 2)
Adult Learning     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 51)
Advances in Dental Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 1.791, CiteScore: 4)
Advances in Developing Human Resources     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35, SJR: 0.614, CiteScore: 2)
Advances in Mechanical Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 156, SJR: 0.272, CiteScore: 1)
Advances in Methods and Practices in Psychological Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20)
Advances in Structural Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 51, SJR: 0.599, CiteScore: 1)
AERA Open     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
Affilia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.496, CiteScore: 1)
Africa Spectrum     Open Access   (Followers: 17)
Agrarian South : J. of Political Economy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Air, Soil & Water Research     Open Access   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.214, CiteScore: 1)
Alexandria : The J. of National and Intl. Library and Information Issues     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 68)
Allergy & Rhinology     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
AlterNative : An Intl. J. of Indigenous Peoples     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 39, SJR: 0.194, CiteScore: 0)
Alternative Law J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.176, CiteScore: 0)
Alternatives : Global, Local, Political     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.351, CiteScore: 1)
Alternatives to Laboratory Animals     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.297, CiteScore: 1)
American Behavioral Scientist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26, SJR: 0.982, CiteScore: 2)
American Economist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
American Educational Research J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 260, SJR: 2.913, CiteScore: 3)
American J. of Alzheimer's Disease and Other Dementias     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23, SJR: 0.67, CiteScore: 2)
American J. of Cosmetic Surgery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
American J. of Evaluation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18, SJR: 0.646, CiteScore: 2)
American J. of Health Promotion     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35, SJR: 0.807, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Hospice and Palliative Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 47, SJR: 0.65, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Law & Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.204, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Lifestyle Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.431, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Medical Quality     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.777, CiteScore: 1)
American J. of Men's Health     Open Access   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.595, CiteScore: 2)
American J. of Rhinology and Allergy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.972, CiteScore: 2)
American J. of Sports Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 248, SJR: 3.949, CiteScore: 6)
American Politics Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 36, SJR: 1.313, CiteScore: 1)
American Review of Public Administration     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28, SJR: 2.062, CiteScore: 2)
American Sociological Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 357, SJR: 6.333, CiteScore: 6)
American String Teacher     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Analytical Chemistry Insights     Open Access   (Followers: 26, SJR: 0.224, CiteScore: 1)
Angiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.849, CiteScore: 2)
Animation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.197, CiteScore: 0)
Annals of Clinical Biochemistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.634, CiteScore: 1)
Annals of Otology, Rhinology & Laryngology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20, SJR: 0.807, CiteScore: 1)
Annals of Pharmacotherapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 59, SJR: 1.096, CiteScore: 2)
Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 51, SJR: 1.225, CiteScore: 3)
Annals of the ICRP     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.548, CiteScore: 1)
Anthropocene Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 3.341, CiteScore: 7)
Anthropological Theory     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 48, SJR: 0.739, CiteScore: 1)
Antitrust Bulletin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Antiviral Chemistry and Chemotherapy     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.635, CiteScore: 2)
Antyajaa : Indian J. of Women and Social Change     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Applied Biosafety     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.131, CiteScore: 0)
Applied Psychological Measurement     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21, SJR: 1.17, CiteScore: 1)
Applied Spectroscopy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 27, SJR: 0.489, CiteScore: 2)
Armed Forces & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25, SJR: 0.29, CiteScore: 1)
Arthaniti : J. of Economic Theory and Practice     Full-text available via subscription  
Arts and Humanities in Higher Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 49, SJR: 0.305, CiteScore: 1)
Asia Pacific Media Educator     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.23, CiteScore: 0)
Asia-Pacific J. of Management Research and Innovation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Asia-Pacific J. of Public Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.558, CiteScore: 1)
Asia-Pacific J. of Rural Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Asian and Pacific Migration J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.324, CiteScore: 1)
Asian Cardiovascular and Thoracic Annals     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.305, CiteScore: 0)
Asian J. of Comparative Politics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Asian J. of Legal Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Asian J. of Management Cases     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.101, CiteScore: 0)
ASN Neuro     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 1.534, CiteScore: 3)
Assessment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19, SJR: 1.519, CiteScore: 3)
Assessment for Effective Intervention     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.578, CiteScore: 1)
Australasian J. of Early Childhood     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.535, CiteScore: 1)
Australasian Psychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18, SJR: 0.433, CiteScore: 1)
Australian & New Zealand J. of Psychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30, SJR: 1.801, CiteScore: 2)
Australian and New Zealand J. of Criminology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 545, SJR: 0.612, CiteScore: 1)
Australian J. of Career Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Australian J. of Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 51, SJR: 0.403, CiteScore: 1)
Australian J. of Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.497, CiteScore: 1)
Autism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 356, SJR: 1.739, CiteScore: 4)
Autism & Developmental Language Impairments     Open Access   (Followers: 17)
Avian Biology Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.401, CiteScore: 1)
Behavior Modification     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.877, CiteScore: 2)
Behavioral and Cognitive Neuroscience Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Behavioral Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Beyond Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Bible Translator     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Biblical Theology Bulletin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24, SJR: 0.184, CiteScore: 0)
Big Data & Society     Open Access   (Followers: 55)
Biochemistry Insights     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Bioinformatics and Biology Insights     Open Access   (Followers: 12, SJR: 1.141, CiteScore: 2)
Biological Research for Nursing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.685, CiteScore: 2)
Biomarker Insights     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.81, CiteScore: 2)
Biomarkers in Cancer     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Biomedical Engineering and Computational Biology     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
Biomedical Informatics Insights     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Bioscope: South Asian Screen Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.235, CiteScore: 0)
BMS: Bulletin of Sociological Methodology/Bulletin de Méthodologie Sociologique     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.226, CiteScore: 0)
Body & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29, SJR: 1.531, CiteScore: 3)
Bone and Tissue Regeneration Insights     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Brain and Neuroscience Advances     Open Access  
Brain Science Advances     Open Access  
Breast Cancer : Basic and Clinical Research     Open Access   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.823, CiteScore: 2)
British J. of Music Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
British J. of Occupational Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 253, SJR: 0.323, CiteScore: 1)
British J. of Pain     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31, SJR: 0.579, CiteScore: 2)
British J. of Politics and Intl. Relations     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39, SJR: 0.91, CiteScore: 2)
British J. of Visual Impairment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.337, CiteScore: 1)
British J.ism Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
BRQ Business Review Quarterly     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Building Acoustics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.215, CiteScore: 1)
Building Services Engineering Research & Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.583, CiteScore: 1)
Bulletin of Science, Technology & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Business & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Business and Professional Communication Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.348, CiteScore: 1)
Business Information Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17, SJR: 0.279, CiteScore: 0)
Business Perspectives and Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Cahiers Élisabéthains     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.111, CiteScore: 0)
Calcutta Statistical Association Bulletin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
California Management Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 37, SJR: 2.209, CiteScore: 4)
Canadian Association of Radiologists J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.463, CiteScore: 1)
Canadian J. of Kidney Health and Disease     Open Access   (Followers: 8, SJR: 1.007, CiteScore: 2)
Canadian J. of Nursing Research (CJNR)     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Canadian J. of Occupational Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 167, SJR: 0.626, CiteScore: 1)
Canadian J. of Psychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28, SJR: 1.769, CiteScore: 3)
Canadian J. of School Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.266, CiteScore: 1)
Canadian Pharmacists J. / Revue des Pharmaciens du Canada     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.536, CiteScore: 1)
Cancer Control     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Cancer Growth and Metastasis     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Cancer Informatics     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.64, CiteScore: 1)
Capital and Class     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.282, CiteScore: 1)
Cardiac Cath Lab Director     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Cardiovascular and Thoracic Open     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Career Development and Transition for Exceptional Individuals     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.44, CiteScore: 1)
Cartilage     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.889, CiteScore: 3)
Cell Transplantation     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 1.023, CiteScore: 3)
Cephalalgia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 1.581, CiteScore: 3)
Cephalalgia Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Child Language Teaching and Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34, SJR: 0.501, CiteScore: 1)
Child Maltreatment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 1.22, CiteScore: 3)
Child Neurology Open     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Childhood     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19, SJR: 0.894, CiteScore: 2)
Childhood Obesity and Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
China Information     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.767, CiteScore: 2)
China Report     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.221, CiteScore: 0)
Chinese J. of Sociology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Christian Education J. : Research on Educational Ministry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Chronic Illness     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.672, CiteScore: 2)
Chronic Respiratory Disease     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.808, CiteScore: 2)
Chronic Stress     Open Access  
Citizenship, Social and Economics Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.145, CiteScore: 0)
Cleft Palate-Craniofacial J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.757, CiteScore: 1)
Clin-Alert     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Clinical and Applied Thrombosis/Hemostasis     Open Access   (Followers: 32, SJR: 0.49, CiteScore: 1)
Clinical and Translational Neuroscience     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Clinical Case Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.364, CiteScore: 1)
Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 45, SJR: 0.73, CiteScore: 2)
Clinical EEG and Neuroscience     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.552, CiteScore: 2)
Clinical Ethics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.296, CiteScore: 1)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Arthritis and Musculoskeletal Disorders     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.537, CiteScore: 2)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Blood Disorders     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.314, CiteScore: 2)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Cardiology     Open Access   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.686, CiteScore: 2)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Case Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.283, CiteScore: 1)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Circulatory, Respiratory and Pulmonary Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.425, CiteScore: 2)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Ear, Nose and Throat     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Endocrinology and Diabetes     Open Access   (Followers: 33, SJR: 0.63, CiteScore: 2)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Oncology     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 1.129, CiteScore: 3)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Pediatrics     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Psychiatry     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Reproductive Health     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.776, CiteScore: 0)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Therapeutics     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.172, CiteScore: 0)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Trauma and Intensive Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Clinical Medicine Insights : Women's Health     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Clinical Nursing Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34, SJR: 0.471, CiteScore: 1)
Clinical Pathology     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Clinical Pediatrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25, SJR: 0.487, CiteScore: 1)
Clinical Psychological Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16, SJR: 3.281, CiteScore: 5)
Clinical Rehabilitation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 78, SJR: 1.322, CiteScore: 3)
Clinical Risk     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.133, CiteScore: 0)
Clinical Trials     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22, SJR: 2.399, CiteScore: 2)
Clothing and Textiles Research J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28, SJR: 0.36, CiteScore: 1)
Collections : A J. for Museum and Archives Professionals     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Common Law World Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Communication & Sport     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.385, CiteScore: 1)
Communication and the Public     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Communication Disorders Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.458, CiteScore: 1)
Communication Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24, SJR: 2.171, CiteScore: 3)
Community College Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 1.451, CiteScore: 1)
Comparative Political Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 292, SJR: 3.772, CiteScore: 3)
Compensation & Benefits Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Competition & Change     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.843, CiteScore: 2)

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Similar Journals
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Australasian Psychiatry
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.433
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 18  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1039-8562 - ISSN (Online) 1440-1665
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1166 journals]
  • Dig deep psychiatry, it takes a village

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: John Kasinathan
      Pages: 381 - 382
      Abstract: Australasian Psychiatry, Volume 29, Issue 4, Page 381-382, August 2021.

      Citation: Australasian Psychiatry
      PubDate: 2021-08-11T02:25:13Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10398562211029480
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. 4 (2021)
       
  • The Thought Broadcast 2: Start Early

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      Authors: Oliver Robertson
      Pages: 382 - 383
      Abstract: Australasian Psychiatry, Volume 29, Issue 4, Page 382-383, August 2021.

      Citation: Australasian Psychiatry
      PubDate: 2021-08-11T02:27:28Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10398562211029480a
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. 4 (2021)
       
  • Should we be Royal'

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      Authors: Warren Kealy-Bateman, Louise Nash, Robyn Shields, Calina Ouliaris, Patrick McGorry
      Pages: 402 - 405
      Abstract: Australasian Psychiatry, Volume 29, Issue 4, Page 402-405, August 2021.
      Objective:Our college name The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists (RANZCP) and Crest (Coat of Arms) are echoes of our colonial past, which create a barrier to an inclusive 21st-century Australasian psychiatry. Two hundred and fifty years after European settlement, this article reviews the colonial legacy, the evolution of the college and the process by which the prefix ‘Royal’ came to be attached. This is now an anachronism that symbolically undermines our mission to create a fully inclusive psychiatry for all Australians and New Zealanders, from indigenous people across the spectrum of cultures drawn from recent migrations within our complex multicultural society.Conclusion:As psychiatrists, it is time to modernise and reinvent the college name and Crest. We will be a healthier and more inclusive community of practice without the ‘Royal’ prefix, and with a new symbol for our college that embodies our values and vision.
      Citation: Australasian Psychiatry
      PubDate: 2021-02-25T12:12:15Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1039856221992648
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. 4 (2021)
       
  • Psychiatry in Nazi Germany: an ethical analysis and relevance to
           psychiatry today

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      Authors: Robert Donald Gillies, Izaak Lim
      Pages: 406 - 408
      Abstract: Australasian Psychiatry, Volume 29, Issue 4, Page 406-408, August 2021.
      Objective:To investigate the war crimes committed by psychiatrists during the German Nazi regime in the twentieth century and better understand the moral arguments used to justify them.Method:This article provides a historical review of the crimes committed by psychiatrists in Nazi Germany and ethical analysis from the perspectives of consequentialism and deontology.Results:Nazi psychiatrists oversaw the death of more than 200,000 people with mental illnesses and inflicted harm on many more. Consequentialist reasoning may have been used to justify these atrocities. Deontological reasoning proved impervious to exploitation by the Nazi regime, but without codification it was too easily abandoned and thus failed to protect patients.Conclusions:A duty-based code of ethics that enshrines universal respect for the humanity, dignity and autonomy of all persons, and condemns the misuse of professional knowledge and skills, may be a safeguard against the future political abuse of psychiatry.
      Citation: Australasian Psychiatry
      PubDate: 2021-02-25T12:12:19Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1039856221992639
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. 4 (2021)
       
  • Psychiatry, psychotherapy and the criminalisation of ‘conversion
           therapy’ in Australia

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      Authors: Patrick Parkinson AM, Philip Morris AM
      Pages: 409 - 411
      Abstract: Australasian Psychiatry, Volume 29, Issue 4, Page 409-411, August 2021.
      Objective:To examine laws in three Australian jurisdictions that prohibit therapy to change or suppress a person’s sexual orientation or gender identity.Conclusions:The laws in Victoria and the ACT provide inadequate protection for clinically appropriate psychiatric practice and may deprive patients of mental health care.
      Citation: Australasian Psychiatry
      PubDate: 2021-08-11T02:23:47Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10398562211014220
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. 4 (2021)
       
  • Keeping COVID out: a collaborative approach to COVID-19 is associated with
           a significant reduction in self-harm in young people in custody

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      Authors: John Kasinathan, Leigh Haysom, Helen Andriotis, Mike Wheaton, Trisha Lloyd, Rohan Langstaff, Renee McClelland, Nick Whiting, Steven Southgate, Michael Vita, Colette McGrath, Marlene Palmai, Christine Armstrong, Connie O’Donovan, Marcus Oyan, Jenny Woodward, Cindy Wilson
      Pages: 412 - 416
      Abstract: Australasian Psychiatry, Volume 29, Issue 4, Page 412-416, August 2021.
      Objective:To describe the collaboration between Youth Justice New South Wales (YJNSW) and Justice Health and Forensic Mental Health Network (JHFMHN) during the early COVID-19 Response (CR) across the six Youth Justice centres in NSW, and the reduced incidence of self-harm noted over this period.Methods:Narrative article with analysis of self-harm incident data during the initial CR period of March to May 2020, compared to the same period in 2019.Results:During the initial CR period (March to May 2020), there was a highly significant, four-fold reduction in self-harming incidents recorded by both YJNSW and JHFMHN compared with the equivalent time period in 2019 (p < .00001).Conclusion:The greater than four-fold reduction in self-harm by young people during the early CR may relate to the ‘interagency response’, with an increase in positive interactions between staff, and between staff and young people. The reduction in self-harm and improvements in mental health will be further explored through standardised interviews with the young people and staff.
      Citation: Australasian Psychiatry
      PubDate: 2021-04-13T10:08:05Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10398562211006125
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. 4 (2021)
       
  • Impact of Covid-19 on the mental health needs of asylum seekers in
           Australia

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      Authors: Sarah Mares, Kym Jenkins, Susan Lutton, Louise Newman AM
      Pages: 417 - 419
      Abstract: Australasian Psychiatry, Volume 29, Issue 4, Page 417-419, August 2021.
      Objective:This paper highlights the significant mental health vulnerabilities of people who have sought asylum in Australia and their additional adversities as a result of the Covid-19 pandemic.Conclusions:Australia’s policies in relation to asylum seekers result in multiple human rights violations and add significantly to mental health vulnerabilities. Despite a majority being identified as refugees, people spend years in personal and administrative limbo and are denied resettlement in Australia. Social isolation and other restrictions associated with Covid-19 and recent reductions in welfare and housing support compound their difficulties. The clinical challenges in working with people impacted by these circumstances and the role of psychiatrists and the RANZCP in advocacy are identified.
      Citation: Australasian Psychiatry
      PubDate: 2021-04-05T12:00:21Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10398562211005445
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. 4 (2021)
       
  • School teachers: the forgotten frontline workers of Covid-19

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      Authors: Joanne R Beames, Helen Christensen, Aliza Werner-Seidler
      Pages: 420 - 422
      Abstract: Australasian Psychiatry, Volume 29, Issue 4, Page 420-422, August 2021.
      Objective:Australian school teachers have been affected by the Covid-19 pandemic. Teachers have had to face relentless and challenging working conditions, take on new roles and responsibilities, and embrace new ways of working. We searched reports and the available research literature on teacher mental health between September 2020 and October 2020. In our perspective piece, we summarise this literature and draw attention to the struggles of Australian school teachers and how Covid-19 has impacted their mental health.Conclusions:To date, there has been a lack of research focusing on teacher mental health both internationally and in Australia. That which is available indicates that teacher mental health is likely to have deteriorated substantially during the pandemic. We position teachers as the forgotten frontline of Covid-19 and make recommendations to facilitate improvements into the future.
      Citation: Australasian Psychiatry
      PubDate: 2021-04-13T10:08:03Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10398562211006145
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. 4 (2021)
       
  • Greatly increased Victorian outpatient private psychiatric care during the
           COVID-19 pandemic: new MBS-telehealth-item and face-to-face psychiatrist
           office-based services from April–September 2020

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      Authors: Jeffrey C L Looi, Stephen Allison, Stephen R Kisely, William Pring, Rebecca E Reay, Tarun Bastiampillai
      Pages: 423 - 429
      Abstract: Australasian Psychiatry, Volume 29, Issue 4, Page 423-429, August 2021.
      Objective:The Australian Federal government introduced new COVID-19-Psychiatrist-Medicare-Benefits-Schedule (MBS) telehealth-items to assist with providing private specialist care. We investigate private psychiatrists’ uptake of telehealth, and face-to-face consultations for April–September 2020 for the state of Victoria, which experienced two consecutive waves of COVID-19. We compare these to the same 6 months in 2019.Method:MBS-item-consultation data were extracted for video, telephone and face-to-face consultations with a psychiatrist for April–September 2020 and compared to face-to-face consultations in the same period of 2019 Victoria-wide, and for all of Australia.Results:Total Victorian psychiatry consultations (telehealth and face-to-face) rose by 19% in April–September 2020 compared to 2019, with telehealth comprising 73% of this total. Victoria’s increase in total psychiatry consultations was 5% higher than the all-Australian increase. Face-to-face consultations in April–September 2020 were only 46% of the comparative 2019 consultations. Consultations of less than 15 min duration (87% telephone and 13% video) tripled in April–September 2020, compared to the same period last year. Video consultations comprised 41% of total telehealth provision: these were used mainly for new patient assessments and longer consultations.Conclusions:During the pandemic, Victorian private psychiatrists used COVID-19-MBS-telehealth-items to substantially increase the number of total patient care consultations for 2020 compared to 2019.
      Citation: Australasian Psychiatry
      PubDate: 2021-04-13T10:08:06Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10398562211006133
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. 4 (2021)
       
  • The Mind-Body Well-being Initiative: a better lifestyle for people with
           severe mental illness

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      Authors: Nikela A Lalley, Sam H Manger, Felice Jacka, Tetyana Rocks, Anu Ruusunen, Linda Barron
      Pages: 434 - 438
      Abstract: Australasian Psychiatry, Volume 29, Issue 4, Page 434-438, August 2021.
      Objective:This article aims to describe ‘The Mind-Body Well-being Initiative’, a residential mental health treatment model based on the Lifestyle Medicine paradigm, which comprises a mind and body well-being programme. In people with severe mental illness (SMI), particularly for those experiencing psychotic illness, the physical health and mortality gap is significant with greater presence of chronic disease and a 15–20-year life expectancy gap.Conclusions:Our AIM Self-Capacity model of care attempts to address the physical and mental health care needs for the promotion of our patients’ recovery.
      Citation: Australasian Psychiatry
      PubDate: 2021-01-21T06:46:43Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1039856220978864
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. 4 (2021)
       
  • The role of music therapy in Australian mental health services and the
           need for increased access to service users

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      Authors: Jennifer Bibb
      Pages: 439 - 441
      Abstract: Australasian Psychiatry, Volume 29, Issue 4, Page 439-441, August 2021.
      Objectives:This opinion paper aims to provide an overview of the current evidence base supporting the use of music therapy in mental health care. It also aims to offer critique on the issue of access to music therapy in Australia.Conclusions:There is a strong evidence base for music therapy to provide symptomatic relief and improve quality of life for people living with mental illness. However, music therapy is underfunded and framed as a supplementary service within mental health services in Australia, which limits its access to consumers. Funding music therapy as an evidence-based treatment option would fill an existing service gap and provide equitable access to a cost-effective and often consumer preferred treatment option for mental health consumers.
      Citation: Australasian Psychiatry
      PubDate: 2021-01-05T05:42:26Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1039856220980255
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. 4 (2021)
       
  • Private psychiatry in Australia: reflections on career opportunities,
           benefits, and challenges

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      Authors: Jeffrey CL Looi, Michelle Atchison, William Pring
      Pages: 442 - 445
      Abstract: Australasian Psychiatry, Volume 29, Issue 4, Page 442-445, August 2021.
      Objective:To provide reflection on career opportunities, benefits and challenges, with regard to commencing private practice psychiatry in Australia.Conclusions:There are varied opportunities for a career in private practice psychiatry. Private practice has benefits and challenges, distinct from public sector psychiatry; with moderately greater professional autonomy, facilitating the provision of expert mental healthcare for the community.
      Citation: Australasian Psychiatry
      PubDate: 2021-01-12T07:50:27Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1039856220978856
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. 4 (2021)
       
  • Enhancing the contribution of clinical psychology: an under-utilised
           workforce in public mental health services

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      Authors: Henry Jackson, Caroline Hunt, Carol Hulbert
      Pages: 446 - 449
      Abstract: Australasian Psychiatry, Volume 29, Issue 4, Page 446-449, August 2021.
      Objective:Clinical psychologists are practitioners with expertise in mental health, who apply advanced psychological theory and knowledge to their practice in order to assess and treat complex psychological disorders. Given their robust specialised mental health training, clinical psychology is an integral component of the Australian mental health workforce, but is under-utilised. Recent reviews have identified significant problems with Australia’s mental health system, including unequal access to clinical psychology services and fragmentation of service delivery, including convoluted pathways to care.Conclusions:Clinical psychology is well placed to contribute meaningfully to public mental health services (PMHS). We describe what clinical psychologists currently contribute to team-based care in PMHS, how we could further contribute and the barriers to making more extensive contributions. We identify significant historical and organisational factors that have limited the contribution made by clinical psychologists and provide suggestions for cultural change to PMHS.
      Citation: Australasian Psychiatry
      PubDate: 2021-02-25T12:12:13Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1039856221992649
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. 4 (2021)
       
  • Intersex adolescents seeking help for their depression: the case study of
           SPARX in New Zealand

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      Authors: Mathijs F G Lucassen, Yael Perry, Christopher Frampton, Theresa Fleming, Sally N Merry, Matthew Shepherd, Karolina Stasiak
      Pages: 450 - 453
      Abstract: Australasian Psychiatry, Volume 29, Issue 4, Page 450-453, August 2021.
      Objective:SPARX is a computerized cognitive behavioral therapy self-help program for adolescent depression that is freely available in New Zealand. At registration, users identify themselves as either male, female, intersex, or transgender. We aimed to describe the mental health of adolescent intersex users.Method:A secondary analysis of SPARX usage data over 5 years.Results:Of the 8922 adolescents users, 0.6% (n = 50) identified as intersex. Based on Patient Health Questionnaire 9 – modified for Adolescents (PHQ-A) results, 78.3% of intersex users had high levels of depression and/or self-harm and suicidal ideation. The mean PHQ-A scores for intersex users were significantly higher than for males and females (p < .001). As only three intersex users completed SPARX Level 4 or more (of the seven-level program), we were unable to meaningfully investigate any reductions in their depressive symptoms over time.Conclusions:There is a dearth of empirical data on the mental health of intersex adolescents. These results suggest that intersex adolescents seeking help from an online resource have high mental health needs compared with other young people, possibly because they defer seeking help.
      Citation: Australasian Psychiatry
      PubDate: 2021-02-25T12:12:19Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1039856221992642
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. 4 (2021)
       
  • Illness identity on social media: a qualitative content analysis of #bpd

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      Authors: Alyssa Chan
      Pages: 454 - 458
      Abstract: Australasian Psychiatry, Volume 29, Issue 4, Page 454-458, August 2021.
      Objective:To explore the themes related to self and illness representations in a public online community.Method:This project utilised an inductive process of data analysis with a phenomenological approach. Two hundred images from the social media image-sharing platform Instagram were described, coded and organised into themes.Results:Five themes were identified: the fragmented and obscured self; trepidation and disappointment about the threatening and persecutory world; an existence built of illness and symptoms; finding comfort in the natural and built environment; and sharing hope and positive experiences of growth.Conclusions:#bpd encompassed a variety of content types, with a wide spectrum of emotional tones expressed through photographs, written communication and artwork.
      Citation: Australasian Psychiatry
      PubDate: 2021-01-05T05:42:26Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1039856220981802
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. 4 (2021)
       
  • ABC series demonstrates critical importance of supporting transgender
           adolescents

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      Authors: Blair Schuch, Klaus Martin Beckmann
      Pages: 469 - 469
      Abstract: Australasian Psychiatry, Volume 29, Issue 4, Page 469-469, August 2021.

      Citation: Australasian Psychiatry
      PubDate: 2021-01-21T06:46:42Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1039856220978857
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. 4 (2021)
       
  • ‘Misophonia in pregnancy – a case report’

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      Authors: William Lugg
      Pages: 472 - 473
      Abstract: Australasian Psychiatry, Volume 29, Issue 4, Page 472-473, August 2021.

      Citation: Australasian Psychiatry
      PubDate: 2021-01-12T07:50:30Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1039856220986719
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. 4 (2021)
       
  • Older Australians are the most vulnerable consumers of community mental
           health teams during the COVID-19 pandemic

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      Authors: Roderick McKay, Carmelo Aquilina, Anne Wand
      Pages: 472 - 472
      Abstract: Australasian Psychiatry, Volume 29, Issue 4, Page 472-472, August 2021.

      Citation: Australasian Psychiatry
      PubDate: 2021-01-12T07:50:25Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1039856220984033
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. 4 (2021)
       
  • Reconsidering “Royal” – a natural progression

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      Authors: William Lugg
      Pages: 473 - 474
      Abstract: Australasian Psychiatry, Volume 29, Issue 4, Page 473-474, August 2021.

      Citation: Australasian Psychiatry
      PubDate: 2021-05-20T07:21:24Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10398562211014223
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. 4 (2021)
       
  • From the President

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      Authors: Vinay Lakra
      Pages: 475 - 475
      Abstract: Australasian Psychiatry, Volume 29, Issue 4, Page 475-475, August 2021.

      Citation: Australasian Psychiatry
      PubDate: 2021-08-11T02:31:04Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10398562211031217
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. 4 (2021)
       
  • From the CEO

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      Authors: Andrew C. Peters
      Pages: 476 - 476
      Abstract: Australasian Psychiatry, Volume 29, Issue 4, Page 476-476, August 2021.

      Citation: Australasian Psychiatry
      PubDate: 2021-08-11T02:25:58Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10398562211031217a
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. 4 (2021)
       
  • Obituary: Dr Peter John Morse (1937–2021)

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      Pages: 477 - 477
      Abstract: Australasian Psychiatry, Volume 29, Issue 4, Page 477-477, August 2021.

      Citation: Australasian Psychiatry
      PubDate: 2021-08-11T02:25:34Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10398562211031217b
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. 4 (2021)
       
  • RANZCP Congress 2021: Successful delivery of the PIF Program enhances
           Congress experience for medical students and prevocational doctors

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      Pages: 478 - 478
      Abstract: Australasian Psychiatry, Volume 29, Issue 4, Page 478-478, August 2021.

      Citation: Australasian Psychiatry
      PubDate: 2021-08-11T02:25:13Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10398562211031217c
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. 4 (2021)
       
  • New Fellows

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      Pages: 479 - 479
      Abstract: Australasian Psychiatry, Volume 29, Issue 4, Page 479-479, August 2021.

      Citation: Australasian Psychiatry
      PubDate: 2021-08-11T02:25:13Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10398562211031217d
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. 4 (2021)
       
  • Upcoming RANZCP conferences

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      Pages: 479 - 479
      Abstract: Australasian Psychiatry, Volume 29, Issue 4, Page 479-479, August 2021.

      Citation: Australasian Psychiatry
      PubDate: 2021-08-11T02:24:51Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10398562211031217e
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. 4 (2021)
       
  • Book Review: “Sink or Swim: A Memoir” by Saxby Pridmore

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      Authors: Paul Skerritt
      Abstract: Australasian Psychiatry, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Australasian Psychiatry
      PubDate: 2021-10-13T05:05:42Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10398562211051250
       
  • The development of National Safety and Quality Digital Mental Health
           Standards

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      Authors: Peggy Brown, Ben Prest, Paul Miles, Vanessa Rossi
      Abstract: Australasian Psychiatry, Ahead of Print.
      Objective:Digital mental health services offer innovative ways for individuals to access services but are not without risk. Our objective was to develop National Safety and Quality Digital Mental Health (NSQDMH) Standards that improve the quality of digital mental health service provision and protect service users from harm.Method:The NSQDMH Standards were developed by adapting the National Safety and Quality Health Service (NSQHS) Standards and adding components highlighted through a national consultation process as critical to the safety and quality of services. Further public consultation and pilot testing assisted in refining the NSQDMH Standards.Results:The NSQDMH Standards comprise three standards—Clinical and Technical Governance, Partnering with Consumers, and Model of Care—and were launched in November 2020.Conclusions:The NSQDMH Standards provide a quality assurance mechanism to improve digital mental health care in Australia.
      Citation: Australasian Psychiatry
      PubDate: 2021-09-27T10:11:29Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10398562211042361
       
  • Remote mental health clients prefer face-to-face consultations to
           telehealth during and after the COVID-19 pandemic

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      Authors: Andrew James Amos, Jocelyn Middleton, Fergus W. Gardiner
      Abstract: Australasian Psychiatry, Ahead of Print.
      Objective:To guide the efficient and effective provision of mental health services to clients in Central West and Far North Queensland, we surveyed preferences for face-to-face or in-person contact.Methods:A clinician-designed survey of contact preferences was offered to 248 clients of mental health services in Far North and Central West Queensland in mid-2020. With the onset of COVID-19, the survey was modified to measure the impact of the pandemic.Results:Just over half of the services’ clients participated in the survey (50.4%), of whom more were female (63.2%). Of the participants, 46.3% in Far North and 8.6% in Central West Queensland identified as Indigenous. Strong resistance to telehealth before the pandemic across groups (76%) was moderated during COVID-19 (42.4%), an effect that appeared likely to continue past the pandemic for Central West clients (34.5%). Far North clients indicated their telehealth reluctance would return after the pandemic (77.6%).Conclusions:Our results suggest that remote Australians strongly prefer in-person mental health care to telehealth. Although the COVID-19 pandemic increased acceptance of telehealth across regions while social distancing continued, there was evidence that Indigenous Australians were more likely to prefer in-person contact after the pandemic.
      Citation: Australasian Psychiatry
      PubDate: 2021-09-27T08:09:35Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10398562211043509
       
  • Schwartz rounds – An organizational intervention to overcome burnout
           in hospitals

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      Authors: Dr Christy Hogan, Prof Andrew Teodorczuk, Dr Georgia Hunt, Dr Paul Pun, Dr Jonathan Munro, Dr Tatjana Ewais
      Abstract: Australasian Psychiatry, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Australasian Psychiatry
      PubDate: 2021-09-22T09:43:13Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10398562211038915
       
  • Psychiatrist workforce planning: contexts, considerations and
           recommendations

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      Authors: Jeffrey CL Looi, Tarun Bastiampillai, Stephen Allison
      Abstract: Australasian Psychiatry, Ahead of Print.
      Objective:To provide a clinical update for psychiatrists and trainees on psychiatric workforce-planning in the Australasian context.Conclusions:There is a lack of detailed evidence regarding effective psychiatric workforce planning. Planning may be based on a foundation of psychiatrist-to-population ratios. This would be modified by needs assessment, understanding of service models and existing service demand. Given that it has recently expressed significant concerns about workforce shortages, the RANZCP should lead development of an independent Australasian psychiatric workforce planning model to inform policy advice to governments.
      Citation: Australasian Psychiatry
      PubDate: 2021-09-22T06:07:41Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10398562211042367
       
  • Book review: the Maudsley practice guidelines for physical health
           conditions in psychiatry

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      Authors: Shuichi Suetani
      Abstract: Australasian Psychiatry, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Australasian Psychiatry
      PubDate: 2021-09-12T09:56:31Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10398562211037330
       
  • Adapting evidence-based group therapies following COVID-19 restrictions

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      Authors: Frances Dark, Anne Miles, Kathy Madson, Ellen Strochnetter
      Abstract: Australasian Psychiatry, Ahead of Print.
      Aim:The COVID-19 pandemic has created barriers to the running of group therapies due to the need to maintain social distance. This paper aims to describe modifications of existing therapeutic groups delivered to people diagnosed with serious and enduring mental illnesses (SMIs) to enable the therapies to continue in an online format due to the COVID-19 restrictions.Conclusions:Therapists and consumers were motivated to find a way to continue the therapies described despite the context of the restrictions imposed due to COVID-19. This paper describes what was involved in ‘pivoting’ to a new mode of practice and modifications that were required over time and as new regulations were put in place. Formal research is required to establish an evidence base if these therapies were required to be regularly delivered in an online mode.
      Citation: Australasian Psychiatry
      PubDate: 2021-09-12T09:56:31Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10398562211040461
       
  • Responding to rural adversity: a qualitative study of alcohol and other
           drug service users’ experiences of service response to COVID-19 in
           Western Australia’s Southwest

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      Authors: Mathew Coleman, Michael Taran, Beatriz Cuesta-Briand
      Abstract: Australasian Psychiatry, Ahead of Print.
      ObjectiveThis study reports on the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the lived experiences of people with substance use problems in accessing services in the Southwest region of Western Australia, and its implications for preparedness in a context of rural adversity.MethodThis was a qualitative study informed by the principles of phenomenology. Data were collected through semi-structured interviews and subjected to thematic analysis.ResultsTwenty-two participants were interviewed. Two main themes were identified: disruption to supportive connections; and bridging the connection gap: local service response to the COVID-19 pandemic.ConclusionsThe COVID-19 pandemic restrictions exacerbated social isolation and mental health issues, and disrupted services and treatment in the Southwest. Our results demonstrate that local alcohol and other drug services in rural areas can successfully respond to crises by assertively and flexibly adapting their service provision.
      Citation: Australasian Psychiatry
      PubDate: 2021-09-08T11:58:29Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10398562211036125
       
  • The effectiveness of a short-term DBT skills group in a
           ‘real-world’ clinical setting

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      Authors: Martin Wieczorek, Tamara Kacen, Bradley King, Kay Wilhelm
      Abstract: Australasian Psychiatry, Ahead of Print.
      Objective:This study evaluated the effectiveness of a short-term outpatient DBT (DBT-S) skills group for individuals experiencing pervasive emotion dysregulation (PED).Method:Pre-and post-group outcome data consisted of self-report measures and six-month Mental Health admissions and Emergency Department presentations.Results:Group completers reported significant improvements in psychological distress, depression, borderline symptomatology and functional impairment, increases in ‘skills use’ and decreases in ‘dysfunctional coping’, associated with symptomatic improvement. There were reduced numbers of Mental Health presentations and admissions between six months pre- and post-group.Conclusion:Findings support emerging evidence for DBT-S as an effective, viable treatment for PED.
      Citation: Australasian Psychiatry
      PubDate: 2021-09-07T03:44:27Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10398562211038907
       
  • Stocktake of Australasian Psychiatry’s training resources

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      Authors: Michael Weightman, Tuan Anh Bui, Oliver D’Arcy Robertson
      Abstract: Australasian Psychiatry, Ahead of Print.
      Objective:To identify all past publications from Australasian Psychiatry with subject matter particularly relevant for trainees. The results of such a search could then be collated into an easily accessible resource available to trainees and their supervisors.Method:An electronic search of the journal’s back catalogue was conducted.Results:Eighty-seven articles published on subjects particularly relevant for trainees were discovered from within Australasian Psychiatry. In particular, multiple useful resources were identified on the topics of the scholarly project and formulation skills.Conclusions:Australasian Psychiatry has published a wealth of literature that is likely to be of significant benefit for trainees as they work their way through the Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists training programme.
      Citation: Australasian Psychiatry
      PubDate: 2021-09-07T03:44:23Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10398562211037335
       
  • Working towards success in the Royal Australian and New Zealand College of
           Psychiatrists Modified Essay Question Exam

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      Authors: Stephen Parker, Karen Freier, Erin Gallagher, Jimsie Cutbush, Shuichi Suetani
      Abstract: Australasian Psychiatry, Ahead of Print.
      Objective:To describe an approach to support Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists (RANZCP) trainees achieve success in the Modified Essay Question (MEQ) examination.Method:Synthesis of the opinion of the authorship encompassing a range of relevant stakeholders, supported by a qualitative content analysis of published examination feedback from the RANZCP Committee for Examinations.Results:In approaching the MEQs, candidates are encouraged to (1) read the scenario and questions carefully, (2) answer questions broadly and with justification, (3) manage time effectively, (4) undertake deliberate practice in preparation, and (5) ‘check your own pulse’ (i.e. limit the detrimental impact of anxiety on performance).Conclusion:Preparing for the MEQ examination through deliberate practice will help candidates become competent psychiatrists. The ability to critically think in clinical practice, a key focus of this assessment, is an essential skill all psychiatrists need to develop and maintain.
      Citation: Australasian Psychiatry
      PubDate: 2021-09-07T03:44:21Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10398562211036120
       
  • Visual hallucinations in psychiatry – what aren’t we
           seeing'

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      Authors: Jeremiah Ayalde, Deborah Wearne, Sean Hood, Flavie Waters
      Abstract: Australasian Psychiatry, Ahead of Print.
      Objective:To increase awareness of practising clinicians and researchers to the phenomenological distinctions between visual hallucinations and trauma-based, dissociative, visual re-experiencing phenomena seen in psychiatric disease.Conclusions:The experience of visual hallucinations is not exclusive to psychotic disorders in psychiatry. Different forms of experiences that resemble visual hallucinations may occur in patients with a trauma background and may potentially affect diagnosis. Given the paucity of literature around the subject, it is imperative that further research aims to characterise the distinction between visual hallucinations in psychosis and visual phenomena associated with trauma.
      Citation: Australasian Psychiatry
      PubDate: 2021-09-07T03:44:21Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10398562211038909
       
  • The importance of motivational postures to mental health regulators:
           Lessons for Victoria’s mental health system in reducing the use of force
           

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      Authors: Simon Katterl
      Abstract: Australasian Psychiatry, Ahead of Print.
      Objective:To consider whether research into “motivational postures” can assist the Victorian Government and the forthcoming Mental Health and Wellbeing Commission to regulate and implement forthcoming mental health laws.Conclusion:Although no research explicitly uses a motivational postures framework, there is evidence of a diverse set of postures amongst the mental health workforce. Some practitioners and disciplines reflect positive motivational postures towards mental health laws and consumer rights, while others show resistance, and others disengagement altogether. More research explicitly built on motivational postures is required to inform appropriate regulatory responses.
      Citation: Australasian Psychiatry
      PubDate: 2021-09-07T03:44:20Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10398562211038913
       
  • There’s no sugar-coating psychological distress and illness perceptions
           in gestational diabetes mellitus: depression and anxiety are associated
           with negative illness perceptions

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      Authors: Paul A Maguire, Jasmine Cummings, Rebecca E Reay, Christopher Nolan, Jeffrey C L Looi
      Abstract: Australasian Psychiatry, Ahead of Print.
      Objective:To gain an understanding of how women with gestational diabetes perceive their illness, and whether depressive/anxiety symptoms and/or psychological distress influence these illness perceptions.Method:A cross-sectional study was conducted with 159 pregnant women aged 18–44 attending gestational diabetes clinics. Participants completed a questionnaire, which included the Edinburgh Depression Scale (EDS), Kessler 10-item Psychological Distress Scale (K-10), Brief Illness Perception Questionnaire (BIPQ), and psychiatric/general health items. Multiple regression was used to explore the relationship between EDS (total and anxiety subscale) scores and BIPQ scores, as well as between K-10 (total and anxiety subscale) scores and BIPQ scores.Results:Regression analysis revealed a positive association between EDS total/anxiety subscale scores and BIPQ total score, as well as between K-10 total/anxiety subscale scores and BIPQ total score, controlling for potentially confounding variables. There was a strong positive correlation between EDS total score and K-10 total score. The most frequently expressed concern about GDM was an adverse effect on their baby’s health. A poor diet was the most frequently reported perceived ‘cause’ of GDM.Conclusion:Greater severity of depressive and anxiety symptoms, and psychological distress, is associated with more negative illness perceptions of GDM in pregnant women.
      Citation: Australasian Psychiatry
      PubDate: 2021-09-07T03:44:19Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10398562211038910
       
  • The Mark Sheldon Remote Mental Health Team: an evaluation of patient
           demographics, diagnoses and clinical management in very remote Central
           Australia

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      Authors: Louise Brightman, Samantha O’Neill, Phyllis Gorey, David Mitchell, Marcus Tabart
      Abstract: Australasian Psychiatry, Ahead of Print.
      Objective:The Mark Sheldon Remote Mental Health Team provides psychiatric services to 29 communities in very remote Central Australia. This study evaluated Mark Sheldon Remote Mental Health Team patient demographics, diagnoses and clinical management.Methods:A retrospective cross-sectional review was performed for January 2020. Variables included age, sex, Indigenous status, diagnosis, legal status, medication class and route of administration.Results:A total of 180 patients were identified (85.6% Indigenous, 53.3% male). Schizophrenia and delusional disorders were most common (41.1%). A small proportion of patients (2.8%) were involuntary. Psychotropic medication was commonly prescribed (77.4%) with a low threshold for anti-psychotic depot use (51.5%). Oral medication rates varied according to class.Conclusions:This study provided insights into the demographic and clinical profile of a unique population. The findings will help to optimise patient management in very remote Central Australia and serve as a foundation for similar evaluations and comparisons with other remote psychiatric services.
      Citation: Australasian Psychiatry
      PubDate: 2021-09-07T03:44:19Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10398562211038911
       
  • Exploring and reorienting psychiatrists’ attitudes regarding smoking
           cessation and its potential to improve mental health outcomes: a pilot
           study

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      Authors: Brooke Short, Luke Giles, Aspasia Karageorge, Lyndon Bauer
      Abstract: Australasian Psychiatry, Ahead of Print.
      Objective:The aims of this study were to explore the knowledge, attitudes, confidence and practices of Australian psychiatrists and psychiatry registrars with regard to smoking cessation with their patients and to promote clinical practice reflection and re-framing.Methods:A mixed-methods questionnaire was developed. Interviews were conducted via telephone or face-to-face utilising participatory action research principles. Qualitative data were de-identified and analysed following a reflexive thematic approach.Results:The questionnaire was completed with 15 participants. The majority worked in the public health sector and agreed that smoking cessation could be used as a clinical tool across mental health services. However, nearly all of the participants reported being unfamiliar with the latest literature. Only one-third of participants reported having had received formal training in smoking cessation. Overwhelmingly, more training was reported as necessary and welcomed by participants.Conclusion:Our study has identified gaps in psychiatrists’ and psychiatry registrars’ knowledge and confidence regarding the promotion, initiation and oversight of smoking cessation strategies for patients. It’s important that psychiatrists lead the way in re-framing and engaging with this issue, and consider smoking cessation as a tool that can improve mental health outcomes. A review of existing Australian policies, guidelines and training is recommended.
      Citation: Australasian Psychiatry
      PubDate: 2021-09-07T03:44:17Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10398562211037321
       
  • Imposter syndrome in doctors beyond training: a narrative review

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      Authors: Joseph Freeman, Carmelle Peisah
      Abstract: Australasian Psychiatry, Ahead of Print.
      Objective:To undertake a narrative literature review of imposter syndrome (IS) in doctors beyond training.Method:Twelve studies met inclusion criteria from a systematised search of three databases.Results:There is a paucity of literature on IS, although it has been observed across a diverse range of specialties. IS appears to be more common in female doctors but is also seen amongst male doctors. IS impacts career progression, leadership and mental health.Conclusions:IS causes professional and personal detriment. Solutions must include institutional changes to foster safer workplaces and to address systemic barriers to help-seeking and peer support. Systemic interventions are the only solution to the systemic drivers of IS.
      Citation: Australasian Psychiatry
      PubDate: 2021-08-31T08:05:27Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10398562211036121
       
  • Predictors of functioning and clinical outcomes in inpatient with
           schizophrenia on clozapine augmented with antipsychotics

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      Authors: Hindol Mukherjee, Vladimir Sazhin
      Abstract: Australasian Psychiatry, Ahead of Print.
      Objective:We aimed at exploring predictors of improvement in clinical and functional outcomes of patients on clozapine with chronic treatment-resistant schizophrenia admitted into rehabilitation wards.MethodIn a cross-sectional study of 62 patients on clozapine augmented with oral and parenteral antipsychotics, predictors of HoNOS (Health of the Nation Outcome Scales) scores were analysed using ordinal logistic regression.Result:Augmentation with parenteral antipsychotics was associated with lower psychotic symptom scores (OR 0.38 [95%CI 0.15, 0.99]) and activity of daily living scores (OR 0.36 [95%CI, 0.13, 0.96]) compared with oral antipsychotics. Increased age was a predictor of behavioural disturbances, physical illness and cognitive problems for all clozapine patients, and female gender was associated with the increase in depression scores.Conclusion:The addition of parental antipsychotics to clozapine in patients with treatment-resistant schizophrenia might have potential benefits for clinical and functional outcomes and needs a further investigation.
      Citation: Australasian Psychiatry
      PubDate: 2021-08-31T06:30:33Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10398562211037339
       
  • Care coordination as a collaborative element of recovery oriented services
           for persons with severe mental illness

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      Authors: Anton N Isaacs
      Abstract: Australasian Psychiatry, Ahead of Print.
      Objective:To propose a model where care coordination can form part of recovery oriented care when it is included as a collaborative element of services for persons with severe mental illness.Conclusion:A recovery-oriented service requires more than clinical interventions. It also needs to address social determinants and be individualised or person centred. Multiple health and community services need to be involved. A care coordination model is capable of addressing multiple needs. It gives the client the first and foremost voice. It facilitates intersectoral collaboration, reduces the burden on clinical mental health services and is supported by mental health and community service personnel.
      Citation: Australasian Psychiatry
      PubDate: 2021-08-31T06:23:45Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10398562211037331
       
  • Burnout: modeling, measuring, and managing

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      Authors: Gordon Parker, Gabriela Tavella
      Abstract: Australasian Psychiatry, Ahead of Print.
      Objective:As burnout has been neglected in medical and psychiatric education, we seek to provide a summary overview.Methods:We extract salient findings from the published literature and offer some challenges.Results:We critique the current principal model of burnout, argue for broadening the symptom constructs and for a diathesis-stress model where a perfectionistic personality style is a key predisposing factor, and observe that burnout is not limited by those in formal work. We argue that burnout is not synonymous with depression, overview biological underpinnings, and summarise a three-fold management model.Conclusion:As many burnout patients are referred to psychiatrists, awareness of its symptom pattern and management nuances is of key importance.
      Citation: Australasian Psychiatry
      PubDate: 2021-08-31T03:52:55Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10398562211037332
       
  • An assessment of psychological distress and professional burnout in mental
           health professionals in Australia during the COVID-19 pandemic

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      Authors: K Northwood, D Siskind, S Suetani, PA McArdle
      Abstract: Australasian Psychiatry, Ahead of Print.
      Objective:To examine psychological distress and professional burnout in a cohort of Australian mental healthcare workers during the COVID-19 pandemicMethods:This study examined a multi-disciplinary cohort of mental healthcare workers in a large metropolitan service in Australia. Demographic information as well as information on employment and individual’s personal experience of the COVID-19 pandemic was collected and correlated with cross-sectional assessments of anxiety, depression and professional burnout using validated clinical questionnairesResults:Mental healthcare workers reported high levels of anxiety, depression, and professional burnout. Participants reported some reduction in anxiety since the early phases of the pandemic, but the reduction was more modest in mental healthcare workers identifying as being “vulnerable” employees.Conclusion:Despite the low numbers of COVID-19 cases, mental healthcare workers in Australia report significant levels of psychological distress and professional burnout during the pandemic.
      Citation: Australasian Psychiatry
      PubDate: 2021-08-25T04:22:44Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10398562211038906
       
  • Understanding perceived social support among women with personality
           disorder clusters

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      Authors: Bianca E Kavanagh, Mohammadreza Mohebbi, Shae E Quirk, Julie A Pasco, Lana J Williams
      Abstract: Australasian Psychiatry, Ahead of Print.
      Objective:This study aimed to understand perceived social support (PSS) among women with personality disorder (PD). We also investigated potential differences in PSS according to PD clusters (clusters A, B, C).Methods:Women (n = 718) from the Geelong Osteoporosis Study completed the Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support (MPSS) and Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Axis II Disorders. Multivariable regression and analyses of covariance were employed, controlling for psychiatric and sociodemographic confounders.Results:After age-adjustment, PD (any) and the PD clusters were negatively associated with PSS across all subscales. Bonferroni-adjusted pairwise comparisons revealed lower: significant other PSS for cluster A; family PSS for cluster C, friend PSS for clusters B and C; and total PSS for clusters B and C.Conclusion:Aspects of PSS were predominantly lower among women with cluster B and C PDs.
      Citation: Australasian Psychiatry
      PubDate: 2021-08-25T04:22:43Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10398562211029948
       
  • Emergency department visits for psychiatric care during the first lockdown
           in Melbourne

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      Authors: Karuppiah Jagadheesan, Vijay Danivas, Annie Itrat, Vinay Lakra
      Abstract: Australasian Psychiatry, Ahead of Print.
      Objective:We investigated the nature of patients presenting to an emergency department (ED) during the first lockdown in Melbourne.Method:This study compared adult patients in the North West Area Mental Health Service catchment area who presented to the local ED during the lockdown (16 March–12 May 2020) and the control (16 March–12 May 2019) periods.Results:The control and lockdown periods included 321 and 332 patients, respectively. Compared to the control period, patients with non-English speaking backgrounds and presenting complaints of suicidal behaviour were lower, whereas patients with anxiety symptoms and needing compulsory assessments were higher in the lockdown period. Diagnostically, the lockdown period included more patients with anxiety disorders, substance use disorders and psychotic disorders.Conclusions:ED access for acute psychiatric care can vary depending upon certain patient characteristics during lockdowns.
      Citation: Australasian Psychiatry
      PubDate: 2021-08-25T04:22:43Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10398562211037329
       
  • Book Review: Emotional Female

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      Authors: Neelya Agalawatta
      Abstract: Australasian Psychiatry, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Australasian Psychiatry
      PubDate: 2021-08-15T09:23:46Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10398562211025031
       
  • Dig deep psychiatry, it takes a village

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      Authors: John Kasinathan
      Abstract: Australasian Psychiatry, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Australasian Psychiatry
      PubDate: 2021-08-09T11:58:49Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10398562211032276
       
  • Suicide risk classifications do not identify those at risk: where to from
           here'

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      Authors: Kathryn Turner, Nicolas JC Stapelberg, Jerneja Sveticic, Anthony R Pisani
      Abstract: Australasian Psychiatry, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Australasian Psychiatry
      PubDate: 2021-08-02T11:51:31Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10398562211032233
       
  • Lack of insight and lack of decision-making capacity are not the same as
           anosognosia

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      Authors: Heba Mohamed, Robert Bertram, Dieneke Hubbeling
      Abstract: Australasian Psychiatry, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Australasian Psychiatry
      PubDate: 2021-08-02T11:51:30Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10398562211032237
       
  • What do people believe caused their mental illness'

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      Authors: Paul A. Maguire, Rebecca E. Reay, Jeffrey C.L. Looi
      Abstract: Australasian Psychiatry, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Australasian Psychiatry
      PubDate: 2021-07-29T03:29:08Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10398562211032228
       
  • Engagement of mental health service users and carers in care planning –
           Is it meaningful and adding value'

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      Authors: Russ Scott, Andrew Aboud
      Abstract: Australasian Psychiatry, Ahead of Print.
      Objective:Consider whether mental health service users and carers meaningfully engage in care planning and whether care planning adds value to patient care.Conclusion:A review of the meta-analyses and systematic reviews of service users and carers identified many barriers to their meaningful engagement in care planning. No research has demonstrated any measurable benefits or positive outcomes linked to mental health care planning.
      Citation: Australasian Psychiatry
      PubDate: 2021-07-16T04:04:49Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10398562211028646
       
  • Factors associated with increased suicidality risk following referral for
           isotretinoin commencement

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      Authors: Andreas S Lappas, Lori Edwards Suarez, Vassiliki Tzanetakou, Sally Morton, Chris Schofield, Nikos G Christodoulou
      Abstract: Australasian Psychiatry, Ahead of Print.
      Objective:To establish whether there is a significant change in suicidality risk following psychiatric assessment for commencement of isotretinoin and identify factors that underpin any potential risk change.Method:Retrospective cohort study. Suicidality risk was defined as a combination of the following: (i) actual/intended self-harm and/or attempted/completed suicide, and (ii) increased service utilisation associated with suicidal ideation/behaviour. All patients referred to Psychiatry for assessment prior to commencement of isotretinoin between 2014 and 2019 were examined. Inclusion criteria: >16 years of age, assessed for commencement of isotretinoin, complete clinical records. Data were collected by reviewing the Electronic Patient Records. Fifty-seven patients were eligible. We employed descriptive statistics, parametric/non-parametric/normality tests and logistic regression analysis, using socio-demographic and clinical characteristics as independent parameters, and suicidality risk as the dependent parameter.Results:Actual/intended self-harm/attempted suicide decreased significantly following assessment without significant change in service utilisation. Female gender, absence of protective factors and assessment by Consultation-Liaison Psychiatry were linked to increased suicidality risk, after controlling for age, ethnicity, recommendation for isotretinoin, and substance misuse.Conclusions:Psychiatric assessment is helpful before commencing isotretinoin. Female gender, and absence of ongoing psychopharmacological and/or psychological intervention and/or regular psychiatric follow-up predict increased suicidality risk among patients assessed for prescription of isotretinoin.
      Citation: Australasian Psychiatry
      PubDate: 2021-07-16T04:04:49Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10398562211029955
       
  • Is trauma informed care possible in the current public mental health
           system'

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      Authors: Dr Sophie Isobel
      Abstract: Australasian Psychiatry, Ahead of Print.
      Objectives:As mental health services move towards implementing ‘Trauma-informed care’, there is a need to consider the challenges posed within services and systems. This paper raises some of the challenges associated with integrating TIC into the current public mental health system. .Conclusion:The lack of clarity about expectations of trauma-informed approaches causes difficulties for its integration into services, but the wider political context of mental health services is also of relevance. Transparent and ongoing debate is required about approaches to mental health care, to ensure the system meets the needs of those who require it, while questioning what other purposes it may be serving at social and political levels.
      Citation: Australasian Psychiatry
      PubDate: 2021-07-16T04:04:48Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10398562211028625
       
  • Patient characteristics predicting attendance for elective in-patient
           treatment of substance use disorder

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      Authors: Bridin Murnion, Anupreet Dhaliwal, Julian Alsop
      Abstract: Australasian Psychiatry, Ahead of Print.
      Objective:Consumption of alcohol and other drugs constitutes a significant health burden. Treatment access is poor, and a number of barriers are recognised. The objective of this retrospective cohort study is to examine patient characteristics of those attending/not attending for elective in-patient withdrawal management (IWM).Methods:Records of all elective admissions for IWM between 1 March and 30 June 2019 were reviewed. Data were extracted on attendance, age, substance(s) used, pre-arranged rehabilitation admissions following discharge, wait time, legal issues and child welfare agency involvement.Results:Of 274 planned admissions, 193 (70%) attended. Attendance was predicted by residential treatment planned after withdrawal management and older age. People using amphetamines were less likely to attend.Conclusion:There are low attendance rates for elective IWM. Patient characteristics predicting lower attendance include younger age, amphetamine use and not planning rehabilitation. Further research is required to improve attendance.
      Citation: Australasian Psychiatry
      PubDate: 2021-07-16T04:04:47Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10398562211025034
       
  • Book Review: Burnout: a guide to identifying burnout and pathways to
           recovery

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      Authors: Jeffrey C.L. Looi
      Abstract: Australasian Psychiatry, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Australasian Psychiatry
      PubDate: 2021-07-16T04:04:47Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10398562211028640
       
  • ‘See one, do one, teach one’: the imperative for leadership and
           management training in Australian University Medical Curricular

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      Authors: Jacqueline Evans, Samuel Tipping Smith, Robert Donald Gillies
      Abstract: Australasian Psychiatry, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Australasian Psychiatry
      PubDate: 2021-07-16T04:04:47Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10398562211029949
       
  • Ascertaining an efficient eligibility cut-off for extended Medicare items
           for eating disorders

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      Authors: Tracey Wade, Jamie-Lee Pennesi, Yuan Zhou
      Abstract: Australasian Psychiatry, Ahead of Print.
      Objective:Currently eligibility for expanded Medicare items for eating disorders (excluding anorexia nervosa) require a score ⩾ 3 on the 22-item Eating Disorder Examination-Questionnaire (EDE-Q). We compared these EDE-Q “cases” with continuous scores on a validated 7-item version of the EDE-Q (EDE-Q7) to identify an EDE-Q7 cut-off commensurate to 3 on the EDE-Q.Methods:We utilised EDE-Q scores of female university students (N = 337) at risk of developing an eating disorder. We used a receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve to assess the relationship between the true-positive rate (sensitivity) and the false-positive rate (1-specificity) of cases ⩾ 3.Results:The area under the curve showed outstanding discrimination of 0.94 (95% CI: .92–.97). We examined two specific cut-off points on the EDE-Q7, which included 100% and 87% of true cases, respectively.Conclusion:Given the EDE-Q cut-off for Medicare is used in conjunction with other criteria, we suggest using the more permissive EDE-Q7 cut-off (⩾2.5) to replace use of the EDE-Q cut-off (⩾3) in eligibility assessments.
      Citation: Australasian Psychiatry
      PubDate: 2021-07-16T04:04:46Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10398562211028632
       
  • Reply to Allison et al.: All-age eating disorder services

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      Authors: Janet Treasure, Ulrike Schmidt
      Abstract: Australasian Psychiatry, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Australasian Psychiatry
      PubDate: 2021-07-16T04:04:46Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10398562211028650
       
  • Predictors of healthcare use in community women with eating disorder
           symptoms: a longitudinal study

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      Authors: Nicol Holtzhausen, Phillipa Hay, Nasim Foroughi, Haider Mannan
      Abstract: Australasian Psychiatry, Ahead of Print.
      ObjectivesThis study aimed to investigate associations between eating disorder mental health literacy (EDMHL), defense style, eating disorder (ED) symptom severity, psychological distress and mental-health-related quality of life (MHRQoL) and the likelihood of formal and informal healthcare use (HCU) across multiple time points.MethodsA community sample of 445 young women with ED symptoms were followed over 7 years. Questionnaires were distributed via email and postal mail across multiple time points; this study includes data from years 2 (baseline in this study), 4 and 9. The inclusion criteria was provision of HCU data at year 2.ResultsED symptom severity at baseline was significantly associated with greater HCU two and seven years later. Accurate identification of an ED by participants (i.e. EDMHL) at baseline was associated with greater HCU seven years later. Defense style, psychological distress, MHRQoL and other aspects of EDMHL were not significantly associated with HCU over time.ConclusionsIndividuals with more severe ED symptoms, and with greater EDMHL, may be more likely to seek help over time. However, individuals with EDs may not seek help directly for poorer MHRQoL and higher levels of psychological distress. This reinforces the importance of ED screening, particularly in primary care settings.
      Citation: Australasian Psychiatry
      PubDate: 2021-07-15T12:27:11Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10398562211009264
       
  • Examining long-acting injectable antipsychotic (depot) medication in the
           elderly: a 5-year retrospective cross-sectional study evaluating depot use
           in an Australian psychogeriatric service

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      Authors: Urvasi Doolabh, Sherlyn Yeap
      Abstract: Australasian Psychiatry, Ahead of Print.
      Objective:The primary aim was to examine the use of long-acting injectable (LAI) antipsychotic (depot) medication in a cohort of older patients in a community psychogeriatric service.Method:From 2014 to 2018, all patients who were on LAIs each year were analysed for various characteristics including their profile, type of LAI used, dose and relapse rates related to switching, ceasing and community treatment order (CTO) use.Results:A total of 880 patients were managed by the service with 142 recorded cases of LAI use in total over the 5 years (16.1%). Second-generation antipsychotics (SGAs) outnumbered first-generation antipsychotics (FGAs) by 2:1, with a trend of increasing use of SGA LAIs. The most commonly used LAI was Paliperidone monthly injection (PP1M) (50.7%). Lower than usual adult chlorpromazine equivalent daily doses of LAIs were used. The relapse rate while on a LAI was 13.4%. Moreover, 54.9% of the patients on LAIs were on a CTO. Relapse rates were lower on LAIs in combination with a CTO (7.7%).Conclusions:LAIs, especially the SGAs, are increasingly used in our service. In combination with a CTO, LAIs are an effective treatment in reducing relapse rates in the elderly.
      Citation: Australasian Psychiatry
      PubDate: 2021-07-12T04:12:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10398562211029951
       
  • Difficulties recruiting voluntary participation in exercise for mental
           health: a Western Australian perspective

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      Authors: Caitlin Fox-Harding, Tegan Richards, Eimear Quigley, Joanne Dickson
      Abstract: Australasian Psychiatry, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Australasian Psychiatry
      PubDate: 2021-07-12T04:12:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10398562211029957
       
  • A clinical update on managed care implications for Australian psychiatric
           practice

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      Authors: Jeffrey CL Looi, Stephen R Kisely, Tarun Bastiampillai, William Pring, Stephen Allison
      Abstract: Australasian Psychiatry, Ahead of Print.
      Objective:To provide a clinical update on private health insurance in Australia and outline developments in US-style managed care that are likely to affect psychiatric and other specialist healthcare. We explain aspects of the US health system, which has resulted in a powerful and profitable private health insurance sector, and one of the most expensive and inefficient health systems in the world, with limited patient choice in psychiatric treatment.Conclusions:Australian psychiatrists should be aware of changes to private health insurance that emphasise aspects of managed care such as selective contracting, cost-cutting or capitation of services. These approaches may limit access to private hospital care and diminish the autonomy of patients and practitioners in choosing the most appropriate treatment. Australian patients, carers and practitioners need to be informed about the potential impact of private managed care on patient-centred evidence-based treatment.
      Citation: Australasian Psychiatry
      PubDate: 2021-07-12T04:12:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10398562211030011
       
  • Stiffen the sinews, summon up the blood, and strain upon the start:
           enfranchising the medical profession for clinically proximate advocacy of
           improved healthcare

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      Authors: Jeffrey C L Looi, Stephen Allison, Stephen R Kisely, Tarun Bastiampillai
      Abstract: Australasian Psychiatry, Ahead of Print.
      Objective:To discuss and reflect upon the role of medical practitioners, including psychiatrists, as health advocates on behalf of patients, carers and staff.Conclusions:Health advocacy is a key professional competency of medical practitioners, and is part of the RANZCP framework for training and continuing professional development. Since advocacy is often a team activity, there is much that is gained experientially from volunteering and working with other more experienced health advocates within structurally and financially independent (of health systems and governments) representative groups (RANZCP, AMA, unions). Doctors may begin with clinically proximate advocacy for improved healthcare in health systems, across the public and private sectors. Health advocacy requires skill and courage, but can ultimately influence systemic outcomes, sway policy decisions, and improve resource allocation.
      Citation: Australasian Psychiatry
      PubDate: 2021-07-06T04:10:44Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10398562211025039
       
  • Have Mental Health Services Met the Expectations of People With
           Neurodevelopmental Disabilities' ‘Yes, No or I Don’t Know’

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      Authors: Pierre Wibawa, Tareq Abuelroos
      Abstract: Australasian Psychiatry, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Australasian Psychiatry
      PubDate: 2021-07-06T04:10:44Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10398562211025043
       
  • Complex neurology: Considering all angles

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      Authors: Dr. William Lugg
      Abstract: Australasian Psychiatry, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Australasian Psychiatry
      PubDate: 2021-06-30T10:23:18Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10398562211025017
       
  • Criminal and financial penalties for clinicians in the ACT Mental Health
           Act weigh more heavily on senior doctors

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      Authors: Dilini Hemachandra, Denise Riordan, Azra Sabir, Philip Keightley
      Abstract: Australasian Psychiatry, Ahead of Print.
      Objective:We sought to assess the attitudes of ACT public psychiatry doctors towards the financial and criminal penalties in the ACT Mental Health Act 2015.Method:Baseline attitude was surveyed with an 11-item 5-point Likert scale. Education was then provided about the offences outlined in the Act and the associated penalties. The same initial survey was then repeated. Primary outcomes were changes in attitude pre- and post- information, and secondarily data was explored for differences related to gender and seniority.ResultsForty-nine percent of 89 eligible public mental health system doctors responded. The majority of the survey respondents were female (59%). Provision of information resulted in a significant improvement in understanding of liabilities (2.80 (SD 1.14) versus 3.58 (SD 0.93), t(39) = 4.06, p < 0.001). Gender had no significant impact on scores. Senior staff were less legally secure and less satisfied with the Mental Health Act pre-information being provided. With regards to notification penalties, with education, junior staff became more secure and seniors less so.Conclusions:Information provision improves understanding of the penalties under the Mental Health Act 2015. Having a senior role predicts lower satisfaction with the penalties in the Act.
      Citation: Australasian Psychiatry
      PubDate: 2021-06-30T10:23:17Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10398562211025015
       
  • Psychosocial and lifestyle predictors of distress and well-being in people
           with mental illness during the COVID-19 pandemic

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      Authors: Justin J Chapman, Eva Malacova, Sue Patterson, Nicola Reavley, Marianne Wyder, Wendy J Brown, Emily Hielscher, Sarah Childs, James G Scott
      Abstract: Australasian Psychiatry, Ahead of Print.
      Objectives:People with mental illness may be vulnerable to psychological distress and reduced well-being during the COVID-19 pandemic. The aim of this study was to assess psychosocial and lifestyle predictors of distress and well-being in people with mental illness during the pandemic.Method:People with mental illness who participated in an exercise programme prior to the pandemic were invited to complete surveys about mental health and lifestyle corresponding to before and during the pandemic.Results:Social support reduced, alcohol intake increased, and sleep quality and diet worsened during the pandemic, contributing to distress. Psychological distress was associated with the two or more mental illnesses, and negatively associated with having a physical disease. Better diet appeared to protect against increases in distress; loneliness hindered improvements in well-being.Conclusions:Healthy lifestyle programmes designed to improve social connection may improve health for people with mental illnesses during and after the COVID-19 pandemic.
      Citation: Australasian Psychiatry
      PubDate: 2021-06-30T10:23:16Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10398562211025040
       
  • The ‘trauma’ of trauma-informed care

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      Authors: Sophie Isobel
      Abstract: Australasian Psychiatry, Ahead of Print.
      Objectives:As mental health services increasingly position themselves as providing ‘trauma-informed care’, there is a need for ongoing critical reflection on the challenges that this movement highlights for mental health services, including those related to the concept of trauma itself.Conclusions:To become trauma-informed requires opportunities to reflect on what trauma means and consideration of the challenges the concept poses to diagnostically driven systems. Alongside uptake, further debate is required.
      Citation: Australasian Psychiatry
      PubDate: 2021-06-23T03:59:33Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10398562211022756
       
  • A narrative literature review: the application of video games as
           therapeutic tools for psychological therapy

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      Authors: Sean Mahon-Daly, Neil Jeyasingam
      Abstract: Australasian Psychiatry, Ahead of Print.
      Objectives:Video games (games played by electronically manipulating images produced by a computer programme on a screen) are being developed with a specific focus on treating mental health. This narrative review briefly discusses the history of video games and mental health. It then provides a critical discussion on the application of video games as therapeutic tools, then discusses the notion of ‘serious games’ (games designed for a primary purpose other than entertainment) and their applicability.Conclusions:Serious games have preliminary evidence to support their use practically in the clinical treatment of mental illness. Future randomised control trials are necessary to further explore their efficacy and potential areas of application.
      Citation: Australasian Psychiatry
      PubDate: 2021-06-23T03:59:32Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10398562211022751
       
  • On RuPaul, drag race and mentalization

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      Authors: Noel Collins
      Abstract: Australasian Psychiatry, Ahead of Print.
      Objective:With reference to relevant literature and brief analysis of televised content, this article discusses the potential value of RuPaul’s Drag Race (RPDR) in psycho-education about mentalization.Conclusions:RPDR can be viewed as an example of the ‘entertainment-education’ genre containing instructive displays of mentalization in action and an opportunity to increase public awareness of concepts that support emotional resilience. The psycho-educative potential of RPDR merits further evaluation.
      Citation: Australasian Psychiatry
      PubDate: 2021-06-17T05:14:36Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10398562211022754
       
  • Neutrophil/lymphocyte, platelet/lymphocyte and monocyte/lymphocyte ratios
           in schizophrenia

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      Authors: Xiaoyu Zhu, Jia Zhou, Yu Zhu, Feng Yan, Xiaole Han, Yunlong Tan, Ran Li
      Abstract: Australasian Psychiatry, Ahead of Print.
      Objective:Neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (NLR), monocyte-to-lymphocyte ratio (MLR), and platelet-to-lymphocyte ratio (PLR) have been used as markers of inflammation in mental illness. However, these indices have not been widely used in schizophrenia research in Chinese participants. Our aim was to use these ratios to explore the relationship between schizophrenia and inflammation.Methods:In this retrospective cross-sectional study, we collected total blood cell counts of 549 patients with schizophrenia and 930 healthy controls at Beijing Huilongguan Hospital in October 2019. We analyzed the subjects’ platelet, lymphocyte, monocyte, and neutrophil counts; compared the calculated NLR, MLR, and PLR between patients and healthy controls; and evaluated the correlations with age and gender.Results:Platelet and lymphocyte counts were significantly lower, while NLR and MLR were significantly higher, in patients with schizophrenia compared to healthy controls. Additionally, monocyte count, lymphocyte count, MLR, and NLR were different between male and female subjects.Conclusion:This study supports the inflammatory hypothesis of schizophrenia in the Chinese population.
      Citation: Australasian Psychiatry
      PubDate: 2021-06-17T05:14:35Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10398562211022753
       
  • E-mental health in child psychiatry during COVID-19: an initial
           attitudinal study

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      Authors: Valsamma Eapen, Ann Dadich, Srilaxmi Balachandran, Anitha Dani, Rasha Howari, Anupama Zeena Sequeria, Joel D Singer
      Abstract: Australasian Psychiatry, Ahead of Print.
      Objective:COVID-19 propelled e-mental health within the Australian health system. It is important to learn from this to inform mental healthcare during future crises.Method:A lexical analysis was conducted of clinician reflections during COVID-19 as they delivered psychiatry services to children and families in New South Wales (n = 6) and transitioned to e-mental health.Results:E-mental health can extend the reach of, and access to psychiatry services, particularly for individuals disadvantaged by inequity. Yet e-mental health can be problematic. It is partly contingent on technological prowess, equipment, internet access as well as space and privacy. Relatedly, e-mental health can hinder clinician capacity to conduct examinations, monitor child development as well as assess risk and the need for child protection.Conclusions:Given the benefits and limitations of e-mental health, a model that supports face-to-face mental healthcare and e-mental health may be of value. This model would require practical, yet flexible policies and protocols that protect the privacy of children and families, safeguard them from harm, and respect the needs and preferences of children, families and clinicians.
      Citation: Australasian Psychiatry
      PubDate: 2021-06-15T06:37:34Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10398562211022748
       
  • Clinical depression: the fault not in our stars'

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      Authors: Gordon Parker
      Abstract: Australasian Psychiatry, Ahead of Print.
      Objective:To consider how a mental health professional might respond to a newly diagnosed depressed patient who inquires into its potential genetic origins and whether they might pass depression on to their children.Methods:Data are provided on risk and pursuit of genetic pathways.Results:As most studies have focussed on DSM-defined major depression – and which is not an entity – no definitive data are available, while there are some few studies indicating a greater genetic risk in those with melancholic than those with non-melancholic depression.Conclusion:We will not know the genetic contribution to clinical depression unless its key sub-types are evaluated as separate conditions. Findings may assist a clinician’s response to an inquiring patient.
      Citation: Australasian Psychiatry
      PubDate: 2021-06-15T06:37:33Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10398562211022750
       
  • “Only intelligent attendants need apply”: the history of Western
           Australia’s first asylum at Fremantle (1865–1909)

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      Authors: Phil Maude
      Abstract: Australasian Psychiatry, Ahead of Print.
      Objective:To examine the history of Fremantle, Western Australia’s first purpose-built asylum.Method:A range of primary sources were consulted.Results:Fremantle was opened in 1865 to house inmates away from the populace and for the most part under the care of Dr HC Barnett. Attendants as well as inmates were occupied with work roles that kept the asylum functioning cost effectively.Conclusion:Within 15 years, the structure was neglected and overcrowded. Changes to the Penal Servitude Act limiting convict transportation, petty crime and a need to manage its proliferation resulted in large numbers of people being incarcerated at Fremantle.
      Citation: Australasian Psychiatry
      PubDate: 2021-05-31T07:02:52Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10398562211014221
       
  • Conduct and evaluation of final-year medical student summative assessments
           in Psychiatry and Addiction Medicine during COVID-19: an Australian
           University Medical School experience

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      Authors: Jeffrey C L Looi, Paul Maguire, Daniel Bonner, Rebecca E Reay, Angus J F Finlay, Philip Keightley, Michael Tedeschi, Claire Wardle, David Kramer
      Abstract: Australasian Psychiatry, Ahead of Print.
      Objective:To describe and share with the medical education community, the conduct and evaluation of summative graduate medical student assessments in Psychiatry and Addiction Medicine during COVID-19 at an Australian university.Methods:Summative assessments were redesigned as follows: written assessments were administered via an online platform (WATTLE), while the Objective Structured Clinical Examinations (OSCE) were conducted via a secure video-conferencing software (Zoom).Results:Our preliminary analysis of the summative assessments indicated that both examiners and students adapted to the format, with overall performance of the students showing no variation due to timing of the assessment (earlier versus later in the day) and performances similar to face-to-face assessments in previous years. Examiners also expressed positive feedback on the assessment process.Conclusions:Our graduate fourth-year medical student summative assessments were effectively conducted using online and video-conferencing software in accordance with existing COVID-19 pandemic public health measures for physical distancing and hygiene.
      Citation: Australasian Psychiatry
      PubDate: 2021-05-27T01:02:12Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10398562211014229
       
  • Iatrogenic suicidality - a case report

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      Authors: William Lugg
      Abstract: Australasian Psychiatry, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Australasian Psychiatry
      PubDate: 2021-05-24T11:38:18Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10398562211014222
       
  • The successful treatment of Kamini dependence with depot buprenorphine
           (Buvidal) – a case report

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      Authors: Ivy Kwon, Alison Blazey, Mark Montebello
      Abstract: Australasian Psychiatry, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Australasian Psychiatry
      PubDate: 2021-05-20T07:21:26Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10398562211014214
       
  • Maslow’s hammer: considering the perils of solutionism in mental
           healthcare and psychiatric practice

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      Authors: Jeffrey C L Looi, Daniel Bonner, Paul Maguire
      Abstract: Australasian Psychiatry, Ahead of Print.
      Objective:To discuss narrow pragmatism, manifest as digital and technical solutionism, in mental healthcare and psychiatric practice. Pragmatism is a view of the field of psychiatry as an instrument or tool for the purpose of providing psychiatric care for people with a mental illness. Solutionism, as proposed by Morozov, can be considered a special case of pragmatism that valorises an approach to solving real-world problems based on computation, algorithms and digital technology,1 which we extend to discuss other technical solutions such as medication, non-invasive brain stimulation and psychotherapy.Conclusions:Digital or technical solutionism may unnecessarily constrain approaches to mental healthcare and psychiatric practice. Psychiatrists can consider, and should advocate for, appropriate adaptation of technology and technical solutions toward collaborative and effective mental healthcare.
      Citation: Australasian Psychiatry
      PubDate: 2021-05-20T07:21:25Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10398562211005438
       
  • The mental health of Australian medical practitioners during Covid-19

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      Authors: Michelle Anne Adams, Matthew Brazel, Richard Thomson, Hannah Lake
      Abstract: Australasian Psychiatry, Ahead of Print.
      Objectives:To ascertain whether doctors were experiencing higher rates of distress during Covid-19 and whether this was impacted by demographic factors. Our hypotheses were that being a junior doctor, having a previous mental health diagnosis and treating Covid-19 positive patients would predict higher rates of distress.Methods:Cross-sectional survey conducted via Survey Monkey. Voluntary participants were recruited from the mailing list of a national-based referral service for doctors to psychiatrists. Distress was measured using the Kessler Psychological Distress Scale (K10). Demographic factors were analysed for predictive value of a higher rating on the K10. Areas of concern in relation to Covid-19 and preference for support services were measured on a Likert scale and compared to levels of distress.Results:The rate of very high distress was 15%. Being a junior doctor and having a previous mental health diagnosis were predictive factors of a higher K10 score. K10 was not affected by likelihood of contact with Covid-19-positive patients. Social isolation had a larger impact on mental health in the context of a previous psychiatric diagnosis. Face-to-face assessments were preferred.Conclusions:Rates of distress in doctors have been higher than baseline during Covid-19. Some groups have been particularly vulnerable.
      Citation: Australasian Psychiatry
      PubDate: 2021-05-19T11:02:48Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10398562211010807
       
  • Amphetamine use and psychiatric admissions: a 10-year perspective

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      Authors: Jai Nathani, Richard W Morris, Nicholas Glozier, Grant Sara
      Abstract: Australasian Psychiatry, Ahead of Print.
      Objective:We aimed to (i) describe the 10-year trend in admissions associated with amphetamine use, (ii) describe the distinguishing characteristics of people with an amphetamine-related diagnosis (ARD) and (iii) examine predictors of repeated admissions among people with an ARD.Method:We conducted a retrospective cohort study. We (i) counted the number of admissions with an ARD and evaluated any trends, and using univariate and multivariate tests, (ii) compared those who had an ARD with those who did not and (iii) compared those with an ARD who had one, two to four, and five or more admissions.Results:Admissions associated with amphetamine use increased between 2009 and 2015. Those with an ARD had significant differences in demographics, diagnosis and pattern of service use relative to those without an ARD. Amongst those with an ARD, a higher number of admissions was positively associated with a schizophrenia diagnosis but inversely associated with a transient psychotic disorder diagnosis.Conclusions:The increase in admissions associated with amphetamine use indicates that people with an ARD posed major demands on inpatient services. Targeting amphetamine treatment to those with psychotic disorders, both schizophrenia and transient psychotic disorders, may reduce hospital-related costs and re-admissions.
      Citation: Australasian Psychiatry
      PubDate: 2021-05-19T10:51:53Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10398562211014227
       
  • Doggone it! Canine therapy doesn’t tame the Black Dog

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      Authors: Paul A Maguire, Jeffrey C L Looi
      Abstract: Australasian Psychiatry, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Australasian Psychiatry
      PubDate: 2021-05-16T08:10:55Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10398562211006151
       
  • Reflections on how to approach early career psychiatrist roles and
           challenges

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      Authors: Jeffrey C L Looi, Angus J F Finlay, Daniel S Heard
      Abstract: Australasian Psychiatry, Ahead of Print.
      Objective:To reflect upon and provide experiential advice to address the roles of early career psychiatrists. The main roles include leading patient care; working in teams; clinical supervision and governance of trainees, and of the psychiatrist by clinical directors/managers. While these roles vary across public and private sectors, the discussion focuses on common elements.Conclusions:The first several years of an early career psychiatrist’s work often involves roles for which formal training cannot provide direct guidance, and which benefit from planning and reflective practice. Learning how to navigate clinical care, clinical supervision and governance, formal/informal mentoring and peer review are necessary to effective practice.
      Citation: Australasian Psychiatry
      PubDate: 2021-05-16T08:10:55Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10398562211010809
       
  • Three perils of medico-political professional organisations:
           corporatisation, bureaucratisation and concentration of power

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      Authors: Jeffrey C L Looi, Stephen R Kisely, Stephen Allison, Tarun Bastiampillai, Stephen J Robson, William Pring
      Abstract: Australasian Psychiatry, Ahead of Print.
      Objective:To discuss relevant factors affecting the effectiveness and membership engagement of medico-political professional organisations, for example, medical colleges, societies and associations.Conclusions:Medico-political professional organisations face perils from corporatisation, bureaucratisation and concentration of power that diminish membership engagement and influence. Actions to address these challenges are necessary to ensure the future viability of these organisations.
      Citation: Australasian Psychiatry
      PubDate: 2021-05-16T08:10:54Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10398562211006128
       
  • Complex PTSD and personality disorder in ICD-11: when to assign one or two
           diagnoses'

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      Authors: Simon Ungar Felding, Line Bang Mikkelsen, Bo Bach
      Abstract: Australasian Psychiatry, Ahead of Print.
      Objective:To outline overlap and boundaries between ICD-11 definitions of complex post-traumatic stress disorder (C-PTSD) and personality disorder (PD) and propose guiding principles that may assist practitioners in assigning one or both of the two diagnoses.Conclusions:The ICD-11 definitions for C-PTSD and PD are substantially comparable in terms of self- and interpersonal problems, and childhood trauma may be at the root of both disorders. The ICD-11 formally recognizes this overlap and allows the assignment of both diagnoses at the same time. The C-PTSD diagnosis essentially differs from a PD diagnosis by requiring a history of trauma and PTSD symptoms. Moreover, C-PTSD typically involves stable and persistent patterns of negative self-perception while emphasizing avoidant interpersonal patterns. In comparison, the PD diagnosis may differ from C-PTSD by allowing an unstable or internally contradictory sense of self, which may involve both overly negative and overly positive self-views. When the diagnostic requirements for both C-PTSD and PD are met, only the C-PTSD diagnosis should be assigned, unless the PD diagnosis may contribute with clinically useful information that is not sufficiently covered by the C-PTSD diagnosis. The outlined similarities and boundaries must be further corroborated by future empirical studies.
      Citation: Australasian Psychiatry
      PubDate: 2021-05-16T08:10:54Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10398562211014212
       
  • Weight perception and symptoms of depression in rural Australian
           adolescents

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      Authors: Samuel Skidmore, Catherine Hawke, Georgina Luscombe, Philip Hazell, Katharine Steinbeck
      Abstract: Australasian Psychiatry, Ahead of Print.
      ObjectiveTo investigate associations between measured and perceived weight, and symptoms of depression in rural Australian adolescents.Method:At baseline a prospective rural adolescent cohort study collected demographic data, measured weight and height, weight self-perception, and presence of depression (Short Mood and Feelings Questionnaire). Using World Health Organisation’s (WHO) age and gender body mass index (BMI) standardisations, participants were classified into four perceptual groups: PG1 healthy/perceived healthy; PG2 overweight/perceived overweight; PG3 healthy/perceived overweight; and PG4 overweight/perceived healthy. Logistic regression analyses explored relationships between these groups and symptoms of depression.Results:Data on adolescents (n = 339) aged 9–14. PG1 contained 63% of participants, PG2 18%, PG3 4% and PG4 14%. Across the cohort, 32% were overweight and 13% had symptoms of depression. PG2 (overweight/perceived overweight) were more likely to experience symptoms of depression than PG1 (healthy/perceived healthy; Adjusted Odds Ratio [AOR] 3.1, 95% CI 1.5–6.7). Females in PG3 (healthy/perceived overweight) were more likely to experience symptoms of depression (38%) than males (14%) and females in PG1 (10%, AOR 5.4, 95% CI 1.1–28.2).Conclusions:Results suggest that perceptions of being overweight may be a greater predictor for symptoms of depression than actual weight. This has public health implications for youth mental health screening and illness prevention.
      Citation: Australasian Psychiatry
      PubDate: 2021-05-16T08:10:53Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10398562211009250
       
  • Tertiary eating disorder services: is it time to integrate specialty care
           across the life span'

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      Authors: Stephen Allison, Tracey Wade, Megan Warin, Randall Long, Tarun Bastiampillai, Jeffrey C L Looi
      Abstract: Australasian Psychiatry, Ahead of Print.
      Objective:Australian tertiary eating disorder services (EDS) have a divided model of care, where child and adolescent mental health services (CAMHS) support patients until the age of 18 years, and thereafter, adult mental health services (AMHS) provide care. Consumers and carers have criticised this divided model because the age boundary occurs during the peak period of onset and acuity for eating disorders. Most CAMHS patients are lost to specialty follow-up around age 18, increasing the risks of relapse and premature mortality from eating disorders, since young women (aged 15–24) have the highest hospitalisation rates from anorexia nervosa. The current article is a commentary on the transition gap and possible service designs.Conclusions:Eating disorders require access to specialty treatment across the life span. The Australian Federal Government has expanded all-age care through the 2019 Medicare Benefit Schedule (MBS) eating disorder plans. Some new MBS patients require a rapid step-up in care intensity to a tertiary EDS, thereby increasing demand on the public sector. State/Territory Governments should strengthen EDS using the ‘youth reach-down’ model, where AMHS extend EDS to age 12. Vertical service integration from 12 to 64+ facilitates continuity of care for the duration of an eating disorder.
      Citation: Australasian Psychiatry
      PubDate: 2021-05-16T08:10:52Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10398562211010802
       
  • COVID-19 and ECT – a Victorian perspective

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      Authors: Karuppiah Jagadheesan, Frances Walker, Vijay Danivas, Quratulain Itrat, Vinay Lakra
      Abstract: Australasian Psychiatry, Ahead of Print.
      Objectives:(i) to describe the operational strategies implemented to practise electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) safely, and (ii) to explore the effect of the lockdown and operational strategies on the characteristics of patients who received ECT during the initial 6 months of the COVID-19 lockdown.Methods:At first, the operational strategies that were implemented at the Broadmeadows ECT suite were summarised. Subsequently, the characteristics of patients who received ECT in the lockdown period (16 March–16 September 2020) and in the comparison period (16 March–16 September 2019) were compared.Results:Many safety measures were implemented, and there was no COVID-19 infection among mental health staff and patients. In the lockdown period, the number of patients (23.9%) and the total number of ECTs (29.4%) were less. This pattern was more prominent among the aged patients.Conclusion:Safe practices are essential to provide ECT during lockdowns even when the community transmission of COVID-19 is high.
      Citation: Australasian Psychiatry
      PubDate: 2021-05-16T08:10:51Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10398562211014224
       
  • Expert consensus on the operation of an adult tertiary intellectual
           disability mental health service in New South Wales, Australia

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      Authors: Jessica A Walsh, Janelle Weise, Claire Eagleson, Julian N Trollor, Rachael C Cvejic
      Abstract: Australasian Psychiatry, Ahead of Print.
      Objective:To identify and reach consensus on the priorities and operation of an adult tertiary intellectual disability mental health service in New South Wales, Australia.Method:An online Delphi consultation was conducted with 25 intellectual disability mental health experts.Results:Participants agreed that the service should involve a multidisciplinary team and accept people with an intellectual disability aged over 15 years with complex needs and/or atypical presentations. Agreed service roles included short-term assessment, diagnosis and treatment, providing high-level clinical advice, and capacity building. Endorsed principles and practical ways of working align with existing guidelines.Conclusions:This study describes experts’ views on how an adult tertiary intellectual disability mental health service should operate in New South Wales. Further consultation is needed to determine the views of people with an intellectual disability and mental health staff.
      Citation: Australasian Psychiatry
      PubDate: 2021-05-16T08:10:51Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10398562211014228
       
  • The utility of daily mood ratings in clinical trials of patients with
           bipolar II disorder

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      Authors: Gordon Parker, Tahlia Ricciardi, Gabriela Tavella, Michael J Spoelma
      Abstract: Australasian Psychiatry, Ahead of Print.
      Objective:To demonstrate that there can be distinctive differences in information generated by standard interval measures as against using daily monitoring for evaluating progress in those with a bipolar disorder.Method:We undertook a 20-week study of individuals with a bipolar II disorder randomly assigned to receive either lamotrigine or lithium. Patients were rated on standard measures of depression and hypomania at monthly intervals, and they also completed a daily rating measure of their mood swings. We sought to demonstrate the potential for differing interpretations that emerge from these measurement strategies.Results:We graphed data for one subject who showed distinct improvement but demonstrated distinctly differing trajectories provided by monthly and daily data. In a second analysis, we considered sets of those who were judged as improving distinctly with lithium or lamotrigine to determine whether the drugs differed in speed of action, and again observed differing patterns between monthly and daily rating measures.Conclusions:A daily rating strategy appeared to provide additional and differing data compared to standard monthly measures. We therefore argue for the inclusion of daily mood ratings in clinical trials evaluating mood stabilisers and their use by clinicians in managing those with a bipolar II disorder.
      Citation: Australasian Psychiatry
      PubDate: 2021-05-16T08:10:50Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10398562211014226
       
  • Corrigendum to Burnout and psychological distress amongst Australian
           healthcare workers during the COVID-19 pandemic

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      Abstract: Australasian Psychiatry, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Australasian Psychiatry
      PubDate: 2021-05-11T09:04:44Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10398562211011741
       
  • Reducing metabolic syndrome in Australian patients: Metabolic Management
           During Antipsychotic Prescribing (MMAP) programme

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      Authors: David J Castle, Malcolm Hopwood, Sanil Rege, David B George
      Abstract: Australasian Psychiatry, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Australasian Psychiatry
      PubDate: 2021-05-09T06:36:14Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10398562211010792
       
  • LOVE in the time of Covid-19: a brief mental health intervention to
           overcome loneliness

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      Authors: Manaan Kar Ray, Ka Ki Chow, Theo Theodoros, Marianne Wyder, Anne Steginga, Rosemary Sorrensen, Paul Hickey, Geoff Lau, Kieran Kinsella, Chiara Lombardo
      Abstract: Australasian Psychiatry, Ahead of Print.
      Objective:The coronavirus disease 2019 outbreak and its containment through public health strategies has resulted in a parallel pandemic of psychological distress. Increased loneliness and social isolation are associated with adverse health outcomes, yet there is a gap in brief interventions that specifically target loneliness. This article introduces a brief intervention to strengthen connectedness, LOVE. In a systematic way, this solution-focused approach encourages openness and sharing of current struggles with the existing circle of support. There are four steps in LOVE: List people in one’s life, Organise them on the helpfulness–availability matrix, Verify what they know to map them onto circles of trust and Engage them through self-disclosure.Conclusion:The article details each concept, its importance, the pragmatics involved and top tips to guide practice. The memorable acronym provides logical sequence and structure. It is time efficient in training and delivery, with no former mental health knowledge required so there is potential for wide application. It facilitates collaboration between health professionals and people in distress and promotes empowerment and self-resilience. Adapted from the safety planning component of PROTECT, a pre-existing suicide prevention framework, LOVE has to be fine-tuned as a brief intervention in the wider context of the pandemic.
      Citation: Australasian Psychiatry
      PubDate: 2021-05-06T12:18:03Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10398562211010806
       
  • Unacceptably high: an audit of Kimberley self-harm data 2014–2018

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      Authors: Rob McPhee, Emma Carlin, Kimberley Seear, Phoebe Carrington-Jones, Barbara Sheil, David Lawrence, Patricia Dudgeon
      Abstract: Australasian Psychiatry, Ahead of Print.
      Objective:To explore the rates and characteristics of self-harm across the Kimberley region of Western Australia.Method:Retrospective, cross-sectional audit. We obtained and descriptively analysed routinely collected self-harm data from the Kimberley District of the Western Australia Police Force (2014–2018) and the Emergency Department Data Collection (June 2017–December 2018). Variables included age, sex, Indigenous status, time of incident, and alcohol and drug use.Results:The rate of emergency department attendance for self-harm was three times higher in the Kimberley than the rest of Western Australia. Both emergency department and police data showed a disproportionately high percentage of incidents involving Aboriginal people, with highest rates in the 15–19 and 20–24 year age groups. Almost 80% of self-harm events recorded by police involving individuals aged 25–50 years involved alcohol. Many self-harm incidents occurred in the evening and at night.Conclusions:The rates of self-harm across the Kimberley region from 2014–2018 are unacceptably high. Increased funding and alignment of services to meet regional need are required as part of a holistic effort to reduce regional rates of self-harm.
      Citation: Australasian Psychiatry
      PubDate: 2021-05-06T12:18:02Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10398562211010790
       
  • Quality of written informed consent forms for electroconvulsive therapy in
           Australia: a comparative analysis

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      Authors: Karuppiah Jagadheesan, Frances Walker, Vinay Lakra
      Abstract: Australasian Psychiatry, Ahead of Print.
      Objectives:We compared the quality of the written informed consent forms for electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) in Australian jurisdictions.Method:For this comparative audit-type study, a checklist was developed to compare informed consent forms from different jurisdictions. The main information sources for consent forms were government health department websites and Google. The directors of clinical services were contacted if a consent form was not available through a web source.Results:Majority of the informed consent forms covered information about ECT, general anaesthesia and alternative treatments, supports available for decision making, and a reference to the right to withdraw consent. Missing information affected information areas such as likely outcome if no ECT, lack of guaranteed response and cultural and linguistic supports.Conclusions:A standardised consent form that can be used across all jurisdictions can help improve the ECT practice.
      Citation: Australasian Psychiatry
      PubDate: 2021-05-03T11:54:15Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10398562211009243
       
  • Impact of Covid-19 physical distancing policies on incidence of
           intentional self-harm in Western Sydney

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      Authors: Andrew Page, Piumee Bandara, Trent Ernest Hammond, Garry Stevens, Greg Carter
      Abstract: Australasian Psychiatry, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Australasian Psychiatry
      PubDate: 2021-05-03T11:54:15Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10398562211010808
       
  • Recovery from anorexia nervosa: the influence of women’s
           sociocultural milieux

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      Authors: Stephen Allison, Megan Warin, Tarun Bastiampillai, Jeffrey C L Looi, Mattias Strand
      Abstract: Australasian Psychiatry, Ahead of Print.
      Objective:Young women living in industrialised westernised societies have a higher prevalence of anorexia nervosa, partly due to a cultural emphasis on thinness as a beauty ideal. Sociocultural milieux might promote recovery from anorexia nervosa amongst young women. The current article is a commentary about the social influences on recovery from anorexia nervosa – based on social anthropology, narratives of people with lived experience, and clinical studies.Conclusion:Anorexia nervosa increases social withdrawal, and recovery leads to re-engagement with meaningful relationships. Recovery also empowers women as ‘cultural critics’ who challenge assumptions about the thinness beauty ideal and gender roles. The gradual process of full or partial recovery often occurs during emerging adulthood (aged 20–29). In this life stage, adolescent friendship groups are dissolving as women move from education to work, reducing the danger of weight-based teasing by peers, which is an environmental risk factor for disordered eating. Women recovering from anorexia nervosa may connect with those aspirations of peers and mentors that eschew a focus on weight and shape, but relate to the life-stage tasks of starting careers, beginning new friendships, selecting life partners and family formation – that is, a broader role in larger relationship networks.
      Citation: Australasian Psychiatry
      PubDate: 2021-05-03T11:54:14Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10398562211010796
       
  • Multiaxial classification in child and adolescent mental health – a
           reaffirmation of benefit and practical applications

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      Authors: Mark Mayall, Brett McDermott, Raja Sadhu, Cortney Husodo
      Abstract: Australasian Psychiatry, Ahead of Print.
      Objective:Classification systems and their practical implications have become increasingly important in child and adolescent psychiatry. This paper presents the evolution and practical applications of a multiaxial classification system for children and adolescents presenting to mental health services. Included are some worked examples demonstrating both the complexity of many presentations and how broadening the use of the multiaxial system can help in identifying appropriate interventions.Conclusions:Classification systems in child and adolescent psychiatry have largely remained uniaxial in nature. A multiaxial system encapsulates the broader biopsychosocial aspects of the presenting child or adolescent, and orders complex data in a concise manner. This approach can be used to concisely communicate with other treating clinicians, and assist with case reviews, formulation and teaching.
      Citation: Australasian Psychiatry
      PubDate: 2021-05-03T11:54:13Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10398562211009268
       
  • Book Review: The Quantum Psychiatrist From Zero to Zen Using
           Evidence-Based Solutions Beyond Meditation and Therapy

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      Authors: Shalija Chaturvedi
      Abstract: Australasian Psychiatry, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Australasian Psychiatry
      PubDate: 2021-05-03T11:54:13Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10398562211010791
       
  • Clinicians’ experiences of inquiries following mental health related
           homicide: a qualitative study

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      Authors: Lillian Ng, Alan F. Merry, Ron Paterson, Sally N. Merry
      Abstract: Australasian Psychiatry, Ahead of Print.
      Objectives:This aim of this qualitative study was to explore the experiences of clinicians involved with inquiries into the mental health care of patients who were perpetrators of homicide in New Zealand.Methods:Our purposive sample comprised ten clinicians working in New Zealand district health board mental health services. These clinicians were individually interviewed. Interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed and thematically analysed. The coding framework was checked and peer reviewed by an independent researcher.Results:Five themes were identified: the inquiry process; emotional burden; impact on team dynamics; changes to individual clinical practice; and perceptions of inquiries being influenced by organisational culture. Clinicians involved with inquiries reported significant anxiety and disrupted multidisciplinary team dynamics. Some participants found inquiries led to changes to their clinical practice and perceived that a punitive organisational culture limited learning.Conclusions:Clinicians perceived inquiries as threatening, anxiety provoking and primarily concerned with protecting organisational interests. Communication of the inquiry process and ensuring inquiry findings are disseminated may enhance clinicians’ experiences of inquiries and facilitate their participation and their reflection on changes to clinical practice that could contribute to improving services. Support for clinicians and multidisciplinary teams should be emphasised by the commissioning agency.
      Citation: Australasian Psychiatry
      PubDate: 2021-05-03T11:54:12Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10398562211009260
       
  • Order out of chaos' Autism spectrum disorder coordinators’ impact on
           service delivery in New Zealand

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      Authors: Matthew Eggleston, Katherine Eggleston, Hiran Thabrew, Shannon Hennig, Christopher Frampton
      Abstract: Australasian Psychiatry, Ahead of Print.
      Objective:To evaluate the impact of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) coordinators (ASDCs) on key aspects of the experience of obtaining an ASD diagnosis and post-diagnostic supports in New Zealand.Method:Members of New Zealand ASD parent support groups were surveyed.Results:Of 516 parents, 41.3% had seen an ASDC. The majority were satisfied. Parents who saw ASDCs pre-diagnosis were more likely to be satisfied with the diagnostic process (p = .04) and saw fewer professionals before receiving a diagnosis (p = .04). Parents who had seen ASDCs post-diagnosis were more likely to be satisfied with post-diagnostic supports (p < .001) and their coordination (p < .001).Conclusions:ASDCs are well regarded by parents and improve key aspects of the process of obtaining an ASD diagnosis and post-diagnostic supports. Given the particularly low rates of parent satisfaction with post-diagnostic supports (23%) and their coordination (19%), ASDCs may be of most value when employed post-diagnosis to assist parents in navigating key supports and co-developing comprehensive individualised care plans.
      Citation: Australasian Psychiatry
      PubDate: 2021-04-29T04:02:55Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10398562211009249
       
  • Voluntary assisted dying (VAD) in Australasia and ‘coup de
           grâce’ in Islam

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      Authors: Ahmed Naguy
      Abstract: Australasian Psychiatry, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Australasian Psychiatry
      PubDate: 2021-04-20T11:36:34Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10398562211009244
       
  • ‘Things are not what they seem to be’: A proposal for the spectrum
           approach to conspiracy beliefs

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      Authors: Vladan Starcevic, Vlasios Brakoulias
      Abstract: Australasian Psychiatry, Ahead of Print.
      Objective:Conspiracy beliefs (also known as conspiracy theories) become more prominent at times of heightened uncertainty and inconsistent or conflicting explanations provided by the authorities for events like terrorist attacks or pandemics, such as COVID-19. This article aims to examine the relevance of conspiracy beliefs for psychiatry in the context of the dynamics of trust and mistrust.Conclusions:Conspiracy beliefs may be situated on a spectrum of mistrust-related phenomena, which extends from healthy scepticism to persecutory delusions. They can be conceptualised as unfounded and fixed beliefs held with strong conviction about harm inflicted by powerful groups on the community or another group of people, usually with preserved insight that these beliefs differ from those that most people have and with reasons for having such beliefs not necessarily being implausible. It is important for conspiracy beliefs to be distinguished from persecutory delusions.
      Citation: Australasian Psychiatry
      PubDate: 2021-04-14T08:20:38Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10398562211008182
       
  • ‘Stranger than Fiction’: a description of an online essay examination
           preparation club for Queensland trainees

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      Authors: Katherine Monahan, Karen Freier, Stephen Parker, Shuichi Suetani
      Abstract: Australasian Psychiatry, Ahead of Print.
      Objective:To describe an online essay-style examination preparation group.Methods:The process of the establishment – including recruitment, rules and characteristics – of ‘Stranger than Fiction’ is outlined.Results:Over the 10-week period, 66 essays were submitted, and 40 essays were marked. Sixteen out of 30 registered candidates submitted at least one essay, and 11 out of 17 registered markers marked at least one essay.Conclusion:‘Stranger than Fiction’ is a novel approach to create a supportive environment where trainees are given opportunities to practise critical essay questions.
      Citation: Australasian Psychiatry
      PubDate: 2021-04-13T10:08:07Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10398562211005446
       
  • The impact of patient suicide on the psychiatrist

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      Authors: Russel Davies
      Abstract: Australasian Psychiatry, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Australasian Psychiatry
      PubDate: 2021-04-07T07:07:05Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10398562211003603
       
  • Frontotemporal dementia and financial capacity: facing the Cerberus of
           overestimation or underestimation'

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      Authors: Vaitsa Giannouli, Magda Tsolaki
      Abstract: Australasian Psychiatry, Ahead of Print.
      Objective:This study investigates the performance of people with frontotemporal dementia (FTD) on objective assessment of financial capacity with comparison to the estimation of financial capacity by both people themselves and their caregivers.Method:FTD patients and healthy (age/gender/education-matched) controls from Greece underwent cognitive assessment (memory, attention, executive functioning, visuospatial skills, verbal functions), emotional (anxiety, depression), and financial capacity assessment (Legal Capacity for Property Law Transactions Assessment Scale—LCPLTAS). Additionally, they self-reported on their financial performance and a third-party living with the older participants for both groups reported their estimates of financial performance and their anxiety and depression levels.Results:Financial capacity in FTD patients is severely impaired compared to controls, but caregivers of FTD patients tend to overestimate the patients’ financial performance, a finding that is not related to the caregivers’ depression and anxiety levels or other demographics. FTD patients overestimate their financial capacity.Conclusion:FTD may have significant impact on financial capacity, but people with FTD tend to overestimate their own financial capacity. This study also indicates that families and caregivers tend to overestimate financial capacity in people with FTD. This has implications for the assessment and care planning of people with FTD in clinical settings.
      Citation: Australasian Psychiatry
      PubDate: 2021-04-05T12:00:22Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10398562211005444
       
  • Lessons from psychiatry for treating post-acute Covid-19 fatigue

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      Authors: Laurence Wainwright
      Abstract: Australasian Psychiatry, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Australasian Psychiatry
      PubDate: 2021-04-05T12:00:20Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10398562211003598
       
  • Instructions for Australian and New Zealand trainees in developing skills
           in formulation: a systematic review of local evidence

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      Authors: Michelle Bagster, Hannah Myles, Matthew Large
      Abstract: Australasian Psychiatry, Ahead of Print.
      Objective:To examine the peer-reviewed literature on psychiatric formulation.Methods:The term (formula*) was used to systematically search Australasian Psychiatry, Australian and New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry, British Journal of Psychiatry, BJPsych Bulletin, American Journal of Psychiatry and Academic Psychiatry. The resulting papers were reviewed.Results:Of the 42 papers located, 22 (52%) were published between 2002 and 2019; 90% papers were published in Australasian Psychiatry (15), Academic Psychiatry (12) or BJPsych Bulletin (10), journals that focus on training and clinical practice. The papers varied in their aims and recommendations and not all justified the need for formulation. Formulation was recommended as a necessity for training, a communication tool and a guide to treatment. No article provided evidence for the superiority of any type of formulation, and the role of consumers in formulation was conspicuously lacking.Conclusion:There are many ways to structure formulation. However, the existing literature does not support any particular approach. More consideration needs to be given to the needs of consumers in conceptualising and practicing formulation.
      Citation: Australasian Psychiatry
      PubDate: 2021-03-19T02:52:08Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1039856221992633
       
  • Neutrophil-lymphocyte ratio (NLR): a marker beyond inflammation'
           Comment on PMID: 32174125

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      Authors: Tevfik Kalelioglu, J. Kim Penberthy, Nesrin Karamustafalioglu
      Abstract: Australasian Psychiatry, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Australasian Psychiatry
      PubDate: 2021-03-03T05:44:50Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1039856221992635
       
  • Confidence of psychiatry trainees in meeting the needs of borderline
           personality disorder in comparison with schizophrenia

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      Authors: Mithira Nithianandan, Parvaneh Heidari, Jillian Broadbear, Sathya Rao
      Abstract: Australasian Psychiatry, Ahead of Print.
      Objective:Borderline personality disorder (BPD) and schizophrenia are both serious and chronic mental health conditions of similar prevalence. This study was designed to assess trainees’ confidence in the assessment, management and treatment of BPD in comparison with schizophrenia.Methods:A survey was used to assess psychiatry trainees’ confidence and experience of training with regard to managing BPD and schizophrenia.Results:Eighty-two psychiatry trainees completed the survey. Overall, confidence scores of respondents with respect to BPD were significantly lower in comparison with schizophrenia. Trainees reported a preference for working with patients with schizophrenia compared with BPD. Respondents reported receiving less adequate supervision and training in the assessment, management and treatment of BPD than for schizophrenia.Conclusions:The results suggest an urgent need to enhance training and supervision in skills related to the diagnosis, management and treatment of BPD, with a greater focus on psychotherapy to improve trainee psychiatrists’ confidence in working with people diagnosed with BPD.
      Citation: Australasian Psychiatry
      PubDate: 2021-02-25T12:12:17Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1039856221992650
       
  • A clinical conundrum: clozapine and COVID-19

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      Authors: Ahmed Naguy, Seshni Moodliar-Rensburg, Bibi Alamiri
      Abstract: Australasian Psychiatry, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Australasian Psychiatry
      PubDate: 2021-02-25T12:12:14Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1039856221992647
       
  • A description of the components of a specialist younger-onset dementia
           service: a potential model for a dementia-specific service for younger
           people

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      Authors: Samantha M Loi, Mark Walterfang, Wendy Kelso, JoAnne Bevilacqua, Ramon Mocellin, Dennis Velakoulis
      Abstract: Australasian Psychiatry, Ahead of Print.
      Objectives:This narrative paper describes the influences behind the development of, and key components of a specialist younger-onset dementia service located in metropolitan Victoria, Australia.Conclusion:The Melbourne Young-Onset Dementia Service was established in 2013 and provides diagnosis and ongoing care for people with younger-onset dementia and their families, through collaboration with other medical units, allied health and community services. It is potentially a model for other younger-onset dementia services nationally and internationally.
      Citation: Australasian Psychiatry
      PubDate: 2021-02-25T12:12:12Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1039856221992643
       
 
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