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The Bible and Critical Theory     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
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The Bible and Critical Theory
Number of Followers: 3  
 
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
ISSN (Print) 1832-3391
Published by Monash University Homepage  [1 journal]
  • Facing the End of History: The Akedah under the Shadow of Empire

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      Authors: Danna Nolan Fewell
      Abstract: The Akedah is one of the Bible’s most haunting and haunted stories. Its silences, secrets, and contradictions lend it a powerful elasticity to do all sorts of difficult, painful, cultural work even millennia after its production. This investigation attempts, in the words of literary philosopher Pierre Macherey, “to trace the path which leads from the haunted work to that which haunts it” (1978, 94). Positioning the story amidst the economic, political, and cultic pressures of the post-exilic period, this discussion explores how the divine demand to sacrifice Isaac and the subsequent divine intervention and promise of ascendancy reflect an anxious communal exploration of the imperial and cultic demands that threaten the end of family and cultural history.
      PubDate: 2018-05-08
      Issue No: Vol. 14, No. 1 (2018)
       
  • "Much Madness is divinest Sense": The Economic Consequences of
           Yahweh's Parasocial Identity

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      Authors: Davis Hankins
      Abstract: The historical development of Israelite theology must be understood in relation to the social antagonisms that shaped the contexts in which people spoke about God. This article brings recent research on the historical development of different institutional forms in ancient Israelite society into conversation with recent arguments regarding the origins and evolution of the worship of Yahweh in the southern Levant.My aim is not to reduce theology to an epiphenomenal reflection or a direct expression of social realities, but to grasp it as creatively engaged with such realities. Yahweh appears to have originated among mobile bands on the social and geographical margins with respect to the centers of political and economic power in southwest Asia. Israel’s emergent monarchic state adopted this popular family god as its patron deity. The real social antagonisms between extractive state regimes and sustainable systems of allocation shaped—in various, indirect, and surprising ways—Israel’s speech about God. This article argues that the conflicted historical development of Israel’s speech about Yahweh takes its shape in relation to the evolving social regimes and antagonisms that marked Israel’s history.
      PubDate: 2018-05-08
      Issue No: Vol. 14, No. 1 (2018)
       
  • "Make yourself at home": the tensions and paradoxes of hospitality in
           dialogue with the Bible

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      Authors: Helen Paynter
      Abstract: Hospitality is a well-identified biblical theme; the consensus among most modern Christian authors is that it is both demonstrated by the deity and expected of humanity, throughout both Old and New Testaments. Often, however, such discussions rely on an assumed transparency of the nature and definition of hospitality, and on the assumption that the biblical attitude to the subject is univocal. However, the biblical witness is not unambiguous, but demonstrates tensions reflecting both the complex nature of hospitality, and the development of the theme through the Bible. In recent years the ambiguous nature of hospitality has been argued in theoretical terms by the deconstructionist Jacques Derrida, and its complexities of praxis by post-colonial critics. This paper sets out to bring these modern critical voices into dialogue with the biblical texts, and it will be shown that when read with a sensitivity to the paradoxes enunciated by these contemporary theorists, the biblical understanding of the hospitality theme is more complex than it at first appears. It will be argued that a more subtle understanding of the developing and complex biblical view of hospitality will aid the development of a more robust Christian ethic, especially in the light of the contemporary challenge of migration.
      PubDate: 2018-05-08
      Issue No: Vol. 14, No. 1 (2018)
       
  • Garden and “Wilderness”: An ecocritical exploration of Gen.
           2:4b–3:24

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      Authors: R. B. Hamon
      Abstract: In this study, I adapt a methodology from the field of ecocriticism to explore the physical world depicted in Gen. 2:4b–3:24. I challenge traditional dualistic interpretations of the text in Christian theological tradition and wider Western culture which have heavily influenced ecocritical thinking and have typically characterized the garden of YHWH as a bounteous paradise and the land outside the garden as a barren wilderness latterly corrupted by sin. I argue that the “wilderness” of Gen. 2:4b–3:24 is ultimately just as capable of supporting life as the garden of YHWH. I also suggest that the garden of YHWH is significantly different in appearance to the sumptuous royal gardens of Western Asian tradition to which it has previously been compared, and propose that a vegetal border delineates the garden of YHWH from the surrounding land. Finally, I find that natural resources play a significant role in the narrative; indeed Gen. 2:4b–3:24 pivots around the consumption of a natural resource, the produce of the tree of knowledge of good and evil. Through the application of an ecocritical reading methodology, I offer original insight into the physical world depicted in this well-known and highly influential text. In doing so, I hope to demonstrate both the value of dialogue between the fields of biblical studies and ecocriticism, and the potential for further ecocritical studies of biblical texts to follow.
      PubDate: 2018-05-08
      Issue No: Vol. 14, No. 1 (2018)
       
  • The Bible as a Graphic Novel: When the Word Becomes (Affecting) Image

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      Authors: Robert Paul Seesengood
      PubDate: 2018-05-08
      Issue No: Vol. 14, No. 1 (2018)
       
  • Review of Danna Nolan Fewell, The Oxford Handbook of Biblical Narrative,
           New York, Oxford University Press, 2016

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      Authors: Sarah Emanuel
      PubDate: 2018-05-08
      Issue No: Vol. 14, No. 1 (2018)
       
  • Review of Dierda Reber, Coming to Our Senses: Affect and An Order of
           Things for Global Culture, New York, Columbia University Press, 2016

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      Authors: Maia Kotrosits
      PubDate: 2018-05-08
      Issue No: Vol. 14, No. 1 (2018)
       
  • Review of Susan E. Hylen, A Modest Apostle: Thecla and the History of
           Women in the Early Church, Oxford, Oxford University Press, 2015

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      Authors: Peter Anthony Mena
      PubDate: 2018-05-08
      Issue No: Vol. 14, No. 1 (2018)
       
  • Review of Caroline Vander Stichele and Susanne Scholz, Hidden Truths from
           Eden: Esoteric Readings of Genesis 1-3, Atlanta, SBL, 2014

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      Authors: Jione Havea
      PubDate: 2018-05-08
      Issue No: Vol. 14, No. 1 (2018)
       
  • Review of S. Brent Plate, Religion and Film: Cinema and the Re-Creation of
           the World, 2nd ed, New York, Columbia University Press, 2017

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      Authors: Robert Paul Seesengood
      PubDate: 2018-05-08
      Issue No: Vol. 14, No. 1 (2018)
       
  • Review of Jione Havea and Peter H.W. Lau, Reading Ruth in Asia, Atlanta,
           SBL, 2015

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      Authors: Elaine Wainwright
      PubDate: 2018-05-08
      Issue No: Vol. 14, No. 1 (2018)
       
 
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