Publisher: European Federation of Associations and Centres of Irish Studies (Total: 1 journals)   [Sort by number of followers]

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Review of Irish Studies in Europe     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
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Review of Irish Studies in Europe
Number of Followers: 1  

  This is an Open Access Journal Open Access journal
ISSN (Online) 2398-7685
Published by European Federation of Associations and Centres of Irish Studies Homepage  [1 journal]
  • Opening Materials

    • Authors: Robert Brazeau; Laura Sydora
      Abstract: Review of Irish Studies (RISE) 5.1 Irish Sexual Liberation and Its Literatures, Part 1
      'Speaking out/ when it's dangerous'
      PubDate: Mon, 27 Jun 2022 14:05:03 +000
       
  • Introduction

    • Authors: Robert Brazeau; Laura Sydora
      Abstract: RISE 5.1 is the first of a two-volume issue dedicated to the study of Irish sexual liberation and its literatures in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. This first volume, entitled ‘Speaking out / when it’s dangerous’, brings together six scholars whose critically attentive articles equally interrogate not only the material and political practices of the heteropatriarchal state in its attempt to codify the sexual and moral script of the nation, but also the historiographic conventions of state-centred narratives revised and recovered in academic scholarship on sexuality and sexual identity. One of the most important contributions of this collection, however, is the range of forms of literary and cultural production addressed: from the traditional literary forms of novels, short stories, and dramas, to the cultural forms of periodicals, trial records, and sports entertainment, these articles offer compelling and innovative frameworks through which scholars of Irish Studies can continue to imagine and reimagine the relationship between sexual politics and social transformation in Ireland.
      PubDate: Wed, 25 May 2022 00:00:00 +000
       
  • The Queer Transnational in Kate O’Brien and Elizabeth Bowen

    • Authors: Naoise Murphy
      Abstract: Transnational modes of thought play a constitutive role in the imaginary of Irish queerness. The novels of Elizabeth Bowen and Kate O'Brien offer a dualistic contestation of hegemonic sex/gender conventions that can be theorised as ‘the queer transnational.’ Based on sustained engagement with the thematics of abjection, their writing highlights how the transnational is deeply embedded in the structure of queer imaginaries in Irish writing. Through readings of O’Brien’s novels Mary Lavelle (1936) and The Land of Spices (1942), and Bowen’s The Last September (1929) and Eva Trout (1968), this article proposes ‘the queer transnational’ as a new way of thinking about queer literary histories in the formative years of the modern Irish State.    Keywords: Queer; Transnational; Irish Literature; Elizabeth Bowen; Kate O’Brien; Abjection; Twentieth Century
      PubDate: Wed, 25 May 2022 00:00:00 +000
       
  • ‘With Foolish Optimism We Thought It Was Just a Miss’: Marriage,
           Sexuality, and Unwanted Pregnancies in Twentieth-Century Ireland

    • Authors: Cara Delay
      Abstract: Much of the scholarly focus of Irish sexuality in the twentieth century has been on ‘sexual non-conformity’: sex outside of marriage, rape and coercion, and abuse. While these are essential topics, particularly given the historical incarceration and containment of sexual ‘others’, they are only part of the story. This article analyses married couples’ sexual lives in Ireland from 1900 to 1950. Utilising criminal abortion trial records, it sheds light on marital sexual practices and reproductive decision-making. Abortions were not only accessed by those who broke sexual norms but also by those whose sexual practices were more conformist: heterosexual committed couples, most of whom already had other children. While the criminal courts depicted abortion-seeking women as docile, women were far from passive in abortion decision-making. Committed couples worked together to manage unwanted pregnancies. This reality rejects the notion of a uniquely Irish sexual purity and complicates representations of married women as oppressed and even sexually naïve. Most couples actively collaborated in managing their sexual lives, receiving support from friends and families. Early twentieth-century popular views of sexuality, then, could be flexible and permissive.   Keywords: Abortion; Sexuality; Fertility, Family Planning; Reproductive Decision-making; Marriage
      PubDate: Wed, 25 May 2022 00:00:00 +000
       
  • ‘Chastity' Poppycock!’: Sexuality, Censorship and the
           Short Story in The Bell

    • Authors: Phyllis Boumans
      Abstract: The middle decades of twentieth-century Irish cultural history have often been described in terms of strict social codes, religious obscurantism, sexual repression and excessive censorship that banned any representation of sexuality that threatened the stringent sexual mores in Ireland’s theocratic society. Vehement opposition to both censorship and sexual puritanism came from The Bell, Ireland’s most influential mid-century literary magazine, edited by Seán O’Faoláin and Peadar O’Donnell. Throughout its lifespan, The Bell campaigned for writing that confronted controversial subjects, and was able to regularly publish short stories that engaged with taboo topics such as same-sex desire, illegitimacy, abortion and extra-marital sex. This essay explores the various ways in which writers responded to The Bell’s calls for frank treatments of sexual matters in their short fiction, and suggests that the poetics of the modern short story – which allowed writers to camouflage their subversive content – combined with ineffective legislation for the banning of periodicals meant that short stories in Irish literary magazines were effectively the censors’ blind spot, and thus contributed to the freeing up of cultural attitudes around sexuality that gradually took place in the second half of the twentieth century.   Keywords: The Bell; Irish Short Stories; Sexuality; Irish Periodicals; Censorship; Seán O’Faoláin; Peadar O’Donnell.
      PubDate: Wed, 25 May 2022 00:00:00 +000
       
  • Re-membering Easter 1916: Homosexuality and Irish History in Jamie
           O’Neill’s At Swim, Two Boys

    • Authors: Estibalitz Ezkerra Vegas
      Abstract: While the benefits brought to the LGBTQ+ community through the legal reforms enacted in the last two decades are undeniable, paradoxically the contribution of this community to Ireland is still largely absent from official narratives of the past. This article discusses Jamie O’Neill’s novel At Swim, Two Boys (2001) as a response to this absence through its reconstruction of Easter 1916. The narrative that the novel presents on the Easter Rising differs from national and nationalist accounts of the event in that it is not a mere recollection or remembering of what happened, but rather a re-membering of it. Drawing on the approach of the Easter Rising as a moment of possibility, the novel reassembles the narrative of the rebellion on the basis of gay experience, an experience that has been absent not only from the historiography on the Easter Rising, but also from the national imaginary as well. Through this reassemble and resignification of the rebellion, O’Neill’s novel provides a retroactive as well as future-oriented counter-memory of Irishness that materializes the need to reorient of Irish historiography and the political body based on a non-heteronormative affiliative understanding of the sovereign country.   Keywords: LGBTQ+ Voices; 1916 Easter Rising; Memory; Jamie O’Neill; Irish Historiography.
      PubDate: Wed, 25 May 2022 00:00:00 +000
       
  • ‘Ransack the histories’: Gay Men, Liberation and the Politics
           of Literary Style

    • Authors: Michael G. Cronin
      Abstract: It is now twenty years since the publication of Jamie O’Neill’s At Swim, Two Boys (2001). O’Neill’s novel was not the first Irish novel to depict same-sex passion, and not even the first Irish gay novel of the post-decriminalisation period. However, it did attain a wider and higher level of recognition among mainstream Irish, and international, readers. This may have been at least partly due to O’Neill’s decision to write a historical romance – a genre which still retains its enduring appeal for readers. By adapting this genre, O’Neill uses fiction to unearth, and imaginatively recreate, an archaeology of same-sex passions between men in revolutionary Ireland. As such, his novel speaks powerfully to a yearning to make the silences of history speak and is motivated by the belief that, as Scott Bravmann puts it in a different context, ‘lesbian and gay historical self-representation – queer fictions of the past – help construct, maintain and contest identities – queer fictions of the present.’ Revisiting O’Neill’s novel now – after two decades of remarkable social change for Ireland’s LGBT communities, and after almost a decade of national commemoration of the revolutionary period – is a timely opportunity to reflect on the relationship between history, fiction and how we imagine sexual liberation.   Keywords: Gay Men in Irish Culture; Historical Fiction; Jamie O’Neill; Denis Kehoe; ANU Theatre Company
      PubDate: Wed, 25 May 2022 00:00:00 +000
       
  • From a ‘Lass Kicker’ to ‘The Man’: WWE’s Irish Wrestler Becky
           Lynch and the Appropriation of Hegemonic Masculinity

    • Authors: Michael Lydon
      Abstract: Since her World Wrestling Entertainment (WWE) debut (2014), Becky Lynch has become one of the best known popular cultural representations of transnationalised Irishness. In emerging victorious in the main event of Wrestlemania 35 (2019), Lynch cemented her place as WWE’s top Superstar. She thus became the first woman to achieve the accolade, completing her transition from a jig dancing ‘Lass Kicker’ to the sports entertainment conglomerate’s top star, or ‘The Man’. In this article, I consider Lynch’s career in what Barthes’ considers the morally embedded theatrical performance that is professional wrestling. This entails assessing WWE as a ‘masculine melodrama’, a scripted form of popular entertainment with a long-standing tradition of asserting hegemonic masculinity. I outline WWE’s history of essentialising Irishness, before considering Lynch’s prominent position in WWE’s neoliberal feminist brandcasting. Finally, I show that fan appreciation for Lynch’s skill as a wrestler, and a ‘real’ moment of bloodshed, facilitated her use of the moniker ‘The Man’. Ultimately, I reveal that in being ‘The Man’, Lynch appropriated hegemonic masculine characteristics to challenge controversial normatives, while also signalling WWE’s neoliberal feminist emphasis on the importance of individual agency over industry accountability.     Keywords: Popular Culture; Irishness; Professional Wrestling; Hegemonic Masculinity; Neoliberal Feminism
      PubDate: Wed, 25 May 2022 00:00:00 +000
       
  • Review of Happiness in Nineteenth-Century Ireland, by Mary Hatfield (ed.)

    • Authors: Madalina Armie
      Abstract: Review of Happiness in Nineteenth-Century Ireland, by Mary Hatfield (ed.) (Liverpool University Press, 2021). ISBN 978-1-800-34825-7, 248pp, £90.00 (hardback) 
      PubDate: Thu, 05 May 2022 00:00:00 +000
       
  • Review of Yeats Now – Echoing into Life, by Joseph M. Hassett

    • Authors: Elena Cotta Ramusino
      Abstract: Review of Yeats Now – Echoing into Life, by Joseph M. Hassett (Dublin: The Lilliput Press, 2020) ISBN-13: 978-1843517788, 200 pp., 15€ (paperback) 
      PubDate: Thu, 05 May 2022 00:00:00 +000
       
  • Review of Modern Writers, Transnational Literatures: Rabindranath Tagore
           and W. B. Yeats, by Ragini Mohite

    • Authors: Mina M. Đurić
      Abstract: Review of Modern Writers, Transnational Literatures: Rabindranath Tagore and W. B. Yeats, by Ragini Mohite (Clemson, SC: Clemson University Press) 2021, ISBN: 978-1-949-97906-0, 256 pp., $120 (hardback) 
      PubDate: Thu, 05 May 2022 00:00:00 +000
       
  • Review of This Strange Loneliness: Heaney’s Wordsworth, by Peter
           Mackay

    • Authors: Stefanie John
      Abstract: Review of This Strange Loneliness: Heaney’s Wordsworth, by Peter Mackay (Montréal: McGill-Queen’s University Press, 2021). ISBN 978-0-2280-0572-8, 352 pp., $39.95 (paperback) 
      PubDate: Thu, 05 May 2022 00:00:00 +000
       
  • Review of Dreams of the Future in Nineteenth-Century Ireland, by Richard
           J. Butler (ed.)

    • Authors: Richard Jorge
      Abstract: Review of Dreams of the Future in Nineteenth-Century Ireland, by Richard J. Butler (ed.) (Liverpool: Liverpool University Press, 2021) ISBN 978-1-800-85675-2, 368 pp., £90 (hardback) 
      PubDate: Thu, 05 May 2022 00:00:00 +000
       
  • Review of Limits and Languages in Contemporary Irish Women’s Poetry,
           by Daniela Theinová

    • Authors: Ailbhe McDaid
      Abstract: Review of Limits and Languages in Contemporary Irish Women’s Poetry, by Daniela Theinová (Palgrave Macmillan, 2020), ISBN: 978-3-030-55953-3, 281 pp., €105,49 (Hardback)
      PubDate: Thu, 05 May 2022 00:00:00 +000
       
  • Review of Avant-Garde Nationalism at the Dublin Gate Theatre, 1928-1940,
           by Ruud van den Beuken

    • Authors: Elliott Mills
      Abstract: Review of Avant-Garde Nationalism at the Dublin Gate Theatre, 1928-1940, by Ruud van den Beuken (New York: Syracuse University Press, 2021) ISBN: 9780815636250, 265 pp., £62.95  
      PubDate: Thu, 05 May 2022 00:00:00 +000
       
  • Review of Vicereines of Ireland: Portraits of Forgotten Women, by Myles
           Campbell

    • Authors: Flicka Small
      Abstract: Review of Vicereines of Ireland: Portraits of Forgotten Women, by Myles Campbell (Dublin: Irish Academic Press, 2021).    ....
      PubDate: Thu, 05 May 2022 00:00:00 +000
       
 
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