Publisher: American Medical Association   (Total: 14 journals)   [Sort alphabetically]

Showing 1 - 14 of 14 Journals sorted by number of followers
JAMA The J. of the American Medical Association     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2114, SJR: 8.876, CiteScore: 7)
JAMA Internal Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 197, SJR: 8.032, CiteScore: 4)
JAMA Pediatrics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 128, SJR: 4.433, CiteScore: 4)
JAMA Psychiatry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 109, SJR: 8.097, CiteScore: 8)
JAMA Neurology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 65, SJR: 4.925, CiteScore: 5)
JAMA Ophthalmology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 62, SJR: 2.776, CiteScore: 3)
JAMA Dermatology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 50, SJR: 2.196, CiteScore: 2)
JAMA Surgery     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 43, SJR: 3.437, CiteScore: 3)
JAMA Cardiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 42, SJR: 5.551, CiteScore: 5)
JAMA Oncology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35, SJR: 6.187, CiteScore: 6)
JAMA Otolaryngology - Head & Neck Surgery     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 30, SJR: 1.462, CiteScore: 2)
JAMA Network Open     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
American medical news     Free   (Followers: 3)
JAMA Health Forum     Open Access  
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JAMA Oncology
Journal Prestige (SJR): 6.187
Citation Impact (citeScore): 6
Number of Followers: 35  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 2374-2437 - ISSN (Online) 2374-2445
Published by American Medical Association Homepage  [14 journals]
  • Association of Patient-Reported Outcomes and Nonfatal Self-injury After a
           New Cancer Diagnosis

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      Authors: Hallet J; Sutradhar R, Isenberg-Grzeda E, et al.
      Abstract: This case-control study examines the associations between patient-reported outcome measures and subsequent nonfatal self-injury in patients with cancer.
      PubDate: Thu, 19 May 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamaoncol.2022.0203
      Issue No: Vol. 8, No. 5 (2022)
       
  • JAMA Oncology Peer Reviewers in 2021

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      PubDate: Thu, 19 May 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamaoncol.2022.0185
      Issue No: Vol. 8, No. 5 (2022)
       
  • Humoral Responses Against Variants of Concern by COVID-19 mRNA Vaccines in
           Immunocompromised Patients

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      Authors: Obeid M; Suffiotti M, Pellaton C, et al.
      Abstract: This comparative effectiveness study of immunocompromised patients and healthy controls in Switzerland examines differences in the magnitude and durability of neutralizing antibody responses against the original SARS-CoV-2 and several variants of concern according to the mRNA-1273 and BNT162b2 vaccines.
      PubDate: Thu, 19 May 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamaoncol.2022.0446
      Issue No: Vol. 8, No. 5 (2022)
       
  • JAMA Oncology

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      Pages: 669 - 669
      Abstract: JAMA Oncology is committed to publishing influential original research, opinions, and reviews that advance the science of oncology and improve the clinical care of patients with cancer.
      PubDate: Sun, 01 May 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamaoncol.2021.5496
      Issue No: Vol. 8, No. 5 (2022)
       
  • Generative Adversarial Networks for Oncological Applications

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      Authors: Phillips H; Soffer S, Klang E.
      Pages: 677 - 678
      Abstract: This Viewpoint assesses the use of generative adversarial networks to overcome current challenges and further revolutionize the use of deep learning in oncology.
      PubDate: Sun, 01 May 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamaoncol.2021.8202
      Issue No: Vol. 8, No. 5 (2022)
       
  • Primary End Point of Progression-Free Survival and Biased Evaluation in
           Cancer Drug Trials

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      Authors: Tannock IF; Pond GR, Booth CM.
      Pages: 679 - 680
      Abstract: This Viewpoint discusses whether the use of progression-free survival as the primary end point in cancer drug trials can result in misleading interpretations of improved overall survival and quality of life.
      PubDate: Sun, 01 May 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamaoncol.2021.8206
      Issue No: Vol. 8, No. 5 (2022)
       
  • Palliative Care Is the Umbrella, Not the Rain—A Metaphor to Guide
           Conversations in Advanced Cancer

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      Authors: Zimmermann C; Mathews J.
      Pages: 681 - 682
      Abstract: This Viewpoint provides a metaphor for physicians to use as a communication tool to explain the benefits of early palliative care to patients with advanced cancer.
      PubDate: Sun, 01 May 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamaoncol.2021.8210
      Issue No: Vol. 8, No. 5 (2022)
       
  • A Radiation Oncologist’s Experience With Medical Aid in Dying

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      Authors: Yajnik SV.
      Pages: 683 - 684
      Abstract: This essay discusses medical aid in dying (MAID) and encourages physicians to inquire about medical societies’ stances on MAID and to consider a position of engaged neutrality.
      PubDate: Sun, 01 May 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamaoncol.2022.0076
      Issue No: Vol. 8, No. 5 (2022)
       
  • JAMA Oncology —The Year in Review, 2021

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      Authors: Disis M.
      Pages: 685 - 686
      Abstract: The COVID-19 pandemic has dominated the medical literature for the past 2 years, and we have learned much about the clinical characteristics of patients with cancer that predict or are associated with severity of infection, effectiveness of vaccination in patients receiving different types of cancer therapy, and most recently, rates of breakthrough infection in previously vaccinated patients with cancer. At JAMA Oncology, we prioritized publication of COVID-19–related articles so that our readers could have the most up-to-date information to provide to patients and aid in medical decision-making. We would like to thank our authors, peer reviewers, and readers for the meaningful contributions made to the journal this past year, especially surrounding the pandemic. The JAMA Oncology editorial board, editors, and I are honored to have the opportunity to serve the oncology community by offering original, innovative, and timely scientific content that has a direct influence on researchers, clinicians, and the patients we serve. The journal’s impact factor of 31.8 placed us as one of the highest-ranking oncology journals.
      PubDate: Sun, 01 May 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamaoncol.2022.0262
      Issue No: Vol. 8, No. 5 (2022)
       
  • Mediators of Racial Disparity in the Use of Prostate Magnetic Resonance
           Imaging

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      Authors: Leapman MS; Dinan M, Pasha S, et al.
      Pages: 687 - 696
      Abstract: This cohort study uses data from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results database to identify clinical, sociodemographic, and structural processes underlying racial disparity in the use of prostate magnetic resonance imaging among men with a new diagnosis of prostate cancer.
      PubDate: Sun, 01 May 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamaoncol.2021.8116
      Issue No: Vol. 8, No. 5 (2022)
       
  • Racist Factors Underlying Prostate Cancer Disparities

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      Authors: Poulson M.
      Pages: 696 - 697
      Abstract: Much work has been done in documenting the disparities between US Black and White individuals across different domains of medicine. For prostate cancer, in particular, Black men are more likely to present at an advanced stage, less likely to undergo surgical resection, and have higher overall mortality. However, the bulk of the literature on racial disparities has focused on documenting the differences in outcomes between Black and White men without understanding the structural factors that shape them. Many authors identify biological differences as the potential underlying cause in these disparities, with multiple works going so far as to study genetic polymorphisms as the root cause of racial disparities. However, this remains an ill-conceived and naive method of measuring differences between socially imposed categories of racial groups. Race is representative of directed discriminatory practices, but medical literature rarely addresses these issues.
      PubDate: Sun, 01 May 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamaoncol.2021.7271
      Issue No: Vol. 8, No. 5 (2022)
       
  • Efficacy of HD201 vs Referent Trastuzumab in Patients With ERBB2-Positive
           Breast Cancer Treated in the Neoadjuvant Setting

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      Authors: Pivot X; Georgievich MA, Shamrai V, et al.
      Pages: 698 - 705
      Abstract: This randomized clinical trial compare the efficacy of HD201 with referent trastuzumab for treating patients with ERBB2-positive breast cancer.
      PubDate: Sun, 01 May 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamaoncol.2021.8171
      Issue No: Vol. 8, No. 5 (2022)
       
  • Paclitaxel, Cisplatin, and Capecitabine vs Cisplatin and Fluorouracil for
           Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma

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      Authors: Li W; Lv X, Hu D, et al.
      Pages: 706 - 714
      Abstract: This phase 3 randomized clinical trial examines whether induction chemotherapy with paclitaxel, cisplatin, and capecitabine improves survival vs cisplatin and fluorouracil prior to chemoradiotherapy for patients with stage IVA to IVB nasopharyngeal carcinoma.
      PubDate: Sun, 01 May 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamaoncol.2022.0122
      Issue No: Vol. 8, No. 5 (2022)
       
  • Induction Chemotherapy for Advanced Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma

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      Authors: Willis M.
      Pages: 715 - 716
      Abstract: Nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) has a distinct cause and geographic distribution predominantly seen in Southeast Asia. More than 50% of patients with NPC present with locally advanced disease with high risk for distant metastases and relapse. Hence, the quest to explore the role of sequential systemic therapies to improve regional and distant disease for patients with NPC became pertinent.
      PubDate: Sun, 01 May 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamaoncol.2022.0082
      Issue No: Vol. 8, No. 5 (2022)
       
  • Guideline-Concordant Surgery and Adjuvant Chemotherapy Among Patients With
           Early-Stage Lung Cancer

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      Authors: Kehl KL; Zahrieh D, Yang P, et al.
      Pages: 717 - 728
      Abstract: This cohort study examines patterns of guideline-concordant treatment among patients enrolled in a US-wide screening protocol for adjuvant treatment trials for resected non-small cell lung cancer.
      PubDate: Sun, 01 May 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamaoncol.2022.0039
      Issue No: Vol. 8, No. 5 (2022)
       
  • Translating Clinical Trial Evidence to Routine Practice

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      Authors: Tang M; Lee C.
      Pages: 728 - 729
      Abstract: In early-stage non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), surgery followed by adjuvant platinum-based chemotherapy has remained the backbone treatment for many decades. Recent trials also define the roles of adjuvant osimertinib and atezolizumab for different patient subgroups. Improvements in cancer outcomes rely not only on randomized clinical trials to generate evidence for the efficacy of novel therapies but are also contingent on that evidence being incorporated into guidelines that are then adopted in routine practice. Accurate capture of real-world cancer treatment is a critical step in evaluating the translation of evidence-based treatment guidelines to routine care to ensure best practice and improve outcomes at a population level.
      PubDate: Sun, 01 May 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamaoncol.2022.0038
      Issue No: Vol. 8, No. 5 (2022)
       
  • Risk of Colorectal Cancer Associated With Lifetime Excess Weight

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      Authors: Li X; Jansen L, Chang-Claude J, et al.
      Pages: 730 - 737
      Abstract: This case-control study examines the use of a measure estimating the association between cumulative lifetime exposure to excess weight and the risk for colorectal cancer.
      PubDate: Sun, 01 May 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamaoncol.2022.0064
      Issue No: Vol. 8, No. 5 (2022)
       
  • Exposure Histories and Cancer Risk—What Can We Learn'

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      Authors: Bradshaw PT.
      Pages: 738 - 739
      Abstract: In this issue of JAMA Oncology, Li et al present findings from a large case-control study of the association of weight history with colorectal cancer risk. The primary analysis used weighted number of years with overweight or obesity (WYOs), calculated as excess body mass index (eBMI, defined as BMI [calculated as weight in kilograms divided by height in meters squared] − 25, truncated 0) accumulated from age 20 years to the index date. The authors observed a consistent association between WYOs and colorectal cancer risk, with seemingly more pronounced associations than similar analyses using age-specific eBMI or untransformed BMI measures. While these results are intriguing, it is important to examine the broader meaning and implications of such measures.
      PubDate: Sun, 01 May 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamaoncol.2022.0061
      Issue No: Vol. 8, No. 5 (2022)
       
  • TRC105 Plus Pazopanib vs Pazopanib Alone for Treatment of Patients With
           Advanced Angiosarcoma

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      Authors: Jones RL; Ravi V, Brohl AS, et al.
      Pages: 740 - 747
      Abstract: This randomized clinical trial investigates whether carotuximab plus pazopanib improves progression-free survival vs pazopanib alone in adult patients with advanced angiosarcoma.
      PubDate: Sun, 01 May 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamaoncol.2021.3547
      Issue No: Vol. 8, No. 5 (2022)
       
  • Evaluation of Antibody Response to SARS-CoV-2 mRNA-1273 Vaccination in
           Patients With Cancer in Florida

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      Authors: Giuliano AR; Lancet JE, Pilon-Thomas S, et al.
      Pages: 748 - 754
      Abstract: This cohort study investigates the immune response of patients with cancer to the first and second doses of the COVID-19 mRNA-1273 vaccination.
      PubDate: Sun, 01 May 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamaoncol.2022.0001
      Issue No: Vol. 8, No. 5 (2022)
       
  • Thickness-Specific Incidence and Risk Factors Associated With Cutaneous
           Melanoma

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      Authors: Chen ML; de Vere Hunt I, John EM, et al.
      Pages: 755 - 759
      Abstract: This population-based cohort study examines patterns in tumor thickness–specific incidence in patients with cutaneous melanoma.
      PubDate: Sun, 01 May 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamaoncol.2022.0134
      Issue No: Vol. 8, No. 5 (2022)
       
  • Diagnosis and Treatment of ERBB2-Positive Metastatic Colorectal Cancer

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      Authors: Strickler JH; Yoshino T, Graham RP, et al.
      Pages: 760 - 769
      Abstract: This review explores the characteristics of ERBB2-positive metastatic colorectal cancer and the potential of treatment with anti-ERBB2 agents.
      PubDate: Sun, 01 May 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamaoncol.2021.8196
      Issue No: Vol. 8, No. 5 (2022)
       
  • An Intramedullary Enigma

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      Authors: Lamba N; Bitterman DS.
      Pages: 770 - 771
      Abstract: A woman in her 60s was diagnosed with high-grade leiomyosarcoma of the uterus, which had been treated with hysterectomy and bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy, and subsequently had relapsed in the liver and spine. What is your diagnosis'
      PubDate: Sun, 01 May 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamaoncol.2022.0462
      Issue No: Vol. 8, No. 5 (2022)
       
  • Use of Early Intrathecal Therapy to Manage High-Grade ICANS

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      Authors: Zurko JC; Johnson BD, Aschenbrenner E, et al.
      Pages: 773 - 775
      Abstract: This case series describes the use of early intrathecal steroid administration to manage high-grade and steroid-refractory immune effector cell-associated neurotoxicity syndrome among patients with B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma.
      PubDate: Sun, 01 May 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamaoncol.2022.0070
      Issue No: Vol. 8, No. 5 (2022)
       
  • Self-reported Transportation Barriers to Health Care Among US Cancer
           Survivors

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      Authors: Jiang C; Yabroff K, Deng L, et al.
      Pages: 775 - 778
      Abstract: This cross-sectional study uses data from the 2014-2018 National Health Interview Survey to examine various characteristics of US cancer survivors who experience delays in care due to transportation barriers.
      PubDate: Sun, 01 May 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamaoncol.2022.0143
      Issue No: Vol. 8, No. 5 (2022)
       
  • Changes in Medicaid Dental Benefit and Localized Oral Cavity Cancer
           Diagnosis

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      Authors: Kana LA; Graboyes EM, Quan D, et al.
      Pages: 778 - 780
      Abstract: This cohort study uses data from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results database to examine the association between changes in Medicaid dental insurance coverage in California between 2009 and 2014 and rates of localized oral cavity cancer diagnoses.
      PubDate: Sun, 01 May 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamaoncol.2022.0149
      Issue No: Vol. 8, No. 5 (2022)
       
  • Internal Mammary Nodal Irradiation Debate for Node-Positive Breast
           Cancer—Has the Needle Moved'

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      Authors: Bazan JG; White JR.
      Pages: 780 - 780
      Abstract: To the Editor We commend Kim et al for addressing the clinical question of internal mammary node irradiation (IMNI) vs no IMNI in axillary node–positive breast cancer in a randomized clinical trial through the Korean Radiation Oncology Group (KROG). However, we believe that their conclusions about IMNI as a component of regional nodal irradiation (RNI) are not supported by the design or results. The authors acknowledge overestimation of the IMNI benefit in the design, yet they did not proportionally adjust their interpretation of the results. To date, all past and more modern randomized trials, including the National Cancer Institute of Canada (NCIC) MA.20 trial and the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) 22922 trial, have included IMNI as a component of total RNI. Therefore, for those who wish to pursue exclusion of IMNI from total RNI, the onus falls on trial investigators to design a powered noninferiority study to evaluate this question rather than a superiority study.
      PubDate: Sun, 01 May 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamaoncol.2022.0226
      Issue No: Vol. 8, No. 5 (2022)
       
  • Internal Mammary Nodal Irradiation Debate for Node-Positive Breast
           Cancer—Has the Needle Moved'—Reply

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      Authors: Byun H; Kim Y, Suh C.
      Pages: 780 - 781
      Abstract: In Reply We appreciate the comments from Bazan and White on our phase 3 randomized clinical trial findings. We agree that the Korean Radiation Oncology Group (KROG) 08-06 trial did not exclude the need for internal mammary node irradiation (IMNI). We overestimated the benefit of disease-free survival (DFS) while designing our study. As no prospective study results, such as those of the National Cancer Institute of Canada (NCIC) MA.20 trial or the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) 22922 trial, were available then, our study was designed based on the results of our previous retrospective study. Accordingly, we predicted that the 7-year DFS benefit would be 10% when IMNI was incorporated into regional nodal irradiation compared with when it was not. However, during the study period, the diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer had evolved. Owing to the early detection of breast cancer with the national mass screening program, the tumor stage had been migrated to an earlier stage. Systemic treatment has been developed with the introduction of effective systemic agents, such as taxanes and trastuzumab. These factors resulted in the overall improvement in the treatment outcome in the modern treatment era; thus, between-group improvement in DFS through IMNI further reduced. Therefore, we could not draw a solid conclusion on using IMNI from the KROG 08-06 trial owing to the lack of power.
      PubDate: Sun, 01 May 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamaoncol.2022.0229
      Issue No: Vol. 8, No. 5 (2022)
       
  • Evidence for Neoadjuvant Therapy for Patients With Locally Advanced Rectal
           Cancer

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      Authors: Siegel R.
      Pages: 781 - 782
      Abstract: To the Editor I read with great interest the secondary analysis of the CAO/ARO/AIO-12 phase 2 randomized clinical trial reported recently in JAMA Oncology. The study group should be congratulated on the long-term results with additional data on late toxic effects, quality of life, and functional outcomes. However, I am respectfully skeptical about the conclusion that the CAO/ARO/AIO-12 trial already proved chemoradiotherapy (CRT) followed by consolidation chemotherapy as the preferred total neoadjuvant therapy (TNT) sequence for organ preservation. After a median follow-up of 43 months, there are no differences between both TNT schedules. As previously discussed, the higher pathological complete response (pCR) rate for the sequence with consolidation therapy is probably based on the significant difference in the time interval between completion of CRT and surgery. Independent of that discussion, the higher pCR rate did not result in improved survival or lower local recurrence rates. Previous studies have shown that adding oxaliplatin to CRT may result in higher pCR (with the costs of toxicity) but did not increase overall survival. Therefore, the results of both the initial and the secondary analysis of the CAO/ARO/AIO-12 trial do not convincingly support the need for a TNT regimen with oxaliplatin-based CRT (in addition to induction/consolidation chemotherapy with oxaliplatin). The TNT regimen of the PRODIGE23-trial, which had similar inclusion criteria as the CAO/ARO/AIO-12 trial but compared TNT with induction chemotherapy (FOLFIRINOX [leucovorin, fluorouracil, irinotecan, and oxaliplatin]) followed by CRT (capecitabine based) vs standard CRT (and adjuvant chemotherapy for both arms), resulted in a significant benefit in 3-year disease-free survival without compromising local recurrence. For a treatment goal of organ preservation, TNT could be a preferred option for patients with locally advanced rectal cancer and distal location, but final results from randomized trials are still awaited. As we have learned from definitive CRT in anal cancer, earlier assessment of complete clinical response after CRT could lead to unnecessary surgery. When aiming for organ preservation in rectal cancer, it may be more important to focus on patient selection and the time interval between completion of CRT and response assessment (to decide whether to proceed to surgery or watch and wait) than on the sequence of TNT.
      PubDate: Sun, 01 May 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamaoncol.2022.0232
      Issue No: Vol. 8, No. 5 (2022)
       
  • Evidence for Neoadjuvant Therapy for Patients With Locally Advanced Rectal
           Cancer—Reply

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      Authors: Fokas E; Rödel C.
      Pages: 782 - 783
      Abstract: In Reply We thank Siegel for his interest in the CAO/ARO/AIO-12 trial and his comments regarding total neoadjuvant treatment (TNT) in rectal cancer. First, Siegel expresses skepticism whether chemoradiotherapy (CRT) followed by consolidation chemotherapy should be the preferred TNT sequence for organ preservation. As we discussed, the choice of TNT sequence remains a matter of debate and largely depends on the treatment goals. The management of rectal cancer is shifting toward organ preservation for selected patients with clinical complete response (cCR) because it appears to be oncologically safe and reduce surgical morbidity. Head-to-head comparison of both TNT sequences as part of randomized trials is essential to provide high-level evidence and guide therapeutic decisions. In line with our study, the sequence CRT/chemotherapy resulted in significantly superior 3-year total mesorectal excision–free survival (59% vs 43%; P = .007) in the Organ Preservation of Rectal Adenocarcinoma (OPRA) randomized phase 2 trial. In both studies that examined the optimal sequence of TNT, up-front CRT (and the associated longer interval to restaging/surgery) resulted in better pathological complete response (CAO/ARO/AIO-12) or sustained cCR/organ preservation (OPRA) without adverse effect on disease-free survival and distant metastases–free survival, supporting our conclusions.
      PubDate: Sun, 01 May 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamaoncol.2022.0235
      Issue No: Vol. 8, No. 5 (2022)
       
  • Cabozantinib for Treatment of Brain Metastases in Patients With Renal Cell
           Carcinoma

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      Authors: Rizzo A; Mollica V, Massari F.
      Pages: 783 - 784
      Abstract: To the Editor Improving outcomes in patients with renal cell carcinoma (RCC) with brain metastases remains a major challenge. Systemic treatment should be considered a crucial component of care, considering that most of these patients will harbor distant metastases outside the central nervous system, and brain metastases at diagnosis confer a dismal prognosis. In JAMA Oncology, Hirsch and colleagues reported the results of a cohort study of cabozantinib for patients with RCC with progressing brain metastases without concomitant brain-directed local therapy (cohort A) or with stable or progressing brain metastases concomitantly treated by brain-directed local therapy (cohort B). Many objective partial responses in the brain were noted, and median overall survival was 15 months and 16 months in cohorts A and B, respectively. Although this was a relatively small cohort study, these data are relevant to clinical practice, and the trial by Hirsch et al represents an interesting piece of work in this setting.
      PubDate: Sun, 01 May 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamaoncol.2022.0049
      Issue No: Vol. 8, No. 5 (2022)
       
  • Cabozantinib for Treatment of Brain Metastases in Patients With Renal Cell
           Carcinoma

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      Authors: Zhao B Ma W.
      Pages: 783 - 783
      Abstract: To the Editor In their cohort study in JAMA Oncology, Hirsch et al found that cabozantinib had considerable intracranial activity and an acceptable safety profile in patients with renal cell carcinoma with brain metastases. These findings substantiate the superiority of cabozantinib for treatment of renal cell carcinoma with brain metastases. However, the conclusions should be critically interpreted and require more suggestions.
      PubDate: Sun, 01 May 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamaoncol.2022.0052
      Issue No: Vol. 8, No. 5 (2022)
       
  • Error in Author Surname

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      Pages: 784 - 784
      Abstract: In the Original Investigation titled “Efficacy of HD201 vs Referent Trastuzumab in Patients With ERBB2-Positive Breast Cancer Treated in the Neoadjuvant Setting: A Multicenter Phase 3 Randomized Clinical Trial,” the fifth author’s name was incorrectly listed as “Hwoei Fen” and should be “Hwoei Fen Soo Hoo.” This article was corrected online.
      PubDate: Sun, 01 May 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamaoncol.2022.0909
      Issue No: Vol. 8, No. 5 (2022)
       
  • How to Breathe

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      Authors: Xiang D.
      Pages: 786 - 786
      Abstract: You worry about leaving this world unloved. As if by some small miracle,
      PubDate: Sun, 01 May 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamaoncol.2021.8215
      Issue No: Vol. 8, No. 5 (2022)
       
  • Financial Toxicity of Cancer Treatment

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      Authors: Hussaini S; Gupta A, Dusetzina SB.
      Pages: 788 - 788
      Abstract: This JAMA Oncology Patient Page explains what financial toxicity is and offers treatment approaches.
      PubDate: Sun, 01 May 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamaoncol.2021.7987
      Issue No: Vol. 8, No. 5 (2022)
       
 
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