Publisher: American Medical Association   (Total: 14 journals)   [Sort alphabetically]

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JAMA The J. of the American Medical Association     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2111, SJR: 8.876, CiteScore: 7)
JAMA Internal Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 194, SJR: 8.032, CiteScore: 4)
JAMA Pediatrics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 127, SJR: 4.433, CiteScore: 4)
JAMA Psychiatry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 108, SJR: 8.097, CiteScore: 8)
JAMA Neurology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 65, SJR: 4.925, CiteScore: 5)
JAMA Ophthalmology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 62, SJR: 2.776, CiteScore: 3)
JAMA Dermatology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 50, SJR: 2.196, CiteScore: 2)
JAMA Surgery     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 43, SJR: 3.437, CiteScore: 3)
JAMA Cardiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 42, SJR: 5.551, CiteScore: 5)
JAMA Oncology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35, SJR: 6.187, CiteScore: 6)
JAMA Otolaryngology - Head & Neck Surgery     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 30, SJR: 1.462, CiteScore: 2)
JAMA Network Open     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
American medical news     Free   (Followers: 3)
JAMA Health Forum     Open Access  
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JAMA Psychiatry
Journal Prestige (SJR): 8.097
Citation Impact (citeScore): 8
Number of Followers: 108  
 
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
ISSN (Print) 2168-622X - ISSN (Online) 2168-6238
Published by American Medical Association Homepage  [14 journals]
  • JAMA Psychiatry Peer Reviewers in 2021

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      PubDate: Wed, 04 May 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamapsychiatry.2022.0114
      Issue No: Vol. 79, No. 5 (2022)
       
  • JAMA Psychiatry

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      Pages: 385 - 385
      Abstract: Mission Statement: JAMA Psychiatry strives to publish original, state-of-the-art studies and commentaries of general interest to clinicians, scholars, and research scientists in psychiatry, mental health, behavioral science, and allied fields. The journal seeks to inform and to educate its readers as well as to stimulate debate and further exploration into the nature, causes, treatment, and public health importance of mental illness.
      PubDate: Sun, 01 May 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamapsychiatry.2021.3043
      Issue No: Vol. 79, No. 5 (2022)
       
  • Improving Perinatal Maternal Mental Health Starts With Addressing
           Structural Inequities

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      Authors: Shuffrey LC; Thomason ME, Brito NH.
      Pages: 387 - 388
      Abstract: This Viewpoint discusses the effect of the COVID-19 pandemic on perinatal maternal mental health and its potential consequences on child development.
      PubDate: Sun, 01 May 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamapsychiatry.2022.0097
      Issue No: Vol. 79, No. 5 (2022)
       
  • Challenges of the COVID-19 Pandemic Among Individuals With ASD

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      Authors: Bitan D; Krieger I, Weinstein O.
      Pages: 389 - 390
      Abstract: This Viewpoint evaluates risk evaluation and standard of care among individuals with autism spectrum disorder.
      PubDate: Sun, 01 May 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamapsychiatry.2022.0237
      Issue No: Vol. 79, No. 5 (2022)
       
  • JAMA Psychiatry —The Year in Review, 2021

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      Authors: Öngür D.
      Pages: 391 - 392
      Abstract: 2021 was another challenging year with a mounting toll of morbidity and death owing to the COVID-19 pandemic and societies struggling to adopt the best public health responses to reduce adverse outcomes. On the other hand, it was also a promising year in which we witnessed one of the greatest triumphs of biomedicine over disease: the development, testing, and dissemination of COVID-19 vaccines. We had no reason to expect that effective vaccines would be developed with few adverse effects, but decades of research, public investment, and global collaboration gave us exactly that. Unfortunately, we have not yet witnessed a similar triumph of biomedicine to alleviate the suffering caused by mental illness, related or unrelated to the pandemic. In fact, both the harms of the pandemic and the mitigation efforts to combat it have likely contributed to worsening of well-being in society.
      PubDate: Sun, 01 May 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamapsychiatry.2022.0033
      Issue No: Vol. 79, No. 5 (2022)
       
  • Screen Time and Externalizing and Internalizing Behavior Problems in
           Children 12 Years or Younger

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      Authors: Eirich R; McArthur B, Anhorn C, et al.
      Pages: 393 - 405
      Abstract: This systematic review and meta-analysis examines the duration of screen time among children 12 years or younger and its association with externalizing and internalizing behavior problems.
      PubDate: Sun, 01 May 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamapsychiatry.2022.0155
      Issue No: Vol. 79, No. 5 (2022)
       
  • Socioeconomic Indicators of Treatment Prognosis for Adults With Depression

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      Authors: Buckman JJ; Saunders R, Stott J, et al.
      Pages: 406 - 416
      Abstract: This systematic review and meta-analysis investigates the socioeconomic factors associated with depression treatment outcome regardless of treatment type.
      PubDate: Sun, 01 May 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamapsychiatry.2022.0100
      Issue No: Vol. 79, No. 5 (2022)
       
  • Outcomes Associated With Metacognitive Training for Psychosis

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      Authors: Penney D; Sauvé G, Mendelson D, et al.
      Pages: 417 - 429
      Abstract: This systematic review and meta-analysis examines the use of metacognitive training for psychosis to help in treatment of individuals with psychosis.
      PubDate: Sun, 01 May 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamapsychiatry.2022.0277
      Issue No: Vol. 79, No. 5 (2022)
       
  • Task-Shared Psychological Interventions in Low- and Middle-Income
           Countries

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      Authors: Karyotaki E; Araya R, Kessler RC, et al.
      Pages: 430 - 443
      Abstract: This systematic review and meta-analysis examines data for the outcomes and moderators of task-shared psychological interventions associated with depression in low- and middle-income countries.
      PubDate: Sun, 01 May 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamapsychiatry.2022.0301
      Issue No: Vol. 79, No. 5 (2022)
       
  • Mortality Associated With Mental Disorders and Comorbid General Medical
           Conditions

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      Authors: Momen NC; Plana-Ripoll O, Agerbo E, et al.
      Pages: 444 - 453
      Abstract: This cohort study examines data from Danish nationwide registries to evaluate how comorbidity between mental disorders and general medical conditions affects life expectancy.
      PubDate: Sun, 01 May 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamapsychiatry.2022.0347
      Issue No: Vol. 79, No. 5 (2022)
       
  • Lithium Treatment and the Risk of Osteoporosis in Patients With Bipolar
           Disorder

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      Authors: Köhler-Forsberg O; Rohde C, Nierenberg AA, et al.
      Pages: 454 - 463
      Abstract: This cohort study evaluates the use of lithium in treating osteoporosis in individuals with bipolar disorder.
      PubDate: Sun, 01 May 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamapsychiatry.2022.0337
      Issue No: Vol. 79, No. 5 (2022)
       
  • Characterizing Heterogeneity Among Patients With Late-Life Depression

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      Authors: Wen J; Fu CY, Tosun D, et al.
      Pages: 464 - 474
      Abstract: This case-control study evaluates disease-related heterogeneity associated with neuroanatomy, cognitive functioning, clinical symptoms, and genetic profiles in patients with late-life depression.
      PubDate: Sun, 01 May 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamapsychiatry.2022.0020
      Issue No: Vol. 79, No. 5 (2022)
       
  • Changes and Inequities in Adult Mental Health ED Visits During the
           COVID-19 Pandemic in the US

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      Authors: Anderson KN; Radhakrishnan L, Lane RI, et al.
      Pages: 475 - 485
      Abstract: This cross-sectional study investigates changes in adult mental health–related emergency department visits during the COVID-19 pandemic in the US.
      PubDate: Sun, 01 May 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamapsychiatry.2022.0164
      Issue No: Vol. 79, No. 5 (2022)
       
  • Outcomes After COVID-19 Requiring Hospitalization Compared With
           Non–COVID-19 Illness

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      Authors: Nersesjan V; Fonsmark L, Christensen RB, et al.
      Pages: 486 - 497
      Abstract: This case-control study investigates cognitive impairment, neuropsychiatric diagnoses, and symptoms in COVID-19 survivors compared with patients hospitalized for non-COVID-19 illness.
      PubDate: Sun, 01 May 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamapsychiatry.2022.0284
      Issue No: Vol. 79, No. 5 (2022)
       
  • Inflammation and Brain Structure in Schizophrenia and Other
           Neuropsychiatric Disorders

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      Authors: Williams JA; Burgess S, Suckling J, et al.
      Pages: 498 - 507
      Abstract: This mendelian randomization study investigates the relationship between inflammation and changes in brain structures in vivo and explores a transcriptome-driven functional basis with relevance to mental illness.
      PubDate: Sun, 01 May 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamapsychiatry.2022.0407
      Issue No: Vol. 79, No. 5 (2022)
       
  • COVID-19 Booster Vaccination Among Individuals With Schizophrenia in
           Israel

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      Authors: Tzur Bitan D; Kridin K, Givon-Lavi N, et al.
      Pages: 508 - 512
      Abstract: This cohort study investigates the frequency of COVID-19 booster vaccination among individuals with schizophrenia in Israel compared with those without schizophrenia.
      PubDate: Sun, 01 May 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamapsychiatry.2022.0382
      Issue No: Vol. 79, No. 5 (2022)
       
  • Suicide Risk and Lithium

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      Authors: Manchia M; Sani G, Alda M.
      Pages: 513 - 513
      Abstract: To the Editor The randomized clinical trial by Katz and coauthors adds to the literature on antisuicide properties of lithium in patients with mood disorders. The study enrolled a large number of participants with major depression or bipolar disorder, most with clinically complex presentations—profiles commonly seen in veteran populations. The trial was prematurely terminated following futility analysis. What conclusions can be drawn' The findings contrast with a bulk of naturalistic and epidemiological data showing an evident suicide-protective effect with lithium. We concur with the accompanying editorial by Baldessarini and Tondo indicating that several factors, including low serum levels of lithium, high rates of psychiatric comorbidity, and the brief treatment exposure, might be responsible for these findings. To wit, Ahrens et al concluded that the mortality-reducing effect of lithium can take up to 2 years. As suicide risk varies over time, the study duration in Katz et al may have been too short to capture a true pharmacological effect.
      PubDate: Sun, 01 May 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamapsychiatry.2022.0081
      Issue No: Vol. 79, No. 5 (2022)
       
  • Suicide Risk and Lithium—Reply

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      Authors: Katz IR; Ferguson RE, Liang MH.
      Pages: 513 - 514
      Abstract: In Reply We appreciate the comments of Manchia and colleagues on our study on lithium treatment for prevention of repeated suicide-related outcomes in veterans with major depression or bipolar disorder. The study reported a nonsignificant hazard ratio for repeated suicide-related behaviors (ie, nonfatal suicide attempts, interrupted attempts, hospitalizations specifically to prevent suicidal behavior, and deaths by suicide) for lithium vs placebo of 1.10 (95% CI, 0.77-1.55), indicating that a treatment effect greater than 23% is unlikely. Manchia and colleagues state, “The findings contrast with a bulk of naturalistic and epidemiological data showing an evident suicide-protective effect with lithium.”
      PubDate: Sun, 01 May 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamapsychiatry.2022.0084
      Issue No: Vol. 79, No. 5 (2022)
       
  • The Direct Effect of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Insomnia on
           Depression Prevention and the Mediation Effect via Insomnia Remission

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      Authors: Lin Y; Lin S, Chen I.
      Pages: 514 - 515
      Abstract: To the Editor The study by Irwin et al found that cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBT-I) had an overall benefit in the prevention of incident and recurrent major depression compared with sleep education therapy (SET) in older adults with insomnia disorder. The authors used a predefined analysis to compare treatment groups as a function of sustained remission of insomnia disorder to test the superiority of CBT-I over SET in remission of insomnia disorder. We suggested that mediation analysis might be used to clarify the role of insomnia remission in the association between CBT-I and SET and the prevention of depression.
      PubDate: Sun, 01 May 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamapsychiatry.2022.0149
      Issue No: Vol. 79, No. 5 (2022)
       
  • The Direct Effect of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Insomnia on
           Depression Prevention and the Mediation Effect via Insomnia
           Remission—Reply

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      Authors: Irwin MR; Olmstead R.
      Pages: 515 - 515
      Abstract: In Reply In an estimated mediation model, Lin et al supported conclusions from our recent report that cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBT-I) vs an active comparator control, that is sleep education therapy (SET), reduced the risk of incident and recurrent depression by over 50% in older adults with insomnia. Further, Lin et al examined whether the survival benefit of CBT-I was mediated by insomnia remission. We found that CBT-I was more likely to result in sustained remission of insomnia compared with SET, and in a predefined secondary analysis, we reported that those who received CBT-I and had a sustained remission of insomnia showed an 83% reduction in the risk of depression compared with those who received SET without insomnia remission (Figure 4 in the main report). In the total sample, sustained remission of insomnia was associated with a 64% reduction in the risk of depression (eTable 6 and eFigure 2). Moreover, in analyses that examined varying duration of insomnia remission, longer duration of insomnia remission was associated with greater reduction in risk of depression (eFigure 3). However, to extend these inferential results and examine whether insomnia remission mediates the survival benefit of CBT-I, a more robust sample is needed to achieve adequate statistical power. In response to Lin et al, we performed a mediation analysis using methods developed by Valeri and VanderWeele. The mediation model found a direct effect of CBT-I in preventing incident and recurrent depression (effect size, 1.83; 95% CI, 0.99-3.36; P = .05), whereas the indirect effect for sustained insomnia remission was not significant (effect size, 1.11; 95% CI, 0.94–1.32; P = .23). The proportion mediated by insomnia remission was 20%, similar to the estimate from Lin et al. Post hoc calculation of statistical power indicated that a 4-fold greater sample would be required to test this mediational model. Hence, additional studies with substantially larger sample sizes are needed to evaluate whether the pathway of insomnia remission mediates the efficacy of CBT-I in preventing depression in older adults with insomnia.
      PubDate: Sun, 01 May 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamapsychiatry.2022.0152
      Issue No: Vol. 79, No. 5 (2022)
       
  • Error in Abstract

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      Pages: 516 - 516
      Abstract: The Original Investigation titled “Association of Opioid Agonist Treatment With All-Cause Mortality and Specific Causes of Death Among People With Opioid Dependence: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis,” was corrected to fix an incorrectly reported rate ratio in the abstract; in the line “In the first 4 weeks of methadone treatment, rates of all-cause mortality and drug-related poisoning were more than double the rates during the remainder of OAT (RR, 2.81; 95% CI, 1.55-5.09),” the rate ratio had mistakenly been reported as 2.01. This article was corrected online.
      PubDate: Sun, 01 May 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamapsychiatry.2022.0357
      Issue No: Vol. 79, No. 5 (2022)
       
  • Errors in Figures 1 and 2

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      Pages: 516 - 516
      Abstract: In the Original Investigation titled “Real-world Effectiveness of Pharmacologic Treatments for the Prevention of Rehospitalization in a Finnish Nationwide Cohort of Patients With Bipolar Disorder,” published in the April 2018 issue, there were errors in the P values regarding 2 types of medication in Figure 1 and 4 types of medication in Figure 2. In Figure 1, the false discovery rate (FDR)–corrected P value should include the superscript “a” for antidepressants and for mood stabilizers (all) to indicate significance after Benjamini-Hochberg correction for 5% FDR. In Figure 2, the P values should be .02 for antidepressants, .65 for antipsychotics, and less than .001 for mood stabilizers (all); the FDR-corrected P value should be .06 for antidepressants, .74 for antipsychotics, and .001 for mood stabilizers (all); and the FDR-corrected P value should include the superscript “a” for mood stabilizers (all) and for quetiapine to indicate significance after Benjamini-Hochberg correction for 5% FDR. This article has been corrected online.
      PubDate: Sun, 01 May 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamapsychiatry.2022.0241
      Issue No: Vol. 79, No. 5 (2022)
       
  • Error in Table and Figure

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      Pages: 516 - 516
      Abstract: The Original Investigation titled “Association of Comorbid Behavioral and Medical Conditions With Cannabis Use Disorder in Pregnancy,” published on November 3, 2021, was corrected to fix an error in the number of patients with multiple sclerosis and substance use disorder reported in Table 1; the correct number is 69 patients. In addition, there were errors in the quintiles presented in the legend to Figure 2; the correct quintile values are 0 to <0.011, 0.011 to <0.015, 0.015 to <0.019, 0.019 to <0.028, and 0.028 to <0.047. This article was corrected online.
      PubDate: Sun, 01 May 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamapsychiatry.2022.0210
      Issue No: Vol. 79, No. 5 (2022)
       
 
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