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Englisia Journal
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  This is an Open Access Journal Open Access journal
ISSN (Print) 2339-2576 - ISSN (Online) 2527-6484
Published by UIN Ar-Raniry Banda Aceh Homepage  [9 journals]
  • The impacts of school on English learners’ motivation in Indonesian
           Islamic schools

    • Authors: Achmad Farid, Reza Anggriyashati Adara, Salim Ashar
      Pages: 1 - 19
      Abstract: Among the teaching practitioners in Indonesia, there is a general belief that some learners of English in some Indonesian pesantren (Islamic boarding schools) have a negative view on English, which consequently affects their motivation. However, it remains unclear what has affected the trend. The current study investigates this issue in three pesantren schools in Indonesia affiliated with different Islamic groups. Using the L2 Motivational Self System (L2MSS) model proposed by Dörnyei (2009) as an analytical lens, a survey instrument was designed to describe and compare students’ motivation to learn English (n = 376). A multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA) was run to describe and compare the students’ motivation, and a stepwise multiple regression analysis was performed to discover which motivational factors made the most significant contribution to motivation by predicting reported learning effort in English.  In addition, a thorough document analysis was performed to obtain background information regarding the teaching of English in the three institutions. It was found that institutional factors do play a role in influencing the learners’ motivation, in that in the most religiously conservative context, the school policy does shape the learners’ ideal L2 self. As the learners’ ideal L2 self was weak, it leads to weak motivational power as well. The paper concludes by emphasizing the crucial role of educational contexts in shaping students’ ideal selves and in providing favourable learning experience, which are key elements in motivating learners to learn English.
      PubDate: 2023-05-02
      DOI: 10.22373/ej.v10i2.14656
      Issue No: Vol. 10, No. 2 (2023)
       
  • EFL students’ language attitudes toward virtual learning environment: A
           technology acceptance model

    • Authors: Avita Elok Faiqoh, Ashadi Ashadi
      Pages: 20 - 36
      Abstract: It is widely believed that L2 learners who have positive attitudes towards the target culture and its people are likely to learn the target language more effectively than those who do not possess such attitudes. As technology continues to be increasingly integrated into language learning, this article aims to explore EFL students' attitudes towards technology acceptance via Virtual Learning Environment (VLE), as well as the potential advantages of VLE in the EFL classroom. A quantitative approach was employed in this study, which involved 30 students from English language education departments at a private university in Indonesia. The students' computer attitudes were assessed using a Likert scale questionnaire with four factors, including affective, perceived usefulness, perceived control, and behavioural intention. The Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) developed by Davis (1989) was utilized as the framework to further examine these factors. The results indicated that the students had a positive attitude towards the Computer Attitude Scale (CAS) factors, which were categorized into affective, perceived usefulness, perceived control, and behavioural intention. The implications of each of these categories in the framework are discussed in relation to behaviourism theory.
      PubDate: 2023-05-02
      DOI: 10.22373/ej.v10i2.15178
      Issue No: Vol. 10, No. 2 (2023)
       
  • Students’ perception of social presence in the online EFL speaking
           class

    • Authors: Brigita Woro Diyatni Kusumaningtyas, Thomas Wahyu Prabowo Mukti
      Pages: 37 - 55
      Abstract: Some students claim to suffer from anxiety, which lowers their self-esteem and causes them to feel anxious and uneasy while studying a foreign language. Establishing a social connection between the lecturer and the students is one of the possible solutions to this issue. The purpose of this study was to examine students' perceptions of social presence in an online speaking class and how social presence affects students' confidence in speaking class. This study employed quantitative research as its method of inquiry. The researchers distributed questionnaires to 159 students to collect data, but only 51 students responded. In addition, the researchers conducted interviews with a subset of participants to gain additional insight into the data required for the study. The research findings on students' perception of social presence in the online speaking class and the effect of social presence on students' confidence in speaking class revealed that students had a favorable perception of social presence in the online speaking class. The first finding's mean score was seventy-two point nine (x ̅ = 72.9). The findings demonstrated that social presence influences students' self-confidence, encourages them to learn more, and assists students in improving their speaking ability in speaking class.
      PubDate: 2023-05-02
      DOI: 10.22373/ej.v10i2.15018
      Issue No: Vol. 10, No. 2 (2023)
       
  • Understanding identity construction of an in-service pre-k teacher using
           discursive psychology

    • Authors: Faishal Zakaria
      Pages: 56 - 70
      Abstract: Experts have asserted that teacher identity is an integral part of classroom practices; studying teacher identity construction would allow us to understand the teachers’ learning process and teaching practices. It is then argued that identity is fluid and is never a stand-alone aspect. Further, many studies of the discursive construction of teacher identities have suggested teacher identity construction is highly contextual. However, little research has focused on how pre-K teachers serving low-income students and families construct their professional identities discursively. Grounded within the perspectives of Discursive Psychology,  this study is interested in how a US government-sponsored pre-K program teacher discursively constructs her identities. The findings further suggest the fluidity of identity and particularly posit that the teacher has constructed and claimed her collective and co-constructed identities, as well as discursively formed her identities as a person who values social capital, who is practical, who serves the needy students and families, who has power or resources, and who is a lifelong learner. The findings further implicate the need to consider teachers’ identities to understand their learning, growth, and classroom practices.
      PubDate: 2023-05-02
      DOI: 10.22373/ej.v10i2.13998
      Issue No: Vol. 10, No. 2 (2023)
       
  • Professional development of Indonesian in-service EFL teachers: Perceived
           impacts and challenges

    • Authors: Fidelis Elleny Averina, Paulus Kuswandono
      Pages: 71 - 91
      Abstract: Despite the growing interest in research on Teacher Professional Development (TPD)  carried out by previous researchers, the voices of local EFL teachers in different regions in Indonesia in which top-down TPD activities are still prevalent remain underrepresented. As a result, in order to fill a gap in the literature, the current study sought to investigate the TPD activities undertaken by EFL teachers, the extent to which those formal TPD programs had an impact on their professional development based on their perceptions, and the constraints that they encountered. This descriptive qualitative study utilized a questionnaire and semi-structured interview as the instruments to gather the data and ensure triangulation for trustworthiness. Twenty-five English teachers from various Junior High schools associated with MGMP in Cirebon, West Java were voluntarily involved in this research. The result revealed that TPD activities that the participants have undertaken all these times helped them improve self-efficacy, attitudes, beliefs, reflective competence, classroom practice and instructional skills, and teacher knowledge and skills. Nevertheless, some challenges such as excessive workload as a teacher, time constraints or mismatched schedule, limited choices of TPD programs that were not in line with teachers’ interests, the mismatch between teachers’ needs and what the program offered, limited access and information about the programs, and less effective program duration remained prevalent during the TPD program implementation.
      PubDate: 2023-05-02
      DOI: 10.22373/ej.v10i2.15589
      Issue No: Vol. 10, No. 2 (2023)
       
  • Elements of critical reading in EFL teachers’ instructions

    • Authors: Hamzah Puadi Ilyas
      Pages: 92 - 104
      Abstract: Reading instructions should go a bit beyond ‘explicit question’ to facilitate students’ critical thinking. What it means by ‘explicit question’ is question whose answer can be found in the text explicitly. This research, therefore, aimed to investigate EFL teachers’ reading instructions to find out to what extend the instructions contained the elements of critical reading. Twenty-seven EFL teachers participated by listing all the activities they had given to students throughout their teaching career. All the activities were collected, and similar activities were combined. There were a total of ninety-nine instructions. The activities were then compared to critical reading framework to find out which elements they belonged to. Findings showed that teachers’ reading instructions only belonged to such categories as identifying, analyzing, summarizing, and guessing. Aside from that, the instructions for the four categories were the same. It appeared that EFL teachers lacked creativity and innovative ideas. There were still elements or categories of critical reading that had not yet been utilized or explored. These findings prompted the inclusion of critical reading instruction design skills in teacher education. After all, critical thinking has long been emphasized in national education as a means of developing responsible citizens and avoiding becoming a victim of false information.
      PubDate: 2023-05-02
      DOI: 10.22373/ej.v10i2.17142
      Issue No: Vol. 10, No. 2 (2023)
       
  • The semiotic and modern hermeneutic review of the online Covid-19 public
           service advertisement texts

    • Authors: I Gede Astawa, I Bagus Gede Upadana, A.A. Sagung Ayu Srikandi Putri
      Pages: 105 - 118
      Abstract: The Indonesian government works closely with other agencies to intensely campaign for the movement against the virus corona in various ways, one of which is through Public Service Advertisements (PSAs). PSAs have verbal and non-verbal elements that contain meanings, both explicit and implicit meanings. This article aims to analyze three samples of PSAs concerning Covid-19 retrieved from three online website media, namely (1) the website of the Ministry of Education, Culture, Research and Technology of the Republic of Indonesia; (2) Republika online; and (3) Kompas.com. This research was conducted using qualitative descriptive methods referring to the semiotic theory developed by Roland Barthes and Charles Sanders Peirce, and the modern hermeneutics theory developed by Paul Ricoeur. The analysis of the PSAs in this study was focused on verbal texts, while non-verbal texts were not analyzed deeply. From the three PSAs analyzed, the study found that the explicit meanings lying in the PSAs were to fight the coronavirus by complying with health protocols. Meanwhile, implicitly, the PSAs imply that the Indonesian people are under threat of death, the coronavirus is not a lie, nor is it a conspiracy.
      PubDate: 2023-05-02
      DOI: 10.22373/ej.v10i2.15005
      Issue No: Vol. 10, No. 2 (2023)
       
  • The relationship between sociocultural adaptation and L2 pragmatic
           development during online study abroad

    • Authors: Ismail Tahir, Aryati Hamzah
      Pages: 119 - 136
      Abstract: Although several linguists have examined the studies on study abroad (SA), limited studies have focused on online study-abroad contexts. The current study investigates the production of pragmatic routine and its influence on online sociocultural adaptation during online study abroad. This study involved Indonesian students in English and Chinese-taught programs at Beihang University, China. As a mixed method, this study uses Vocabulary Knowledge Scale (VKS) and Sociocultural Adaptation Scale (SCAS) to measure the students’ pragmatic routines production and online sociocultural adaptation. VKS scale is used to investigate the expression categories, including expressions of thanking, requesting, complementing, and greeting. In addition, SCAS is also used to explore the students’ sociocultural aspects, cognitive aspects, and behavioral situations. As a result, the study shows that most Indonesian students enrolling in Chinese and English-taught programs tend to produce pragmatic routines even though the Chinese aspect is produced more than the English aspect. Furthermore, there is also a positive contribution to the production of pragmatic routine and its development influenced by sociocultural adaptation during online study abroad.
      PubDate: 2023-05-02
      DOI: 10.22373/ej.v10i2.15374
      Issue No: Vol. 10, No. 2 (2023)
       
  • When English language matters: Internationalizing PhD research by
           Indonesian political scientists

    • Authors: Jürgen Rüland
      Pages: 137 - 147
      Abstract: The essay traces frequent language problems and un(der)developed academic writing skills of Indonesian PhD students in the field of political science and international relations. The author thereby draws on personal experiences as a thesis supervisor. Apart from problematic scope conditions in the Indonesian university system, he identifies a lack of training in academic writing at the undergraduate and graduate levels of education and a missing research and publication culture in social sciences. The remainder of the essay reflects about how the problem of deficient language and academic writing skills can be remedied. It argues that both Indonesian universities and also host universities abroad must develop measures to overcome the identified problems.
      PubDate: 2023-05-02
      DOI: 10.22373/ej.v10i2.17607
      Issue No: Vol. 10, No. 2 (2023)
       
  • Measuring EFL students’ self-efficacy levels in online learning

    • Authors: Maman Asrobi, Siti Maysuroh, Zukhruf Farizi
      Pages: 148 - 163
      Abstract: The rapid development of technology and the integration of technology into the education system have made several educational institutions begin to introduce and begin to apply it in their teaching and learning processes, one of which is by applying distance/online/remote learning methods that are considered flexible and convenience. The purpose of this study was to measure the level of self-efficacy that EFL students in higher education have regarding the use of online learning methods in their teaching and learning activities. The data in this study were taken through an online survey technique of 60 higher education EFL students. The instrument used is Self-Efficacy for Online Learning (SeQoL) which contains 20 statements with 3-point Likert-type scale. The findings in this study found that the level EFL learner self-efficacy in online learning was in moderate level (M= 2.22; SD= .59). Based on this result, EFL students need to adapt more to online learning methods so that they are able to master online learning experiences to get high self-efficacy.
      PubDate: 2023-05-02
      DOI: 10.22373/ej.v10i2.14773
      Issue No: Vol. 10, No. 2 (2023)
       
  • English learning motivation and pragmatic competence: Correlational study
           of non-English major postgraduate students in java

    • Authors: Muhammad Syahied Hidayatullah, Nur Hidayanto
      Pages: 164 - 178
      Abstract: This research aims to investigate the significant relationship between English learning motivation and pragmatic competence of non-English major postgraduate students and their current pragmatic competence. 350 non-English major postgraduate students from Javanese provinces (West, Central, and East Java) participated in this study. This study was quantitative research in the form of a correlational study by using one adapted questionnaire (Attitude and Motivation Test Battery (AMTB)) for English learning motivation and two kinds of adapted pragmatic competence tests (Multiple-choice Discourse Completion Test (MDCT) and Written Discourse Completion Test (WDCT)). The data were analyzed by using Normality Test, Linearity Test, Bivariate Pearson Product Moment, and Descriptive statistical analysis by IBM SPSS 26. The finding indicated English learning motivation correlated with English pragmatic competence. Although the correlation degree was 0.563 which had a moderate degree of correlation, they have a positive correlation which means the English learning motivation has contributed to the pragmatic competence. The current level of the non-English major postgraduate students’ pragmatic competence in Javanese provinces was categorized as still developing because the students hardly understand responses in the pragmatic competence test, especially in pragmatic awareness.
      PubDate: 2023-05-02
      DOI: 10.22373/ej.v10i2.15130
      Issue No: Vol. 10, No. 2 (2023)
       
  • “Publish or no degree”: Cultivating a scholarly writing Group for
           Indonesian Master’s students of English education

    • Authors: Rahmah Fithriani, Benni Ichsanda Rahman Hz, Rita Seroja br Ginting
      Pages: 179 - 193
      Abstract: In line with the increasing institutionalization of scholarly publication as a graduation requirement for graduate students around the world, the use of a community of writing practice to support students navigate their publication endeavour has begun to receive attention from academic supervisors and graduate researchers. Despite the burgeoning interest in this topic, there has been little empirical evidence on master’s students’ experiences and perspectives of working within such writing groups at an Indonesian university. This phenomenological case study intends to fill this lacuna by elaborating on the process of a writing group's establishment and development for master's students of English education and exploring their perceptions of participating in such a community of practice (COP). Findings indicate that the writing group served as a flexible and participatory COP that produced critical and enduring alterations in identity as scholarly writers amongst participants. Specifically, their perceived transition into academic writers involves three aspects: knowledge of the values of scholarly publication, construction of a scholarly identity, and demystification of the publishing endeavour. This study's findings can be utilized to inform other master's and doctorate programs, as well as academic professionals seeking interventions to assist their students' productive writing.
      PubDate: 2023-05-02
      DOI: 10.22373/ej.v10i2.16725
      Issue No: Vol. 10, No. 2 (2023)
       
  • Politeness strategies used by Papuan students in virtual communication
           practices at university

    • Authors: Rahmawansyah Sahib, Zulihi Zulihi, Abdi Maloga, Zulfadli Zulfadli, Lalu Nasrulloh, Junaiddin Junaiddin
      Pages: 194 - 216
      Abstract: This study aims at investigating and revealing language politeness strategies, as well as the factors that influence politeness strategies used by Papuan students during virtual in the context of virtual academic consultations as a practice of virtual communications to the lecturers. This study uses descriptive qualitative methods and purposive sampling to choose two lecturers and fifteen university students from the Papua as participants. Data was also gathered through online observation, offline interviews, and documentation. Online observations were made by evaluating screenshots of Google Classroom comments and recording of written conversations on WhatsApp and SMS sent by ten Papuan students. At the same time, offline interviews were carried out 10 students and 2 instructors. The data is then analysed using discourse analysis, which consists of multiple steps, including data recording, data transcription, data selection, and data interpretation. In line with the findings of this study, Papuan students use four types of politeness strategies when consulting with lecturers via virtual communication. They are positive, negative, bald on record, and off the record politeness strategies. In online communication, the negative politeness strategy is the most prevalent among Papuan students. The diversity of politeness strategies that are replicated, even if they appear unpleasant at times, is not an aspect of purposeful or disrespectful behaviour toward the interlocutor. But let us get back to the level of language skills, which still require more attention and are impacted by a variety of internal factors such as personality and age, and external factors such as culture, facilities obtained. The findings indicate that even when language capabilities are restricted in virtual communication, Papuan students receive enough education. This situation will improve the civility of language that students in Papua use while conversing digitally. As a result, higher education institutions in Papua should pay more attention to standard communication patterns when academic consulting with lecturers as speech partners in the context of higher education in Papua in order to develop comprehensive and effective communication practices.
      PubDate: 2023-05-02
      DOI: 10.22373/ej.v10i2.15289
      Issue No: Vol. 10, No. 2 (2023)
       
  • Understanding the implementation of an at-home language test: A case of an
           online version of TOEFL-PBT

    • Authors: Refanja Rahmatillah, Rizki Fajrita, Endah Anisa Rahma
      Pages: 217 - 230
      Abstract: An at-home test is a unique mode of language test delivery as a result of mass-gathering prohibition during the COVID-19 pandemic. Despite the uniqueness, little is known about how to effectively implement an at-home test. This study aims to provide a deeper understanding of the test by exploring the execution of the online version of TOEFL-PBT in the Language Center of Syiah Kuala University. Four test administrators were interviewed to share their experiences and opinions related to considerations for implementing an at-home proficiency test, which includes technological resources, security, and validity concerns. The data were then analyzed descriptively. The results of this study revealed that the Language Center used Safe Exam Browser to deliver the test and Zoom to supervise the test-takers in real time. The proctors could stop the test and privately investigate the test takers using the Zoom Breakout feature. The validity of the test was claimed not to be a concern since the test provider used the same form of questions as the offline version. In addition, the Language Center expressed exhaustion in carrying out the online test, thus suggesting the development of a less complicated procedure of an at-home test.
      PubDate: 2023-05-02
      DOI: 10.22373/ej.v10i2.15899
      Issue No: Vol. 10, No. 2 (2023)
       
  • The analysis of the use of satire in the daily show with Trevor Noah

    • Authors: Sitti Rahma, Syahron Lubis, Alemina Perangin-angin
      Pages: 231 - 242
      Abstract: Various TV channels established with various talk shows stand out among other shows for presenting bitter facts in a very light-hearted way by commenting, satirizing, analyzing and criticizing in a very funny style. "The Daily Show with Trevor Noah" is a very popular comedy talk show in the United States because of its high language, witty praise, and especially the characters of "The Daily Show with Trevor Noah" criticizing various aspects of society. The aims of this study are to categorize various types of satire and reveal Trevor Noah's technique in expressing satire. This study uses a qualitative descriptive design with a sample of six episodes of The Daily Show with Trevor Noah downloaded from the official comedy center website. The data concentrated on the Satire utterances of the host of The Daily Show with Trevor Noah were analyzed using interactive analysis. The results of the analysis showed that three types of satire appeared in the event: 21 Horatian satires, 13 juvenile satires, and 16 Menippean satires. The satire that is used in the daily show has conveyed a message of criticism of someone's ideas and behavior based on what they have said and done based on events that actually happened. Sacrificial conclusions have become the most powerful and effective way of getting a message across, even today, no matter what means a satirist chooses to create their work. 
      PubDate: 2023-05-02
      DOI: 10.22373/ej.v10i2.16611
      Issue No: Vol. 10, No. 2 (2023)
       
  • Online English speaking instruction in junior high schools: Readiness and
           obstacles

    • Authors: Syafryadin Syafryadin, Santiana Santiana
      Pages: 243 - 254
      Abstract: In the midst of a pandemic, teaching speaking online becomes one of the challenges. This study investigates whether or not English teachers were prepared to teach speaking virtually. Consequently, the purpose of this study was to determine the English teachers' readiness and obstacles to teaching speaking online during the pandemic Covid-19. The researcher utilized mixed research methods to conduct this study. The information was gathered via questionnaires and interviews. The experts have tested and validated these instruments. The data were then quantitatively and qualitatively analyzed. Quantitative data were analyzed with the aid of SPSS statistical calculations. In contrast, qualitative data were analyzed using multiple steps, including data reduction, data presentation, and conclusion. The results indicated that the majority of English teachers were prepared to implement online speaking instruction during a pandemic, despite the fact that some teachers were not quite prepared due to several obstacles. As for the challenges encountered by English teachers, there were online speaking assessments, poor connections, low interaction, and a lack of learning devices. Shortly, English teachers prepared to teach online speaking to students in order to improve the students' speaking ability, despite the emergence of certain obstacles.
      PubDate: 2023-05-02
      DOI: 10.22373/ej.v10i2.15043
      Issue No: Vol. 10, No. 2 (2023)
       
  • Weighing research competencies of department of English language education
           graduates at UIN Ar-Raniry Banda Aceh

    • Authors: Syarifah Dahliana, Saiful Akmal, Rizka Malda Phonna
      Pages: 255 - 275
      Abstract: The purpose of this study is to scrutinize participants’ research competency, source of research competency, and problems related to the research conduct. Nine graduates of the Department of English Language Education were purposefully selected; three of them completed their theses in one semester, three others finished in two semesters, and one other finalized in three semesters. In this qualitative study, semi-structured interviews were used. The findings revealed that graduates with one-semester thesis completion rates have stronger research proficiency than other groups. They have a higher motivational value component, a higher methodology-reflective component, and a higher operational activity component of research competency. Meanwhile, the emotional-volitional component of research competency remains equal for each group of participants. Furthermore, graduates acquired research competency through coursework, research conduct, and self-study. In terms of problems with research conduct, the data disclosed that graduates frequently struggled with self-motivation, supervisors, time/class schedule, knowledge of prior studies, data analysis, and  participants selection.
      PubDate: 2023-05-02
      DOI: 10.22373/ej.v10i2.17226
      Issue No: Vol. 10, No. 2 (2023)
       
  • Exploring Al-Ghazali’s concept of education: A study of speech acts
           through English language lens

    • Authors: Zurriyati Zurriyati, Alemina Br Perangin-angin, Fadhlur Rahman
      Pages: 276 - 291
      Abstract: The purpose of this study is to provide an in-depth analysis of the types, functions, and manner of speech acts utilised in al-Ghazali's notion on educational concept. The study employed a content analysis methodology, which entailed gathering data from a variety of sources, including Al-Ghazali's writings and scholarly articles related to his works. The findings of this study reveal that al-Ghazali's idea of education in is dominated by directive speech acts, followed by assertive acts and constative acts. The category of recommending acts makes up the vast majority of directive acts, whereas order acts are somewhat less common. Further, Al-Ghazali’s use of speech acts tends to emphasize a competitive function, followed by a collaborative one. Interestingly, neither convivial nor conflicting functions are presented in this study. The dominance of directive speech acts, highlight Al-Ghazali's preference for providing guidance and advice to his readers in a harmonious and respectful communication style. Furthermore, Al-Ghazali's use of speech acts can be classified primarily as literal and direct speech acts, with subsequent employment of indirect and non-literal forms.. These findings contribute to the teaching learning process including English language in applying speech act. Finally, this study highlights the significance of considering the types, functions, and manner of performing speech acts propose to  teachers and students in English language teaching learning process.

      PubDate: 2023-05-02
      DOI: 10.22373/ej.v10i2.17515
      Issue No: Vol. 10, No. 2 (2023)
       
 
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